History Main / MagicAIsMAgicA

10th Feb '16 3:35:20 PM DarkHunter
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'' does this with D&D rules (mostly). For an example, there's a strip where Durkon uses Weather Control to attack a group of treants warded against electrical attacks... by generating a thunderclap so loud that it breaks the treants in half. When an angel tells Thor (Durkon's patron god who enabled the spell) that that's not how the spell works (Weather Control doesn't cause sonic damage), Thor tells him to be quiet [[RuleOfCool because it was awesome]].
to:
* ''[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'' does this with D&D rules (mostly).rules, except when the result would be really funny or sufficiently cool. For an example, there's a strip where Durkon uses Weather Control to attack a group of treants warded against electrical attacks... by generating a thunderclap so loud that it breaks the treants in half. When an angel tells Thor (Durkon's patron god who enabled the spell) that that's not how the spell works (Weather Control doesn't cause sonic damage), Thor tells him to be quiet [[RuleOfCool because it was awesome]].
10th Feb '16 3:33:26 PM DarkHunter
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' never gets into the "nuts and bolts" of how one learns alchemy or gets it to work, but we are shown through repeated example that it requires a great deal of research, practice and the use of [[GeometricMagic inscribed runes or circles]] to make it happen. There is also the constantly repeated rule of ''EquivalentExchange,'' that for the alchemist to create something, he or she must destroy something of equal value (in practice, this means just having the necessary raw materials at hand - the act of construction itself doesn't seem to "cost" anything, since alchemy uses geothermal energy). In fact, the author's notes at the beginning of the manga emphasize that the series was originally intended to showcase a B-movie style version of real-life alchemy, without so much emphasis on the actual science behind it. In [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist the 2003 anime]], though, it's revealed that [[spoiler:''[[SoylentGreen human souls]]'' from our world, especially the influx of souls from World War One]] are the cost being paid to perform alchemy. [[{{PhilosophersStone}} Philosopher's Stones]] seem to break this, acting as an infinite unkowable energy source, but in ''Brotherhood'' it's revealed quite early on they're [[spoiler: compressed human souls]] and they eventually run out like a battery.
to:
* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'' never gets into the "nuts and bolts" of how one learns alchemy or gets it to work, but we are shown through repeated example that it requires a great deal of research, practice and the use of [[GeometricMagic inscribed runes or circles]] to make it happen. There is also the constantly repeated rule of ''EquivalentExchange,'' that for the alchemist to create something, he or she must destroy something of equal value (in practice, this means just having the necessary raw materials at hand - the act of construction itself doesn't seem to "cost" anything, since alchemy uses geothermal energy). In fact, the author's notes at the beginning of the manga emphasize that the series was originally intended to showcase a B-movie style version of real-life alchemy, without so much emphasis on the actual science behind it. In [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist the 2003 anime]], though, it's revealed that [[spoiler:''[[SoylentGreen human souls]]'' from our world, especially the influx of souls from World War One]] are the cost being paid to perform alchemy. [[{{PhilosophersStone}} Philosopher's Stones]] seem to break this, acting as an infinite unkowable energy source, but in ''Brotherhood'' it's revealed quite early on they're [[spoiler: compressed human souls]] and they eventually run out like a battery.

** It's one of the rules that Shikigami don't ''have'' to explain all the rules to humans holding a Death Note unless one of them is about to be broken.
to:
** It's one of the rules that Shikigami Shinigami don't ''have'' to explain all the rules to humans holding a Death Note unless one of them is about to be broken.
30th Jan '16 8:02:29 AM Vir
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** With the episodes ''Beginnings Part 1 & 2'', the [[spoiler: the history of the Avatar is set out. Notably, bending was ''given'' to people by lion-turtles, who acted as guardians to humanity in a world ravaged by spirits. At the end, Wan becomes the first Avatar by merging with the Spirit of Light Raava and becoming the first person capable of bending all four elements at once. With the coming of the Avatar, the lion-turtles relinquished their position as guardians of humanity and notably claimed that they will not give humans the power to bend elements any more. This provides for two possibilities: All benders are descendants of those humans who kept their bending powers after the lion-turtles left. Or, subsequent generations of humanity really did learn to bend the elements by watching animals (and the Moon) do it. The show vaguely implies the second, as the effects of energy-bending were shown to not be hereditary, meaning that the people with bending granted by energy-bending can't pass it on to their children.]]
to:
** With the episodes ''Beginnings "Beginnings, Part 1 & 2'', and 2", the [[spoiler: the history of the Avatar is set out. Notably, bending was ''given'' to people by lion-turtles, who acted as guardians to humanity in a world ravaged by spirits. At the end, Wan becomes the first Avatar by merging with the Spirit of Light Raava and becoming the first person capable of bending all four elements at once. With the coming of the Avatar, the lion-turtles relinquished their position as guardians of humanity and notably claimed that they will not give humans the power to bend elements any more. This provides for two possibilities: All benders are descendants of those humans who kept their bending powers after the lion-turtles left. Or, subsequent generations of humanity really did learn to bend the elements by watching animals (and the Moon) do it. The show vaguely implies the second, as the effects of energy-bending were shown to not be hereditary, meaning that the people with bending granted by energy-bending can't pass it on to their children.]]

* ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' ''{{Transformers}}'' had the "Transmetal" subline, which was forced on them by virtue of being MerchandiseDriven. Essentially the story goes that they had to destroy a doomsday device in orbit that was threatening them with DeathFromAbove. The resulting "quantum shockwave" changed the bodies of Transformers on both sides, but due to budget (CGI models take a lot more effort to redesign then with traditional animation) only a handful of current characters were redesigned. To try and explain why some changed while others didn't, those who weren't altered were otherwise incapacitated in a repair chamber or something else. It wasn't perfect and there was still a few inconsistencies with a couple of characters. Then the Transmetal process was refered to again. A device from the same aliens that sent the "Planet Buster" emitted a paralyzing pulse at the transformers around it. Those who with some form of transmetal in them proved to be immune to its effects.
to:
* ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' ''{{Transformers}}'' Franchise/{{Transformers}} had the "Transmetal" subline, which was forced on them by virtue of being MerchandiseDriven. Essentially the story goes that they had to destroy a doomsday device in orbit that was threatening them with DeathFromAbove. The resulting "quantum shockwave" changed the bodies of Transformers on both sides, but due to budget (CGI models take a lot more effort to redesign then with traditional animation) only a handful of current characters were redesigned. To try and explain why some changed while others didn't, those who weren't altered were otherwise incapacitated in a repair chamber or something else. It wasn't perfect and there was still a few inconsistencies with a couple of characters. Then the Transmetal process was refered to again. A device from the same aliens that sent the "Planet Buster" emitted a paralyzing pulse at the transformers around it. Those who with some form of transmetal in them proved to be immune to its effects.
16th Jan '16 8:04:19 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''WorldTreeRPG'' uses a noun/verb system (7 and 12 of each), but lets several of each be combined in one spell. Eg. a life-extension spell involves "Sustain/Body+Mind+Spirit". And that's the standard "pattern magic", one of several systems the main races know, each with known rules. The trope is played straight in that the rules exist, but subverted in that ultimately the gods control magic and don't do it predictably.
to:
* ''WorldTreeRPG'' ''TabletopGame/WorldTreeRPG'' uses a noun/verb system (7 and 12 of each), but lets several of each be combined in one spell. Eg. a life-extension spell involves "Sustain/Body+Mind+Spirit". And that's the standard "pattern magic", one of several systems the main races know, each with known rules. The trope is played straight in that the rules exist, but subverted in that ultimately the gods control magic and don't do it predictably.
7th Jan '16 11:18:11 PM humble_user
Is there an issue? Send a Message
->'''Finn''': We'll figure it out. We'll use the Force!
to:
->'''Finn''': We'll Solo, we'll figure it out. We'll use the Force!
29th Dec '15 2:56:23 AM Gamma097
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Adjusted a bit of formatting on the quote; also capitalized Force
->'''Finn''': We'll figure it out. We'll use the force! ->'''Han Solo''': That's not how the force works! -->Film/TheForceAwakens
to:
->'''Finn''': We'll figure it out. We'll use the force! Force! ->'''Han Solo''': That's not how the force Force works! -->Film/TheForceAwakens -->--''[[Film/TheForceAwakens Star Wars: The Force Awakens]]''
25th Dec '15 6:16:45 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' explicitly tries to be internally consistent with mutant powers in that each mutant gets one mutation, along with any RequiredSecondaryPowers. Then "Secondary Mutations" throws that right out the window, not that it hasn't been broken in the past. * {{Superman}} is an interesting example. When he was first published in UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, he was simply "leap an eighth of a mile or hurdle a 20 story building", "lift tremendous weights", "run faster than an express train" and "Nothing less than a bursting shell could penetrate his skin", or as later adaptations more eloquently put it: "faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and able to leap tall buildings with a single bound". Then, TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks started a ''massive'' PowerCreepPowerSeep, with his abilities including powers as ludicrous as Super-Ventriloquism and ''Super-Weaving''. It wasn't until later when his powers finally settled in the most accepted set nowadays: flight, invulnerability, super-strength, super-speed, super-hearing, X-ray vision, heat vision, and super-breath. Additionally, the basic/familiar power set above had become cemented by the early Silver Age (heat vision became a permanently separate power from x-ray vision in the early 60s). [[note]] The tacit rule in the SilverAge was that Superman could do (or learn to do) anything a normal man could do, only much faster and more powerfully. So if he weaves a large item in a matter of seconds, that can be called "super-weaving" without anyone actually considering it a distinct power. The Ventriloquism is an odd case, though: it was once a popular misconception that a ventriloquist could ''literally'' throw his voice; and so, "logically," if a normal man could do it, then Superman could do it exceptionally well. Once more sensible writers came along and noticed that it was now established canon that Supes ''could'' literally throw his voice, they just kept it--especially since it provided a handy explanation for how Superman and Supergirl could talk to each other in the vacuum of space. [[/note]]
to:
* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' ''ComicBook/XMen'' explicitly tries to be internally consistent with mutant powers in that each mutant gets one mutation, along with any RequiredSecondaryPowers. Then "Secondary Mutations" throws that right out the window, not that it hasn't been broken in the past. * {{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} is an interesting example. When he was first published in UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, he was simply "leap an eighth of a mile or hurdle a 20 story building", "lift tremendous weights", "run faster than an express train" and "Nothing less than a bursting shell could penetrate his skin", or as later adaptations more eloquently put it: "faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and able to leap tall buildings with a single bound". Then, TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks started a ''massive'' PowerCreepPowerSeep, with his abilities including powers as ludicrous as Super-Ventriloquism and ''Super-Weaving''. It wasn't until later when his powers finally settled in the most accepted set nowadays: flight, invulnerability, super-strength, super-speed, super-hearing, X-ray vision, heat vision, and super-breath. Additionally, the basic/familiar power set above had become cemented by the early Silver Age (heat vision became a permanently separate power from x-ray vision in the early 60s). [[note]] The tacit rule in the SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} was that Superman could do (or learn to do) anything a normal man could do, only much faster and more powerfully. So if he weaves a large item in a matter of seconds, that can be called "super-weaving" without anyone actually considering it a distinct power. The Ventriloquism is an odd case, though: it was once a popular misconception that a ventriloquist could ''literally'' throw his voice; and so, "logically," if a normal man could do it, then Superman could do it exceptionally well. Once more sensible writers came along and noticed that it was now established canon that Supes ''could'' literally throw his voice, they just kept it--especially since it provided a handy explanation for how Superman and Supergirl could talk to each other in the vacuum of space. [[/note]]
25th Dec '15 2:19:44 PM Zoraine
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The quote was incorrect
->'''Han Solo''': The force does not work that way!
to:
->'''Han Solo''': The That's not how the force does not work that way!works!
25th Dec '15 11:42:50 AM GrigorII
Is there an issue? Send a Message
->''"We don't ask that you stay within the bounds of physics, but at least follow the rules you freaking made up."'' -->-- '''Website/{{Cracked}}''', ''[[http://www.cracked.com/article_16625_8-classic-movies-that-got-away-with-gaping-plot-holes.html 8 Classic Movies That Got Away With Gaping Plot Holes]]''
to:
->''"We don't ask ->'''Finn''': We'll figure it out. We'll use the force! ->'''Han Solo''': The force does not work that you stay within the bounds of physics, but at least follow the rules you freaking made up."'' -->-- '''Website/{{Cracked}}''', ''[[http://www.cracked.com/article_16625_8-classic-movies-that-got-away-with-gaping-plot-holes.html 8 Classic Movies That Got Away With Gaping Plot Holes]]'' way! -->Film/TheForceAwakens
19th Dec '15 2:35:11 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* A rather interesting case in ''ShadowsOfTheApt''- humans all possess the Art, giving them powers and abilities based on the particular insect-archetype. This is all inherited- if you have Beetle parents, you're a Beetle yourself and you get Beetle Art. There's also Aptitude- either you're Apt, and can use- and learn to create- technology, or you're Inapt and can't even open a door with a spring-latch. However, the Inapt can learn magic- another interesting part being that if you ''see'' Art, you ''know'' it's Art not magic.
to:
* A rather interesting case in ''ShadowsOfTheApt''- ''Literature/ShadowsOfTheApt''- humans all possess the Art, giving them powers and abilities based on the particular insect-archetype. This is all inherited- if you have Beetle parents, you're a Beetle yourself and you get Beetle Art. There's also Aptitude- either you're Apt, and can use- and learn to create- technology, or you're Inapt and can't even open a door with a spring-latch. However, the Inapt can learn magic- another interesting part being that if you ''see'' Art, you ''know'' it's Art not magic.
This list shows the last 10 events of 221. Show all.