History Main / MadwomanintheAttic

26th Aug '16 2:57:46 AM tsstevens
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* Chance the Gardener in ''BeingThere'' was confined to the Old Man's house all of his life due to his mental retardation, and no one but the maids who worked in the house knew he existed. And it's possible he's the Old Man's illegitimate son to boot. The story gets underway once the Old Man dies and he is turned out of the house by the lawyers who came to close the estate. He's a nice, well-spoken person, however (partially due to his being allowed to watch television, giving him some idea of proper behavior and speech), and winds up becoming a ParodySue when he encounters people who have no idea what he really is.

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* Chance the Gardener in ''BeingThere'' was confined to the Old Man's house all of his life due to his mental retardation, handicap, and no one but the maids who worked in the house knew he existed. And it's possible he's the Old Man's illegitimate son to boot. The story gets underway once the Old Man dies and he is turned out of the house by the lawyers who came to close the estate. He's a nice, well-spoken person, however (partially due to his being allowed to watch television, giving him some idea of proper behavior and speech), and winds up becoming a ParodySue when he encounters people who have no idea what he really is.
15th Aug '16 2:34:50 PM margdean56
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* In ''[[{{Narnia}} The Magician's Nephew]]'', Digory and Polly, [[GenreSavvy being familiar with this trope]], consider that Uncle Andrew might have a mad wife hidden in his attic. He's actually experimenting with the rings that are among the {{Mac Guffin}}s of the series.

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* In ''[[{{Narnia}} The Magician's Nephew]]'', Digory and Polly, [[GenreSavvy being familiar with this trope]], consider that Uncle Andrew might have a mad wife hidden in his attic. He's actually experimenting with the rings that are among the {{Mac Guffin}}s {{MacGuffin}}s of the series.



* Happens thrice in ''Literature/HarryPotter''- to Harry himself in the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone first book]], [[spoiler:Barty Crouch]] Junior, and [[spoiler: Dumbledore's little sister Ariana]]. Subverted with Harry, though, as he was locked in a cupboard under a stairway, but was allowed outside unless he showed signs of magic. He was then freed when all the letters came from Hogwarts, but only because his aunt and uncle thought the letters would stop coming if he slept in a different part of the house. And then he got locked in there anyway, and food was passed to him through a cat flap.
** [[spoiler:Barty Crouch]] Junior is a case of ParentalAbandonment gone horribly wrong. His father was too busy persecuting and growing in political power on the Dark Witch Hunts to take his son on fishing trips (or even talk to the kid), and the Death Eaters saw one hell of an opportunity to hire the son of the head of the secret police as a mole. When Kakaroff sold him out, Senior sentenced his own son to jail (note that this is a magical jail that is not inspected by ANYONE, so it's a living hell), but was talked out of it by his wife. [[spoiler: BC]] Junior spent the rest of his jail time in the attic of their house... until Voldemort broke him out. He proceeds to bring about the apocalypse in book four.
** As for [[spoiler: Ariana]] this was played semi-straight. She [[TheOphelia went mad]] [[spoiler: after an attack by a gang of Muggle boys, which could be read as rape]] and was locked up after [[spoiler: her father was sent to prison for attacking the Muggle boys, and refusing to say why he did it]]. Everybody outside the family (the ones who knew about her existence, anyway) figured her mother had locked her up for being a Squib (a wizard with no magical ability), which was a bad thing to be during [[spoiler: Ariana's lifetime]]. Which, in the present in the novels, is still a bad thing; she's indirectly responsible for Russia's secret magician corps (they killed Russian civilians during world war II), as her extremely flashy death provides the muse of the magic corps' leader.

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* Happens thrice in ''Literature/HarryPotter''- to ''Literature/HarryPotter''--to Harry himself in the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone first book]], [[spoiler:Barty Crouch]] Junior, and [[spoiler: Dumbledore's little sister Ariana]]. Subverted with Harry, though, as he was locked in a cupboard under a stairway, but was allowed outside unless he showed signs of magic. He was then freed when all the letters came from Hogwarts, but only because his aunt and uncle thought the letters would stop coming if he slept in a different part of the house. And then he got locked in there anyway, and food was passed to him through a cat flap.
** [[spoiler:Barty Crouch]] Junior is a case of ParentalAbandonment gone horribly wrong. His father was too busy persecuting and growing in political power on the Dark Witch Hunts to take his son on fishing trips (or even talk to the kid), and the Death Eaters saw one hell of an opportunity to hire the son of the head of the secret police as a mole. When Kakaroff Karkaroff sold him out, Senior sentenced his own son to jail (note that this is a magical jail that is not inspected by ANYONE, so it's a living hell), but was talked out of it by his wife. [[spoiler: BC]] Junior spent the rest of his jail time in the attic of their house... until Voldemort broke him out. He proceeds to bring about the apocalypse in book four.
** As for [[spoiler: Ariana]] Ariana]], this was played semi-straight. She [[TheOphelia went mad]] [[spoiler: after an attack by a gang of Muggle boys, which could be read as rape]] rape]], and was locked up after [[spoiler: her father was sent to prison for attacking the Muggle boys, and refusing to say why he did it]]. Everybody outside the family (the ones who knew about her existence, anyway) figured her mother had locked her up for being a Squib (a wizard with no magical ability), which was a bad thing to be during [[spoiler: Ariana's lifetime]]. Which, in the present in the novels, is still a bad thing; she's indirectly responsible for Russia's secret magician corps (they killed Russian civilians during world war World War II), as her extremely flashy death provides the muse of the magic corps' leader.



* Chance the Gardener in ''BeingThere'' was isolated to the Old Man's house all of his life due to his mental retardation and no one but the maids who worked in the house knew he existed. And it's possible he's the Old Man's illegitimate son to boot. The story gets underway once the Old Man dies and he is turned out of the house by the lawyers who came to close the estate. He's a nice, well-spoken person, however (partially due to his being allowed to watch television, giving him some idea of proper behavior and speech), and winds up becoming a ParodySue when he encounters people who have no idea what he really is.

to:

* Chance the Gardener in ''BeingThere'' was isolated confined to the Old Man's house all of his life due to his mental retardation retardation, and no one but the maids who worked in the house knew he existed. And it's possible he's the Old Man's illegitimate son to boot. The story gets underway once the Old Man dies and he is turned out of the house by the lawyers who came to close the estate. He's a nice, well-spoken person, however (partially due to his being allowed to watch television, giving him some idea of proper behavior and speech), and winds up becoming a ParodySue when he encounters people who have no idea what he really is.



* Paul Auster's ''[[Literature/TheNewYorkTrilogy City of Glass]]'' features a character that was brought up at home in complete isolation as part of a crackpot linguistic experiment by his father. At the time of the story, he has been recovered and mostly rehabilitated - he has learned to speak - but is still quite disconcerting.

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* Paul Auster's ''[[Literature/TheNewYorkTrilogy City of Glass]]'' features a character that was brought up at home in complete isolation as part of a crackpot linguistic experiment by his father. At the time of the story, he has been recovered and mostly rehabilitated - -- he has learned to speak - -- but is still quite disconcerting.



** Another subversion comes from ''The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier'', written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself, that is much along these same lines. A soldier who made friends with another younger soldier in the Boer War hires Holmes when he thinks the younger soldier's parents are keeping him imprisoned on their family estate. It turns out [[spoiler:that the younger soldier actually contracted what he thinks is leprosy during his time in South Africa, and the family was actually keeping him at home in secret to treat him without his being locked up in a hospital. The younger soldier, who's actually only suffering from treatable icthyosis, voluntarily went along with this.]]
** Then there's "The Yellow Face," in which the ''suspected'' Madwoman in the Attic in fact turns out to be [[spoiler:simply the main character's mixed-race daughter from a previous marriage, whom she'd kept hidden from her new husband. The story has a happy ending - the little girl is somehow quite healthy and happy, and her new stepfather accepts her immediately.]]

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** Another subversion comes from ''The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier'', written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself, that is much along these same lines. A soldier who made friends with another younger soldier in the Boer War hires Holmes when he thinks the younger soldier's parents are keeping him imprisoned on their family estate. It turns out [[spoiler:that the younger soldier actually contracted what he thinks is leprosy during his time in South Africa, and the family was actually keeping him at home in secret to treat him without his being locked up in a hospital. The younger soldier, who's actually only suffering from treatable icthyosis, voluntarily went along with this.]]
** Then there's "The Yellow Face," in which the ''suspected'' Madwoman in the Attic in fact turns out to be [[spoiler:simply the main character's mixed-race daughter from a previous marriage, whom she'd kept hidden from her new husband. The story has a happy ending - -- the little girl is somehow quite healthy and happy, and her new stepfather accepts her immediately.]]



* Both Charlie Angelfield and his father, George, in ''Literature/TheThirteenthTale'' go mad after the death of their loved ones, and enter into a sort of self inflicted imprisonment where they lock themselves in their rooms for extended periods of time.
* Hortensia from Creator/IsabelAllende's "Cuentos de Eva Luna" (Takes of Eva Luna).

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* Both Charlie Angelfield and his father, George, in ''Literature/TheThirteenthTale'' go mad after the death of their loved ones, and enter into a sort of self inflicted self-inflicted imprisonment where they lock themselves in their rooms for extended periods of time.
* Hortensia from Creator/IsabelAllende's "Cuentos de Eva Luna" (Takes (Tales of Eva Luna).



* Alberto Blest-Gana's ''El Loco Estero'' has the titular Julián "El Loco" Estero, an ex-military man locked away by his sister Manuela supposedly to keep his borderline AxCrazy tantrums at bay, but in reality [[FinancialAbuse to use his share of the family inheritance]] (out of resentment for [[HeirClubForMen being passed up as heiress]]). Carlos Díaz, TheProtagonist of the book, manages to strike an InterGenerationalFriendship with Estero and vows to set him free.

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* Alberto Blest-Gana's ''El Loco Estero'' has the titular Julián "El Loco" Estero, an ex-military man locked away by his sister Manuela supposedly to keep his borderline AxCrazy tantrums at bay, but in reality [[FinancialAbuse to use his share of the family inheritance]] (out of resentment for [[HeirClubForMen being passed up as heiress]]). Carlos Díaz, TheProtagonist of the book, manages to strike up an InterGenerationalFriendship with Estero and vows to set him free.
15th Aug '16 2:24:40 PM margdean56
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** Jean Rhys' ''Wide Sargasso Sea'' examines this example (yes, this one -- same woman[[note]]though moved to a slightly different historical period[[/note]]) more deeply, giving a possible BackStory of (the literal) Mad Woman in the Attic. It's also a [[DeconstructedTrope deconstruction]], similar in that to "The Yellow Wallpaper", since it's quite clear in this version that her identity was robbed ("Bertha" is not even her real name) and insanity was a role that was forced upon her in an effort of controlling her rather than something that would have happened anyway.

to:

** Jean Rhys' ''Wide Sargasso Sea'' examines this example (yes, this one -- same woman[[note]]though moved to a slightly different historical period[[/note]]) more deeply, giving a possible BackStory of (the literal) Mad Woman in the Attic. It's also a [[DeconstructedTrope deconstruction]], similar in that to "The Yellow Wallpaper", since it's quite clear in this version that her identity was robbed stolen ("Bertha" is not even her real name) and insanity was a role that was forced upon her in an effort of controlling to control her rather than something that would have happened anyway.
15th Aug '16 2:19:53 PM margdean56
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* At one point, ''Dv8'', ''Gen13'''s EvilCounterpart, meets an even eviller team called Twist. One of Twist's KickTheDog moments is when one of them shows Dv8's Evo a cellar under their base crammed full of BodyHorror[=s=] mutated by the same Phlebotinum that gave the others powers, and tries to get him to have sex with her in front of them.

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* At one point, ''Dv8'', ''[=Dv8=]'', ''Gen13'''s EvilCounterpart, meets an even eviller team called Twist. One of Twist's KickTheDog moments is when one of them shows Dv8's [=Dv8=]'s Evo a cellar under their base crammed full of BodyHorror[=s=] mutated by the same Phlebotinum that gave the others powers, and tries to get him to have sex with her in front of them.
15th Aug '16 2:17:28 PM margdean56
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This trope is named for the landmark work of feminist literary criticism by Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, referring to [[spoiler:Mr. Rochester's wife]] in Charlotte Brontë's ''Literature/JaneEyre''. The analysis indicates that this trope first popularly appeared, in all places, in Victorian women's literature, where depicting some women as crazy people was an easy way to make female villains with whom readers would be unlikely to sympathize. Obviously, this plan was not a complete success.

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This trope is named for the landmark work of feminist literary criticism by Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, referring to [[spoiler:Mr. Rochester's wife]] in Charlotte Brontë's ''Literature/JaneEyre''. The analysis indicates that this trope first popularly appeared, in of all places, in Victorian women's literature, where depicting some women as crazy people was an easy way to make female villains with whom readers would be unlikely to sympathize. Obviously, this plan was not a complete success.
10th Aug '16 5:03:03 PM SilentStranger
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* The Monster of Glamis, a deformed child supposedly born to the Bowes-Lyon family and bricked up in Glamis Castle.

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* The Monster of Glamis, a deformed child supposedly born to the Bowes-Lyon family and bricked up in Glamis Castle. The most common version of the myth is that he was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lyon-Bowes_(heir_to_Lord_Glamis,_born_1821) Thomas Lyon-Bowes]], the firstborn son of Lord Glamis who had supposedly been born disfigured and hidden away in a sealed room (the real Thomas had died in early infancy). The myth seems to have originated in relatively modern times due to the fact that Thomas does not have a headstone in the family cemetary despite having been baptized, however this was common at the time due to high infant mortality rates.
9th Aug '16 1:57:08 PM ironballs16
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* Parodied in a HalloweenEpisode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', with Bart's EvilTwin, Hugo, locked up in the attic. The TwistEnding was that ''Bart'' was the Evil Twin, so Hugo was allowed to go free (even though he was clearly insane - then again, you'd be insane too, if in his shoes) and Bart is locked up in his place.

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* Parodied in a HalloweenEpisode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', with Bart's EvilTwin, Hugo, locked up in the attic. The TwistEnding was that ''Bart'' was the Evil Twin, so Hugo was allowed to go free (even though he was clearly insane - then again, you'd be insane too, [[GoMadFromTheIsolation if in his shoes) shoes]]) and Bart is locked up in his place.
30th Jun '16 7:02:33 PM FlakyPorcupine
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* Kaylie and Tim's mother in ''Film/{{Oculus}}'' eventually becomes this, when the mirror causes her to become increasingly insane and the father (who is also slowly being driven insane) chains her to her room so their kids wouldn't find out.
25th Jun '16 10:18:06 PM FlakyPorcupine
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* ''Main/Croc'' has a surprising number of nightmarish creatures lurking in the dungeon of the villain's castle but none are more disturbing than a chained, rabid, (possibly) zombie prisoner that attempts to grab whoever comes near it. The chains imply that it cannot be trusted even by the Dantinis.

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* ''Main/Croc'' ''VideoGame/{{Croc}}'' has a surprising number of nightmarish creatures lurking in the dungeon of the villain's castle but none are more disturbing than a chained, rabid, (possibly) zombie prisoner that attempts to grab whoever comes near it. The chains imply that it cannot be trusted even by the Dantinis.Dantinis.
* The Hillybilly from ''Videogame/DeadByDaylight'' was this according to his StartOfDarkness. He spent a good chunk of his life bricked up inside of his own room, only fed through a hole in the wall due to his parents shunning him because of his deformities. Eventually, he escaped and went on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge.
14th Jun '16 9:22:26 AM Shadowgazer
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Main/Croc'' has a surprising number of nightmarish creatures lurking in the dungeon of the villain's castle but none are more disturbing than a chained, rabid, (possibly) zombie prisoner that attempts to grab whoever comes near it. The chains imply that it cannot be trusted even by the Dantinis.
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