History Main / LyricalShoehorn

27th Apr '17 12:58:07 PM StFan
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* [[DianaRoss Do you know where you're going to?]]

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* [[DianaRoss [[Music/DianaRoss Do you know where you're going to?]]
21st Apr '17 7:25:39 PM LadyJaneGrey
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12th Apr '17 5:57:12 PM jamespolk
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* The Cranberries do this sometimes, for instance:

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* The Cranberries Music/TheCranberries do this sometimes, for instance:
8th Apr '17 9:44:19 AM nombretomado
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* The QueensOfTheStoneAge song "Turnin' On The Screw" has this rather cringe-worthy line:

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* The QueensOfTheStoneAge Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge song "Turnin' On The Screw" has this rather cringe-worthy line:
26th Feb '17 10:50:21 AM nombretomado
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*** Then again, they credit the line-as-written to HunterSThompson, so make of that what you will.

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*** Then again, they credit the line-as-written to HunterSThompson, Creator/HunterSThompson, so make of that what you will.
19th Feb '17 9:30:59 AM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

* The children's praise song "The Wa Wa Song" has a particularly glaring one:
-->On days when trials come\\
And my heart goes '''clippity-ping'''\\
Iím glad for Jesus Christ\\
And that He taught me how to sing
5th Feb '17 9:46:56 AM Twentington
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* Diamond Rio's "How Your Love Makes Me Feel":

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* Diamond Rio's Rio has a few:
**
"How Your Love Makes Me Feel":



** Also from Diamond Rio is "Walkin' Away", with the line "These occasional moments of weakness only ''makes'' our love more strong". Subect/verb disagreement, anyone?

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** Also from Diamond Rio is "Walkin' Away", with the line "These occasional moments of weakness only ''makes'' our love more strong". Subect/verb disagreement, anyone?anyone?
** And "Unbelievable" has "She's so beautiful, it's undisputable / It's undeniable, she's ''gottahaveable''".
28th Jan '17 9:44:30 AM Twentington
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* The third verse of Music/AlanJackson's "Where I Come From" is a {{Painful Rhyme}}-ridden mess of a word salad. Good luck trying to figure out what he's even trying to say:

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* The third verse of Music/AlanJackson's "Where I Come From" is a {{Painful Rhyme}}-ridden Rhyme}}-riddled mess of a word salad. Good luck trying to figure out what he's even trying to say:
23rd Dec '16 2:35:38 AM 06tele
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* In a sort-of non-musical example, the poetry of Literature/Homer is full of these, at least if you accept the (generally accepted) theory of oral-formulaic composition. Anyone who reads Homer soon notices that certain words and passages crop up again and again: e.g., the sea is often described as 'wine-dark', dawn is 'rosy-fingered', and there's an entire chunk of lines in the ''Iliad'' describing how they cook and eat meat which just gets repeated whenever the guys want to have food. In the 1920s, classical scholar Milman Parry developed a theory to explain this, based in part on his field studies of oral poetry in the Balkan countries. The theory says that the poems attributed to Homer were originally composed as part of an oral tradition before they got written down, and the poets often needed to come up with a word that would help a line to flow but would also fit the meaning. Some of these would take the form of entire 'type-scenes', which could be brought out to mark significant moments and which wouldn't vary much from character to character. Further scholars have extended this theory to the study of Literature/TheBible and Literature/TheQuran. Yes, when it's a showdown between rhythm and meaning, rhythm wins.

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* In a sort-of non-musical example, the poetry of Literature/Homer Literature/{{Homer}} is full of these, at least if you accept the (generally accepted) theory of oral-formulaic composition. Anyone who reads Homer soon notices that certain words and passages crop up again and again: e.g., the sea is often described as 'wine-dark', dawn is 'rosy-fingered', and there's an entire chunk of lines in the ''Iliad'' describing how they cook and eat meat which just gets repeated whenever the guys want to have food. In the 1920s, classical scholar Milman Parry developed a theory to explain this, based in part on his field studies of oral poetry in the Balkan countries. The theory says that the poems attributed to Homer were originally composed as part of an oral tradition before they got written down, down -- in fact, they were sung -- and the poets singers often needed to come up with a word that would help a line to flow but would also fit the meaning. Some of these would take the form of entire 'type-scenes', which could be brought out to mark significant moments and which wouldn't vary much from character to character. Further scholars have extended this theory to the study of Literature/TheBible and Literature/TheQuran. Yes, when it's a showdown between rhythm and meaning, rhythm wins.
23rd Dec '16 2:34:08 AM 06tele
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* In a sort-of non-musical example, the poetry of Literature/Homer is full of these, at least if you accept the (generally accepted) theory of oral-formulaic composition. Anyone who reads Homer soon notices that certain words and passages crop up again and again: e.g., the sea is often described as 'wine-dark', dawn is 'rosy-fingered', and there's an entire chunk of lines in the ''Iliad'' describing how they cook and eat meat which just gets repeated whenever the guys want to have food. In the 1920s, classical scholar Milman Parry developed a theory to explain this, based in part on his field studies of oral poetry in the Balkan countries. The theory says that the poems attributed to Homer were originally composed as part of an oral tradition before they got written down, and the poets often needed to come up with a word that would help a line to flow but would also fit the meaning. Some of these would take the form of entire 'type-scenes', which could be brought out to mark significant moments and which wouldn't vary much from character to character. Further scholars have extended this theory to the study of Literature/TheBible Bible and Literature/TheQuran. Yes, when it's a showdown between rhythm and meaning, rhythm wins.

to:

* In a sort-of non-musical example, the poetry of Literature/Homer is full of these, at least if you accept the (generally accepted) theory of oral-formulaic composition. Anyone who reads Homer soon notices that certain words and passages crop up again and again: e.g., the sea is often described as 'wine-dark', dawn is 'rosy-fingered', and there's an entire chunk of lines in the ''Iliad'' describing how they cook and eat meat which just gets repeated whenever the guys want to have food. In the 1920s, classical scholar Milman Parry developed a theory to explain this, based in part on his field studies of oral poetry in the Balkan countries. The theory says that the poems attributed to Homer were originally composed as part of an oral tradition before they got written down, and the poets often needed to come up with a word that would help a line to flow but would also fit the meaning. Some of these would take the form of entire 'type-scenes', which could be brought out to mark significant moments and which wouldn't vary much from character to character. Further scholars have extended this theory to the study of Literature/TheBible Bible and Literature/TheQuran. Yes, when it's a showdown between rhythm and meaning, rhythm wins.
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