History Main / LyingToThePerp

20th Apr '16 2:15:17 PM Kartoonkid95
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** In another episode, Krusty is announced as the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize and he travels to Oslo to accept it, but it turned out to be a ruse to bring him to World Court.
9th Apr '16 2:05:56 PM Morgenthaler
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* According to DavidSimon in ''Homicide'', this is basically a requirement of being a detective. A good detective must be able to read a suspect his Miranda rights, (and in Baltimore) sign a paper showing they've understood them, and then in the very next breath convince the suspect that those rights are meaningless. From there, it's half-truths and lies all the way. For example: One common trick is to confiscate the suspect's shoes and tell the suspect that they're going to check that blood splatter on them to see if it's the victim's blood type. It serves a double-whammy: The suspect is convinced they have evidence, and their faith in themselves is shot; hell, they didn't even notice that any blood splatter had hit their shoes!

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* According to DavidSimon Creator/DavidSimon in ''Homicide'', this is basically a requirement of being a detective. A good detective must be able to read a suspect his Miranda rights, (and in Baltimore) sign a paper showing they've understood them, and then in the very next breath convince the suspect that those rights are meaningless. From there, it's half-truths and lies all the way. For example: One common trick is to confiscate the suspect's shoes and tell the suspect that they're going to check that blood splatter on them to see if it's the victim's blood type. It serves a double-whammy: The suspect is convinced they have evidence, and their faith in themselves is shot; hell, they didn't even notice that any blood splatter had hit their shoes!
1st Apr '16 3:49:40 PM Morgenthaler
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** The photocopier-as-lie-detector story is actually [[http://www.snopes.com/legal/colander.asp much older]] and probably never happened in real life.
** David Simon mentions instances of the photocopier-as-lie-detector trick in his true crime book ''Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets'', which is the basis for both ''Homicide: Life on the Street'' and (in part) ''The Wire''. Detroit homicide detectives were "publicly upbraided and disciplined by their superiors for using the office Xerox as a polygraph device." When Baltimore detectives read about this, they "wondered why anyone had a problem" because "polygraph by copier was an old trick; it had been attempted on more than one occasion in the sixth-floor Xerox room."
7th Mar '16 8:32:38 AM Morgenthaler
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** In ''The Shooting,'' Friday and Gannon are interrogating a pair of suspects who gunned down a patrolman after a drug-store robbery. The patrolman just barely survived, but with no memory of the attack, meaning he can't identify them. Believing the cop dead, the gunman refuses to roll over, telling Friday he has a nice story, but it's useless without a witness to corroborate it. Friday smiles, and opens the door to the interrogation room, revealing the cop, in uniform, very much alive. This is enough to make the partner roll over on the gunman to prevent getting sent up for murdering a cop, which is now on the interrogation room's tape recorder. Friday leaves the room, closing the door, and this exchange takes place:

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** In ''The Shooting,'' "The Shooting," Friday and Gannon are interrogating a pair of suspects who gunned down a patrolman after a drug-store robbery. The patrolman just barely survived, but with no memory of the attack, meaning he can't identify them. Believing the cop dead, the gunman refuses to roll over, telling Friday he has a nice story, but it's useless without a witness to corroborate it. Friday smiles, and opens the door to the interrogation room, revealing the cop, in uniform, very much alive. This is enough to make the partner roll over on the gunman to prevent getting sent up for murdering a cop, which is now on the interrogation room's tape recorder. Friday leaves the room, closing the door, and this exchange takes place:



** In ''The Investigation'', Friday and Gannon are investigating a prospective recruit's background and find an irregularity in his history. The prospect claimed that he left the city where his now ex-wife lives in December of the previous year, but she claims that he left town the previous July, which would mean six months of his life is not accounted for. To resolve the dispute, the detectives ask the recruit's previous employer, Turnbull. They suspect Turnbull would be open to lying in the prospect's favor, so they say the wife claimed he left in '''December''' instead, knowing the boss would either admit reluctantly she was telling the truth, or claim she was lying and admit the recruit left in July. Sure enough, Turnbull accuses the ex-wife of lying and confirms the unfavorable date of July. Turnbull is not pleased to learn that she actually said he left in July, and refuses to answer any more questions.

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** In ''The Investigation'', "The Investigation", Friday and Gannon are investigating a prospective recruit's background and find an irregularity in his history. The prospect claimed that he left the city where his now ex-wife lives in December of the previous year, but she claims that he left town the previous July, which would mean six months of his life is not accounted for. To resolve the dispute, the detectives ask the recruit's previous employer, Turnbull. They suspect Turnbull would be open to lying in the prospect's favor, so they say the wife claimed he left in '''December''' instead, knowing the boss would either admit reluctantly she was telling the truth, or claim she was lying and admit the recruit left in July. Sure enough, Turnbull accuses the ex-wife of lying and confirms the unfavorable date of July. Turnbull is not pleased to learn that she actually said he left in July, and refuses to answer any more questions.
7th Mar '16 8:32:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* In both ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' and ''TheWire'', a photocopier pre-loaded with sheets of paper marked "TRUE" and "FALSE" was passed off to a perp as a new, highly accurate, highly ''dangerous'' lie detector. Silly as it sounds, the story originates in David Simon's non-fiction book ''Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets''.
** ''Homicide'' again: Detective Bayliss convinces a perp that his special camera can detect the image of the last thing a murder victim had seen by photographing the dead man's eyes.
** One more ''Homicide'' example: faced with an unflappable perp, a dog-lover who had used arson to conceal a murder, the detective asks, offhand, "We found a dog in the wreckage. Why'd you kill the dog?", a total fabrication. Without thinking, the perp reflexively answers, "I didn't know the dog was there."
** Where ''Homicide'' is concerned, this is a OnceAnEpisode trope if ever there was one.
* David Simon wrote the ol' photocopier-as-lie-detector trick into yet another series, when Bunk uses it in the opening scene of the fifth season of ''TheWire''.
** The first season of TheWire has a particularly egregious example, where the detectives claim that a picture of Bunk's kids are the kids of a murder victim in order to get D'Angelo Barksdale to write a letter saying he's sorry to them. His lawyer arrives in time to snatch it off him, and his the-morons-I-have-to-deal-with demeanor is hilarious.

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* In both ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' and ''TheWire'', ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'': This is a OnceAnEpisode trope if ever there was one.
** A
photocopier pre-loaded with sheets of paper marked "TRUE" and "FALSE" was passed off to a perp as a new, highly accurate, highly ''dangerous'' lie detector. Silly as it sounds, the story originates in David Simon's non-fiction book ''Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets''.
** ''Homicide'' again: Detective Bayliss convinces a perp that his special camera can detect the image of the last thing a murder victim had seen by photographing the dead man's eyes.
** One more ''Homicide'' example: faced Faced with an unflappable perp, a dog-lover who had used arson to conceal a murder, the detective asks, offhand, "We found a dog in the wreckage. Why'd you kill the dog?", a total fabrication. Without thinking, the perp reflexively answers, "I didn't know the dog was there."
* ''Series/TheWire'':
** Where ''Homicide'' is concerned, this is a OnceAnEpisode trope if ever there was one.
*
David Simon wrote the ol' photocopier-as-lie-detector trick into yet another series, when Bunk uses it in the opening scene of the fifth season of ''TheWire''.
season.
** The first season of TheWire has a particularly egregious example, where the detectives claim that a picture of Bunk's kids are the kids of a murder victim in order to get D'Angelo Barksdale to write a letter saying he's sorry to them. His lawyer arrives in time to snatch it off him, and his the-morons-I-have-to-deal-with demeanor is hilarious.



** David Simon mentions instances of the photocopier-as-lie-detector trick in his true crime book ''Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets'', which is the basis for both ''Homicide: Life on the Street'' and (in part) ''TheWire''. Detroit homicide detectives were "publicly upbraided and disciplined by their superiors for using the office Xerox as a polygraph device." When Baltimore detectives read about this, they "wondered why anyone had a problem" because "polygraph by copier was an old trick; it had been attempted on more than one occasion in the sixth-floor Xerox room."
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': Warrick convinces a suspect that an on-site DNA test has [=ID'ed=] him as the perp. Really the test only determines if the substance is human blood.

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** David Simon mentions instances of the photocopier-as-lie-detector trick in his true crime book ''Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets'', which is the basis for both ''Homicide: Life on the Street'' and (in part) ''TheWire''.''The Wire''. Detroit homicide detectives were "publicly upbraided and disciplined by their superiors for using the office Xerox as a polygraph device." When Baltimore detectives read about this, they "wondered why anyone had a problem" because "polygraph by copier was an old trick; it had been attempted on more than one occasion in the sixth-floor Xerox room."
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': ''Series/{{CSI}}'':
**
Warrick convinces a suspect that an on-site DNA test has [=ID'ed=] him as the perp. Really the test only determines if the substance is human blood.



* In the ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' episode "Legacy," Munch tells a victim's mother that her comatose daughter has awakened and "told us everything." After the mother confesses, we find out the little girl is still in a coma.
** Another SVU example: Captain Cragen tells a perpetrator that they used DNA analysis to prove that the cigarettes he smoked were used to burn an old woman. When he goes back behind the two-way mirror, Detective Tutuola reminds him that the lab found all DNA from the lit end of the cigarette to be burned away.

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* ''Series/LawAndOrder'':
** Subverted in the episode "Ritual." Detectives suspect a man of committing murder in a parking garage and then driving out of it, using his magnetic key-card to exit the garage. However, the garage's gate system doesn't record card usages, and with no witnesses they have no way of knowing whether he did actually use his key-card that evening. They decide to bluff and tell him in interrogation, "We checked the readout at the garage. Your card was used just after Uncle Josef got his head bashed in." As they say this, the suspect lights up with a smile and faint glimmer in his eyes. "The magnetic card system?" he calmly replies; "You can't get a readout from that thing." D'oh!
** An important distinction is also made in another episode when Jamie Ross plays a clever game of half-truths to convince a perp to surrender the gun he used to kill a woman. Though she's able to convince the judge to allow the gun into evidence anyway, he makes it clear that while he accepts the idea that cops can lie to suspects, he expects more of an ADA.
* ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'':
**
In the ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' episode "Legacy," Munch tells a victim's mother that her comatose daughter has awakened and "told us everything." After the mother confesses, we find out the little girl is still in a coma.
** Another SVU example: Captain Cragen tells a perpetrator that they used DNA analysis to prove that the cigarettes he smoked were used to burn an old woman. When he goes back behind the two-way mirror, Detective Tutuola reminds him that the lab found all DNA from the lit end of the cigarette to be burned away.



* This one is used in ''[[Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent Criminal Intent]]'' (the first episode, even): Goren convinces the girlfriend of a narcissist perp to help them by convincing her that he gave her AIDS. At the end, when he finds out she betrayed him, she shouted "You killed us both anyway!" to which Eames reveals that neither of them had AIDS after all, to which Goren half-heartedly admits, "I lied. Sorry."

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* This one is used in ''[[Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent Criminal Intent]]'' (the first episode, even): ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'':
**
Goren convinces the girlfriend of a narcissist perp to help them by convincing her that he gave her AIDS. At the end, when he finds out she betrayed him, she shouted "You killed us both anyway!" to which Eames reveals that neither of them had AIDS after all, to which Goren half-heartedly admits, "I lied. Sorry."



*** Actually they didn't even have to lie in that one; they just asked the guy's wife if she'd found a tooth in their home. They knew she would tell her husband, and that he was such a perfectionist he'd go nuts looking for it.
*** Original flavor had a similar plot, when [=McCoy=] put a comatose girl on the witness list for the trial of her attacker. He also told the doctor that when the perp's lawyer called, he was to say she was awake and talking to police. The doctor agreed to, under protest, and the defense pleads out without checking in person.



*** Subverted in mothership episode "Ritual." Detectives suspect a man of committing murder in a parking garage and then driving out of it, using his magnetic key-card to exit the garage. However, the garage's gate system doesn't record card usages, and with no witnesses they have no way of knowing whether he did actually use his key-card that evening. They decide to bluff and tell him in interrogation, "We checked the readout at the garage. Your card was used just after Uncle Josef got his head bashed in." As they say this, the suspect lights up with a smile and faint glimmer in his eyes. "The magnetic card system?" he calmly replies; "You can't get a readout from that thing." D'oh!
*** This actually happens a fair few times on various incarnations of "Law & Order". Considering the sheer number of episodes the show has, a GenreSavvy perp makes things interesting.
** An important distinction is also made in another episode of the mothership when Jamie Ross plays a clever game of half-truths to convince a perp to surrender the gun he used to kill a woman. Though she's able to convince the judge to allow the gun into evidence anyway, he makes it clear that while he accepts the idea that cops can lie to suspects, he expects more of an ADA.
*** Also from CI; the detectives are investigating the immolation of a journalist who was investigating this sick girl. Turns out [[spoiler: the girl never existed, and was her "parents" tricking people into giving them money or medical equipment they could sell for profit]] They tell the girl's "parents" that said Journalist left some money to her and they'd get it if they helped catch the murderer [[note]] a woman who truly believed the girl existed and killed the guy because he was sure she didn't and was going to expose that. [[/note]] After they do, the woman asks when they get the money, with the cops explaining there is no money and arresting them, causing the woman to yell to the murderer something along the lines of "you ruined everything!"
* Similarly on ''OneLifeToLive''. Rookie cop Andy has been arrested on charges of corruption, thanks to being framed by the cop who was actually guilty. Also arrested is a local hoodlum who has been trying to help her in her investigation of the crooked cop. When the police commissioner interrogates the hood, he tells him "Andy already told me everything, so we just need your statement, etc." However, having been in and out of the system, the guy is fully aware of the tricks that cops use and doesn't believe him for a second. Not to mention the fact that he knows full well that he and Andy are innocent and that Andy, being a cop herself, isn't likely to fall for the police tactics either.

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*** Subverted in mothership episode "Ritual." Detectives suspect a man of committing murder in a parking garage and then driving out of it, using his magnetic key-card to exit the garage. However, the garage's gate system doesn't record card usages, and with no witnesses they have no way of knowing whether he did actually use his key-card that evening. They decide to bluff and tell him in interrogation, "We checked the readout at the garage. Your card was used just after Uncle Josef got his head bashed in." As they say this, the suspect lights up with a smile and faint glimmer in his eyes. "The magnetic card system?" he calmly replies; "You can't get a readout from that thing." D'oh!
*** This actually happens a fair few times on various incarnations of "Law & Order". Considering the sheer number of episodes the show has, a GenreSavvy perp makes things interesting.
** An important distinction is also made in another episode of the mothership when Jamie Ross plays a clever game of half-truths to convince a perp to surrender the gun he used to kill a woman. Though she's able to convince the judge to allow the gun into evidence anyway, he makes it clear that while he accepts the idea that cops can lie to suspects, he expects more of an ADA.
*** Also from CI; the
The detectives are investigating the immolation of a journalist who was investigating this sick girl. Turns out [[spoiler: the girl never existed, and was her "parents" tricking people into giving them money or medical equipment they could sell for profit]] They tell the girl's "parents" that said Journalist left some money to her and they'd get it if they helped catch the murderer [[note]] a woman who truly believed the girl existed and killed the guy because he was sure she didn't and was going to expose that. [[/note]] After they do, the woman asks when they get the money, with the cops explaining there is no money and arresting them, causing the woman to yell to the murderer something along the lines of "you ruined everything!"
* Similarly on ''OneLifeToLive''.''Series/OneLifeToLive''. Rookie cop Andy has been arrested on charges of corruption, thanks to being framed by the cop who was actually guilty. Also arrested is a local hoodlum who has been trying to help her in her investigation of the crooked cop. When the police commissioner interrogates the hood, he tells him "Andy already told me everything, so we just need your statement, etc." However, having been in and out of the system, the guy is fully aware of the tricks that cops use and doesn't believe him for a second. Not to mention the fact that he knows full well that he and Andy are innocent and that Andy, being a cop herself, isn't likely to fall for the police tactics either.



* In ''Series/TheShield'' episode "Blood and Water", Det. Vic Mackey (who is blue eyed, with head shaved) pretends to be a neo-Nazi to get a suspect to open up (it doesn't work).

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* ''Series/TheShield'':
**
In ''Series/TheShield'' the episode "Blood and Water", Det. Vic Mackey (who is blue eyed, with head shaved) pretends to be a neo-Nazi to get a suspect to open up (it doesn't work).



* Though not itself a CrimeFiction, the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "The Drumhead" had an interrogator use this tactic on a young medical bay Lieutenant. A Klingon spying for the Romulans was discovered early in the program shortly after an explosion rocked the ''Enterprise'''s warp core, seemingly committed by sabotage. The explosion was later discovered to be caused by a faulty seal, but convinced of the Lieutenant's guilt by association to the spy, and the fact that his grandfather is Romulan, the interrogator attempts to force a confession out of him by claiming that evidence was found of a corrosive chemical causing the explosion, which the Lieutenant had access to. Subverted when the Lieutenant (rightfully) rebuffs the accusation, and Picard later chides the interrogator for using the tactic as unjustified and uncalled-for. In this case, the unethical interrogator had even opened up the previously private interviews to a public audience; presumably, so that the false accusation would apply even ''more'' pressure by destroying the young officer's reputation whether it was true or not. Picard is then hauled before the interrogator himself for questioning its methods, where he gives her a well-deserved TheReasonYouSuckSpeech, pointing out the similarities with [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything numerous other unfair legal processes in the past]].

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* Though not itself a CrimeFiction, the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
** The
episode "The Drumhead" had an interrogator use this tactic on a young medical bay Lieutenant. A Klingon spying for the Romulans was discovered early in the program shortly after an explosion rocked the ''Enterprise'''s warp core, seemingly committed by sabotage. The explosion was later discovered to be caused by a faulty seal, but convinced of the Lieutenant's guilt by association to the spy, and the fact that his grandfather is Romulan, the interrogator attempts to force a confession out of him by claiming that evidence was found of a corrosive chemical causing the explosion, which the Lieutenant had access to. Subverted when the Lieutenant (rightfully) rebuffs the accusation, and Picard later chides the interrogator for using the tactic as unjustified and uncalled-for. In this case, the unethical interrogator had even opened up the previously private interviews to a public audience; presumably, so that the false accusation would apply even ''more'' pressure by destroying the young officer's reputation whether it was true or not. Picard is then hauled before the interrogator himself for questioning its methods, where he gives her a well-deserved TheReasonYouSuckSpeech, pointing out the similarities with [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything numerous other unfair legal processes in the past]].



* ''NYPDBlue'': Two lies used frequently were: A) A vehicle was involved in an accident and your license plate number was reported, it's probably just a mix-up but we have to do the paperwork; B) [Victim having died without identifying anyone] 1. The victim is talking and has identified you so it'll go easier if you confess, 2. You should write out a confession telling your side of the story, 3. The victim is dead, you're going away for murder based on your confession, you SOB.

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* ''NYPDBlue'': ''Series/NYPDBlue'':
**
Two lies used frequently were: A) A vehicle was involved in an accident and your license plate number was reported, it's probably just a mix-up but we have to do the paperwork; B) [Victim having died without identifying anyone] 1. The victim is talking and has identified you so it'll go easier if you confess, 2. You should write out a confession telling your side of the story, 3. The victim is dead, you're going away for murder based on your confession, you SOB.



* Happens all the time on ''Series/CriminalMinds''. One particularly memorable episode involved Jason Gideon helpfully providing prayer time/rugs/etc. for an imprisoned Muslim fellow, but really he was just manipulating the guy's sense of time.

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* Happens all the time on ''Series/CriminalMinds''. ''Series/CriminalMinds''.
**
One particularly memorable episode involved Jason Gideon helpfully providing prayer time/rugs/etc. for an imprisoned Muslim fellow, but really he was just manipulating the guy's sense of time.



*** Kind of deconstructed in "Reckoner", where Rossi lies to a somewhat sympathetic Unsub by making him (and even the team) think that he slept with his late wife multiple times. The Unsub ends up [[spoiler:dying before we learn that it wasn't true]].

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*** ** Kind of deconstructed in "Reckoner", where Rossi lies to a somewhat sympathetic Unsub by making him (and even the team) think that he slept with his late wife multiple times. The Unsub ends up [[spoiler:dying before we learn that it wasn't true]].



* Also [[strike:happens all the time]] OnceAnEpisode (if not more) on ''Series/TheCloser''. Perhaps the ultimate example was when Deputy Chief Brenda Johnson told the perp that [[RefugeInAudacity she was the public defender assigned to him]].

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* Also [[strike:happens all the time]] OnceAnEpisode (if not more) on ''Series/TheCloser''. ''Series/TheCloser''.
**
Perhaps the ultimate example was when Deputy Chief Brenda Johnson told the perp that [[RefugeInAudacity she was the public defender assigned to him]].



*** She apparently didn't ''say'' she was his public defender, she just implied it and let him jump to that conclusion. She does introduce herself as being from the Public Defender's office, but those watching the interview also note that in this case the deception is only fine as long as the witness doesn't say anything they have to prosecute him for.



* In one episode of ''Shark'', the title character attempts to coax a confession out of a perp by claiming that someone will testify against him unless he signs a confession. The problem is that the supposed person is dead and the lie falls through immediately when the man's lawyer notices how quickly Stark is pushing for him to sign it. Stark almost ends up losing his license to practice law as a result.

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* In one episode of ''Shark'', ''Series/{{Shark}}'', the title character attempts to coax a confession out of a perp by claiming that someone will testify against him unless he signs a confession. The problem is that the supposed person is dead and the lie falls through immediately when the man's lawyer notices how quickly Stark is pushing for him to sign it. Stark almost ends up losing his license to practice law as a result.



* {{QI}} described an Elizabethan mathematician, John Napier, who "[[FreudWasRight encouraged his servants to stroke his cock]]" - one of them had been stealing, and he got them all together and told them his pet cockerel [[TooDumbToLive could tell when someone who touched it was lying]]. He sent them into a dark room and told them to stroke it, while unbeknownst to them it was covered in soot - the guilty servant was the only one not to have soot on his hands.

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* {{QI}} ''Series/{{QI}}'' described an Elizabethan mathematician, John Napier, who "[[FreudWasRight encouraged his servants to stroke his cock]]" - one of them had been stealing, and he got them all together and told them his pet cockerel [[TooDumbToLive could tell when someone who touched it was lying]]. He sent them into a dark room and told them to stroke it, while unbeknownst to them it was covered in soot - the guilty servant was the only one not to have soot on his hands.



* ''Series/{{Castle}}'' does the "divide and conquer" ploy in "The Double Down" to break the beta of the StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder pair.

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* ''Series/{{Castle}}'' ''Series/{{Castle}}'':
** It
does the "divide and conquer" ploy in "The Double Down" to break the beta of the StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder pair.



* Non- CrimeFiction example: In ''ThreesCompany'', Janet exposes a crooked health inspector who demanded a bribe in order to keep Jacks' perfectly acceptable restaurant open:

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* Non- CrimeFiction example: In ''ThreesCompany'', ''Series/ThreesCompany'', Janet exposes a crooked health inspector who demanded a bribe in order to keep Jacks' perfectly acceptable restaurant open:



* On ''[[Series/{{WithoutATrace}} Without a Trace]]'' this came back to bite [[spoiler: Elena's old partner: she told a murderous drug dealer that a neighborhood woman saw him kill one of his rivals. The dealer never cracked and instead put out a hit on the woman from jail and was never charged with either murder.]]

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* On ''[[Series/{{WithoutATrace}} Without a Trace]]'' ''Series/WithoutATrace'' this came back to bite [[spoiler: Elena's old partner: she told a murderous drug dealer that a neighborhood woman saw him kill one of his rivals. The dealer never cracked and instead put out a hit on the woman from jail and was never charged with either murder.]]



* In one episode of ''{{Neighbours}}'', a man arrested for assaulting Chris names Jarrod as the man who paid him to. Jarrod effortlessly exposes him as a liar by showing up at the interview with Superintendent Hayes and leading Walton to believe he is his Legal Aid lawyer. By the following scene he has changed his story.
* Played for laughs on ''{{The Golden Girls}}''. One of the ''EmptyNest'' characters, Barbara, had crossed over for the episode and had to help the girls when a guy came into the house with a gun.

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* In one episode of ''{{Neighbours}}'', ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'', a man arrested for assaulting Chris names Jarrod as the man who paid him to. Jarrod effortlessly exposes him as a liar by showing up at the interview with Superintendent Hayes and leading Walton to believe he is his Legal Aid lawyer. By the following scene he has changed his story.
* Played for laughs on ''{{The Golden Girls}}''.''Series/TheGoldenGirls''. One of the ''EmptyNest'' characters, Barbara, had crossed over for the episode and had to help the girls when a guy came into the house with a gun.
17th Jan '16 10:36:01 AM nombretomado
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-->-- A [[SelfMadeOrphan girl who killed her mother]] learns about this trope the hard way on ''LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit''

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-->-- A [[SelfMadeOrphan girl who killed her mother]] learns about this trope the hard way on ''LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit''
''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit''



* In the ''[[LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit Law And Order: Special Victims Unit]]'' episode "Legacy," Munch tells a victim's mother that her comatose daughter has awakened and "told us everything." After the mother confesses, we find out the little girl is still in a coma.

to:

* In the ''[[LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit Law And Order: Special Victims Unit]]'' ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' episode "Legacy," Munch tells a victim's mother that her comatose daughter has awakened and "told us everything." After the mother confesses, we find out the little girl is still in a coma.
19th Dec '15 7:45:16 PM nombretomado
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* In ''TheShield'' episode "Blood and Water", Det. Vic Mackey (who is blue eyed, with head shaved) pretends to be a neo-Nazi to get a suspect to open up (it doesn't work).

to:

* In ''TheShield'' ''Series/TheShield'' episode "Blood and Water", Det. Vic Mackey (who is blue eyed, with head shaved) pretends to be a neo-Nazi to get a suspect to open up (it doesn't work).
31st Oct '15 12:10:25 PM luiz4200
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Added DiffLines:

* In Creator/MichaelConnelly's ''The Scarecrow'', the cops questioning Alonzo Winslow employ this tactic when they tell him his hands match the strangling marks found on the victim's neck. He replies that the victim wasn't strangled. Not only he comes with a reason to know this in spite of not being the killer but he turns out to be the innocent man he claims to be.
15th Oct '15 10:00:58 AM RainFairy
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* Happens all the time in {{meitantei}} series, since they're centered on detective work. They're usually set by having the culprit believe their work was successful when it hasn't, then catching him or her before getting away and revealing the bluff. i.e, a case in ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' involved [[spoiler: Conan and Heiji pointing at a rich family's young servant for the death of said family's butler despite having deduced that the family's son was the culprit, so the real killer would lower his guard and then give them the chance to uncover his crime.]]
30th Sep '15 1:11:24 PM Morgenthaler
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* A variation occurs in the comedy movie ''My Fellow Americans'': a character, tied and blindfolded, is made to think that his interrogators are going to torture him, beginning with truth serum. One of them gets a needle from a sewing kit, goes through the motions of preparing a shot, and just barely touches the crook's arm with the needle when he shouts "I'll talk!"
* Used in ''AFewGoodMen''. With Jessup on the stand, Kaffee starts talking about a flight from Guantanamo that (he knows, but can't otherwise prove) Jessup has scrubbed from the records, then indicates two Air Force ground crew, who'd been working at the base the day in question, he intends to call to the stand. Jessup is visibly shaken, and later proceeds to the famous meltdown. Confronted by Ross after the trial ends, Kaffee admits that the two men would have testified they hadn't the foggiest memory if there had been a flight that day.

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* A variation occurs in the comedy movie ''My Fellow Americans'': ''Film/MyFellowAmericans'': a character, tied and blindfolded, is made to think that his interrogators are going to torture him, beginning with truth serum. One of them gets a needle from a sewing kit, goes through the motions of preparing a shot, and just barely touches the crook's arm with the needle when he shouts "I'll talk!"
* Used in ''AFewGoodMen''.''Film/AFewGoodMen''. With Jessup on the stand, Kaffee starts talking about a flight from Guantanamo that (he knows, but can't otherwise prove) Jessup has scrubbed from the records, then indicates two Air Force ground crew, who'd been working at the base the day in question, he intends to call to the stand. Jessup is visibly shaken, and later proceeds to the famous meltdown. Confronted by Ross after the trial ends, Kaffee admits that the two men would have testified they hadn't the foggiest memory if there had been a flight that day.



* In ''[[TheMillenniumTrilogy The Girl Who Played With Fire]]'', Dan, a new reporter at the Millennium magazine, wants to interview a policeman about the sexual trafficking he participated in (as a customer), but the man is understandably evasive. Blomkvist instructs Dan to mail the perp a new phone and tell him he's won a lottery and is legible for bigger prizes if he agrees to participate in a "survey". The guy takes the bait, hook, line and sinker.

to:

* In ''[[TheMillenniumTrilogy ''[[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy The Girl Who Played With Fire]]'', Dan, a new reporter at the Millennium magazine, wants to interview a policeman about the sexual trafficking he participated in (as a customer), but the man is understandably evasive. Blomkvist instructs Dan to mail the perp a new phone and tell him he's won a lottery and is legible for bigger prizes if he agrees to participate in a "survey". The guy takes the bait, hook, line and sinker.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LyingToThePerp