History Main / LyingToThePerp

21st Jan '18 3:15:41 PM Jerry
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* German law forbids (among other things) deception as a method to compromise the free will of an interrogated person.
18th Jan '18 7:40:16 AM BeerBaron
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* An amusing example in in ''[[Franchise/TheElderScrolls The Elder Scrolls]]'': One of the in-game books (found in Morrowind, Oblivion, and Skyrim) tells of a prince who throws a lavish dinner for several of his advisers. After dinner, he brings out a dessert and explains that some of the advisers are spies and were poisoned during the dinner (the narrator is in fact a spy, and it's strongly hinted that [[FlockOfWolves the rest of the advisers present]] are spies as well). He then says that the dessert contains the antidote. This presents [[MortonsFork a conundrum]] to the attendees -- eat the dessert and essentially confess to being a spy, or refrain and possibly die from poison? One of them finally decides to eat... [[spoiler:and dies rather horribly from the poison in the dessert]]. The tale ends with the narrator begging his superiors to be removed from his position. "I cannot win at the games [[MagnificentBastard he]] mastered long ago."

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* An amusing example in in ''[[Franchise/TheElderScrolls * The Elder Scrolls]]'': One of the ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series has an [[Literature/TheElderScrollsInUniverseBooks in-game books (found in Morrowind, Oblivion, book]] titled ''[[http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:A_Game_at_Dinner A Game at Dinner]]'' which includes this on a BatmanGambit scale. A Dunmer (Dark Elf) spy is writing a letter of resignation from espionage, and Skyrim) tells of a prince who throws a lavish dinner for explains why. He was invited (along with several other Dunmer and at least one human) to dinner by Hlaalu Helseth, the head of his advisers. After the [[TheClan House]] the narrator is spying on. The narrator describes having seen a renowned alchemist (who makes [[MasterPoisoner exceptionally unpleasant poisons]]) visit the host. The narrator attends the dinner, and fakes eating and drinking. After everyone has eaten, Helseth announces that the disloyal have been given a fast-acting poison, the faithful have been spared, and [[CarryingTheAntidote the antidote]] is in a broth he brings had just had brought out (there was enough food available at the feast that nobody would have any other reason to drink any). The narrator wonders how this was possible, as all ate from the same plates and drank wine from the same chalice. Helseth announces that the utensils were actually poisoned, so even feigning eating would poison you. Due to this, not only would you die, but you would have "sadly, missed an excellent roast." Eventually, one of the human guests jumps up and drinks a dessert large quantity of the broth, and then confesses his espionage. Helseth smiles when he finishes, and explains that some of the advisers are spies "antidote" was actually the poison, and were poisoned during the dinner (the that he does NOT, in fact, have an antidote to it. The narrator is in fact a spy, and it's strongly hinted finishes his letter of resignation by informing his superiors that [[FlockOfWolves he sincerely does not want to describe the rest of agony in which the advisers present]] are spies as well). He then says poor man died, and that the dessert contains paymaster to whom the antidote. This presents [[MortonsFork a conundrum]] letter is addressed does not want to the attendees -- eat the dessert and essentially confess to being a spy, or refrain and possibly die from poison? One of them finally decides to eat... [[spoiler:and dies rather horribly from the poison in the dessert]].know. The tale ends with the narrator begging his superiors to be removed from his position. "I cannot win at the games [[MagnificentBastard he]] mastered long ago."
26th Nov '17 7:11:50 PM PaulA
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* In Sharyn [=McCrumb=]'s ''[[Literature/BimbosOfTheDeathSun Zombies of the Gene Pool]]'', when he suspects that the murderer's motive was to hide a skeleton in the closet, Jay Omega claims to have the phone number of one of their old lady friends and threatens to uncover the secrets himself. In fact, the piece of paper he's holding is blank, but fear of exposure causes the suspects to confess to a number of misdeeds, including [[spoiler:the fact that several of them raped the aforementioned lady friend when she was drunk at a sci-fi con decades ago.]]

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* In Sharyn [=McCrumb=]'s ''[[Literature/BimbosOfTheDeathSun Zombies of the Gene Pool]]'', ''Literature/ZombiesOfTheGenePool'', when he suspects that the murderer's motive was to hide a skeleton in the closet, Jay Omega claims to have the phone number of one of their old lady friends and threatens to uncover the secrets himself. In fact, the piece of paper he's holding is blank, but fear of exposure causes the suspects to confess to a number of misdeeds, including [[spoiler:the fact that several of them raped the aforementioned lady friend when she was drunk at a sci-fi con decades ago.]]
21st Oct '17 11:32:16 AM BKelly95
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* ''Series/NashBridges'' was a fan of this:
** To get a corrupt bail bondsman to confess, he arranged for a group of men who bore a strong resemblance to various skips to board a bus under the guise of getting them out of town when they're supposed to be attending their trials.
** Another time, he tells a suspect that his partner is telling Harvey everything about their crime. The suspect counters with everything he knows, unaware that Harvey is just talking sports with the partner.
** At least twice, Nash and Joe have pretended a dead suspect was still alive and confessing everything to get that suspect's accomplice to talk.
--->'''Accomplice''': Does he have a lawyer?\\
'''Joe''': He hasn't asked for one.
* ''Series/{{Psych}}'' had Juliet do this rather briefly, but it still worked.
-->'''Juliet''': Well, that's okay. We can just check the security cameras in the parking garage.\\
'''Suspect''': [[SayingTooMuch There were no cameras in that...garage.]]


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* The book ''America's Dumbest Criminals'' once recounted the time a police detective bought a new fingerprint kit and tested it on himself. Later, he interrogated a suspect and took out the card with his own fingerprints on it, implying it was taken from the crime scene. This is a borderline case as he never outright said the fingerprints were the suspect's.
25th Sep '17 4:29:43 PM sonicsuns3
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* According to Creator/DavidSimon in ''Homicide'', this is basically a requirement of being a detective. A good detective must be able to read a suspect his Miranda rights, (and in Baltimore) sign a paper showing they've understood them, and then in the very next breath convince the suspect that those rights are meaningless. From there, it's half-truths and lies all the way. For example: One common trick is to confiscate the suspect's shoes and tell the suspect that they're going to check that blood splatter on them to see if it's the victim's blood type. It serves a double-whammy: The suspect is convinced they have evidence, and their faith in themselves is shot; hell, they didn't even notice that any blood splatter had hit their shoes!

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* According to Creator/DavidSimon in ''Homicide'', this is basically a requirement of being a detective. A good detective must be able to read a suspect his Miranda rights, (and in Baltimore) sign a paper showing they've understood them, and then in the very next breath convince the suspect that those rights are meaningless. From there, it's half-truths and lies all the way. For example: One common trick is to confiscate the suspect's shoes and tell the suspect that they're going to check that blood splatter on them to see if it's the victim's blood type. It serves a double-whammy: The suspect is convinced they have evidence, and their faith in themselves is shot; hell, they didn't even notice ''notice'' that any blood splatter had hit their shoes!
9th Aug '17 6:12:10 AM WillBGood
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* In an episode of ''Series/{{Mash}}'' Hawkeye is wrongly accused of stealing. So he gathers the alternative suspects together in one tent (while dressed up as Sherlock Holmes) and says one of the stolen items was a trap -- it had been coated in a chemical that turns the hands blue. When the guilty party instinctively hides his hands, Hawkeye points out that he was actually bluffing.

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* In an episode of ''Series/{{Mash}}'' ''Series/{{MASH}}'' Hawkeye is wrongly accused of stealing. So he gathers the alternative suspects together in one tent (while dressed up as Sherlock Holmes) and says one of the stolen items was a trap -- it had been coated in a chemical that turns the hands blue. When the guilty party instinctively hides his hands, Hawkeye points out that he was actually bluffing.
23rd Jul '17 9:25:19 PM Discar
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* ''Series/{{Community}}'': PlayedForLaughs in [[Recap/CommunityS1E02Spanish101 the second episode]].
-->'''Dean:''' ''[over P.A.]'' To whoever is growing a small patch of cannabis behind the gymnasium, congratulations, you have won a cruise. Report to Security to claim your tickets.
9th Apr '17 10:04:51 AM nombretomado
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* The "Truth Crocodile" in RozenMaiden.

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* The "Truth Crocodile" in RozenMaiden.''Manga/RozenMaiden''.
17th Mar '17 5:13:58 AM ChronoLegion
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** When Worf's family is accused of treason by the Klingon High Council, Picard -- suspecting the accusation is a cover-up -- calls a woman who served Worf's family as witness, falsely claiming that she has new evidence. The bluff reveals the real traitor, though the High Council is too compromised to drop the charges and Worf is banished from Klingon society.

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** When Worf's family is accused of treason by the Klingon High Council, Picard -- suspecting the accusation is a cover-up -- calls a woman who served Worf's family as witness, falsely claiming that she has new evidence. The bluff reveals the real traitor, though the High Council is too compromised to drop the charges and Worf is banished from Klingon society. In fact, the only reason K'mpec even agreed to accuse Worf's father is because he believed only Worf remained of that family, and Worf was safely outside their jurisdiction. He didn't expect Worf to actually go to Qo'noS to defend his father's honor or for Worf to have a brother, living as member of another House.
19th Feb '17 11:54:28 AM TheWanderer
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* An undercover cop pulling a buy-and-bust on ''Series/BreakingBad'' rouses Badger's suspicions, but he covers himself by saying "If you ask a cop straight-up if he's a cop, they ''have'' to say yes. It's like, a law or something." He's asked, he denies it solemnly with his hand to God, and they complete the deal. "You have the right to remain silent..."

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* An undercover cop pulling a buy-and-bust on ''Series/BreakingBad'' rouses Badger's suspicions, but he covers himself by saying "If you ask a cop straight-up if he's a cop, they ''have'' to say yes. [[MustStateIfYoureACop It's like, a law in the Constitution or something.something]]." He's asked, he denies it solemnly with his hand to God, and they complete the deal. "You have About five seconds after completing the right to remain silent..."deal, the cop busts Badger.
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