History Main / LuddWasRight

1st Feb '17 11:12:02 PM mat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


According to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ned_Ludd/ folklore]], sometime in the late 18th century or early 19th century, a man named Ned Ludd broke into a factory and destroyed two machines. A movement to oppose the industrial revolution was named after him, spear-headed by those who saw their jobs being done more efficiently by new machinery. They claimed that inventions such as the Spinning Jenny would lead to mass unemployment, since where would the spinners go? The Luddites failed to understand, or were simply too poor to take advantage of, the fact that increased efficiency in Part A of the economy leads to increased economic activity - and therefore theoretically more jobs - in other parts of the economy, who now can buy cheaper machine-made products from Part A and therefore can spend the saved money elsewhere.

to:

According to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ned_Ludd/ org/wiki/Ned_Ludd folklore]], sometime in the late 18th century or early 19th century, a man named Ned Ludd broke into a factory and destroyed two machines. A movement to oppose the industrial revolution was named after him, spear-headed by those who saw their jobs being done more efficiently by new machinery. They claimed that inventions such as the Spinning Jenny would lead to mass unemployment, since where would the spinners go? The Luddites failed to understand, or were simply too poor to take advantage of, the fact that increased efficiency in Part A of the economy leads to increased economic activity - and therefore theoretically more jobs - in other parts of the economy, who now can buy cheaper machine-made products from Part A and therefore can spend the saved money elsewhere.
13th Jan '17 7:21:19 PM Valen
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Subverted with the Brotherhood of Steel in ''Franchise/{{Fallout}}''. Though they originally seek to simply preserve technology of the Old World (Even reintroducing it out in one ending of the first ''VideoGame/Fallout1''), later depictions of the organization show it as simply hoarding it all for themselves, partly because they believe TheWorldIsNotReady and partly because they've declined in power and want to keep from losing their stake in the world. Since Old World technology was what caused almost the entire planet to become a radioactive hellhole, who's to say how right they are to keep what they've found under lock and key.
12th Jan '17 5:34:04 AM Basara-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also ArtisticLicenseEconomics, GreenAesop. May be the ({{s|caleOfScientificSins}}inful) Discipline in HarmonyVersusDiscipline. May be enforced by StatusQuoIsGod (and in extreme cases, a ResetButton). Compare IndustrializedEvil, where evil itself uses the scientific method and/or efficient methods of "production" (not necessarily machines, but that's popular too). Contrast EvilLuddite, for when being against technology is portrayed in a negative light.

to:

See also ArtisticLicenseEconomics, GreenAesop. May be the ({{s|caleOfScientificSins}}inful) Discipline in HarmonyVersusDiscipline. May be enforced by StatusQuoIsGod (and in extreme cases, a ResetButton). Compare IndustrializedEvil, where evil itself uses the scientific method and/or efficient methods of "production" (not necessarily machines, but that's popular too).too) and {{Technophobia}}, a mild version of this trope, mostly a SubTrope. Contrast EvilLuddite, for when being against technology is portrayed in a negative light.
30th Dec '16 5:28:28 PM HeroGal2347
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Monk}}'': One episode intentionally invokes the story of John Henry in regards to Adrian Monk vs. the technologically supplied FBI agents. However, given how over the top the FBI acts, it's likely this was more of a parody of modern crime dramas, such as ''Series/{{CSI}}''. In the end, the escaping bad guy is caught thanks to a high-tec hand-held device... that the chief threw at him.

to:

* ''Series/{{Monk}}'': One episode "[[Recap/MonkS5E15MrMonkAndTheReallyReallyDeadGuy Mr. Monk and the Really, Really Dead Guy]" intentionally invokes the story of John Henry in regards to Adrian Monk vs. the technologically supplied FBI agents. However, given how over the top the FBI acts, it's likely this was more of a parody of modern crime dramas, such as ''Series/{{CSI}}''. In the end, the escaping bad guy is caught thanks to a high-tec hand-held device... that the chief threw at him.
30th Oct '16 3:45:17 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared'':
** A theme in "TIME" is that all the puppets become complacent and indifferent to life, instead getting distracted by, and wasting their time on, the computer, or complaining about missing their programme.
--> '''Yellow Guy:''' "An old man died."
--> '''Tony:''' "But LOOK! A computer!"
** This theme was expanded upon in the fourth instalment, where the focus is a singing computer who, at first, seems really helpful, touting how much knowledge he has and all the things he can do. However, he then starts asking the puppets extremely personal questions, such as what their blood type is and the colour of their hair. Later on, once the puppets are in the digital world, they can only do three things: look at stuff, try on clothes, and dance aimlessly. They do this again and again, seemingly forever, until Red decides to quit the whole thing.
** This comes up again in the final video. [[spoiler:It turns out all the strange Teachers that accosted the puppets were created by a large computer, and the series concludes with Red Guy attempting to shut it off.]]
30th Oct '16 3:25:50 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In MercedesLackey's ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_Warning_%28Mercedes_Lackey_novel%29 The Mage Storms]]'' trilogy (part of the HeraldsOfValdemar series), a kingdom that runs on magic is disabled when magic becomes unreliable. Those who did things manually, and those too poor to afford magical assistance, do much better than their wealthier neighbors.

to:

* In MercedesLackey's Creator/MercedesLackey's ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_Warning_%28Mercedes_Lackey_novel%29 The Mage Storms]]'' trilogy (part of the HeraldsOfValdemar Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar series), a kingdom that runs on magic is disabled when magic becomes unreliable. Those who did things manually, and those too poor to afford magical assistance, do much better than their wealthier neighbors.
24th Oct '16 12:24:20 PM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There's actually logic behind this: in a VR simulation, you're not fearing for your life, so once you get into the real thing, you're far more likely to act like a suicidal idiot.
*** Unless you make "death" a non-option, and just leave them writhing on the ground in simulated pain.
** In addition, in a VR simulation, you never kill real people, which tends to change your outlook on things.



** For the Amish, the family is a sacrosanct unit that technology should not threaten. So a telephone to be used only in the case of a medical emergency is fine, but a telephone that draws attention away from the immediate family and society is not.
6th Oct '16 11:27:36 AM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This a minor theme in [[Creator/ThisIsIt ''Don't Hug Me I'm Scared'']].

to:

* This a minor theme in [[Creator/ThisIsIt ''Don't Hug Me I'm Scared'']].''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared''.
28th Sep '16 8:24:23 AM VicGeorge2011
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:Comic Books]]
* In ''ComicBooks/TheSmurfs'' comic book story "You Don't Smurf Progress", Handy creates machines for his fellow Smurfs Baker, Miller, and Carpenter that take manual labor out of food production and furniture making. However, as life in the Smurf Village becomes further automated by machines, Handy creates a bunch of wooden robots that would do all the jobs in the village for the Smurfs, allowing themselves to luxuriate and to treat the machines with disdain. One of the robots eventually gains sentience through magic, which leads to the robots [[TurnedAgainstTheirMasters turning against their masters]] and forcing the Smurfs to work for them until Handy creates a robot filled with termites that destroys the robots, eventually restoring the village to normal and getting the Smurfs back to doing manual labor again.



* ''TheSmurfs'': In one episode, Brainy enchants a needle to sew clothing faster than Tailor Smurf. But the clothing is cheap and even Baby Smurf can detect the lack of tender loving care sewn into his diapers. To finally drop the Anvil, attempts to disable the magic needle turn it evil, and it attacks the villagers.

to:

* ''TheSmurfs'': ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'': In one episode, Brainy enchants a needle to sew clothing faster than Tailor Smurf. But the clothing is cheap and even Baby Smurf can detect the lack of tender loving care sewn into his diapers. To finally drop the Anvil, attempts to disable the magic needle turn it evil, and it attacks the villagers.
19th Sep '16 1:15:52 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''Before that steam drill shall beat me down,\\
I'll die with my hammer in my hand.''

to:

->''Before ->''"Before that steam drill shall beat me down,\\
I'll die with my hammer in my hand.''"''
This list shows the last 10 events of 271. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LuddWasRight