History Main / LowerDeckEpisode

19th Mar '17 12:00:55 PM nombretomado
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** "PhineasAndFerbStarWars" is set up as this for ''StarWarsANewHope''--Phineas and Ferb are Luke Skywalker's neighbors on Tattooine, Isabella is Han Solo's rival, and "Darthenshmirtz" is a low-ranking member of the Imperial hierarchy, with the movie's events going on in the background. (We literally see Alderaan blow up out a window as the characters are doing something else.)

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** "PhineasAndFerbStarWars" is set up as this for ''StarWarsANewHope''--Phineas ''Film/StarWarsANewHope''--Phineas and Ferb are Luke Skywalker's neighbors on Tattooine, Isabella is Han Solo's rival, and "Darthenshmirtz" is a low-ranking member of the Imperial hierarchy, with the movie's events going on in the background. (We literally see Alderaan blow up out a window as the characters are doing something else.)
18th Mar '17 11:36:55 AM AthenaBlue
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* Anime/{{Pokemon}} Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.

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* Anime/{{Pokemon}} Chronicles An episode of the fifth anime season of ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' focuses on [[ADayInTheLimelight a french man]] whose grandfather had met France when he was younger, and now this man runs into France on a street in Paris. The whole episode is dedicated to show the perspective of common folk on the nations, plus showing the audience a series more serious and charming side of France (which the audience ''loved'').
* In {{Manga/Citrus}}, an unnamed Meganekko
that follows appeared in the adventures beginning of secondary the manga, with the only other appearance was near the end of chapter 2 to give a school speech, was given 2 pages in Citrus Special issue 1 between her, Harumi and Himeko, giving a slightly playful observation to their relationships.
* Chapter 480 of Manga/{{Bleach}} which largely focuses on [[ButtMonkey Ryuunosuke Yuki]] and [[{{Tsundere}} Shino]], two minor
characters during who were just introduced and barely had any plot relevance, other than being Afro-San's replacements.
* The first ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'' anime has an episode that focuses on Mustang's team. The episode is based on a number of omake from
the Hoenn Arc.manga, where Riza "disciplines" Black Hayate.



* ''Anime/ShinkonGattaiGodannar'' has an episode dedicated entirely to the BridgeBunnies and maintenance crew, mostly centering around the bustier female member of the maintenance crew as she got called for an arranged marriage that she later turns down.
* Most of ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'' by Naoki Urasawa is told from the perspective of Gesicht, a one-shot character from the original ''Manga/AstroBoy'' series.

to:

* ''Anime/ShinkonGattaiGodannar'' has an episode dedicated entirely to ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'': During the BridgeBunnies Magical World arc, an important number of main characters are transported to it and maintenance crew, mostly centering around the bustier female member of action takes place primarily there. There are, however, the maintenance crew as she got called for an arranged marriage occasional chapters that she later turns down.
* Most of ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'' by Naoki Urasawa is told from
look back at the perspective of Gesicht, a one-shot character from characters left behind in Japan and the original ''Manga/AstroBoy'' series.UK.



* ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'': During the Magical World arc, an important number of main characters are transported to it and the action takes place primarily there. There are, however, the occasional chapters that look back at the characters left behind in Japan and the UK.
* The first ''Anime/FullMetalAlchemist'' anime has an episode that focuses on Mustang's team. The episode is based on a number of omake from the manga, where Riza "disciplines" Black Hayate.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamKnight'' is an anime movie designed to bridge the gap between the films ''Film/BatmanBegins'' and ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', made up of a series of vignettes by different animators. One of the vignettes shows a group of kids discussing/arguing about what they saw when they witnessed Batman fighting someone.
* Episode 18 of ''LightNovel/RentalMagica'' featured mainly Daphne and Sekiren, showing what they were up to when Itsuki and Adilicia dealt with a demon problem the episode before.



* Chapter 480 of Manga/{{Bleach}} which largely focuses on [[ButtMonkey Ryuunosuke Yuki]] and [[{{Tsundere}} Shino]], two minor characters who were just introduced and barely had any plot relevance, other than being Afro-San's replacements.

to:

* Chapter 480 Most of Manga/{{Bleach}} which largely focuses on [[ButtMonkey Ryuunosuke Yuki]] and [[{{Tsundere}} Shino]], two minor ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'' by Naoki Urasawa is told from the perspective of Gesicht, a one-shot character from the original ''Manga/AstroBoy'' series.
* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}} Chronicles'' is a series that follows the adventures of secondary
characters who during the Hoenn Arc.
* Episode 18 of ''LightNovel/RentalMagica'' featured mainly Daphne and Sekiren, showing what they
were just introduced up to when Itsuki and barely had any plot relevance, other than being Afro-San's replacements.Adilicia dealt with a demon problem the episode before.



* An episode of the fifth anime season of ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' focuses on [[ADayInTheLimelight a french man]] whose grandfather had met France when he was younger, and now this man runs into France on a street in Paris. The whole episode is dedicated to show the perspective of common folk on the nations, plus showing the audience a more serious and charming side of France (which the audience ''loved'').
* In {{Manga/Citrus}}, an unnamed Meganekko that appeared in the beginning of the manga, with the only other appearance was near the end of chapter 2 to give a school speech, was given 2 pages in Citrus Special issue 1 between her, Harumi and Himeko, giving a slightly playful observation to their relationships.

to:

* An ''Anime/ShinkonGattaiGodannar'' has an episode of the fifth anime season of ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' focuses on [[ADayInTheLimelight a french man]] whose grandfather had met France when he was younger, and now this man runs into France on a street in Paris. The whole episode is dedicated entirely to show the perspective of common folk on BridgeBunnies and maintenance crew, mostly centering around the nations, plus showing the audience a more serious and charming side of France (which the audience ''loved'').
* In {{Manga/Citrus}}, an unnamed Meganekko that appeared in the beginning
bustier female member of the manga, with the only other appearance was near the end of chapter 2 to give a school speech, was given 2 pages in Citrus Special issue 1 between her, Harumi and Himeko, giving a slightly playful observation to their relationships.maintenance crew as she got called for an arranged marriage that she later turns down.



* Several of ''Comicbook/AstroCity'' series tend to focus on the viewpoint of minor characters in a Superhero universe, witnessing Crisis-level events from the sidelines or behind the scenes. The stories collected into a paperback under the title "Local Heroes" qualify best, focusing on characters such as a hotel usher and a lawyer working in Astro City.
* ''Comicbook/AvengersTheInitiative'' #26 is a genuinely moving {{Tearjerker}} that tells the story of Johnny Guitar and Doctor Sax, two D-list Comicbook/{{Dazzler}} villains who end up on the Shadow Initiative squad. [[spoiler: Johnny discovers that the Shadow Initiative members are just CListFodder meant to perform suicide missions, and ends up dying just in time for the "big name" Initiative heroes to show up and claim all the glory]].
* Several ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' stories are told from the point of view of regular people with Dredd himself making only sporadic appearances in them.



* Amidst regular story arcs, the ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicIDW'' devote entire issues to Spike, Celestia, Big Macintosh, and Shining Armor.
** The short story in ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyMicroSeries'' Issue #3 focuses on Hayseed Turnip Truck.
** And a full main-comic entry from the pet's POV.
* One issue of Roberta Gregory's ''ComicBook/NaughtyBits'' focused on a week in the life of New Age co-worker Sylvia, while main character Midge (aka 'Bitchy Bitch') was on vacation. While her relentlessly positive attitude is a source of annoyance for the perpetually cranky Midge, here we see her as a much more three dimensional character who is just as much, if not more so, stressed out by her job as Midge is.



* One issue of Roberta Gregory's ''NaughtyBits'' focused on a week in the life of New Age co-worker Sylvia, while main character Midge (aka 'Bitchy Bitch') was on vacation. While her relentlessly positive attitude is a source of annoyance for the perpetually cranky Midge, here we see her as a much more three dimensional character who is just as much, if not more so, stressed out by her job as Midge is.
* Several of ''Comicbook/AstroCity'' series tend to focus on the viewpoint of minor characters in a Superhero universe, witnessing Crisis-level events from the sidelines or behind the scenes. The stories collected into a paperback under the title "Local Heroes" qualify best, focusing on characters such as a hotel usher and a lawyer working in Astro City.
* Several ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' stories are told from the point of view of regular people with Dredd himself making only sporadic appearances in them.
* ''Comicbook/AvengersTheInitiative'' #26 is a genuinely moving {{Tearjerker}} that tells the story of Johnny Guitar and Doctor Sax, two D-list Comicbook/{{Dazzler}} villains who end up on the Shadow Initiative squad. [[spoiler: Johnny discovers that the Shadow Initiative members are just CListFodder meant to perform suicide missions, and ends up dying just in time for the "big name" Initiative heroes to show up and claim all the glory]].



* Amidst regular story arcs, the ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicIDW'' devote entire issues to Spike, Celestia, Big Macintosh, and Shining Armor.
** The short story in ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyMicroSeries'' Issue #3 focuses on Hayseed Turnip Truck.
** And a full main-comic entry from the pet's POV.



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film -- Animated]]
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamKnight'' is an anime movie designed to bridge the gap between the films ''Film/BatmanBegins'' and ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', made up of a series of vignettes by different animators. One of the vignettes shows a group of kids discussing/arguing about what they saw when they witnessed Batman fighting someone.
* ''Disney/TheLionKingOneAndAHalf'' (or ''3: Hakuna Matata'') is the Lower Deck version of The Lion King, telling the story from Timon and Pumbaa's point of view.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film -- Live Action]]
* ''Film/{{Cloverfield}}'' is basically a lower deck version of every monster movie ever made. We don't see the perspective of scientists nor any important military figures. Because of this, we have little to no information about the monster and where it came from. Instead, the whole movie revolves around the nameless crowds of people who are trying to avoid getting squashed by the monster.
* In response to the [[ThoseTwoGuys Bruce and Lloyd's]] unexpected [[EnsembleDarkHorse break away popularity]] in the ''Film/GetSmart'' movie, the spin-off movie ''Get Smart's Bruce And Lloyd: Out of Control'' was released, focusing on their escapades while everybody is distracted by Maxwell Smart's adventures.



* In response to the [[ThoseTwoGuys Bruce and Lloyd's]] unexpected [[EnsembleDarkHorse break away popularity]] in the ''Film/GetSmart'' movie, the spin-off movie ''Get Smart's Bruce And Lloyd: Out of Control'' was released, focusing on their escapades while everybody is distracted by Maxwell Smart's adventures.
* ''Film/{{Cloverfield}}'' is basically a lower deck version of every monster movie ever made. We don't see the perspective of scientists nor any important military figures. Because of this, we have little to no information about the monster and where it came from. Instead, the whole movie revolves around the nameless crowds of people who are trying to avoid getting squashed by the monster.






* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' novel [[http://nzdwfc.tetrap.com/archive/wkk/ "Who Killed Kennedy"]] (available for free online-reading at the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club webpage) takes a ''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' approach to the early Third Doctor era, notably the Master episodes, from the POV of a Times reporter whose career is sent into a tailspin when he attempts to uncover [[ConspiracyTheorist the truth about UNIT]], [[spoiler:and later gets recruited by the Doctor to stop the Master from interfering with the past during the [[WhoShotJFK Kennedy assassination]]]].

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* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' novel [[http://nzdwfc.''[[http://nzdwfc.tetrap.com/archive/wkk/ "Who Who Killed Kennedy"]] Kennedy]]'' (available for free online-reading at the New Zealand Doctor Who Fan Club webpage) takes a ''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' approach to the early Third Doctor era, notably the Master episodes, from the POV of a Times reporter whose career is sent into a tailspin when he attempts to uncover [[ConspiracyTheorist the truth about UNIT]], [[spoiler:and later gets recruited by the Doctor to stop the Master from interfering with the past during the [[WhoShotJFK Kennedy assassination]]]].assassination]]]].
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' short stories "Backup" (starring [[spoiler: Thomas Raith, whom we know to be Harry's half brother at that point]]), "Even Hand" (starring "Gentleman" John Marcone), "Aftermath" (starring Karrin Murphy after the events of ''Changes'') and "Bombshells" (starring [[TheApprentice Molly Carpenter]], also set between ''Changes'' and ''Ghost Story''). Except for a few moments in "Backup", Harry doesn't even show up in these stories, focusing more on important people in his life dealing with the supernatural without him. In each story, the reader gets to see Harry through the eyes of his allies: in "Backup", [[spoiler: Thomas]] sees Harry as an artist and philosopher when it comes to magic, in "Even Hand", Marcone reveals that [[spoiler: all the anti-magic defenses in his stronghold are there in the event that he and Dresden go head to head, since Marcone sees him as a WorthyOpponent]], and in "Aftermath", Karrin has to deal with a supernatural investigation without Harry's help.
** There's also "Cold Case", about Molly's [[spoiler:first mission as the Winter Lady]].



* ''Literature/TheReader2016'' has a chapter about the naive Captain Lon and his associates trying to arrest Hatchet's men, only to fail miserably. He even realizes near the end that he was probably just a bit player in someone else's story.
* ''Literature/{{Relativity}}'' has a few of these, mostly in the Side Stories collections. "Summer Job", "Lady Luck", and "Secrets" are all lower-deck episodes. So is "Rune", which is part of the main continuity (although that's technically a VillainEpisode).
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** ''[[Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy I, Jedi]]'' largely does this as the main story is Corran's quest to save his wife by learning to become and Jedi and infiltrating a pirate ring, with the backdrop of the Jedi Academy trilogy. It features cameos from all of the main movie characters in which they were involved in their own struggles and his conflict was barely relevant to them. Luke does make a significant appearance at the ending and shows just what a proper Jedi can do to the Jensaarai, a splinter group of Dark Side force users. This was after Corran was concerned with fighting even one of them.
* ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' follows the first-person narrative of an ActionSurvivor, a simple middle-class scientific journalist. Likewise, [[Film/WarOfTheWorlds the 2005 film]] centers around a dockworker who tries to survive the invasion with his two children. Apart from the opening and closing narration, we only know and see what's seen by him.
** There is a central portion of exposition regarding what the narrator's brother saw, which is important as it describes one of only two even remotely successful[[note]]inasmuch as Martians, as well as humans, take fatal casualties[[/note]] attempts to engage the Martians in combat.



* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' short stories ''Backup'' (starring [[spoiler: Thomas Raith, whom we know to be Harry's half brother at that point]]), ''Even Hand'' (starring "Gentleman" John Marcone), ''Aftermath'' (starring Karrin Murphy after the events of ''Changes'') and ''Bombshells'' (starring [[TheApprentice Molly Carpenter]], also set between ''Changes'' and ''Ghost Story''). Except for a few moments in ''Backup'', Harry doesn't even show up in these stories, focusing more on important people in his life dealing with the supernatural without him. In each story, the reader gets to see Harry through the eyes of his allies: in ''Backup'', [[spoiler: Thomas]] sees Harry as an artist and philosopher when it comes to magic, in ''Even Hand'', Marcone reveals that [[spoiler: all the anti-magic defenses in his stronghold are there in the event that he and Dresden go head to head, since Marcone sees him as a WorthyOpponent]], and in ''Aftermath'', Karrin has to deal with a supernatural investigation without Harry's help.
* ''[[Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy I, Jedi]]'' largely does this as the main story is Corran's quest to save his wife by learning to become and Jedi and infiltrating a pirate ring, with the backdrop of the Jedi Academy trilogy. It features cameos from all of the main movie characters in which they were involved in their own struggles and his conflict was barely relevant to them. Luke does make a significant appearance at the ending and shows just what a proper Jedi can do to the Jensaarai, a splinter group of Dark Side force users. This was after Corran was concerned with fighting even one of them.
* ''Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds'' follows the first-person narrative of an ActionSurvivor, a simple middle-class scientific journalist. Likewise, [[Film/WarOfTheWorlds the 2005 film]] centers around a dockworker who tries to survive the invasion with his two children. Apart from the opening and closing narration, we only know and see what's seen by him.
** There is a central portion of exposition regarding what the narrator's brother saw, which is important as it describes one of only two even remotely successful[[note]]inasmuch as Martians, as well as humans, take fatal casualties[[/note]] attempts to engage the Martians in combat.
* ''Literature/{{Relativity}}'' has a few of these, mostly in the Side Stories collections. "Summer Job", "Lady Luck", and "Secrets" are all lower-deck episodes. So is "Rune", which is part of the main continuity (although that's technically a VillainEpisode).
* ''Literature/TheReader2016'' has a chapter about the naive Captain Lon and his associates trying to arrest Hatchet's men, only to fail miserably. He even realizes near the end that he was probably just a bit player in someone else's story.



* Played with in a ''Series/ThirtyRock'' episode shown as an episode of "Queen of Jordan". Angie's effort to organize a charity fashion show keeps getting overshadowed by the show's focus on Jack's UnresolvedSexualTension with his mother-in-law, Liz's feud with a baby and even Kenneth's feud with a power cord. Technically, it's a lower deck episode of her show.
* The eighth episode of ''Series/AmericanCrimeStory'', "A Jury in Jail", pulls away from the big personalities in the O.J. Simpson trial and instead focuses on the miserable toll the trial is having on the jurors, sequestered under draconian rules for eight months away from their families.



* The TropeNamer from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', as mentioned at the top. Specifically, the episode focuses on a group of four ensigns who are concerned about their performance evaluations, and figuring out which of them will have a chance to be promoted. In the background, we hear a more typical storyline going on, but the audience is left in the dark just like the ensigns, who do not have the security clearance to learn what is going on. When we do see real focus on the main cast, the primary discussion still involves evaluations of the younger officers. In addition, the supporting cast, such as Geordi, are superior officers (whereas normally they're subservient to Picard.)



* ''Series/StargateSG1'' has done this a few times.
** The 5th season episode "Proving Ground", about some previously unseen cadets in a Stargate training program (one of them had appeared in the 4th season episode "Prodigy", but three were genuinely new).
** The appropriately-titled 6th season episode "The Other Guys", which was also a subversion of AllUpToYou.
** The 7th season's "Avenger 2.0" featured the same characters from "The Other Guys".
** The 8th season's "Citizen Joe", in which a mild-mannered barber gets psychic images of the SG-1 team and tells the stories to his wife and friends -- thus also allowing for a ClipShow.

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* ''Series/StargateSG1'' The ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' has done this many a few times.
Lower Deck episode, often coupled with a DayInTheLimelight. Episodes focus on the literal lower deck with Chief Tyrol experiencing the troubles the of fuel shortages and labor disputes. There are also DayInTheLimelight episodes focusing on less important pilots. The movie, ''Razor'', is almost an entire Lower Deck/ Limelight of the ''Pegasus'', its former Captains, and its XO.
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'':
** The 5th season lighthearted BreatherEpisode slash BottleEpisode "You Kill Me", about TheLabRat Hodges (not himself part of this trope, being a credits-listed character by this point) running the other Lab Rats through elaborate (and absurd) murder scenarios as part of a CSI-themed board game he was creating. The previous episode "Proving Ground", about some previously unseen cadets in a Stargate training program (one of them had appeared in featured the 4th season PutOnABus departure of a main character, while the following episode "Prodigy", but three were genuinely new).
concerned another main character breaking down after becoming addicted to prescription drugs.
** The appropriately-titled 6th season Another episode "The Other Guys", which was also a subversion of AllUpToYou.
** The 7th
titled "Lab Rats" features said lab rats trying their best to solve the season's "Avenger 2.0" MythArc. They didn't do a bad job either, [[spoiler: actually identifying a fairly important clue about the killer's psychosis.]]
* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' season five
featured a look back at the same life of a previously seen character, handy-man Eli Scrugs (played by Beau Bridges), with the main characters from "The Other Guys".
** The 8th season's "Citizen Joe", in
remembering their most significant encounters with him, ending with a flash-back to Scrugs himself visiting Mary-Alice just before her suicide, which a mild-mannered barber gets psychic images of opened the SG-1 team and tells the stories to his wife and friends -- thus also allowing for a ClipShow.series pilot.



** The revived series has such an episode in series 2 and 3 doubling as {{Bottle Episode}}s. Usually called "Doctor-lite" episodes in the fandom, these two, titled "Love & Monsters" and "Blink" focus on {{Muggles}} with only peripheral access to the Doctor's world, and how those characters react to High Weirdness without the Doctor around to explain what's going on. "Love & Monsters" notably had point of view shots of the central character referring to other episodes.
** The 2005 Christmas special "The Christmas Invasion" has the newly-regenerated Tenth Doctor unconscious until near the end, with most of the action up until then focused on UNIT and the prime minister.
** The 4th series, rather than repeating the conventional formula, had one episode focusing solely on the companion, with the Doctor absent except for the very beginning and the very end. This and the previous episode (with the Doctor centre screen and the companion mostly absent) served the same purpose as a single LowerDeckEpisode: to release one more episode in the series than the stars were able to film.
** From the classic series, there is "Mission to the Unknown", which basically operates like a typical ''Who'' episode--a bunch of alien cultures have united to fight the Daleks, and find themselves under attack. Rather than signposting its lower-deck nature, it simply presents itself as an ordinary ''Who'' episode in which the Doctor and his companions just happen to not show up, and because they're not there to save the day mass slaughter ensues. (Of course, they didn't leave it at that, as the episode also functions as a prequel to the serial ''The Daleks' Master Plan'' later in the season.
* The ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' episode "Random Shoes". It was actually narrated by the protagonist of the episode to differentiate it even further from the normal episodes.

to:

** The revived series has such an episode in series 2 and 3 doubling as {{Bottle Episode}}s. Usually called "Doctor-lite" episodes in the fandom, these two, titled "Love & Monsters" and "Blink" focus on {{Muggles}} with only peripheral access to the Doctor's world, and how those characters react to High Weirdness without the Doctor around to explain what's going on. "Love & Monsters" notably had point of view shots of the central character referring to other episodes.
** The 2005 Christmas special "The Christmas Invasion" has the newly-regenerated Tenth Doctor unconscious until near the end, with most of the action up until then focused on UNIT and the prime minister.
** The 4th series, rather than repeating the conventional formula, had one episode focusing solely on the companion, with the Doctor absent except for the very beginning and the very end. This and the previous episode (with the Doctor centre screen and the companion mostly absent) served the same purpose as a single LowerDeckEpisode: to release one more episode in the series than the stars were able to film.
** From the classic series, there is [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E2MissionToTheUnknown "Mission to the Unknown", Unknown"]], which basically operates like a typical ''Who'' episode--a bunch of alien cultures have united to fight the Daleks, and find themselves under attack. Rather than signposting its lower-deck nature, it simply presents itself as an ordinary ''Who'' episode in which the Doctor and his companions just happen to not show up, and because they're not there to save the day mass slaughter ensues. (Of course, they didn't leave it at that, as the episode also functions as a prequel to the serial ''The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan "The Daleks' Master Plan'' Plan"]] later in the season.
* ** The ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' 2005 Christmas special [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] has the newly-regenerated Tenth Doctor unconscious until near the end, with most of the action up until then focused on UNIT and the prime minister.
** The revived series has such an
episode "Random Shoes". It was actually narrated by in series 2 and 3 doubling as {{Bottle Episode}}s. Usually called "Doctor-lite" episodes in the protagonist fandom, these two, titled [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E10LoveAndMonsters "Love & Monsters"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] focus on {{Muggles}} with only peripheral access to the Doctor's world, and how those characters react to High Weirdness without the Doctor around to explain what's going on. "Love & Monsters" notably had point of view shots of the central character referring to other episodes.
** The 4th series, rather than repeating the conventional formula, had [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E11TurnLeft one episode]] focusing solely on the companion, with the Doctor absent except for the very beginning and the very end. This and the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E10Midnight previous episode]] (with the Doctor centre screen and the companion mostly absent) served the same purpose as a single LowerDeckEpisode: to release one more
episode to differentiate it even further from in the normal episodes.series than the stars were able to film.



** The final third-season episode, "The Gas Man," follows two new characters as they stalk main character Frank Pembleton and his wife around Baltimore. A variation on this trope, as it wasn't done to free up the main cast for other episodes, but as a screw-you to NBC for [[ScrewedByTheNetwork the show's constant near-cancellation]].
* ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' has an example in Season 2's "Somehow, Satan Got Behind Me," which focuses mostly on four devils swapping war stories (including driving a Broadcast Standards and Practices head so insane he shot up the set of a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of sister show ''Series/TheXFiles.'') And it turns out Frank Black managed to see all four of them in their true forms. [[BizarroEpisode It's also highly offbeat and humorous, entirely at odds with the show's general tone of hyper-darkness]], to the point where it actually seems more appropriate for a ''[[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Buffy]]'' or ''Series/{{Angel}}'' episode.
* The eighth episode of ''Series/AmericanCrimeStory'', "A Jury in Jail," pulls away from the big personalities in the O.J. Simpson trial and instead focuses on the miserable toll the trial is having on the jurors, sequestered under draconian rules for eight months away from their families.
* The ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' has many a Lower Deck episode, often coupled with a DayInTheLimelight. Episodes focus on the literal lower deck with Chief Tyrol experiencing the troubles the of fuel shortages and labor disputes. There are also DayInTheLimelight episodes focusing on less important pilots. The movie, ''Razor'', is almost an entire Lower Deck/ Limelight of The Pegasus, its former Captains, and its XO.
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'':
** The lighthearted BreatherEpisode slash BottleEpisode "You Kill Me," about TheLabRat Hodges (not himself part of this trope, being a credits-listed character by this point) running the other Lab Rats through elaborate (and absurd) murder scenarios as part of a CSI-themed board game he was creating. The previous episode featured the PutOnABus departure of a main character, while the following episode concerned another main character breaking down after becoming addicted to prescription drugs.
** Another episode titled "Lab Rats" features said lab rats trying their best to solve the season's MythArc. They didn't do a bad job either, [[spoiler: actually identifying a fairly important clue about the killer's psychosis.]]
* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' season five featured a look back at the life of a previously seen character, handy-man Eli Scrugs (played by Beau Bridges), with the main characters remembering their most significant encounters with him, ending with a flash-back to Scrugs himself visiting Mary-Alice just before her suicide, which opened the series pilot.
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** The episode "Good Shepherd" was a LowerDeckEpisode that ''literally'' showed the lower decks -- the dimly-lit, poorly-maintained areas where the real work of keeping a poorly-supplied refugee ship running was carried out. The three redshirts focused on were misfits who under normal conditions would have been transferred off Voyager long ago, were it not for the long walk home. (They don't get sole focus, though, sharing the episode with Janeway. On the other hand, their interactions with Janeway - and each other - make up the majority of the action, and their character development.)
** "Learning Curve" was a similar episode, which focused on training Maquis crewmembers that, unlike Chakotay or Torres, had no Starfleet experience whatsoever. Tuvok plays as close to DrillSergeantNasty as a Vulcan can get.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'': The series had a [[OnceASeason yearly tradition]] of [[ADayInTheLimelight passing off episode narration]] via InternalMonologue to other cast members besides the main character, J.D. After 7 years, they exhausted giving the narration to their main cast and went on to [[FakeGuestStar the very common supporting cast]].
** Season 7 has "Their Story," looking at three minor character Jordan (Dr. Cox's wife and hospital board member), Todd (meathead surgeon) and Ted (the incompetent, put upon lawyer). Each story had a plot involving the main cast and their struggles, with each coming to the rescue even if not getting much, if any, recognition for it.
** Season 8 has "Their Story II", focused on and narrated by the interns that have been slowly introduced since the beginning of the season. As a result, it's [[PoorlyDisguisedPilot remarkably similar]] to a season 1 episode, one of the interns became a main character in the SpinOff / PostScriptSeason in season 9.
** The episode that followed "Their Story II", "My Full Moon", featured none of the main cast except for Elliott and Turk. They discuss their fears during a night shift while watching over the interns, who collectively get an equal amount of screentime as the two regular characters.
* ''Series/RememberWENN'' had an episode where Victor and all the actors disappear after the first few minutes (off to a convention in Harrisburg) and as a result Betty and and the minor station employees have to keep the programming going for a full day.
* Double subverted in the ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'' episode "Icebreaker". The episode opens with Henry (a supporting lead character), Declan (a recurring minor character), and a bunch of newbies on an isolated ship in the Bering Sea. The audience expects this trope when the characters reveal that Magnus and Will (the leads) are on their way but severely delayed by the heavy storm, but the trope is subverted almost immediately when Will and Magnus arrive. Double subverted [[spoiler: when the real Magnus and Will show up at the end of the episode and reveal that the earlier pair were shapeshifting abnormals.]]
* ''Series/TheSopranos'' began its third season by having a particularly unremarkable day for the titular family shown through the eyes of the rarely-seen FBI. Overlaps with VillainEpisode.
* Played with in a ''Series/ThirtyRock'' episode shown as an episode of "Queen of Jordan". Angie's effort to organize a charity fashion show keeps getting overshadowed by the show's focus on Jack's UnresolvedSexualTension with his mother-in-law, Liz's feud with a baby and even Kenneth's feud with a power cord. Technically, it's a lower deck episode of her show.
* An interesting example in the ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' episode "Relevance". The premise of the show is that a secret government surveillance supercomputer can predict acts of terrorism and, as a by-product, spot ordinary civilians who will be involved with violent crimes. The protagonists are the ones who [[WeHelpTheHelpless deal with the latter]], the so-called "irrelevant" list, so its jarring when an episode late in the second season suddenly focuses on Shaw, a badass assassin whose job is to follow up on the "relevant" list. Much like the ''Series/DoctorWho'' examples, their paths cross briefly but we follow Shaw for the whole episode and the protagonists appear in a barely a handful of scenes.

to:

** The final third-season episode, "The Gas Man," Man", follows two new characters as they stalk main character Frank Pembleton and his wife around Baltimore. A variation on this trope, as it wasn't done to free up the main cast for other episodes, but as a screw-you to NBC for [[ScrewedByTheNetwork the show's constant near-cancellation]].
* ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' has an example in Season 2's "Somehow, Satan Got Behind Me," which focuses mostly on four devils swapping war stories (including driving a Broadcast Standards and Practices head so insane he shot up the set of a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of sister show ''Series/TheXFiles.'') And it turns out Frank Black managed to see all four of them in their true forms. [[BizarroEpisode It's also highly offbeat and humorous, entirely at odds with the show's general tone of hyper-darkness]], to the point where it actually seems more appropriate for a ''[[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Buffy]]'' or ''Series/{{Angel}}'' episode.
* The eighth episode of ''Series/AmericanCrimeStory'', "A Jury in Jail," pulls away from the big personalities in the O.J. Simpson trial and instead focuses on the miserable toll the trial is having on the jurors, sequestered under draconian rules for eight months away from their families.
* The ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' has many a Lower Deck episode, often coupled with a DayInTheLimelight. Episodes focus on the literal lower deck with Chief Tyrol experiencing the troubles the of fuel shortages and labor disputes. There are also DayInTheLimelight episodes focusing on less important pilots. The movie, ''Razor'', is almost an entire Lower Deck/ Limelight of The Pegasus, its former Captains, and its XO.
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'':
** The lighthearted BreatherEpisode slash BottleEpisode "You Kill Me," about TheLabRat Hodges (not himself part of this trope, being a credits-listed character by this point) running the other Lab Rats through elaborate (and absurd) murder scenarios as part of a CSI-themed board game he was creating. The previous episode featured the PutOnABus departure of a main character, while the following episode concerned another main character breaking down after becoming addicted to prescription drugs.
** Another episode titled "Lab Rats" features said lab rats trying their best to solve the season's MythArc. They didn't do a bad job either, [[spoiler: actually identifying a fairly important clue about the killer's psychosis.]]
* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' season five featured a look back at the life of a previously seen character, handy-man Eli Scrugs (played by Beau Bridges), with the main characters remembering their most significant encounters with him, ending with a flash-back to Scrugs himself visiting Mary-Alice just before her suicide, which opened the series pilot.
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** The episode "Good Shepherd" was a LowerDeckEpisode that ''literally'' showed the lower decks -- the dimly-lit, poorly-maintained areas where the real work of keeping a poorly-supplied refugee ship running was carried out. The three redshirts focused on were misfits who under normal conditions would have been transferred off Voyager long ago, were it not for the long walk home. (They don't get sole focus, though, sharing the episode with Janeway. On the other hand, their interactions with Janeway - and each other - make up the majority of the action, and their character development.)
** "Learning Curve" was a similar episode, which focused on training Maquis crewmembers that, unlike Chakotay or Torres, had no Starfleet experience whatsoever. Tuvok plays as close to DrillSergeantNasty as a Vulcan can get.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'': The series had a [[OnceASeason yearly tradition]] of [[ADayInTheLimelight passing off episode narration]] via InternalMonologue to other cast members besides the main character, J.D. After 7 years, they exhausted giving the narration to their main cast and went on to [[FakeGuestStar the very common supporting cast]].
** Season 7 has "Their Story," looking at three minor character Jordan (Dr. Cox's wife and hospital board member), Todd (meathead surgeon) and Ted (the incompetent, put upon lawyer). Each story had a plot involving the main cast and their struggles, with each coming to the rescue even if not getting much, if any, recognition for it.
** Season 8 has "Their Story II", focused on and narrated by the interns that have been slowly introduced since the beginning of the season. As a result, it's [[PoorlyDisguisedPilot remarkably similar]] to a season 1 episode, one of the interns became a main character in the SpinOff / PostScriptSeason in season 9.
** The episode that followed "Their Story II", "My Full Moon", featured none of the main cast except for Elliott and Turk. They discuss their fears during a night shift while watching over the interns, who collectively get an equal amount of screentime as the two regular characters.
* ''Series/RememberWENN'' had an episode where Victor and all the actors disappear after the first few minutes (off to a convention in Harrisburg) and as a result Betty and and the minor station employees have to keep the programming going for a full day.
* Double subverted in the ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'' episode "Icebreaker". The episode opens with Henry (a supporting lead character), Declan (a recurring minor character), and a bunch of newbies on an isolated ship in the Bering Sea. The audience expects this trope when the characters reveal that Magnus and Will (the leads) are on their way but severely delayed by the heavy storm, but the trope is subverted almost immediately when Will and Magnus arrive. Double subverted [[spoiler: when the real Magnus and Will show up at the end of the episode and reveal that the earlier pair were shapeshifting abnormals.]]
* ''Series/TheSopranos'' began its third season by having a particularly unremarkable day for the titular family shown through the eyes of the rarely-seen FBI. Overlaps with VillainEpisode.
* Played with in a ''Series/ThirtyRock'' episode shown as an episode of "Queen of Jordan". Angie's effort to organize a charity fashion show keeps getting overshadowed by the show's focus on Jack's UnresolvedSexualTension with his mother-in-law, Liz's feud with a baby and even Kenneth's feud with a power cord. Technically, it's a lower deck episode of her show.
* An interesting example in the ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' episode "Relevance". The premise of the show is that a secret government surveillance supercomputer can predict acts of terrorism and, as a by-product, spot ordinary civilians who will be involved with violent crimes. The protagonists are the ones who [[WeHelpTheHelpless deal with the latter]], the so-called "irrelevant" list, so its jarring when an episode late in the second season suddenly focuses on Shaw, a badass assassin whose job is to follow up on the "relevant" list. Much like the ''Series/DoctorWho'' examples, their paths cross briefly but we follow Shaw for the whole episode and the protagonists appear in a barely a handful of scenes.
near-cancellation]].



* ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' has an example in Season 2's "Somehow, Satan Got Behind Me", which focuses mostly on four devils swapping war stories (including driving a Broadcast Standards and Practices head so insane he shot up the set of a NoCelebritiesWereHarmed version of sister show ''Series/TheXFiles''). And it turns out Frank Black managed to see all four of them in their true forms. [[BizarroEpisode It's also highly offbeat and humorous, entirely at odds with the show's general tone of hyper-darkness]], to the point where it actually seems more appropriate for a ''[[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Buffy]]'' or ''Series/{{Angel}}'' episode.
* An interesting example in the ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' episode "Relevance". The premise of the show is that a secret government surveillance supercomputer can predict acts of terrorism and, as a by-product, spot ordinary civilians who will be involved with violent crimes. The protagonists are the ones who [[WeHelpTheHelpless deal with the latter]], the so-called "irrelevant" list, so it's jarring when an episode late in the second season suddenly focuses on Shaw, a badass assassin whose job is to follow up on the "relevant" list. Much like the ''Series/DoctorWho'' examples, their paths cross briefly but we follow Shaw for the whole episode and the protagonists appear in a barely a handful of scenes.
* ''Series/RememberWENN'' had an episode where Victor and all the actors disappear after the first few minutes (off to a convention in Harrisburg) and as a result Betty and the minor station employees have to keep the programming going for a full day.
* Double subverted in the ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'' episode "Icebreaker". The episode opens with Henry (a supporting lead character), Declan (a recurring minor character), and a bunch of newbies on an isolated ship in the Bering Sea. The audience expects this trope when the characters reveal that Magnus and Will (the leads) are on their way but severely delayed by the heavy storm, but the trope is subverted almost immediately when Will and Magnus arrive. Double subverted [[spoiler: when the real Magnus and Will show up at the end of the episode and reveal that the earlier pair were shapeshifting abnormals.]]
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'': The series had a [[OnceASeason yearly tradition]] of [[ADayInTheLimelight passing off episode narration]] via InternalMonologue to other cast members besides the main character, J.D. After 7 years, they exhausted giving the narration to their main cast and went on to [[FakeGuestStar the very common supporting cast]].
** Season 7 has "Their Story," looking at three minor character Jordan (Dr. Cox's wife and hospital board member), Todd (meathead surgeon) and Ted (the incompetent, put upon lawyer). Each story had a plot involving the main cast and their struggles, with each coming to the rescue even if not getting much, if any, recognition for it.
** Season 8 has "Their Story II", focused on and narrated by the interns that have been slowly introduced since the beginning of the season. As a result, it's [[PoorlyDisguisedPilot remarkably similar]] to a season 1 episode, one of the interns became a main character in the SpinOff / PostScriptSeason in season 9.
** The episode that followed "Their Story II", "My Full Moon", featured none of the main cast except for Elliott and Turk. They discuss their fears during a night shift while watching over the interns, who collectively get an equal amount of screentime as the two regular characters.
* ''Series/TheSopranos'' began its third season by having a particularly unremarkable day for the titular family shown through the eyes of the rarely-seen FBI. Overlaps with VillainEpisode.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'' has done this a few times.
** The 5th season episode "Proving Ground", about some previously unseen cadets in a Stargate training program (one of them had appeared in the 4th season episode "Prodigy", but three were genuinely new).
** The appropriately-titled 6th season episode "The Other Guys", which was also a subversion of AllUpToYou.
** The 7th season's "Avenger 2.0" featured the same characters from "The Other Guys".
** The 8th season's "Citizen Joe", in which a mild-mannered barber gets psychic images of the SG-1 team and tells the stories to his wife and friends -- thus also allowing for a ClipShow.
* The TropeNamer from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', as mentioned at the top. Specifically, the episode focuses on a group of four ensigns who are concerned about their performance evaluations, and figuring out which of them will have a chance to be promoted. In the background, we hear a more typical storyline going on, but the audience is left in the dark just like the ensigns, who do not have the security clearance to learn what is going on. When we do see real focus on the main cast, the primary discussion still involves evaluations of the younger officers. In addition, the supporting cast, such as Geordi, are superior officers (whereas normally they're subservient to Picard.)
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** The episode "Good Shepherd" was a LowerDeckEpisode that ''literally'' showed the lower decks -- the dimly-lit, poorly-maintained areas where the real work of keeping a poorly-supplied refugee ship running was carried out. The three redshirts focused on were misfits who under normal conditions would have been transferred off Voyager long ago, were it not for the long walk home. (They don't get sole focus, though, sharing the episode with Janeway. On the other hand, their interactions with Janeway - and each other - make up the majority of the action, and their character development.)
** "Learning Curve" was a similar episode, which focused on training Maquis crewmembers that, unlike Chakotay or Torres, had no Starfleet experience whatsoever. Tuvok plays as close to DrillSergeantNasty as a Vulcan can get.



* The ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' episode "Random Shoes". It was actually narrated by the protagonist of the episode to differentiate it even further from the normal episodes.



* ''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' is a variation crossed with TheRashomon, featuring the point of view of two minor ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' characters.



* ''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' is a variation crossed with TheRashomon, featuring the point of view of two minor ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' characters.



* ''VideoGame/DeadSpaceExtraction'' features, for a short time, [[DeadlyDoctor Karen Howell, a botanist]], who worked in hydroponics. She kills a brute protecting Lexine, but she [[spoiler: dies when she calls Warren out for seeding Unitologists into every corner of the ship. Immediately afterwards she is attacked by a tentacle and left to die by Warren while he yells about his "god" having different plans. This leaves the player in [[CaptainObvious serious doubt of his character.]]]]
* ''Videogame/Doom3'' has the Lost Mission. Viewed from the perspective of the last surviving Bravo Team member (who was dragged through the vents before the Doom Marine could connected with Bravo). The story runs in parallel (though they never cross) to the main story, with the Bravo Marine trying to close a prototype portal in the old Exis labs near Mars City, as the demons could use this as a "back door" to Earth.
* ''VideoGame/{{FEAR}} 2: Project Origin'' involves an SFOD-D squad near the end of the first game. The expansion pack's protagonist is a Replica {{redshirt}} who gets possessed by Fettel.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' GaidenGame ''Great Fairy Wars'' [[ADayInTheLimelight features Cirno]] as the only playable character, setting out not to thwart some incredibly powerful being from messing with the natural order of things, but as revenge against the local TerribleTrio for wrecking her house ([[TheDitz even though they didn't actually wreck her house]]). And the obligatory BonusBoss fight is basically an inversion of stage 1 or 2 of every ''Touhou'' game ever, a pitifully weak character getting pulverised by one of the main characters.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' GaidenGame ''Great Fairy Wars'' [[ADayInTheLimelight features Cirno]] as ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsTheThirdAge'' is this to [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the only playable character, setting out not to thwart some incredibly powerful being from messing with film trilogy]], showcasing an unrelated group of characters tailing after the natural order Fellowship of the Ring and encountering many of the same things, but as revenge against including the local TerribleTrio for wrecking her house ([[TheDitz even though they didn't actually wreck her house]]). And Watcher in the obligatory BonusBoss fight is basically an inversion of stage 1 or 2 of every ''Touhou'' game ever, a pitifully weak character getting pulverised by one of Water, the main characters.Balrog, and the Witch-King.
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Underground'' focuses on Manon Batiste, the player's advisor from the first game, before and during the events of that story.



* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Underground'' focuses on Manon Batiste, the player's advisor from the first game, before and during the events of that story.
* ''VideoGame/{{FEAR}} 2: Project Origin'' involves an SFOD-D squad near the end of the first game. The expansion pack's protagonist is a Replica {{redshirt}} who gets possessed by Fettel.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Underground'' focuses ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' focused entirely on Manon Batiste, the player's advisor from the first game, before and four clone commandos in three engagements during the events of that story.
* ''VideoGame/{{FEAR}} 2: Project Origin'' involves an SFOD-D squad near the end of the first game. The expansion pack's protagonist is
Clone Wars. Not a Replica {{redshirt}} who gets possessed by Fettel.single Jedi in sight.



* ''VideoGame/DeadSpaceExtraction'' features, for a short time, [[DeadlyDoctor Karen Howell, a botanist,]] who worked in hydroponics. She kills a brute protecting Lexine, but she [[spoiler: dies when she calls Warren out for seeding Unitologists into every corner of the ship. Immediately afterwards she is attacked by a tentacle and left to die by Warren while he yells about his "god" having different plans. This leaves the player in [[CaptainObvious serious doubt of his character.]]]]
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' focused entirely on four clone commandos in three engagements during the Clone Wars. Not a single Jedi in sight.
* ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsTheThirdAge'' is this to [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the film trilogy]], showcasing an unrelated group of characters tailing after the Fellowship of the Ring and encountering many of the same things, including the Watcher in the Water, the Balrog, and the Witch-King.
* ''Videogame/Doom3'' has the Lost Mission. Viewed from the perspective of the last surviving Bravo Team member (who was dragged through the vents before the Doom Marine could connected with Bravo). The story runs in parallel (though they never cross) to the main story, with the Bravo Marine trying to close a prototype portal in the old Exis labs near Mars City, as the demons could use this as a "back door" to Earth.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DeadSpaceExtraction'' features, for a short time, [[DeadlyDoctor Karen Howell, a botanist,]] who worked in hydroponics. She kills a brute protecting Lexine, but she [[spoiler: dies when she calls Warren The ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' GaidenGame ''Great Fairy Wars'' [[ADayInTheLimelight features Cirno]] as the only playable character, setting out for seeding Unitologists into every corner of not to thwart some incredibly powerful being from messing with the ship. Immediately afterwards she is attacked by a tentacle and left to die by Warren while he yells about his "god" having different plans. This leaves the player in [[CaptainObvious serious doubt natural order of his character.]]]]
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'' focused entirely on four clone commandos in three engagements during the Clone Wars. Not a single Jedi in sight.
* ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsTheThirdAge'' is this to [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the film trilogy]], showcasing an unrelated group of characters tailing after the Fellowship of the Ring and encountering many of the same
things, including but as revenge against the Watcher in the Water, the Balrog, and the Witch-King.
* ''Videogame/Doom3'' has the Lost Mission. Viewed from the perspective of the last surviving Bravo Team member (who was dragged through the vents before the Doom Marine could connected with Bravo). The story runs in parallel (though
local TerribleTrio for wrecking her house ([[TheDitz even though they never cross) to didn't actually wreck her house]]). And the obligatory BonusBoss fight is basically an inversion of stage 1 or 2 of every ''Touhou'' game ever, a pitifully weak character getting pulverised by one of the main story, with the Bravo Marine trying to close a prototype portal in the old Exis labs near Mars City, as the demons could use this as a "back door" to Earth.characters.



* One of the original shorts that preceded the ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'' series switches focus from the "heroine" to the point of view of the mooks being killed by her.
* The ''WesternAnimation/AladdinTheSeries'' episodes "Rain of Terror" and "Power to the Parrot" don't feature Aladdin or Jasmine ''as the main characters'', instead focusing on Genie, Abu and Iago. Well, in "Power to the Parrot", it ''does'' feature Aladdin and Jasmine, but they are DemotedToExtra and barely have any lines, let alone an impact on the plot, and become PluckyComicRelief. "Mission: Imp Possible" also features Aladdin getting poisoned at the very beginning so it can focus on Genie and Iago's attempts to recover the antidote for the entire episode.
* A sequence of ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' episodes centers on Carl and the Aqua Teens' landlord Markula. The Aqua Teens themselves are absent, having been cocooned by military spiders in the Mojave Desert.
* A season 19 episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' is based around Maria, a LivingProp background character who hasn't even spoken a word in the almost 20 years the series has been running but is well-known with fans. Her episode "Maria Speaks" presents her as TheSilentBob who only speaks to her friend Jenna because she has a very noticeable stutter.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' has an episode, "To Steal an Ant-Man," which consists almost entirely of [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]] and [[ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire Luke Cage]] (who had never appeared in the cartoon before this point) fighting criminals. None of the Avengers appear except for TheWasp, who only does so during the first three minutes, and ex-Avenger [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym]], who had enlisted the two Heroes For Hire to hunt the man who stole his former crimefighting equipment. Hank gets some additional CharacterDevelopment in this episode, giving it some connection to one of the show's main plots.
** "New Avengers" provides an even better example: Kang the Conqueror traps the Avengers in another time, so Comicbook/IronMan calls some of their crimefighting allies (including Franchise/{{Spider-Man}}, Comicbook/WarMachine, [[Franchise/FantasticFour The Thing]], Iron Fist, and Luke Cage) to form their own superhero team. These heroes ([[WolverinePublicity plus]] {{Wolverine}}) try to work out their differences and try to stop Kang from taking over the world.
* The final produced (but not aired) episode of the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' run focuses entirely on Batgirl and Catwoman with Robin playing a supporting role. Discounting a dream sequence at the beginning, Batman only appears out of costume briefly while telephoning Dick out of town.
** The ''WesternAnimation/TheNewBatmanAdventures'' episode "Girl's Night Out" is a CrossoverEpisode focusing on Batgirl and Supergirl. Batman only appears for about two minutes, calling from Europe.
* {{Subverted}} on ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}''--since there are a lot of recurring background characters with interesting designs, animator/director Guy Moore once pitched an episode focused entirely on them, with our protagonists only appearing in the background. Episode director Karen Disher didn't think it would work, however, since fans were already expressing annoyance at any subplot that didn't focus on [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] and [[CoolLoser Jane]]. This is HilariousInHindsight, since over the years the fandom has put more focus on the [[FanNickname backgrounders]] and made many of them into {{Ensemble Darkhorse}}s.
* The episode "The Big Scoop" in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', third season, was Chester and AJ's version of what happened in "A Wish Too Far". When they notice Timmy's sudden popularity, at the same time required to write for the school newspaper, they investigate to find out how he got popular. [[FlashbackWithTheOtherDarrin The voices were redubbed]] due to different voice actors for Chester and AJ, and the animation was also changed, possibly to match the pace of the dubbed version.
* A second season episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' features Vinnie, a disgruntled ex-[[FacelessGoons Faceless Goon]] who blames the gargoyles for his unemployment. While plotting his revenge, he narrates clips of his prior encounters with the gargoyles, interjecting his own POV.
* In ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]'', the episode "Task Force X" is told from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the villain team Task Force X's perspective.]] The only notable member of the Justice League to make an appearance is the ComicBook/MartianManhunter, and [[MookHorrorShow he nearly thwarts their mission on his own.]]
** "The Greatest Story Never Told" focuses on ComicBook/BoosterGold, who gets tasked to the sidelines while all of the greatest heroes are fighting a frighteningly powerful menace, and what he accomplishes in the background while no one notices. [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold It even became a Trope Namer itself.]]
** A lot of JLU episodes focus on introducing new characters, some of which are only used for that episode, some of which become prominent as the series goes on. Episodes featuring the Question, Supergirl, or Green Arrow generally tend to be more important ones, but their inclusion doesn't necessarily preclude a Lower Deck Episode. "Patriot Act" focuses on the original Seven Soldiers of Victory, with the only prominent cast member being Green Arrow. "The Ties That Bind" focuses a lot on the Flash, but mainly showcases guest stars Mr. Miracle and Big Barda. Even in the pre-Unlimited series, "The Terror Beyond" is really more about Solomon Grundy than it is about any of the Justice League, save Hawkgirl. The show would just about always use a main character alongside new, less popular characters.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLooneyTunesShow'' has "Ridiculous Journey" which is a roadtrip involving the "pet" characters journeying home ala ''Film/HomewardBoundTheIncredibleJourney'' while meeting other Looney Tunes characters that haven't been used in the show before, instead of the regular cast of Bugs and Daffy.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** The episode "Just for Sidekicks", which tells the story of what Spike and the Mane Six's pets were up to in Ponyville [[SynchronousEpisodes during the events of "Games Ponies Play"]].
** The [[MilestoneCelebration 100th episode]], "Slice of Life", focuses on background characters and a number of {{ensemble darkhorse}}s. The main characters only have minimal lines while virtually every background character gets a turn in the foreground.
** "Brotherhooves Social" [[SynchronousEpisodes takes place synchronously]] with "Made in Manehattan" and focuses on Big Macintosh filling in for Applejack in the Sisterhooves Social [[DisguisedInDrag under the guise of Orchard Blossom]]. Other than AJ's cameo at the beginning, Rainbow Dash is the only Mane Six character present.
** "Dungeons and Discord" features Discord, Spike, and Big Mac joining in a role-playing game of sorts while the Mane Six take a train trip to Yakyakistan.



** "Isabella and the Temple of Sap" is a Lower Deck version of "Bubble Boys," showing Isabella's Fireside Girls troop getting the sap needed for her crush's project at an abandoned amusement park. The sub-plot even has some fun with this by featuring her dog Pinky on a secret agent mission rather than Perry (who does make a little cameo).

to:

** "Isabella and the Temple of Sap" is a Lower Deck version of "Bubble Boys," Boys", showing Isabella's Fireside Girls troop getting the sap needed for her crush's project at an abandoned amusement park. The sub-plot even has some fun with this by featuring her dog Pinky on a secret agent mission rather than Perry (who does make a little cameo).



* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' had "Rookies", a clone-focused episode with the main characters as supporting characters. Its predecessor, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' managed to have episodes entirely without Jedi, but that's only because the episodes were 3 minutes long.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' had "Rookies", a clone-focused The ''WesternAnimation/QuackPack'' episode with "All Hands On Duck" doesn't feature Huey, Dewey or Louie. It instead focuses entirely on Donald.
* The framing device for
the ''WesternAnimation/{{Recess}}'' direct-to-video special, "Recess Christmas: Miracle on Third Street" is this for the three main characters teachers, taking place right after the ChristmasEpisode "Yes Mikey, Santa Does Shave". In the episode itself, Principal Prickly only appeared in two scenes, Miss Finster appeared in the same amount of scenes but had even less dialoge, and Miss Grotke only appeared for a few seconds.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'':
** "The Tale of X-9" is told from the point of view of a robot that gained sentience and free will. Aku only appears briefly in background propaganda and in person only to hand an assignment, and Jack doesn't show up until halfway through the last act, where he [[MookHorrorShow cuts down X-9 just
as supporting characters. Its predecessor, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' managed to have easily as any other robot in the show]].
** "Birth of Evil" is one of the weirdest examples of this Trope, in that it's one of the most critically acclaimed
episodes entirely without Jedi, but that's of the series, [[OscarBait won an Emmy and a few minor Awards]], yet it had almost no Jack, the story focusing on his father. Jack appeared for only because about a minute in the episodes were 3 minutes long.final scene, after he was born.



* A second season episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' features Vinnie, a disgruntled ex-[[FacelessGoons Faceless Goon]] who blames the gargoyles for his unemployment. While plotting his revenge, he narrates clips of his prior encounters with the gargoyles, interjecting his own POV.

to:

* A second season ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' had [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E5Rookies "Rookies"]], a clone-focused episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' features Vinnie, a disgruntled ex-[[FacelessGoons Faceless Goon]] who blames the gargoyles for his unemployment. While plotting his revenge, he narrates clips of his prior encounters with the gargoyles, interjecting his own POV.
main characters as supporting characters. Its predecessor, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' managed to have episodes entirely without Jedi, but that's only because the episodes were 3 minutes long.
* There's an odd subversion in ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' "Know Your Fusion". The episode focuses around Sardonyx and the newly introduced Smokey Quartz, and is about Sardonyx trying to unlock Smokey's inner talent. However, Sardonyx and Smokey are both [[FusionDance fusions]] of the main cast - repectively, Garnet/Pearl and [[spoiler: Steven/Amethyst]]. So despite the main cast only appearing proper at the beginning and the end, it's still somewhat about them.



* The entire ''WesternAnimation/TransformersRescueBots'' show could be regarded as a Lower Decks series, as it depicts the adventures of four junior Autobots who are not yet experienced enough to join the battles occurring concurrently in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime''.



* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** The episode "Just for Sidekicks", which tells the story of what Spike and the Mane Six's pets were up to in Ponyville [[SynchronousEpisodes during the events of "Games Ponies Play"]].
** The [[MilestoneCelebration 100th episode]], "Slice of Life", focuses on background characters and a number of {{ensemble darkhorse}}s. The main characters only have minimal lines while virtually every background character gets a turn in the foreground.
** "Brotherhooves Social" [[SynchronousEpisodes takes place synchronously]] with "Made in Manehattan" and focuses on Big Macintosh filling in for Applejack in the Sisterhooves Social [[DisguisedInDrag under the guise of Orchard Blossom]]. Other than AJ's cameo at the beginning, Rainbow Dash is the only Mane Six character present.
** "Dungeons and Discord" features Discord, Spike, and Big Mac joining in a role-playing game of sorts while the Mane Six take a train trip to Yakyakistan.
* In ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]'', the episode "Task Force X" is told from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the villain team Task Force X's perspective.]] The only notable member of the Justice League to make an appearance is the ComicBook/MartianManhunter, and [[MookHorrorShow he nearly thwarts their mission on his own.]]
** "The Greatest Story Never Told" focuses on ComicBook/BoosterGold, who gets tasked to the sidelines while all of the greatest heroes are fighting a frighteningly powerful menace, and what he accomplishes in the background while no one notices. [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold It even became a Trope Namer itself.]]
** A lot of JLU episodes focus on introducing new characters, some of which are only used for that episode, some of which become prominent as the series goes on. Episodes featuring the Question, Supergirl, or Green Arrow generally tend to be more important ones, but their inclusion doesn't necessarily preclude a Lower Deck Episode. "Patriot Act" focuses on the original Seven Soldiers of Victory, with the only prominent cast member being Green Arrow. "The Ties That Bind" focuses a lot on the Flash, but mainly showcases guest stars Mr. Miracle and Big Barda. Even in the pre-Unlimited series, "The Terror Beyond" is really more about Solomon Grundy than it is about any of the Justice League, save Hawkgirl. The show would just about always use a main character alongside new, less popular characters.
* The final produced (but not aired) episode of the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' run focuses entirely on Batgirl and Catwoman with Robin playing a supporting role. Discounting a dream sequence at the beginning, Batman only appears out of costume briefly while telephoning Dick out of town.
* The ''WesternAnimation/TheNewBatmanAdventures'' episode "Girl's Night Out" is a CrossoverEpisode focusing on Batgirl and Supergirl. Batman only appears for about two minutes, calling from Europe.
* A sequence of ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' episodes centers on Carl and the Aqua Teens' landlord Markula. The Aqua Teens themselves are absent, having been cocooned by military spiders in the Mojave Desert.
* The episode "The Big Scoop" in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', third season, was Chester and AJ's version of what happened in "A Wish Too Far." When they notice Timmy's sudden popularity, at the same time required to write for the school newspaper, they investigate to find out how he got popular. [[FlashbackWithTheOtherDarrin The voices were redubbed]] due to different voice actors for Chester and AJ, and the animation was also changed, possibly to match the pace of the dubbed version.
* The framing device for the ''WesternAnimation/{{Recess}}'' direct-to-video special, "Recess Christmas: Miracle on Third Street" is this for the three main teachers, taking place right after the ChristmasEpisode "Yes Mikey, Santa Does Shave". In the episode itself, Principal Prickly only appeared in two scenes, Miss Finster appeared in the same amount of scenes but had even less dialoge, and Miss Grotke only appeared for a few seconds.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' has an episode, "To Steal an Ant-Man," which consists almost entirely of [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]] and [[ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire Luke Cage]] (who had never appeared in the cartoon before this point) fighting criminals. None of the Avengers appear except for TheWasp, who only does so during the first three minutes, and ex-Avenger [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym]], who had enlisted the two Heroes For Hire to hunt the man who stole his former crimefighting equipment. Hank gets some additional CharacterDevelopment in this episode, giving it some connection to one of the show's main plots.
** "New Avengers" provides an even better example: Kang the Conqueror traps the Avengers in another time, so Comicbook/IronMan calls some of their crimefighting allies (including Franchise/{{Spider-Man}}, Comicbook/WarMachine, [[Franchise/FantasticFour The Thing]], Iron Fist, and Luke Cage) to form their own superhero team. These heroes ([[WolverinePublicity plus]] {{Wolverine}}) try to work out their differences and try to stop Kang from taking over the world.
* The entire ''WesternAnimation/TransformersRescueBots'' show could be regarded as a Lower Decks series, as it depicts the adventures of four junior Autobots who are not yet experienced enough to join the battles occurring concurrently in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime''.
* The ''WesternAnimation/AladdinTheSeries'' episodes "Rain of Terror" and "Power to the Parrot" don't feature Aladdin or Jasmine ''as the main characters'', instead focusing on Genie, Abu and Iago. Well, in "Power to the Parrot", it ''does'' feature Aladdin and Jasmine, but they are DemotedToExtra and barely have any lines, let alone an impact on the plot, and become PluckyComicRelief. "Mission: Imp Possible" also features Aladdin getting poisoned at the very beginning so it can focus on Genie and Iago's attempts to recover the antidote for the entire episode.
* The ''WesternAnimation/QuackPack'' episode "All Hands On Duck" doesn't feature Huey, Dewey or Louie. It instead focuses entirely on Donald.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'':
** "The Tale of X-9" is told from the point of view of a robot that gained sentience and free will. Aku only appears briefly in background propaganda and in person only to hand an assignment, and Jack doesn't show up until halfway through the last act, where he [[MookHorrorShow cuts down X-9 just as easily as any other robot in the show]].
** "Birth of Evil" is one of the weirdest examples of this Trope, in that it's one of the most critically acclaimed episodes of the series, [[OscarBait won an Emmy and a few minor Awards]], yet it had almost no Jack, the story focusing on his father. Jack appeared for only about a minute in the final scene, after he was born.
* ''Disney/TheLionKingOneAndAHalf'' (or ''3: Hakuna Matata'') is the Lower Deck version of The Lion King, telling the story from Timon and Pumbaa's point of view.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLooneyTunesShow'' has "Ridiculous Journey" which is a roadtrip involving the "pet" characters journeying home ala ''Film/HomewardBoundTheIncredibleJourney'' while meeting other Looney Tunes characters that haven't been used in the show before, instead of the regular cast of Bugs and Daffy.
* {{Subverted}} on ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}''--since there are a lot of recurring background characters with interesting designs, animator/director Guy Moore once pitched an episode focused entirely on them, with our protagonists only appearing in the background. Episode director Karen Disher didn't think it would work, however, since fans were already expressing annoyance at any subplot that didn't focus on [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] and [[CoolLoser Jane]]. This is HilariousInHindsight, since over the years the fandom has put more focus on the [[FanNickname backgrounders]] and made many of them into {{Ensemble Darkhorse}}s.
* One of the original shorts that preceded the ''WesternAnimation/AeonFlux'' series switches focus from the "heroine" to the point of view of the mooks being killed by her.
* A season 19 episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' is based around Maria, a LivingProp background character who hasn't even spoken a word in the almost 20 years the series has been running but is well-known with fans. Her episode "Maria Speaks" presents her as TheSilentBob who only speaks to her friend Jenna because she has a very noticeable stutter.
* There's an odd subversion in ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' "Know Your Fusion". The episode focuses around Sardonyx and the newly introduced Smokey Quartz, and is about Sardonyx trying to unlock Smokey's inner talent. However, Sardonyx and Smokey are both [[FusionDance fusions]] of the main cast - repectively, Garnet/Pearl and [[spoiler: Steven/Amethyst]]. So despite the main cast only appearing proper at the beginning and the end, it's still somewhat about them.
10th Mar '17 3:25:33 PM Crossover-Enthusiast
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* ''Fanfic/CaveStoryVersusIMMeen'' is basically the literal definition of this trope for ''VideoGame/CaveStory'', turning Jack, one of the most minor characters in the entire game, into the lead protagonist, an Main/ADorkable, Main/BadassAdorable Main/NerdActionHero.

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* ''Fanfic/CaveStoryVersusIMMeen'' ''Cave Story Versus I.M. Meen'' is basically the literal definition of this trope for ''VideoGame/CaveStory'', turning Jack, one of the most minor characters in the entire game, into the lead protagonist, an Main/ADorkable, Main/BadassAdorable Main/NerdActionHero.[[BadassAdorable Badass]] {{Adorkable}} NerdActionHero.
15th Feb '17 9:05:24 AM dmcreif
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** Marvel's Netflix shows (''Series/Daredevil2015'', ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', ''Series/LukeCage2016'', ''Series/IronFist2017'', ''Series/ThePunisher2017'', and ''Series/TheDefenders2017'') are about lower level superheroes who deal with street criminals or extraterrestrial elements that are even beneath the notice of SHIELD.

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** Marvel's Netflix shows (''Series/Daredevil2015'', ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', ''Series/LukeCage2016'', ''Series/IronFist2017'', ''Series/ThePunisher2017'', ''Series/ThePunisher'', and ''Series/TheDefenders2017'') are about lower level superheroes who deal with street criminals or extraterrestrial elements that are even beneath the notice of SHIELD.
15th Feb '17 9:05:08 AM dmcreif
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** Marvel's Netflix shows are also subjected to this. ''Series/Daredevil2015'', ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', ''Series/LukeCage2016'', and ''Series/IronFist2017'' are all about lower level superheroes who deal with street criminals or extraterrestrial elements that are even beneath the notice of SHIELD.

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** Marvel's Netflix shows are also subjected to this. ''Series/Daredevil2015'', (''Series/Daredevil2015'', ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', ''Series/LukeCage2016'', ''Series/IronFist2017'', ''Series/ThePunisher2017'', and ''Series/IronFist2017'' ''Series/TheDefenders2017'') are all about lower level superheroes who deal with street criminals or extraterrestrial elements that are even beneath the notice of SHIELD.
8th Feb '17 10:34:23 AM SparkyYoungUpstart
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheReader2016'' has a chapter about the naive Captain Lon and his associates trying to arrest Hatchet's men, only to fail miserably. He even realizes near the end that he was probably just a bit player in someone else's story.
7th Feb '17 3:31:33 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* The ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episode "Birth of Evil" is one of the weirdest examples of this Trope, in that it's one of the most critically acclaimed episodes of the series, [[OscarBait won an Emmy and a few minor Awards]], yet it had almost no Jack, the story focusing on his father. Jack appeared for only about a minute in the final scene, after he was born.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episode "Birth of Evil" is one of the weirdest examples of this Trope, in that it's one of the most critically acclaimed episodes of the series, [[OscarBait won an Emmy and a few minor Awards]], yet it had almost no Jack, the story focusing on his father. Jack appeared for only about a minute in the final scene, after he was born.



* The ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episode "The Tale of X-9" is told from the point of view of a robot that gained sentience and free will. Aku only appears briefly in background propaganda and in person only to hand an assignment, and Jack doesn't show up until halfway through the last act, where he [[MookHorrorShow cuts down X-9 just as easily as any other robot in the show]].

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' episode ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'':
**
"The Tale of X-9" is told from the point of view of a robot that gained sentience and free will. Aku only appears briefly in background propaganda and in person only to hand an assignment, and Jack doesn't show up until halfway through the last act, where he [[MookHorrorShow cuts down X-9 just as easily as any other robot in the show]].show]].
** "Birth of Evil" is one of the weirdest examples of this Trope, in that it's one of the most critically acclaimed episodes of the series, [[OscarBait won an Emmy and a few minor Awards]], yet it had almost no Jack, the story focusing on his father. Jack appeared for only about a minute in the final scene, after he was born.
27th Dec '16 6:43:55 PM NumberFortyFour
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* "Anime/{{Pokemon}}" Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.

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* "Anime/{{Pokemon}}" Anime/{{Pokemon}} Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.
27th Dec '16 6:43:30 PM NumberFortyFour
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* "Anime/Pokemon" Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.

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* "Anime/Pokemon" "Anime/{{Pokemon}}" Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.
27th Dec '16 6:42:56 PM NumberFortyFour
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* [["Anime/Pokemon" Pokemon Chronicles]] is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.

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* [["Anime/Pokemon" Pokemon Chronicles]] "Anime/Pokemon" Chronicles is a series that follows the adventures of secondary characters during the Hoenn Arc.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LowerDeckEpisode