History Main / LowCultureHighTech

24th Aug '16 6:33:31 AM Morgenthaler
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** The episode "Bread and Circuses" featured a world with 1960s-level tech (television, firearms) but a society that mirrored the RomanEmpire, complete with the slow rise of Christianity (albeit 2000 years late).

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** The episode "Bread and Circuses" featured a world with 1960s-level tech (television, firearms) but a society that mirrored the RomanEmpire, UsefulNotes/RomanEmpire, complete with the slow rise of Christianity (albeit 2000 years late).
16th Aug '16 1:55:55 PM Da1tonTheGreat
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* This is in some ways how Marx defined capitalism. Humanity has developed to universally fulfill needs, but the culture, government, and organization of society had not caught up to the sheer ability to produce and provide for those needs in spite of that. So a revolutionary change must be made in order to bring human society up to the standards that technology and industry make possible.

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* This is in some ways how Karl Marx defined capitalism. Humanity has developed to universally fulfill needs, but the culture, government, and organization of society had not caught up to the sheer ability to produce and provide for those needs in spite of that. So a revolutionary change must be made in order to bring human society up to the standards that technology and industry make possible.


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* The terrorist group ISIS/ISIL/whatever has access to modern weaponry, yet their beliefs in regards to women's rights, LGBT rights, science, etc. are straight out of the Dark Ages.
13th Aug '16 5:19:49 PM PushoverMediaCritic
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* The Saiyans from ''Manga/DragonBallZ'' are a brutal race of violent barbarians with a constantly warring society built entirely on an AsskickingEqualsAuthority political system. They live in houses carved out of stone but, because they work for the Planet Trade Organization, they have access to technology far beyond their normal capabilities, such as interplanetary spaceships, healing pods, incredibly durable, flexible, and lightweight body armor, Scouters capable of reading PowerLevels, as well as an assortment of other high-tech goodies.
8th Aug '16 6:32:09 PM Da1tonTheGreat
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':''Franchise/StarTrek'': The PrimeDirective, which bans interfering with the development of less advanced societies, exists to prevent this from happening.
8th Aug '16 6:24:36 PM Da1tonTheGreat
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* The Ferengi in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' were originally designed to follow this trope and were introduced by one of the characters explaining that they are a species who simply should not have been given access to advanced technology yet, as they have not yet reached a sufficiently developed state to use it responsibly. However, there was a very strong sub-human racist vibe to it and they mostly disappeared until being revived as a greedy merchant species in ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** There's an interesting example with the Talosians from the original pilot episode "The Cage." Their brains are actually significantly more evolved than those of their ancestors, to the point that their powers of illusion essentially (though not technically) make them [[RealityWarper Reality Warpers]]. However, this also caused them to lose any motivation to do anything besides entertain themselves with their fantasies, and their more cerebrally-primitive ancestors' technological knowledge was lost.
** In "A Private Little War," Kirk and [=McCoy=] discover that the Klingons gave flintlock weapons to the natives who didn't have them before. To restore the balance of power, Kirk provides another group (a bunch of cavemen) with them. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything McCoy compares their situation to the "Brush Wars" of the mid 20th Century]].
** The episode "Bread and Circuses" featured a world with 1960s-level tech (television, firearms) but a society that mirrored the RomanEmpire, complete with the slow rise of Christianity (albeit 2000 years late).
**
The Ferengi in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'' were originally designed to follow this trope and were introduced by one of the characters explaining that they are a species who simply should not have been given access to advanced technology yet, as they have not yet reached a sufficiently developed state to use it responsibly. However, there was a very strong sub-human racist vibe to it and they mostly disappeared until being revived as a greedy merchant species in ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.



* Another ''Franchise/StarTrek'' example has the episode "A Private Little War" from ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. Kirk and [=McCoy=] discover that the Klingons gave flintlock weapons to the natives who didn't have them before. To restore the balance of power, Kirk provides another group (a bunch of cavemen) with them. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything McCoy compares their situation to the "Brush Wars" of the mid 20th Century]].
** The episode "Bread and Circuses" featured a world with 1960s-level tech(television, firearms) but a society that mirrored the RomanEmpire, complete with the slow rise of Christianity(albeit 2000 years late).
** The Kazon from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' don't exactly inspire confidence with their technical abilities. However, they only recently acquired it, namely by overthrowing their Trabe conquerors. There's a reason [[TheAssimilator the Borg]] deemed the Kazon to have absolutely nothing worth assimilating.

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* Another ''Franchise/StarTrek'' example has the episode "A Private Little War" from ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. Kirk and [=McCoy=] discover that the Klingons gave flintlock weapons to the natives who didn't have them before. To restore the balance of power, Kirk provides another group (a bunch of cavemen) with them. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything McCoy compares their situation to the "Brush Wars" of the mid 20th Century]].
** The episode "Bread and Circuses" featured a world with 1960s-level tech(television, firearms) but a society that mirrored the RomanEmpire, complete with the slow rise of Christianity(albeit 2000 years late).
** The Kazon from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' don't exactly inspire confidence with their technical abilities. However, they only recently acquired it, namely by overthrowing their Trabe conquerors. There's a reason [[TheAssimilator the Borg]] deemed the Kazon to have absolutely nothing worth assimilating.
8th Aug '16 12:51:01 PM WillBGood
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** [[{{Recap/DoctorWhoS16E5ThePowerOfKroll}} The Power Of Kroll]] has the boss of a mining rig hire an arms dealer to sell defective weapons to the natives of a moon that orbits his planet. This is to justify removing the natives because his [[MegaCorp company]] wants that moon.

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** [[{{Recap/DoctorWhoS16E5ThePowerOfKroll}} The "The Power Of Kroll]] Kroll"]] has the boss of a mining rig hire an arms dealer to sell defective weapons to the natives of a moon that orbits his planet. This is to justify removing the natives because his [[MegaCorp company]] wants that moon.



** The BidBad Ashka manages to make it to our world and tricks an engineer into re-creating one of those combat suits using late 20th-century tech. The resulting suit looks less like ornate Medieval armor and more like a sleek black body-hugging jumpsuit with gadgets. Not only that, but it's better than the original Spellbinder suits, able to fly. It's also waterproof, since that would be one of the things an engineer would do to a piece of tech, unlike the original suits that could be stopped by a puddle.

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** The BidBad BigBad Ashka manages to make it to our world and tricks an engineer into re-creating one of those combat suits using late 20th-century tech. The resulting suit looks less like ornate Medieval armor and more like a sleek black body-hugging jumpsuit with gadgets. Not only that, but it's better than the original Spellbinder suits, able to fly. It's also waterproof, since that would be one of the things an engineer would do to a piece of tech, unlike the original suits that could be stopped by a puddle.
25th May '16 1:41:08 AM PaulA
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* The Hellborn from the Literature/JonShannow trilogy ride horses, practice human sacrifice, wear goats' horns on their helmets... and pack high-quality firearms.
15th Mar '16 9:31:05 AM zarpaulus
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** Whether he was right or not is [[FlameBait still under debate]].
14th Mar '16 11:34:24 PM Eliphas8
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* This is in some ways how Marx defined capitalism. Humanity has developed to universally fulfill needs, but the culture, government, and organization of society had not caught up to the sheer ability to produce and provide for those needs in spite of that. So a revolutionary change must be made in order to bring human society up to the standards that technology and industry make possible.
23rd Feb '16 12:11:59 AM shadowbeast
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* This trope is one of the reasons suggested in ''1001 Science Fiction Weapons'' for the OGL system, as a potential explanation for the existence of the many melee weapons in the book created with [[EnhancedArchaicWeapon advanced technology]], from regular swords made from alloys and composite materials far beyond modern technology to warhammers made out of hyperdense materials with a little antigravity motor inside in order to allow the use of little anime-esque schoolgirl characters wielding hammers that weigh five tons or more (they become unusable when the power runs out, as not so many sci-fi settings allow playable races that can lift that.) The idea being that advanced races develop these things for their more primitve hirelings who are more familiar with more primitive weapons but need a technological edge when it is uneconomical to train them with gun-shaped energy weapons, unlikely as that sounds. It also provides the rationale for many of the [[ThrowawayGuns disposable weapons]] in the book; the "idiot guns" series are meant for warlords to issue to their [[ChildSoldiers Child Soldiers]] who can't read with a minimum of training (hence the pictorial instructions on the outside) resulting in not so much a gun as a claymore mine that is held onto, while the Liberator assault shotgun is an automatic shotgun meant to be dropped to rebel and extremist groups who can't be trusted to care for a firearm, for purposes of slaughtering many people as messily as possible, and therefore cannot be reloaded and may as well be tossed out when empty, as it doesn't make a very good club.

to:

* This trope is one of the reasons suggested in ''1001 Science Fiction Weapons'' for the OGL system, as a potential explanation for the existence of the many melee weapons in the book created with [[EnhancedArchaicWeapon advanced technology]], from regular swords made from alloys and composite materials far beyond modern technology to warhammers made out of hyperdense materials with a little antigravity motor inside in order to allow the use of little anime-esque schoolgirl characters wielding hammers that weigh five tons or more (they become unusable when the power runs out, as not so many sci-fi settings allow playable races that can lift that.) The idea being that advanced races develop these things for their more primitve primitive hirelings who are more familiar with more primitive weapons but need a technological edge when it is uneconomical to train them with gun-shaped energy weapons, unlikely as that sounds. It also provides the rationale for many of the [[ThrowawayGuns disposable weapons]] in the book; the "idiot guns" series are meant for warlords to issue to their [[ChildSoldiers Child Soldiers]] who can't read with a minimum of training (hence the pictorial instructions on the outside) resulting in not so much a gun as a claymore mine that is held onto, while the Liberator assault shotgun is an automatic shotgun meant to be dropped to rebel and extremist groups who can't be trusted to care for a firearm, for purposes of slaughtering many people as messily as possible, and therefore cannot be reloaded and may as well be tossed out when empty, as it doesn't make a very good club.
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