History Main / LoudnessWar

14th Oct '16 2:01:03 AM LondonKdS
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* Deliberate over-amplification is part of the voice treatment for [[Series/DoctorWho the Daleks]].
20th Jun '16 11:05:06 AM gewunomox
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* Virtually any recent act that psych-rock producer David Fridmann has worked with, like Music/TheFlamingLips, Music/{{MGMT}} and Music/TameImpala. It can be traced back to Music/{{MGMT}}'s ''Music/OracularSpectacular'': They asked Fridmann to turn up the gain to make it sound "dirty", turning "Kids" in particular from [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_MCp_-uwVo this]] to [[http://youtu.be/fe4EK4HSPkI this]].

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* Virtually any recent act that psych-rock producer David Fridmann has worked with, like Music/TheFlamingLips, Music/FlamingLips, Music/{{MGMT}} and Music/TameImpala. It can be traced back to Music/{{MGMT}}'s ''Music/OracularSpectacular'': They asked Fridmann to turn up the gain to make it sound "dirty", turning "Kids" in particular from [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_MCp_-uwVo this]] to [[http://youtu.be/fe4EK4HSPkI this]].
9th Jun '16 11:36:50 PM CassandraLeo
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(Alternatively, a quick, cheap partial solution, using a program like Nero Wave Editor, is to simply reduce the bass using the graphic equalizer, since bass-boosting is usually part of the loudness enhancement process. If done properly the bass-reduced version will sound only marginally 'thinner' than the original, while having more peak fluctuations; the "Normalize" function can also be used to adjust the volume of sections of the song, although care must be taken to avoid sudden jumps in volume between sections. Another potential quick solution is to run the song through a high pass filter, which mimics the effect of pressing an album to vinyl. A CD run through a high pass filter with the right settings will be virtually indistinguishable from a vinyl rip from a comparable-sounding master, and will wind up with substantially higher dynamic range than the original recording.)

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(Alternatively, a quick, cheap partial solution, using a program like Nero Wave Editor, is to simply reduce the bass using the graphic equalizer, since bass-boosting is usually part of the loudness enhancement process. If done properly the bass-reduced version will sound only marginally 'thinner' than the original, while having more peak fluctuations; the "Normalize" function can also be used to adjust the volume of sections of the song, although care must be taken to avoid sudden jumps in volume between sections. Another potential quick solution is to run the song through a high pass filter, which mimics the effect of pressing an album to vinyl. A CD run through a high pass filter with the right settings will be virtually indistinguishable from a vinyl rip from a comparable-sounding master, and will wind up with substantially higher dynamic range than the original recording. Note that the clipping will still be present if either of these solutions are used; it will probably, however, be substantially less annoying.)
9th Jun '16 11:34:26 PM CassandraLeo
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(Alternatively, a quick, cheap partial solution, using a program like Nero Wave Editor, is to simply reduce the bass using the graphic equalizer, since bass-boosting is usually part of the loudness enhancement process. If done properly the bass-reduced version will sound only marginally 'thinner' than the original, while having more peak fluctuations; the "Normalize" function can also be used to adjust the volume of sections of the song, although care must be taken to avoid sudden jumps in volume between sections.)

to:

(Alternatively, a quick, cheap partial solution, using a program like Nero Wave Editor, is to simply reduce the bass using the graphic equalizer, since bass-boosting is usually part of the loudness enhancement process. If done properly the bass-reduced version will sound only marginally 'thinner' than the original, while having more peak fluctuations; the "Normalize" function can also be used to adjust the volume of sections of the song, although care must be taken to avoid sudden jumps in volume between sections. Another potential quick solution is to run the song through a high pass filter, which mimics the effect of pressing an album to vinyl. A CD run through a high pass filter with the right settings will be virtually indistinguishable from a vinyl rip from a comparable-sounding master, and will wind up with substantially higher dynamic range than the original recording.)
9th Jun '16 11:28:45 PM CassandraLeo
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* New York-based PsychedelicRock band The Psychic Paramount's [=CDs=] are generally some of the loudest ever. ''Gamelan into the Mink Supernatural'' is [=DR0=] and only a shade quieter than ''Venereology'' (see a couple of entries above). Their other CDs aren't quite as loud, but still usually in the [=DR3-4=] range (''Origins and Primitives'', which contains a number of acoustic tracks, is better, being overall [=DR6=]). As they are also a NoiseRock band, it's safe to say ArtisticLicense probably applies.

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* New York-based PsychedelicRock band The Psychic Paramount's [=CDs=] are generally some of the loudest ever. ''Gamelan into the Mink Supernatural'' is [=DR0=] and only a shade quieter than ''Venereology'' (see a couple of entries above). Their other CDs [=CDs=] aren't quite as loud, but still usually in the [=DR3-4=] range (''Origins and Primitives'', which contains a number of acoustic tracks, is better, being overall [=DR6=]). As they are also a NoiseRock band, it's safe to say ArtisticLicense probably applies.
9th Jun '16 11:28:21 PM CassandraLeo
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* New York-based PsychedelicRock band The Psychic Paramount's [=CDs=] are generally some of the loudest ever. ''Gamelan into the Mink Supernatural'' is [=DR0=] and only a shade quieter than ''Venereology'' (see a couple of entries above). As they are also a NoiseRock band, it's safe to say ArtisticLicense probably applies.

to:

* New York-based PsychedelicRock band The Psychic Paramount's [=CDs=] are generally some of the loudest ever. ''Gamelan into the Mink Supernatural'' is [=DR0=] and only a shade quieter than ''Venereology'' (see a couple of entries above). Their other CDs aren't quite as loud, but still usually in the [=DR3-4=] range (''Origins and Primitives'', which contains a number of acoustic tracks, is better, being overall [=DR6=]). As they are also a NoiseRock band, it's safe to say ArtisticLicense probably applies.
9th Jun '16 11:20:25 PM CassandraLeo
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* Intentionally invoked by a number of Noise and early {{Industrial}} artists, most notably by Whitehouse on ''Birthdeath Experience'' (1979) and ''Right To Kill'' (1984), on which ''everything'' is "in the red". HellIsThatNoise, indeed. Averted by legendary harsh-noise artist Merzbow, whose production tends to be frighteningly clear.

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* Intentionally invoked by a number of Noise and early {{Industrial}} artists, most notably by Whitehouse on ''Birthdeath Experience'' (1979) and ''Right To Kill'' (1984), on which ''everything'' is "in the red". HellIsThatNoise, indeed. Averted by legendary harsh-noise artist Merzbow, whose production tends to be frighteningly clear.clear (though see below).


Added DiffLines:

* New York-based PsychedelicRock band The Psychic Paramount's [=CDs=] are generally some of the loudest ever. ''Gamelan into the Mink Supernatural'' is [=DR0=] and only a shade quieter than ''Venereology'' (see a couple of entries above). As they are also a NoiseRock band, it's safe to say ArtisticLicense probably applies.
24th May '16 11:43:46 PM CassandraLeo
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This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, which actually serves to nullify the ability to pull off loudness war stunts, even though it seems counterintuitive that this would be the case. While it's commonly believed that it's impossible to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, this isn't strictly true; however, the format's limitations are of ''average loudness'' (as contrasted with digital formats, whose limitations are of ''peak loudness''), meaning that if you want to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, you will need to lower the volume to do so. If you tried to press a [=DR3=] recording with the same loudness as it would have on CD, it would usually just throw off the needle or make the record unplayable. Since the average loudness would therefore be the same, this nullifies the incentive to pull off loudness war stunts; a [=DR10=] master would stand out over a [=DR3=] one on vinyl even more than it would on other formats. The {{Irony}} in all this, of course, is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.

to:

This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, which actually serves to nullify the ability to pull off loudness war stunts, even though it seems counterintuitive that this would be the case. While it's commonly believed that it's impossible to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, this isn't strictly true; however, the format's limitations are of ''average loudness'' (as contrasted with digital formats, whose limitations are of ''peak loudness''), meaning that if you want to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, you will need to lower the volume to do so. If you tried to press a [=DR3=] recording with the same loudness as it would have on CD, it would usually just throw off the needle or make the record unplayable. Since the average loudness would therefore be the same, war stunts will have little to no effect on a vinyl record's average loudness, this nullifies reduces the incentive to pull off loudness war such stunts; a [=DR10=] master would stand out over a [=DR3=] one on vinyl even more than it would on other formats.formats, meaning that the only incentive for labels to press loudness war masters to vinyl is simply being too lazy to master the album separately (which, unfortunately, still happens fairly often). The {{Irony}} in all this, of course, is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.
24th May '16 11:41:23 PM CassandraLeo
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This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, which actually serves to nullify the ability to pull off loudness war stunts, even though it seems counterintuitive that this would be the case. While it's commonly believed that it's impossible to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, this isn't strictly true; however, the format's limitations are of ''average loudness'', meaning that if you want to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, you will need to lower the volume to do so. If you tried to press a [=DR3=] recording with the same loudness as it would have on CD, it would usually just throw off the needle or make the record unplayable. Since the average loudness would therefore be the same, this nullifies the incentive to pull off loudness war stunts; a [=DR10=] master would stand out over a [=DR3=] one on vinyl even more than it would on other formats. The {{Irony}} in all this, of course, is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.

to:

This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, which actually serves to nullify the ability to pull off loudness war stunts, even though it seems counterintuitive that this would be the case. While it's commonly believed that it's impossible to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, this isn't strictly true; however, the format's limitations are of ''average loudness'', loudness'' (as contrasted with digital formats, whose limitations are of ''peak loudness''), meaning that if you want to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, you will need to lower the volume to do so. If you tried to press a [=DR3=] recording with the same loudness as it would have on CD, it would usually just throw off the needle or make the record unplayable. Since the average loudness would therefore be the same, this nullifies the incentive to pull off loudness war stunts; a [=DR10=] master would stand out over a [=DR3=] one on vinyl even more than it would on other formats. The {{Irony}} in all this, of course, is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.
24th May '16 11:40:28 PM CassandraLeo
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This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, and any attempt to pull loudness war stunts on them will usually just throw off the needle or make them unplayable. The {{Irony}} in all this is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.

to:

This is the main reason why people say vinyl records are "higher quality" (besides personal taste reasons such as the crackle and hum of records). The inherent quality of [=CDs=] is far better than records, but since "records are for audiophiles", there is far less incentive for audio engineers to trade-off quality for loudness on records. Additionally, vinyls have a smaller dynamic range, and any attempt which actually serves to nullify the ability to pull off loudness war stunts on them stunts, even though it seems counterintuitive that this would be the case. While it's commonly believed that it's impossible to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, this isn't strictly true; however, the format's limitations are of ''average loudness'', meaning that if you want to press a low-dynamic-range master to vinyl, you will need to lower the volume to do so. If you tried to press a [=DR3=] recording with the same loudness as it would have on CD, it would usually just throw off the needle or make them the record unplayable. Since the average loudness would therefore be the same, this nullifies the incentive to pull off loudness war stunts; a [=DR10=] master would stand out over a [=DR3=] one on vinyl even more than it would on other formats. The {{Irony}} in all this this, of course, is that digital formats like the CD finally made it possible to make audio as ''quiet'' as you wanted without any analog hiss obscuring it, but with a lot of equipment out there accommodating the audio levels of the War, exploiting this quality will often make things simply too quiet to hear.
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