History Main / LostInTranslation

13th Jan '18 3:06:08 PM CassandraLeo
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[[folder:Music]]
* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at least two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "[[Music/TheFlamingLips Flaming Lips]]", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Music]]
* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at least two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "[[Music/TheFlamingLips Flaming Lips]]", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]
[[/folder]]
13th Jan '18 3:04:51 PM CassandraLeo
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* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at last two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "[[Music/TheFlamingLips Flaming Lips]]", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]

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* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at last least two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "[[Music/TheFlamingLips Flaming Lips]]", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]
13th Jan '18 3:03:36 PM CassandraLeo
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* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at last two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "Flaming Lips", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]

to:

* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at last two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "Flaming Lips", "[[Music/TheFlamingLips Flaming Lips]]", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]
13th Jan '18 3:02:51 PM CassandraLeo
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Music]]
* The intended translation of Japanese singer Gotō Mariko's third solo album's title, ''こわれた箱にりなっくす'' (romaji: ''Kowa reta hako ni Rinakkusu''), is ''Linux in a Broken Box''. Sensible enough. One linguistic anomaly of the title is that the final five characters, which represent "Linux", are written in hiragana. Normally (though not exclusively), loanwords from other languages are written in Japanese using katakana characters, which are otherwise mostly used in Japanese writing for the sake of emphasis. (The katakana for "Linux", or more specifically "Rinakkusu", would be "リナックス"). A probable reason Gotō used hiragana is that there's an untranslatable double meaning in the title, explained by the title of the second track, "Re:なくす" (romaji: "Re:nakusu", pronounced identically to "Rinakkusu"; note the identical final three characters to the album title). The meaning of the song title is "Re-Lost".[[note]]Gotō has also used hiragana for loanwords in at last two other titles, namely "ふれーみんぐりっぷす" ("Furēmingu rippusu", i.e., "Flaming Lips", which would be "フレーミングリップス" in katakana) and "れっつきるみ" ("Rettsu kiru mi", i.e., "Let's Kill Me", which would be "レッツキルミ"). The reason for this is unclear.[[/note]]
[[/folder]]
3rd Jan '18 7:12:50 PM rjd1922
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* The major significance of Rena from ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry''s MeaningfulRename is this. To most it seems like all she did was [[spoiler:drop the "I" in "Reina"]].

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* The major significance of Rena from ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry''s ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'''s MeaningfulRename is this. To most it seems like all she did was [[spoiler:drop the "I" in "Reina"]].



* From ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'', the veterinarian, Dr. Crab, is described within various out of game sources as having a large potty-mouth which likes to run itself a lot. In the Japanese version, he often refers to Sniper, the penguin chick, by "kono yarou", which is a phrase that usually gets translated to "you bastard". The phrase, just like other such words in Japan, isn't actually profanity however. The severity of how inappropriate it is to say it depends on how the phrase is said. In this sense, any form of such insult isn't really inappropriate. In the English version, to try and recreate this, they have Dr. Crab call Sniper a "son of a gun". Although this obviously makes the entire "he has a large potty mouth" part of his character, less apparent, considering he's obviously purposefully censoring himself. [[FridgeBrilliance Although this actually created a pretty clever pun in itself, in the fact that Sniper, in a sense, is literally the son of a gun. Aka, Rifle the Penguin.]]

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* From ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'', the veterinarian, Dr. Herman Crab, is described within various out of game sources as having a large potty-mouth which likes to run itself a lot. In the Japanese version, he often refers to Sniper, the penguin chick, by "kono yarou", which is a phrase that usually gets translated to "you bastard". The phrase, just like other such words in Japan, isn't actually profanity however. The severity of how inappropriate it is to say it depends on how the phrase is said. In this sense, any form of such insult isn't really inappropriate. In the English version, to try and recreate this, they have Dr. Crab call Sniper a "son of a gun". Although this obviously makes the entire "he has a large potty mouth" part of his character, less apparent, considering he's obviously purposefully censoring himself. [[FridgeBrilliance Although this actually created a pretty clever pun in itself, in the fact that Sniper, in a sense, is literally the son of a gun. Aka, Rifle the Penguin.]]]]
* In ''VisualNovel/DokiDokiLiteratureClub'', which was originally written in English, Natsuki makes a joke about Monika not liking fried squid (since "ika" is Japanese for "squid"), which Monika notes doesn't make sense in translation. In a weird double example, it doesn't completely work in Japanese either; due to how the Japanese language works, with characters assigned to syllables rather than individual letters, Monika's name would be written as モニカ (Mo-Ni-Ka) as opposed to もんいか (Mo-n-i-ka), which the pun is based off, since squid is written as いか (i-ka).
1st Jan '18 11:01:20 PM icewater
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* An anatomy paper in [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0146193 PLOS ONE]] written by Chinese-national authors referred to (mother)nature as a "creator" because how one of the scientists (who was neither a native English speaker, nor professional translator) translated the Chinese word, resulting in [[https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/mar/07/hand-of-god-scientific-plos-one-anatomy-paper-citing-a-creator-retracted-after-furore an outcry]] among British and American scientists, bringing increased scrutiny on the paper, [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0151685 which it didn't survive]]. China, of course, has a very different religious tradition than the UK or US, and the furthest thing in a Chinese scientist's mind conducting state-sponsered research in an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_atheism#China officially atheist state]], just before their leader [[http://time.com/4306179/china-religion-freedom-xi-jinping-muslim-christian-xinjiang-buddhist-tibet/ reaffirmed China's committment to atheism]], would be to be mistaken for an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creationism_by_country#United_States American/British-style creationist]]. It's now an example in [[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312077112_The_Challenges_and_Opportunities_for_English_Teachers_in_Teaching_ESP_in_China ESL materials]] how even having a high level of formal knowledge in a specific domain does not prevent the need of native speaker consultation, as even ''one single poorly translated word'' can have serious professional ramifications.

to:

* An anatomy paper in [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0146193 PLOS ONE]] written by Chinese-national authors referred to (mother)nature as a "creator" because how one of the scientists (who was neither a native English speaker, nor professional translator) translated the Chinese word, resulting in [[https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/mar/07/hand-of-god-scientific-plos-one-anatomy-paper-citing-a-creator-retracted-after-furore an outcry]] among British and American scientists, bringing increased scrutiny on the paper, [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0151685 which it didn't survive]]. China, of course, has a very different religious tradition than the UK or US, and the furthest thing in a Chinese scientist's mind conducting state-sponsered research in an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_atheism#China officially atheist state]], just before their leader [[http://time.com/4306179/china-religion-freedom-xi-jinping-muslim-christian-xinjiang-buddhist-tibet/ reaffirmed China's committment to atheism]], would be to be mistaken for an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creationism_by_country#United_States American/British-style creationist]]. It's now an example in [[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312077112_The_Challenges_and_Opportunities_for_English_Teachers_in_Teaching_ESP_in_China ESL materials]] how even having a high level of formal knowledge in a specific domain does not prevent the need of native speaker consultation, as even ''one single poorly translated word'' can have serious professional ramifications.ramifications, especially if that word has a lot of cultural baggage to the listerner.
1st Jan '18 10:58:50 PM icewater
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Added DiffLines:

* An anatomy paper in [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0146193 PLOS ONE]] written by Chinese-national authors referred to (mother)nature as a "creator" because how one of the scientists (who was neither a native English speaker, nor professional translator) translated the Chinese word, resulting in [[https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/mar/07/hand-of-god-scientific-plos-one-anatomy-paper-citing-a-creator-retracted-after-furore an outcry]] among British and American scientists, bringing increased scrutiny on the paper, [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0151685 which it didn't survive]]. China, of course, has a very different religious tradition than the UK or US, and the furthest thing in a Chinese scientist's mind conducting state-sponsered research in an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_atheism#China officially atheist state]], just before their leader [[http://time.com/4306179/china-religion-freedom-xi-jinping-muslim-christian-xinjiang-buddhist-tibet/ reaffirmed China's committment to atheism]], would be to be mistaken for an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creationism_by_country#United_States American/British-style creationist]]. It's now an example in [[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312077112_The_Challenges_and_Opportunities_for_English_Teachers_in_Teaching_ESP_in_China ESL materials]] how even having a high level of formal knowledge in a specific domain does not prevent the need of native speaker consultation, as even ''one single poorly translated word'' can have serious professional ramifications.
1st Jan '18 5:50:12 AM Saurubiker
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** In VideoGame/MetalGearSolid 3, Volgin uses the phrase "Kuwabara, Kuwabara" several times. It's a Japanese expression equivalent to the English "knock on wood" that is believed to ward off lightning. At the end of the game, [[spoiler:he refuses to say the phrase, instead ''mocking'' the storm, and [[PoeticJustice is promptly struck by lightning]].]]

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** In VideoGame/MetalGearSolid 3, ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'', Emma's parrot frequently says the phrase "Venus in cancer", which makes Emma seem like an astrology nut. In the Japanese version, what the parrot was actually referring was the Venusian from the 1956 B-movie ''It Conquered World''. That's because the creature in question is called the ''Kinsei Gani'' (金星ガニ) or "Venusian crab" in the Japanese version, which is supposed to reflect Emma's interest in sci-fi B-movie.
** In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3'',
Volgin uses the phrase "Kuwabara, Kuwabara" several times. It's a Japanese expression equivalent to the English "knock on wood" that is believed to ward off lightning. At the end of the game, [[spoiler:he refuses to say the phrase, instead ''mocking'' the storm, and [[PoeticJustice is promptly struck by lightning]].]]
31st Dec '17 8:07:28 PM Saurubiker
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** "La Li Lu Le Lo" are "missing" vowel sounds in Japanese; the point of the name is that it's not technically possible to write or say it in Hiragana (because there's no distinction between "L" and "R" and the string is usually "Ra Ri Ru Re Ro"), so the Patriots censor their name to something that can't be written down or spoken (or at least ''not anymore'' since E.E. claims that the Patriots' power is such that they could remove entire parts of the (Japanese) language without anyone noticing, meaning this could have been deliberately engineered). This is never really gone into in the dub (since English doesn't do that), so it just seems to be meaningless babble.



** A good ActorAllusion joke in ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' is lost in English. If the player decides to kill the unconscious Ocelot in Rassvet, you get a NonStandardGameOver where Colonel Campbell from the previous three games yells at Snake for causing a [[TemporalParadox Time Paradox]]. In the English version, it's a non-sequitur. In the Japanese version, it's because Campbell's voiced by the same actor who dubbed Doc Brown in ''Film/BackToTheFuture''.

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** A good ActorAllusion joke in ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' is lost in English. If the player decides to kill the unconscious Ocelot in Rassvet, you get a NonStandardGameOver where Colonel Campbell from the previous three games original ''Metal Gear Solid'' yells at Snake for causing a [[TemporalParadox Time Paradox]]. In the English version, it's a non-sequitur. In the Japanese version, it's because Campbell's voiced by Creator/TakeshiAono, the same actor who dubbed Doc Brown in ''Film/BackToTheFuture''.
11th Dec '17 11:38:08 PM Steven
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'', Leon talks to [[MissionControl Hunnigan]] about the cult he faced, to which Hunnigan tells him that their name is the Los Illuminados and Leon replies that it's "quite a mouthful". Saying the name in English isn't exactly a tongue twister, but it's more difficult to say in Japanese, which makes Leon's quip about the name in the English script seem strange.
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