History Main / LostInTranslation

22nd Mar '17 10:48:20 AM zaqq
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** Would be nice if it where that easy. But for example in Germany both "Fourteen thirty" and "half-three" are used interchangeably all the time. Usually it's not a problem since there are very few situations in which both early morning and late evening would make sense. A university class starting at "half eight", a fight going at "six", or a nature documentary being on TV at "eleven" would be ambigous, but it so rarely causes problems that people don't even think about it.

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** Would be nice if it where were that easy. But for example in Germany both "Fourteen thirty" and "half-three" are used interchangeably all the time. Usually it's not a problem since there are very few situations in which both early morning and late evening would make sense. A university class starting at "half eight", a fight going at "six", or a nature documentary being on TV at "eleven" would be ambigous, but it so rarely causes problems that people don't even think about it.
16th Mar '17 4:28:52 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'':
** As with most Creator/ReneGoscinny-scripted comics, the dialogue in ''Iznogoud'' relies heavily on puns and wordplay which don't translate well into other languages, forcing the translators to either come up with puns that do make sense in their language or change the dialogue so that the density of jokes is the same but they don't happen in the same place. For example, the title story in the album ''Des astres pour Iznogoud'' translates as "Stars for Iznogoud", but is a homophone of "Désastres pour Iznogoud", meaning "Disasters for Iznogoud". The title was rendered in English as "Iznogoud Rockets to Stardom".[[note]] The original English translators, Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge, already had experience dealing with Goscinny's fondness for puns in their capacity as the English translators for ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}''.[[/note]]
** One of the wax statues Iznogoud brings to life in "The Wax Museum" is real life [[TheBluebeard Bluebeard]] Henri Landru; he is uninterested in bumping off the Caliph since he specialises in killing women, so he brings a waxwork of Lucrezia Borgia to life instead, and they go off together, each plotting the other's demise. In the English translation of the AnimatedAdaptation, the waxwork is identified instead as UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper (with the number of his victims changed from 11 to 5 accordingly), since Landru is not as well-known in the English-speaking world, but the waxwork still looks like Landru, and since Jack the Ripper's identity - and appearance - are a mystery, we have no idea if it looks like him.
** Oddly played straight and averted in Finland. Finland being possibly one of three countries that changed Iznogoud's name (the other ones are Poland - where he was named as ''Wezyr Nic-po-nim'', but this translation was used only in Polish dub of the comic's AnimatedAdaptation - and Italy, where he was named ''Gran Bailam'', again only in the cartoon), plenty of jokes about his name (is no good) instantly become void, and the tone of the whole series is somewhat changed around his Finnish name - Ahmed Ahne (lit. "Ahmed Greedy").



* Oddly played straight and averted in Finland with the series ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}. Finland being possibly one of three countries that changed Iznogoud's name (the other ones are Poland - where he was named as ''Wezyr Nic-po-nim'', but this translation was used only in Polish dub of the comic's AnimatedAdaptation - and Italy, where he was named ''Gran Bailam'', again only in the cartoon), plenty of jokes about his name (is no good) instantly become void, and the tone of the whole series is somewhat changed around his Finnish name - Ahmed Ahne (lit. "Ahmed Greedy").
8th Mar '17 10:18:05 PM jormis29
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* The Creator/TexAvery catoon "Symphony in Slang" is about a man telling his life story with lots and lots of idiomatic expressions, all of it illustrated by {{Visual Pun}}s (e.g. someone's "old flame" is depicted as an actual humanoid mass of fire, someone "draws a gun" on the hero... with a ballpoint pen, etc.) The cartoon was dubbed into Polish, and is still occasionally shown on the TV there. How did the translators manage to translate all this wordplay, you ask? Well, they ''didn't''. All the idioms were translated literally; result--seven minutes of utter gibberish. Really, ''this'' is definitely the kind of a work which one shouldn't even attempt to translate.

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* The Creator/TexAvery catoon "Symphony in Slang" "WesternAnimation/SymphonyInSlang" is about a man telling his life story with lots and lots of idiomatic expressions, all of it illustrated by {{Visual Pun}}s (e.g. someone's "old flame" is depicted as an actual humanoid mass of fire, someone "draws a gun" on the hero... with a ballpoint pen, etc.) The cartoon was dubbed into Polish, and is still occasionally shown on the TV there. How did the translators manage to translate all this wordplay, you ask? Well, they ''didn't''. All the idioms were translated literally; result--seven minutes of utter gibberish. Really, ''this'' is definitely the kind of a work which one shouldn't even attempt to translate.
7th Mar '17 5:24:25 PM nombretomado
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* The MarxBrothers movies were famous in Spain for having pretty much literal translations, making every other pun and joke a complete NonSequitur. They were still funny, mind you, but [[SurrealHumor it was a different kind of humor]].

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* The MarxBrothers Creator/MarxBrothers movies were famous in Spain for having pretty much literal translations, making every other pun and joke a complete NonSequitur. They were still funny, mind you, but [[SurrealHumor it was a different kind of humor]].
5th Mar '17 11:14:33 AM Occidensill
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* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev's famous "Мы вас закопаем" ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_will_bury_you "We will bury you"]]) quote was taken by many in 'the West' (NATO et. al) to be a promise of nuclear holocaust. [[BlindIdiotTranslation While that]] ''[[BlindIdiotTranslation was]]'' [[BlindIdiotTranslation the literal translation of what he said]], it was in fact a Russian-language proverb. The ''metaphorical'' meaning was that the Soviet Union would outlive the capitalist countries and be there to help out at their proverbial funerals.

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* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev's famous "Мы вас закопаем" ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_will_bury_you "We will bury you"]]) quote was taken by many in 'the West' (NATO et. al) to be a promise of nuclear holocaust. [[BlindIdiotTranslation While that]] ''[[BlindIdiotTranslation was]]'' [[BlindIdiotTranslation that ''was'' the literal translation of what he said]], said, it was in fact a Russian-language proverb. The ''metaphorical'' meaning was that the Soviet Union would outlive the capitalist countries and be there to help out at their proverbial funerals.



* Some languages, like English, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and many others doesn't have grammatical genders for many words and it can be a pain to translate to languages that features them, like Spanish, Italian, French, Norwegian, etc, especially when the original author keeps the gender of the person as ambiguous. This can become ''nightmarish'' when ValuesDissonance are involved, especially when the AmbiguousGenderIdentity trope is involved between countries when that trope is normally accepted or tolerated and countries when this is definitely ''out of question''.

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* Some languages, like English, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and many others doesn't don't have grammatical genders for many words and it can be a pain to translate to languages that features them, like Spanish, Italian, French, Norwegian, etc, especially when the original author keeps the gender of the person as ambiguous. This can become ''nightmarish'' when ValuesDissonance are involved, especially when the AmbiguousGenderIdentity trope is involved between countries when that trope is normally accepted or tolerated and countries when this is definitely ''out of question''.
27th Feb '17 7:46:24 AM TheGreatUnknown
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** It can happen with visual puns as well. Wobbuffet, Jesse's Wobbuffet and its constantly interrupting everything, in particular, was inspired by a Japanese comedian. Non-Japanese 'Pokemon'' fans were completely lost on it. It would have been semi-intelligible (though losing its full meaning) if Wobbuffet kept a name that sounded like a situationally-appropriate conversational phrase, like in the Japanese. (Said phrase was part of said comedian's well-known CatchPhrase.)

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** It can happen with visual puns as well. Wobbuffet, Jesse's Wobbuffet and its constantly interrupting everything, in particular, was inspired by a Japanese comedian. Non-Japanese 'Pokemon'' ''Pokemon'' fans were completely lost on it. It would have been semi-intelligible (though losing its full meaning) if Wobbuffet kept a name that sounded like a situationally-appropriate conversational phrase, like in the Japanese. (Said phrase was part of said comedian's well-known CatchPhrase.)
12th Feb '17 9:46:10 AM gb00393
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': A lot of official translations fail to recognize the difference between a "wight" (a re-animated corpse) and a "White Walker" (the ice demons who create them). Admittedly, the same applies to many English-speaking viewers since it hasn't quite been explained yet.
8th Feb '17 3:19:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* One [[BlindIdiotTranslation particularly heinous Dutch translation]] of Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/JohnnyAndTheDead'', which includes snatches from well-known pop songs in a passage featuring a radio, actually translates a line from BohemianRhapsody. [[FacePalm Word for word]].

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* One [[BlindIdiotTranslation particularly heinous Dutch translation]] of Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/JohnnyAndTheDead'', which includes snatches from well-known pop songs in a passage featuring a radio, actually translates a line from BohemianRhapsody.Music/BohemianRhapsody. [[FacePalm Word for word]].
30th Jan '17 9:11:33 PM Pichu-kun
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* In a French fan sub of ''RozenMaiden'', it became very obvious the sub was based off an english sub when Kanaria said she was going to play a requiem "pour la sorciere perdue" (for the witch that was lost), which is a mistranslation of what she said in the English sub: That which was lost.

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* In a French fan sub of ''RozenMaiden'', ''Manga/RozenMaiden'', it became very obvious the sub was based off an english sub when Kanaria said she was going to play a requiem "pour la sorciere perdue" (for the witch that was lost), which is a mistranslation of what she said in the English sub: That which was lost.






** The name of King Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' is a [[PunnyName pun]] on the Japanese words for "ship" (fune) and "sailboat" (hansen). It is easier to see the connection in the Japanese localization of the game (Da'''fune'''su No'''hansen''' Hairaru).



** One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me". The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me".

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** One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me". The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me". ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon 2}}'' fixes this by changing the translation to "This Way!"



* The name of King Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' is a [[PunnyName pun]] on the Japanese words for "ship" (fune) and "sailboat" (hansen). It is easier to see the connection in the Japanese localization of the game (Da'''fune'''su No'''hansen''' Hairaru).
29th Jan '17 3:17:00 PM staticat09
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Added DiffLines:

* There are English rhyming versions of popular psalms, although they are used strictly for worship and not for reading. Many churches have conceded that they "force" stilted rhymes, and detract from the original meaning of the psalm.
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