History Main / LostInTranslation

26th Jun '16 6:39:36 PM Pichu-kun
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** Red's rival in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' is named "Ookido Green" in Japan. Due to countries outside of Japan getting the UpdatedRerelease ''Pokemon Blue'', instead of ''Pokemon Green'', he is [[DubNameChange called]] "Blue Oak" internationally. Red and green are opposite colors on the Color Wheel but more commonly people think of blue as red's opposite. The problem comes in future games though. In the remakes to ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' his bedroom is completely ''green''. Renaming him "Blue" also messes with the FamilyThemeNaming (his grandfather is Professor Oak and his sister is Daisy Oak). Oddly internationally the remakes for ''Red'' and ''Blue'' were ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'' however Blue's name was kept as "Blue" instead of {{retcon}}ned.

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** Red's rival in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' is named "Ookido Green" in Japan. Due to countries outside of Japan getting the UpdatedRerelease ''Pokemon Blue'', instead of ''Pokemon Green'', he is [[DubNameChange called]] "Blue Oak" internationally. Red and green are opposite colors on the Color Wheel but more commonly people think of blue as red's opposite. opposite so this change worked fine originally. The problem comes in future games though.games. In the remakes to ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' his bedroom is completely ''green''. Renaming him "Blue" also messes with the FamilyThemeNaming (his grandfather is Professor Oak and his sister is Daisy Oak). Oddly Oddly, internationally the remakes for ''Red'' and ''Blue'' were ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'' however Blue's name was kept as "Blue" instead of being {{retcon}}ned.



* ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'':
* O* One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me". The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me".
** In-series this is the reason Inklings worship a fax machine. An AlternateCharacterReading for "god" is "paper". [[spoiler:The game takes place in HumanitysWake and Inkling language evolved from Japanese]].



* The major significance of Rena from ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry''s MeaningfulRename is this. To most it seems like all she did was drop the "I" in "Reina".
* In ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'', one of the biggest twists of the game is that [[spoiler:the line given out by Zero, "An exist is hidden, but it can be found. Seek a door. Seek a door that carries a 9", wasn't "seek a door that carries a 9" at all. But rather "seek a door that carries a ''q''. Therefore meaning that the door's digital root number was actually 8, with Q being 26 in base-22. Near the start of the game, the rules of the game are read out by Junpei from a piece of paper, who must have mistake the q as a 9 when reading them out, which makes sense. But the moments in which characters think about Zero ''speaking'' the lines over the speaker doesn't make much sense with the twist in the English version. In Japanese, 9 is pronounced "Kyuu", making 9 and Q hard to distinguish audibly.]]

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* The major significance of Rena from ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry''s MeaningfulRename is this. To most it seems like all she did was drop [[spoiler:drop the "I" in "Reina".
"Reina"]].
* In ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'', one ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'':
** One
of the biggest twists of the game is that [[spoiler:the line given out by Zero, "An exist is hidden, but it can be found. Seek a door. Seek a door that carries a 9", wasn't "seek a door that carries a 9" at all. But rather "seek a door that carries a ''q''. Therefore meaning that the door's digital root number was actually 8, with Q being 26 in base-22. Near the start of the game, the rules of the game are read out by Junpei from a piece of paper, who must have mistake the q as a 9 when reading them out, which makes sense. But the moments in which characters think about Zero ''speaking'' the lines over the speaker doesn't make much sense with the twist in the English version. In Japanese, 9 is pronounced "Kyuu", making 9 and Q hard to distinguish audibly.]]



* An episode of the ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' cartoon from the '80s included a quest involving a hare. In English, the confusion between the words hair and hare are played up as the adventurers think they are looking for hair. In the version aired in Mexico, this was explained with one of the characters saying, "Oh, you mean the hair on the rabbit!"

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* ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'':
**
An episode of the ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' cartoon from the '80s included a quest involving a hare. In English, the confusion between the words hair and hare are played up as the adventurers think they are looking for hair. In the version aired in Mexico, this was explained with one of the characters saying, "Oh, you mean the hair on the rabbit!"



* The Latin dub of ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' also got "Twinkle toes" translated as two different things one for every season, and you can just imagine how much of Sokka's humour got lost in translation.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'':
**
The Latin dub of ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' also got "Twinkle toes" translated as two different things one for every season, and you can just imagine how much of Sokka's humour got lost in translation.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "Accent You Hate", a school bully hated kids with funny accents, to the extent of bullying Dexter's friends and challenging him to a fight, but in the Mexican dub every trace of a funny accent is lost, so it makes no sense that he disliked Dexter's since it's completely neutral. It makes even less sense considering that Dexter's voice actor for LatAm sounds very normal and not squeaky and young as in English.

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* ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'':
**
In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "Accent You Hate", a school bully hated kids with funny accents, to the extent of bullying Dexter's friends and challenging him to a fight, but in the Mexican dub every trace of a funny accent is lost, so it makes no sense that he disliked Dexter's since it's completely neutral. It makes even less sense considering that Dexter's voice actor for LatAm sounds very normal and not squeaky and young as in English.


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* The song "Stronger Than You" from ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' is about ThePowerOfLove involving two female characters. The French dub originally translated it as a song about ThePowerOfFriendship. After complaints about the dub trying to HideYourLesbians, it was stated to be a translation issue and the song was redubbed properly.
24th Jun '16 12:05:22 AM Korodzik
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* A RunningGag in Literature/{{Discworld}} books is the Librarian (an orangutan) [[BerserkButton going into a rage]] whenever someone calls him a "monkey" rather than an "ape", as orangutans are apes. Unfortunately, this doesn't work in Polish, a language which doesn't have separate words for "monkey" and "ape". The translators usually resort to translating them as "małpiszon" (an informal and somewhat dismissive form) and "małpa" (the regular form), but not only this loses the spirit of the original joke (the Librarian getting angry at someone's biological ignorance), but ends up sounding rather unnatural since "małpiszon" isn't a word a typical person would use spontaneously.


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* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'''s episode "May the Best Pet Win" has a RunningGag where Fluttershy corrects those who'd call Tank a turtle (an aquatic animal), rather than a tortoise (a land animal). This works much worse in the Polish dub, as this language doesn't have entirely separate words for both animals; the Polish terms for "turtle" and "tortoise" are basically "aquatic tortoise" and "land-based tortoise". So, in the Polish dub every time someone mentions that Tank's a tortoise, Fluttershy pops up to completely unnecessarily note that he's "[[CaptainObvious land-based]]".
23rd Jun '16 8:20:35 PM nombretomado
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* The dubbing of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' for Latin America has drawn heavy criticism for many reasons, but among others; simply disregarding the source material and making up jokes, using to many Mexican local expression (generally voice actor in dubbing tend to avoid that and use standard Spanish) and changing the meaning of some jokes apparently thinking that the Latino viewer is not going to get it. For example, when the guys bought a replica of the machine use in ''TheTimeMachine'', the Spanish dubbing change the jokes to make references to ''BackToTheFuture''. Like if no one in Latin America knows what The Time Machine is.

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* The dubbing of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' for Latin America has drawn heavy criticism for many reasons, but among others; simply disregarding the source material and making up jokes, using to many Mexican local expression (generally voice actor in dubbing tend to avoid that and use standard Spanish) and changing the meaning of some jokes apparently thinking that the Latino viewer is not going to get it. For example, when the guys bought a replica of the machine use in ''TheTimeMachine'', ''Film/{{The Time Machine|1960}}'', the Spanish dubbing change the jokes to make references to ''BackToTheFuture''. Like if no one in Latin America knows what The Time Machine is.
11th Jun '16 1:01:40 PM nombretomado
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* Two Disney series during that time, ''TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' and ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'', had '''literal''' ones in their episodes, ''[[TitleDrop Lost In Translation]]'' and ''Lost And Found in Translation'', respectively. Both are PlayedForLaughs.

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* Two Disney series during that time, ''TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' and ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'', had '''literal''' ones in their episodes, ''[[TitleDrop Lost In Translation]]'' and ''Lost And Found in Translation'', respectively. Both are PlayedForLaughs.
9th Jun '16 9:30:34 AM StFan
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* In ''VideoGame/{{La-Mulana}}'', the name of Duracuets is supposed to be an [[PortmanteauSeriesNickname abbreviation]] of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''. Fixed somewhat in the remake, where it's translated as "Dracuet".

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* In ''VideoGame/{{La-Mulana}}'', ''VideoGame/LaMulana'', the name of Duracuets is supposed to be an [[PortmanteauSeriesNickname abbreviation]] of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''. Fixed somewhat in the remake, where it's translated as "Dracuet".



** The original script gave Cloud a habit of speaking with clichéd idioms, with the idea being that he's someone whose own words weren't his own - a habit strongly associated with the character by Japanese fans, and {{Lampshaded}} in ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy''. In the English version it's [[{{Woolseyism}} Woolseyfied]] into him using a lot of understatement and undercutting his own words, which isn't as memorable and hasn't carried over to any of his future appearances.

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** The original script gave Cloud a habit of speaking with clichéd idioms, with the idea being that he's someone whose own words weren't his own - -- a habit strongly associated with the character by Japanese fans, and {{Lampshaded}} in ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy''. In the English version it's [[{{Woolseyism}} Woolseyfied]] into him using a lot of understatement and undercutting his own words, which isn't as memorable and hasn't carried over to any of his future appearances.
8th Jun '16 5:42:17 AM pinkdalek
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** Aeris's speaking pattern in Japanese comes across as being tomboyish and rough, to match her low-class upbringing and contrast with her girly appearance. In English, her speech pattern is made playful and almost cutesy ("Hmmmmm!"), meaning [[{{Fanon}} a lot of the irony was lost on English-speaking fans]].

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** JapanesePronouns and modes of politeness were all lost:
***
Aeris's speaking pattern in Japanese comes across as being tomboyish and rough, to match her low-class upbringing and contrast with her girly appearance. In English, her speech pattern is made playful and almost cutesy ("Hmmmmm!"), meaning [[{{Fanon}} a lot of the irony was lost on English-speaking fans]].fans]].
*** After we find out the truth about Red XIII's [[ADarkerMe personality]], he goes from speaking in a pompous and condescendingly formal way to speaking like a child. In Japanese, this change affected every line, with his party dialogue in early optional events having alternatives depending on whether his sidequest had been finished or not. This change does carry over to the English script, but thanks to English' more limited palette when it comes to indicating social status and politeness, it's much less striking, with a lot of the changes just being trivial tweaks in phrasing ("That's the reactor, and the condor." / "That's the reactor. And the condor.")
*** During Cloud's possession scenes, the Japanese version had him suddenly start speaking in a formal way to indicate that he'd become a completely different person. In the English version, he speaks in his usual way ("This place is about to get rough.") indicating that MoreThanMindControl might be involved.
8th Jun '16 5:01:49 AM pinkdalek
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* In the first two ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games, Revolver Ocelot is known among his Russian comrades as "Shalashaska", which he claims to be a Russian slang word for "prison". The name "Shalashaska" is actually a mistranslation of the actual word "Sharashka" from Russian (Sharashka) to Japanese (シャラシャーシカ, Sharashaashika) and then from Japanese to English (Shalashaska).

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* In ''Franchise/MetalGear'':
**In
the first two ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games, Revolver Ocelot is known among his Russian comrades as "Shalashaska", which he claims to be a Russian slang word for "prison". The name "Shalashaska" is actually a mistranslation of the actual word "Sharashka" from Russian (Sharashka) to Japanese (シャラシャーシカ, Sharashaashika) and then from Japanese to English (Shalashaska).



** "La Li Lu Le Lo" are "missing" vowel sounds in Japanese; the point of the name is that it's not technically possible to write or say it in Hiragana (because there's no distinction between "L" and "R" and the string is usually "Ra Ri Ru Re Ro"), so the Patriots censor their name to something that can't be written down or spoken (or at least ''not anymore'' since E.E. claims that the Patriots' power is such that they could remove entire parts of the (Japanese) language without anyone noticing, meaning this could have been deliberately engineered). This is never really gone into in the dub (since English doesn't do that), so it just seems to be meaningless babble.



** "La Li Lu Le Lo" are "missing" vowel sounds in Japanese; the point of the name is that it's not technically possible to write or say it in Hiragana (because there's no distinction between "L" and "R" and the string is usually "Ra Ri Ru Re Ro"), so the Patriots censor their name to something that can't be written down or spoken (or at least ''not anymore'' since E.E. claims that the Patriots' power is such that they could remove entire parts of the (Japanese) language without anyone noticing, meaning this could have been deliberately engineered). This is never really gone into in the dub (since English doesn't do that), so it just seems to be meaningless babble.

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** "La Li Lu Le Lo" are "missing" vowel sounds A good ActorAllusion joke in Japanese; ''Metal Gear Solid 3'' is lost in English. If the point of player decides to kill the name is that unconscious Ocelot in Rassvet, you get a NonStandardGameOver where Colonel Campbell from the previous three games yells at Snake for causing a [[TemporalParadox Time Paradox]]. In the English version, it's not technically possible to write or say it in Hiragana (because there's no distinction between "L" and "R" and a non-sequitur. In the string is usually "Ra Ri Ru Re Ro"), so Japanese version, it's because Campbell's voiced by the Patriots censor their name to something that can't be written down or spoken (or at least ''not anymore'' since E.E. claims that the Patriots' power is such that they could remove entire parts of the (Japanese) language without anyone noticing, meaning this could have been deliberately engineered). This is never really gone into same actor who dubbed Doc Brown in the dub (since English doesn't do that), so it just seems to be meaningless babble.''Film/BackToTheFuture''.
4th Jun '16 4:33:09 PM nombretomado
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* The PS2 game ''VideoGame/ApeEscape 3'' features an unlockable parody of Metal Gear Solid, named Mesal Gear Solid. In Japanese, this is a pun- ''Metal Gear'' is transliterated as ''Metaru Gia'', so Mesal becomes ''Mesaru''- Saru being the Japanese word for monkey (the series is called Saru Getchu! there). In English, it's just confusing gibberish.

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* The PS2 [=PS2=] game ''VideoGame/ApeEscape 3'' features an unlockable parody of Metal Gear Solid, named Mesal Gear Solid. In Japanese, this is a pun- ''Metal Gear'' is transliterated as ''Metaru Gia'', so Mesal becomes ''Mesaru''- Saru being the Japanese word for monkey (the series is called Saru Getchu! there). In English, it's just confusing gibberish.
2nd Jun '16 1:04:54 PM Morgenthaler
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* Translating plays is perhaps more susceptible to this than translating novels or other works; getting the words, grammar and tone correct is one thing, but having all that in a translation that sounds natural when spoken by actors is a whole other challenge. Translators, as a result, have to sacrifice either accuracy to the original language in favour of a script better suited to performance, or performability in favour of a more accurate translation.
** For example, due to a text stuffed with ancient greek puns and cultural allusions, {{Aristophanes}}' theatrical work is an awful task to translate.

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* Translating plays is perhaps more susceptible to this than translating novels or other works; getting the words, grammar and tone correct is one thing, but having all that in a translation that sounds natural when spoken by actors is a whole other challenge. Translators, as a result, have to sacrifice either accuracy to the original language in favour of a script better suited to performance, or performability in favour of a more accurate translation.
**
translation. For example, due to a text stuffed with ancient greek puns and cultural allusions, {{Aristophanes}}' Creator/{{Aristophanes}}' theatrical work is an awful task to translate.
30th May '16 6:21:09 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In many Japanese-developed fighting games and beat-'em-ups, it is not uncommon to have a character whose fighting style is listed as "martial arts". Examples includes Terry Bogard from the ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' series, Cody from ''VideoGame/FinalFight'', Joe and Guile from the ''StreetFighter'' series, Ralf and Clark from ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' series, Axel Stone from the ''StreetsOfRage'' series, and Sarah Bryant from the ''VirtuaFighter'' series, among others. This is because at one time the Japanese believed that the English term "martial arts" referred to a specific fighting style and not a general term for combative sports. When martial artist Benny Urquidez was asked what kind of fighting style he used, he stated that he was a "full-contact martial artist", which led the Japanese public to believe that "martial arts" was the name of his fighting style (in reality, Urquidez's main fighting style is full-contact karate). In the martial arts manga ''Shikakui Jungle'' (Squared Jungle), the term "martial arts" is defined as a "fighting style used by the American military" and many video game designers based their definition of "martial arts" on the manga's description. However, to anyone outside Japan, the term "martial arts" is meaningless as far as specific styles are concerned. [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment How can a character have "martial arts" as his "martial arts"?]]

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* In many Japanese-developed fighting games and beat-'em-ups, it is not uncommon to have a character whose fighting style is listed as "martial arts". Examples includes Terry Bogard from the ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' series, Cody from ''VideoGame/FinalFight'', Joe and Guile from the ''StreetFighter'' series, Ralf and Clark from ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' series, Axel Stone from the ''StreetsOfRage'' series, and Sarah Bryant from the ''VirtuaFighter'' ''VideoGame/VirtuaFighter'' series, among others. This is because at one time the Japanese believed that the English term "martial arts" referred to a specific fighting style and not a general term for combative sports. When martial artist Benny Urquidez was asked what kind of fighting style he used, he stated that he was a "full-contact martial artist", which led the Japanese public to believe that "martial arts" was the name of his fighting style (in reality, Urquidez's main fighting style is full-contact karate). In the martial arts manga ''Shikakui Jungle'' (Squared Jungle), the term "martial arts" is defined as a "fighting style used by the American military" and many video game designers based their definition of "martial arts" on the manga's description. However, to anyone outside Japan, the term "martial arts" is meaningless as far as specific styles are concerned. [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment How can a character have "martial arts" as his "martial arts"?]]
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