History Main / LostInTranslation

25th Aug '16 4:58:04 PM pinkdalek
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** You may notice that Cloud's name is [[AerithAndBob even odder than those of the rest of the cast]], having two fantastical names, when the rest of the heroes have normal surnames. This is because Cloud's peculiar surname, Strife, was intended as a slight modification/pun on the common Germanic surname "Strauss" (Suturaa'''ifu''' rather than Suturaa'''uso'''). To Japanese ears, it sounds plausibly like a surname, being only one tweak away from a well-known one. In English, it sounds like a ridiculous and {{Narm}}fully on-the-nose AwesomeMcCoolname.

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** You may notice that Cloud's name is [[AerithAndBob even odder than those of the rest of the cast]], having two fantastical names, when the rest of the heroes have normal surnames. This is because Cloud's peculiar surname, Strife, was intended as a slight modification/pun on the common Germanic surname "Strauss" (Suturaa'''ifu''' rather than Suturaa'''uso''').Suturaa'''uso'''. Note that the name of Cloud's mother was given as 'Claudia Strauss' in the artbook). To Japanese ears, it sounds plausibly like a surname, being only one tweak away from a well-known one. In English, it sounds like a ridiculous and {{Narm}}fully on-the-nose AwesomeMcCoolname.
23rd Aug '16 11:07:02 AM pinkdalek
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** Cloud's {{Catchphrase}} was inconsistently translated as "not interested", "don't really care", "don't care", "not my thing" etc., with the effect of diluting the fact that he has a catch phrase. His later appearances all strictly used "not interested" (the most accurate translation of his Japanese catchphrase, ''kyoumi nai ne'', but fairly rare in the original game), which a lot of English-speaking fans assumed was {{Flanderization}} of his uncaring attitude.

to:

** Cloud's {{Catchphrase}} was inconsistently translated as "not interested", "don't really care", "don't care", "not my thing" etc., with the effect of diluting the fact that he has a catch phrase. His later appearances all strictly used "not interested" (the most accurate translation of his Japanese catchphrase, ''kyoumi nai ne'', but fairly rare in the original game), and made it obviously a catchphrase, which a lot of English-speaking fans assumed was {{Flanderization}} of his uncaring attitude.disaffected attitude. In fact, it had been part of his character from the beginning.
23rd Aug '16 11:03:17 AM pinkdalek
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Added DiffLines:

** Cloud's {{Catchphrase}} was inconsistently translated as "not interested", "don't really care", "don't care", "not my thing" etc., with the effect of diluting the fact that he has a catch phrase. His later appearances all strictly used "not interested" (the most accurate translation of his Japanese catchphrase, ''kyoumi nai ne'', but fairly rare in the original game), which a lot of English-speaking fans assumed was {{Flanderization}} of his uncaring attitude.
20th Aug '16 12:15:35 PM pinkdalek
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** English and Japanese ''do'' share the same allegorical meanings around the term 'spiky' (e.g. a ''spiky'' personality, a ''pointed'' comment, etc.), but it's fair to say that calling Cloud 'spiky-headed' in English just sounds like a reference to his hair. In Japanese, it's '''[[{{Tsundere}} tsun]]''-headed', which comes off like a childish insult about his character (something like "meaniehead") as well as a reference to his hair.

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** English and Japanese ''do'' share the same allegorical meanings around the term 'spiky' (e.g. a ''spiky'' personality, a ''pointed'' comment, etc.), but it's fair to say that calling Cloud 'spiky-headed' in English just sounds like a reference to his hair. In Japanese, it's '''[[{{Tsundere}} tsun]]''-headed', which comes off like a [[BigStupidDoodooHead childish insult about his character (something like "meaniehead") character]] as well as a reference to his hair.
20th Aug '16 9:22:35 AM pinkdalek
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** English and Japanese ''do'' share the same allegorical meanings around the term 'spiky' (e.g. a ''spiky'' personality, a ''pointed'' comment, etc) it's fair to say that calling Cloud 'spiky-headed' in English just sounds like a reference to his hair. In Japanese, it's '''[[{{Tsundere}} tsun]]''-headed', which comes off like a childish insult about his character (something like "meaniehead") as well as a reference to his hair.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''

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** English and Japanese ''do'' share the same allegorical meanings around the term 'spiky' (e.g. a ''spiky'' personality, a ''pointed'' comment, etc) etc.), but it's fair to say that calling Cloud 'spiky-headed' in English just sounds like a reference to his hair. In Japanese, it's '''[[{{Tsundere}} tsun]]''-headed', which comes off like a childish insult about his character (something like "meaniehead") as well as a reference to his hair.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''*''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''
20th Aug '16 8:13:27 AM pinkdalek
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''

to:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''** English and Japanese ''do'' share the same allegorical meanings around the term 'spiky' (e.g. a ''spiky'' personality, a ''pointed'' comment, etc) it's fair to say that calling Cloud 'spiky-headed' in English just sounds like a reference to his hair. In Japanese, it's '''[[{{Tsundere}} tsun]]''-headed', which comes off like a childish insult about his character (something like "meaniehead") as well as a reference to his hair.
*''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''
13th Aug '16 4:53:05 PM TrackmaniaPlayer11
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* In ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'', one of the game's bad endings has Clover [[spoilier:manipulating Sigma into picking betray by seducing him, with the former promising the latter that she'll "listen to anything he says" if he picks betray. Of course, when she then gains her 9 BP and ditches everyone, she says that she promised she'd only listen to what Sigma had to say, not that she'd actually do anything. This sort of makes Sigma seem like an extremely gullible idiot. In the Japanese version, the phrase she uses in her promise is one that's used casually as an affectionate/seductive expression to mean the speaker will do anything that's asked of them, but does literally mean "I'll listen to whatever you say"]].

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* In ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'', one of the game's bad endings has Clover [[spoilier:manipulating [[spoiler:manipulating Sigma into picking betray by seducing him, with the former promising the latter that she'll "listen to anything he says" if he picks betray. Of course, when she then gains her 9 BP and ditches everyone, she says that she promised she'd only listen to what Sigma had to say, not that she'd actually do anything. This sort of makes Sigma seem like an extremely gullible idiot. In the Japanese version, the phrase she uses in her promise is one that's used casually as an affectionate/seductive expression to mean the speaker will do anything that's asked of them, but does literally mean "I'll listen to whatever you say"]].
1st Aug '16 1:38:43 AM TylerL320
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', Kuma's ([[ADogNamedDog Japanese for "bear"]]) name was localized as "Teddie", which is fine in itself. However, the name change unfortunately removed a double pun that appears later in the game: [[spoiler:when he grows a human body and starts leaving the [[EldritchLocation TV World]] to visit the real one]], Kuma uses the alias "Kumada": besides being an actual, common Japanese surname, "Kumada" can be interpreted as meaning "It's kuma". The joke was obviously lost with the localized name, and Teddie simply doesn't use an alias.
** The title of ''Videogame/PersonaQShadowOfTheLabyrinth'' is meant to be a play on ''Sekaiju no Mei'''kyuu''''' ('Q' and 'kyuu' are homophones), another Atlus series. Unfortunately, most fans in the West won't get that, because ''[=SnM=]'' is [[MarketBasedTitle marketed as]] ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'' outside of Japan.

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* In ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTenseiPersona'':
**
''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', 4}}'':
***
Kuma's ([[ADogNamedDog Japanese for "bear"]]) name was localized as "Teddie", which is fine in itself. However, the name change unfortunately removed a double pun that appears later in the game: [[spoiler:when he grows a human body and starts leaving the [[EldritchLocation TV World]] to visit the real one]], Kuma uses the alias "Kumada": besides being an actual, common Japanese surname, "Kumada" can be interpreted as meaning "It's kuma". The joke was obviously lost with the localized name, and Teddie simply doesn't use an alias.
*** Lecherous Teddie constantly refers to "scoring" with ladies, but it's not entirely clear he's aware of what the word even means and most of the party seems bemused or baffled by his word choice. In the original Japanese version, he uses the term "gyakunan", something he picked up from [[spoiler:Shadow Yukiko]], who is a woman. It's used specifically to refer to a woman hitting on a man, explaining the group's reactions. Obviously, there was no real way to translate that into English, so the joke was lost.
*** The Personas used to fuse [[spoiler:Izanagi-no-Okami]] lost some meaning in the English version. In Japanese, the first kana of each of the Personas used in the fusion spell out "[[spoiler:Izanagi-no-ookami-tsukure]]", literally meaning "[[spoiler:create Izanagi-no-Okami]]". This almost barely works in English: the first one or two letters of the first few Personas spell out [[spoiler:Isanaginoookami]], but the names of the last few Personas simply don't translate, and the meaning is lost.
*** The game itself references this InUniverse with the translation job that can be taken: the protagonist gets tripped up on translating a joke, and the player has to decide between rendering it literally or [[{{Woolseyism}} coming up with a new joke]].
** The title of ''Videogame/PersonaQShadowOfTheLabyrinth'' is meant to be a play on ''Sekaiju no Mei'''kyuu''''' ('Q' and 'kyuu' are homophones), another Atlus series. Unfortunately, most fans in the West won't get that, because ''[=SnM=]'' is [[MarketBasedTitle marketed known as]] ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey'' outside of Japan.
19th Jul '16 1:59:38 PM PrincessGwen
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* English language, especially the American dialect, is ''very'' analogy-based and full of idioms that translated literally in languages without it's proper context could lost its meaning in other languages who doesn't do this, like Japanese, Spanish and possibly others.

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* The English language, especially the American dialect, is ''very'' analogy-based and full of idioms that translated literally in languages without it's its proper context could lost lose its meaning in other languages who doesn't that don't do this, like Japanese, Spanish and possibly others.



* The joke about ChekovsGun being confused with ChekhovsGun will tend to confuse any German troper, because [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Chekov]] is Chekov, but [[Creator/AntonChekhov Chekhov]] is Tschechow. (Half a dozen other {{Pun}} problems omitted for length reasons.)

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* The joke about ChekovsGun being confused with ChekhovsGun will tend to confuse any German troper, because [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Chekov]] is Chekov, but [[Creator/AntonChekhov Chekhov]] is Tschechow. (Half a dozen other {{Pun}} problems were omitted for length reasons.)
17th Jul '16 10:05:20 AM Pichu-kun
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** As mentioned above, Wobbuffet was inspired by a Japanese comedian. In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonRescueTeam'' a Wobbuffet speaks in PokemonSpeak (unlike the others, who use AnimalTalk) and is paired with Wynaut. In the Japanese version its PokemonSpeak makes sense but in translations it's just a random sounding {{Catchphrase}}.



* O* One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me". The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me".

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* O* ** One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me". The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me".
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