History Main / LoneWolf

21st Jan '13 8:34:40 AM StFan
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[[quoteright:227:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/LoneWolf.gif]]
[[caption-width-right:227:[[InfinityPlusOneSword The Sommerswerd]]]]

->''You are Lone Wolf. In a devastating attack, the Darklords have destroyed the monastery where you were learning the skills of the Kai Lords. You are the sole survivor.''

The '''''Lone Wolf''''' {{Gamebook}} series (plural, containing the Kai, Magnakai, Grand Master, and New Order series) were written by Joe Dever; the first book came out in 1984. As the opening quote tells us, the hero is the LastOfHisKind [[AnAdventurerIsYou Fighter/Ranger/Psionic Knight]] Lone Wolf, who escapes the BigBad's [[DoomedHometown destruction of the monastery]] where he and the rest of the Kai Order lived. In the course of his many adventures, Lone Wolf has to avenge his fallen brethren, foil the Darklords and other {{Evil Overlord}}s, try to rebuild the Kai Order, and otherwise save his SwordAndSorcery world Magnamund many, many times.

The books take many {{RPG}} elements and incorporate them into playing/reading, such as HitPoints (called Endurance points), "Combat Skill", skills (Kai / Magnakai / Grand Master Disciplines), and an inventory system. Each book can be read as a standalone adventure, but finishing a book allows one to [[OldSaveBonus gain an extra Discipline and carry over most (usually) of his inventory]]. You can cheat, but you can cheat at TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}} too.

There are 20 books out that follow Lone Wolf himself, then 8 after that following a student of his, with more being written. There's also a four-books ''World of Lone Wolf'' [[SpinOff spin-off]] that takes place in the same world, with Grey Star the Wizard as the hero. There are also 12 ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novelizations roughly covering the first 8 books, fleshing out characterization and the series mythology, as well as a ''Magnamund Companion'' guidebook. There are even ''two'' TabletopRPG versions of the books and a graphic novel spin-off. [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/blog/2011/08/lone-wolf-game-in-production/ A computer game is in the works]], though it's been stuck in DevelopmentHell for some time.

'''Kai series'''
* Flight from the Dark (1984)
* Fire on the Water (1984)
* The Caverns of Kalte (1984)
* The Chasm of Doom (1985)
* Shadow on the Sand (1985)

'''Magnakai series'''
* The Kingdoms of Terror (1985)
* Castle Death (1986)
* The Jungle of Horrors (1986)
* The Cauldron of Fear (1986)
* The Dungeons of Torgar (1987)
* The Prisoners of Time (1987)
* The Masters of Darkness (1988)

'''Grand Master series'''
* The Plague Lords of Ruel (1990)
* The Captives of Kaag (1991)
* The Darke Crusade (1991)
* The Legacy of Vashna (1991)
* The Deathlord of Ixia (1992)
* Dawn of the Dragons (1992)
* Wolf's Bane (1993)
* The Curse of Naar (1993)

'''New Order series'''
* Voyage of the Moonstone (1994)
* The Buccaneers of Shadaki (1994)
* Mydnight's Hero (1995)
* Rune War (1995)
* Trail of the Wolf (1997)
* The Fall of Blood Mountain (1997)
* Vampirium (1998)
* The Hunger of Sejanoz (1998)

'''World of Lone Wolf'''
* Grey Star the Wizard (1985)
* The Forbidden City (1986)
* Beyond the Nightmare Gate (1986)
* War of the Wizards (1986)

'''The Final Four'''[[note]][[UnCancelled Lone Wolf Books 29-32]], presumably a continuation of the New Order[[/note]]
* The Storms of Chai ([[ScheduleSlip 2011]])
* Untitled 30 (tba)
* Untitled 31 (tba)
* Untitled 32 (tba)

All the gamebooks up to ''Trail of the Wolf'' and a few of the others can, with the permission of Dever, be played online at [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/Main/Home Project Aon]].

Also of note is Joe Dever's ''FreewayWarrior'' series, which uses similar rules, but exchanges Magnamund for a ''Film/MadMax''-inspired post-holocaust setting.
----
!!''Lone Wolf'' and its [[SpinOff spin-offs]] provide examples of:

* AbsurdlySpaciousSewer: The Baga-darooz in Barrakeesh, and a few others.
* AlienNonInterferenceClause: The Shianti are forbidden from interfering in human affairs, even though [[spoiler:Wytch-king Shasarak, one of their number, is doing just that.]] Of course, when a human baby accidentally lands on their island, there AintNoRule about teaching him to use magic and "allowing" him to go into the world to deal with the threat.
* AllThereInTheManual
** The novelizations introduce several key characters such as Naar or Alyss. (Good luck knowing who or what Alyss is otherwise.)
** Also the ''Magnamund Companion''; nothing really vital, or that doesn't come up elsewhere, but loads and loads of awesome worldbuilding. As well as a ''Lone Wolf'' board game and a short Choose Your Own Adventure with Banedon as protagonist, providing some backdrop to Book 1.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: The Drakkarim, the Darklords, the Giaks and too many others to count.
** But not the Szalls, a Giak sub-race who fled enslavement by the Darklords and settled in the Wildlands. There's a spot in Book 2 where Szalls try to warn you ''not'' to go near a monster. (Though the little bastards do steal your horse afterwards.)
** The novelizations feature Carag, a Giak [[DefectorFromDecadence who turned against its masters]] and joined Lone Wolf. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, he is implied to have been killed by the Darklords by the end of ''The Claws of Helgedad''.]]
* AmplifierArtifact: The Pyschic Ring and the Grey Crystal Ring. They are implied to be useful only because Lone Wolf has strong PsychicPowers already. Their uses are very situational, however.
* AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent
** Lone Wolf's star apprentice (you name him) takes over in Book 21, starting over from relative scratch. And if you don't want to name him, you can use a table to combine two words to give him a supposedly cool name. Or more likely, something absurd like "Shield Sword".
** The ''World of Lone Wolf'' books feature Grey Star the Wizard, a young wunderkind trained in magic by the Shianti, beings so good at magic that the gods had to ask -- nicely -- for them to leave human beings alone. He's an orphan marooned on the rocks of their island by a storm, and finding him was serendipitous since they are forbidden to leave their island, yet there's this evil sorcerer taking over the world right outside. So they raise him, train him in their ways and send him off to topple an empire.
* AnimalAssassin: The Plaak in Book 12.
* AnimalisticAbomination: Demonlord Tagazin
* AnotherDimension: The books ''The Prisoners of Time'' and ''Beyond the Nightmare Gate'' involve Lone Wolf and Grey Star traveling to the Daziarn plane, outside the normal universe of Magnamund. In the Grand Master series, Lone Wolf makes repeated (and unwelcome) visits to the Plane of Darkness, [[BigBad Naar's]] home turf.
* AnticlimaxBoss
** [[spoiler:Darklords Zagarna (Book 2) and Gnaag (Book 12) are destroyed without a fight by the power of the Sommerswerd. In gameplay terms an anticlimax, but the satisfying and incredibly badass descriptions of these literal embodiments of evil being annihilated in a blast of holy sunfire makes up for it.]]
** [[spoiler:Wytch-king Shasarak and Agarash the Damned]] from the ''World of Lone Wolf'' books starring Grey Star might end up being these. The former can have a fearsome Combat Strength of 30, but that can be reduced to 10 if you take certain options in the pre-fight, making him significantly weaker. Grey Star beats the latter by simply [[spoiler:throwing the Moonstone at the gate Agarash is trying to pass through, thus preventing his escape]].
* ArrowsOnFire: Kai-alchemy grants this as a spell.
* ArtEvolution
** Darklord Gnaag's appearance between Book 8 and Book 12, which is primarily due to the change in illustration artists. The UpdatedRerelease changes his appearance further, again, due to a new artist.
** The Chaos-master's illustrations in Grey Star's series and then in ''The Prisoners of Time'' are also wildly different, but here it's completely justified in-story, since the Chaos-master is an EldritchAbomination who keeps changing shape all the time.
* [[ArtifactOfDeath Artifacts of Death]]: The Doomstones and Death Staff. If not already undead when starting to use them, you may become one soon.
* [[ArtifactOfDoom Artifacts of Doom]]: Many. Doomstones, Darklord weapons, the Death Staff, etc. And in ''The Skull of Agarash'' graphic novel, the eponymous demonic cranium.
* AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: The funerals of Lors Casis in ''The Buccaneers of Shadaki'', as the Elder Magi is passing over to the Plane of Light, leaving no body behind.
* TheAtoner: The Redeemers, a silent order of healers that helps Lone Wolf from time to time, are atoning not for their own misdeeds, but for the misdeeds of their ''ancestors'', [[spoiler:the Patar. The Patar played a key role in the near extinction of their former masters the Elder Magi by plague]]. Ashamed, they vowed that they and their descendants would dedicate themselves to fighting disease in all its forms.
* AttackReflector: The Sommerswerd can sometimes be used to volley a magical attack back at the caster. An example from ''Shadow on the Sand'' is the Vordak riding a Zlanbeast and firing on Banedon's skyship with a magic staff, who subsequently gets a taste of his own {{Fireball|s}}.
* BackFromTheBrink: Books 1 and 2 cover this for the country of Sommerlund, which Zagarna made his first target in his war. Books 8 through 12 seem to cover this for the entirety of Northern Magnamund, as it seems Gnaag is saving Sommerlund for last.
* BadBoss: The Darklords, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap-filled building just to set said traps off, or torturing underlings for kicks.
* BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil: Mentioned in some places, particularly as one of the reasons for the Exile of the Shianti. Their Moonstone had to be returned to them after being borrowed by Lone Wolf for a while because his home nation started to have way too many "good" things happening to it at once, like winter and autumn disappearing into an eternal spring.
* BarbarianTribe
** The Ice Barbarians of Kalte, for the bad guys.
** And, arguably, the Lost Tribe of the Kundi and the Masbate, for the good guys.
* BattleAura: Zakhan Kimah has this on steroids with his Orb of Death. The intro to his fight with Lone Wolf in Book 9 has him strolling across the battlefield nonchalantly, with the only normal soldier who dares strike him being instantly disintegrated. [[ThatOneBoss This is very likely to happen to Lone Wolf as well.]]
* BattleCry
** "For Sommerlund and the Kai!" -- Order of the Kai
** "Shaag Drakkarim!" -- Drakkarim [[labelnote:*]]"Shaag" = "Charge"[[/labelnote]]
** "SHEGGA-ASH-TAAG!" -- Giaks [[labelnote:*]]literally "Hunt and Kill!"[[/labelnote]]
* TheBattleDidntCount: Happens a couple times to Lone Wolf and once to Grey Star.
** When Lone Wolf defeats [[spoiler:the Rahkos in Book 7]], it will immediately kill him if he [[spoiler:turns his back on it]].
** A DoubleSubversion occurs in Book 11 when Lone Wolf fights [[spoiler:the Scarlet Warrior]]. The subversion occurs if Lone Wolf gets a one-hit KO on the random number table and actually ''kills'' him. It's doubly subverted since the incredibly contrived way the enemy dies means that [[spoiler:the last Lorestone is stolen anyway]].
** Grey Star's fight against [[spoiler:the Kleasa]] ends up being one of these as well. Even if Grey Star "wins" the fight -- which he might not, considering it's very though -- [[spoiler:the Kleasa]] still kicks his ass. [[spoiler:The LoveInterest Tanith]] has to make a HeroicSacrifice to save Grey Star [[spoiler:but she recovers at the end of the second book]].
* BeardOfEvil: Prince Lutha
* BearsAreBadNews: One rare actual bear he meets in the series (depending on if he has Animal Control or not) will either just leave him alone when he gets attacked by a pack of hungry Akataz, or he'll come to Lone Wolf's aid and [[CurbStompBattle curb stomp them]]. So it's bad news for Lone Wolf's ''enemies'', making this a nice change of pace from EverythingTryingToKillYou.
* BellyMouth: Darklord Zagarna is described in the novels as having a fanged maw in the belly, which is constantly feeding on Giak or human flesh.
* TheBerserker: Some enemies are described as entering fights in a state of rage, making them immune to basic psychic attacks. This is common with the Drakkarim; they're sometimes seen hacking at lowly soldiers on their side, like Giaks, just to reach their main foe.
* BigBad: While Naar, the King of the Darkness, is the ultimate BigBad of the setting, each series also has its own BigBad. Darklord Haakon is the BigBad in the Kai series, though he's not challenged until Book 5 and most of the Kai series sees "the Darklords" as a whole as the threat. Darklord Gnaag emerges as the main villain of the Magnakai series after he claims the title of Archlord in Book 8. Naar himself takes a more direct role in the Grandmaster series. The vampire Sejanoz becomes the BigBad midway through the New Order Kai series. Further south, the evil Wytch-King Shasarak runs the Shadakine Empire in the "World of Lone Wolf" books and he's Grey Star's nemesis.
* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: Itikars
* BigBadassWolf
** Lone Wolf himself draws on this symbolism with his name.
** BigBadWolves: Doomwolves, Hounds of Death, Taintor Wolves...
* BigBadEnsemble: Most of the time, Naar is essentially a BiggerBad, operating through various minions such as the Darklords, Archdruid Cadak, the Demoness Shamath and Agarash the Damned. They don't usually work together or have anything to do with each other, and some individual villains (Deathlord Ixiataaga as the prime example) act as independent {{Big Bad}}s of their own books but are only remotely linked to Naar.
* BilingualBonus: Some of the books include messages written in the [[ConLang Giak language]], which can give interesting hints if you can read them (with the help of the ''Magnamund Companion'').
* BlackAndWhiteMorality
* BlackMagic: Right-handed Magic, the evil counterpart to the Left-handed Magic used by Banedon and the other wizards of the Crystal Star. Used by the Nadziranim for such fun things as demon summoning, [[OneWingedAngel transformation]], various destructive spells (though to be fair, the Lefties have these too), and necromancy.
* BlackSpeech
** The Giak language, lingua franca of the Darklands and Drakkarim.
** There is also a "dark tongue" that only the Darklords have been seen using. It is described as a harsh, guttural language, with words and sounds that the mouths of men could never form.
* BlessedWithSuck: Or possibly TheComputerIsACheatingBastard, though replace "The Computer" with "The Author". The [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sommerswerd]], mentioned below, makes the next few books in the series much easier, but after that, Dever began compensating by making some fights ''harder'', or taking away non-combat options, if you have it. Perhaps the most egregious example is in Book 11, where having the Sommerswerd forces you into a battle that is almost unwinnable without cheating or massive good luck.\\\
And in Book 12, if you try to use it too soon... you just die. Since, if you draw it from its Korlinium scabbard in the Darklands, the release of holy energy will tell the entire forces of darkness where you are. The same goes for Books 17 and 20. Even an InfinityPlusOneSword is of little good when you're lit up like a Christmas tree and ripe for ''every evil creature in an entire realm of evil'' to converge on your location. On the other hand, if you do bring it along [[spoiler:it will ''vaporize'' the BigBad]].\\\
You know it's bad when there're fan justifications for the hero ''not'' to have his InfinityPlusOneSword for Book 11, and for continuity's sake Book 10 as well.
* BodyArmorAsHitPoints
* BodyHorror: The Beholder of Yanis in Book 11 used to be a pretty decent-looking guy until he [[DealWithTheDevil struck a bargain with the Chaos-master]].
* BoisterousBruiser
** The mercenary captain in Book 6.
** Thog the Barbarian in the novels.
* BottledHeroicResolve
** Adgana herb. The strongest CS-enhancing drug in the series, but with a risk of nasty addiction that can reduce the Endurance score -- permanently.
** Alether potion, too, with less enhancement but without the side effects. As a result, much more common; you can find a draught about [[OncePerEpisode Once per Book]].
* BowAndSwordInAccord: Starting with the Magnakai series, the hero can use a bow alongside melee weapons.
* ButThouMust: Since each book has to have 350 entries (except Book 5) and there's only one good ending, it's inevitable that some choices don't actually matter (you'll end up at the same destination page in a couple turns regardless of the choice). The entries are well-written enough (usually) that this doesn't seem like too forced.
* CanonImmigrant: Alyss, [[GreatGazoo the mischievous demigoddess]], originated in the ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novels penned by John Grant, but showed up in the proper adventure starting Book 16.
* CarnivoreConfusion: Book 14 has Lone Wolf storming the fortress city of Kaag. References are made to the Giak-spawning vats used to spawn Giaks as cannon fodder... and as an ''unlimited source of meat''. The other Giaks that handle and cook the meat in the kitchens don't seem to mind handling the flesh of their own kind. It is never stated if the Giaks [[ImAHumanitarian also eat it]], but it's quite likely.
* CastFromHitPoints: Some spells work by burning Endurance in the adventure where you play Banedon, and sometimes too in the Grandmaster books, with Kai-alchemy and Magi-magic.
* CelibateHero: Lone Wolf doesn't appear to have a canonical love interest in the main books, though ''Legend of Lone Wolf'' gives him a couple of female companions.
* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: In the first batch of Kai Disciplines, "disciplines" such as Hunting and Camouflage are listed right alongside powers like Sixth Sense and Mindblast.
* ChekhovsGun: As a staple of Gamebooks, any item found by the protagonist (even seemingly useless trinkets) can prove surprisingly useful later in the book -- or sometimes, one or two books further in the series. However, there are also plenty of random items that serve no purpose but to take up space in the backpack, and thus you must choose wisely what you keep. Also, it is quite possible to miss the specific path were any item happens to be used.
** That Kazim stone Grey Star gets tortured with in Book 1 of his series? [[spoiler:Those things become much more significant in Book 4.]]
** A negative version of this trope being the Black Crystal Cube from ''Shadow on the Sand''. It's not until later in the book that you learn [[spoiler:a) it attracts your enemies to your location, and b) it is going to explode in your hand if you don't throw it away fast enough]]. A similar one can be found in ''The Masters of Darkness'', and [[spoiler:if you keep it too long, it just kills you outright when exploding]].
* TheChessmaster: [[spoiler:Darklord Gnaag]], as revealed in ''The Claws of Helgedad'' and [[spoiler:Book 10.]]
* TheChosenOne: Lone Wolf himself.
* ChronicBackstabbingDisorder: The Darklords, as evidenced by Archlord Gnaag's reaction when he walks in on Lone Wolf (in disguise as Darklord Ghanesh's minion) slaying Darklord Taktaal: "Your master would be proud of you!" The fact that Darklord weapons like Helshezag and the Dagger of Vashna give ''combat bonuses'' when fighting other Darklords -- and are among the very few things, besides the Sommerswerd, which can kill a Darklord -- is further proof of their treacherous nature.
* CleanCut: Can happen with the Sommerswerd due to CutscenePowerToTheMax -- especially to TheUndead.
* ClearMyName: In Book 19, Lone Wolf is arrested for the crimes of his EvilKnockoff, Wolf's Bane.
* CombatTentacles: [[LongList Burrowcrawler, Crypt Spawns, Akraa'Neonor, Giant Meresquid, Roctopus, Octagtah, Ictakko, Stragnah, Korozon, Ixian Mhagani]]....
* CoolHorse: Wildwind. A gift from Gwynian the Sage, able to go over sixty miles per hour without ever slowing down.
* CoolSword
** All of the named swords in this series could be considered a Cool Sword:
*** the [[PhantasySpelling Sommerswerd]];
*** the [[AncestralWeapon Ironheart Broadsword]];
*** [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Helshezag]] ("Blacksword") and [[{{Fictionary}} Nadazgada]] ("Darkflame");
*** [[AlliterativeName Skarn-Ska]] ("Wolf's Blade").
** Lone Wolf can ''make'' a bunch of these with the new discipline of Kai Weaponcraft once he reach the rank of Kai Supreme Master. In the New Order Kai books, the protagonist receive one of these named weapon (an axe, sword or broadsword). These "Kai-weapons" all offer +5 CS normally and provide bonus CS depending on enemy type, environment, or time of day.
* CreepySouvenir: One Vassagonian warrior wears [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/04tcod/ill1.htm a necklace of shrunken heads]].
* CrystalDragonJesus: Nyxator. He created the Lorestones and inspired the Kai Order. He was also a ''literal'' dragon.
* DarkSkinnedBlond: Paido
* DeadlyDodging: Rarely comes into play, as most fight sequences are straightforward. There's an example in book 6, however: in the ruins of Castle Taunor, if Lone Wolf flees from the enraged monster waiting in ambush, you can lure it into jumping down a precipice by dodging at the last moment.
* DealWithTheDevil: The malevolent Chaos-master, who grants wishes with the expected Monkey's Paw twists.
* DeathWorld: The goal of the Darklords is to turn Magnamund into this for everyone but themselves.
* DemBones: Skeletons warriors constitute the main troops of the Ixian [[TheUndead Undead]].
* DemonicInvaders: The Agarashi, and to an extent the Darklords and their more inhuman minions.
* DepartureMeansDeath: The Darklords of Helgedad cannot survive outside the polluted atmosphere of the Darklands without special apparati, which can be magical, but can also include special breathing tanks. Of course, they are attempting to expand the Darklands through conquest.
* DiagonalCut: This is the fate of a Vordak in Book 5 if you have the Sommerswerd.
-->''You strike again, curving the golden blade in a great arc. It bites into the Vordak's neck, tearing through its unnatural body, and severing it diagonally from collarbone to hip.''
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu
** Book 11 has Lone Wolf take on the aforementioned Chaos-master, the equivalent of the Devil in the Daziarn. Even other physical gods are afraid of it. On the other hand, if you brought the Sommerswerd with you on this adventure, [[ThatOneBoss it's probably not a fight you'll win]].
** Book 20 has Lone Wolf doing this ''constantly''.
* DoomedHometown: The Kai Monastery at the beginning of the series.
* DoomMagnet: Whatever you do, ''never'' board the same ship/boat/ferry as Lone Wolf. You'll either be attacked by pirates, be the victim of sabotage, sunk by an ironclad battleship, attacked by a hungry sea serpent, captured by a giant fish-shaped boat crewed by a horde of [[TheUndead Undead]], ambushed and dragged to your death by hungry frogmen, have a {{necromancer}} stir up havoc in the taproom, or any combination of the above. Justified to an extent: Lone Wolf is such a powerful force for good that he naturally attracts evil.
* DoomyDoomsOfDoom: Doomwolves; the [[ArtifactOfDoom Doomstones]], mentioned above; the Doomlands of Naaros in Southern Magnamund; and of course Book 4: ''The Chasm of Doom'' (guest star: Barraka the Doomslayer).
* TheDragon: BigBad Naar has had several Dragons in the BackStory and throughout the series. The most notable was Agarash the Damned, described as his most powerful champion of evil. Agarash in turn had his own Dragon, the Deathlord Ixiataaga, the BigBad of Book 17. Ixiataaga even had his ''own'' Dragon, [[spoiler:Demonlord Tagazin]].
* DressingAsTheEnemy: Lone Wolf's infiltrating the Darklands while disguised as a Drakkar and (later) Darklord Ghanesh's servant in Book 12. See also the MuggedForDisguise examples.
* DualWielding: Technically not allowed. However, this hasn't stopped [[{{Munchkin}} some players]] to homebrew their own rules to gain the bonus of two magic weapons at once.
* DueToTheDead: Both paths in Book 8 lead to an example.
* DungeonBypass
** The only way to escape TheMaze in ''Castle Death''.
** Also, at the very end of ''War of the Wizards'', the armies of the BigBad are winning despite everything Grey Star have done. So what can the hero do? You use your magic to teleport directly to Shasarak and kill him personally.
* DwindlingParty
** In Book 4, the squad you bring with you is slowly killed off, and will be entirely dead by the end regardless of what path you take.
** Same thing in Book 3 with the three guides and sled dogs helping Lone Wolf travel the icy wastes of Kalte. By the time he reaches the title Cavern of Kalte, he's alone. However, there are paths where the guides actually survive and just turn back without Lone Wolf.
* DyingRace: The Elder Magi. In the second book of the New Order series, the Grandmaster can attend the funeral/ascension of one of the Magi. It is mentioned that fewer than a hundred Elder Magi remain, and their power is fading with each passing year. The Elder Magi accept their eventual demise, secure in the knowledge that the New Order Kai stand ready to take their place in the fight against evil.
* EldritchAbomination: Several enemies Lone Wolf encounters could be considered as such.
** Darklord Gnaag is essentially the Brundle Fly.
** The Agtah and their master the horrific Chaos-master of the Daziarn boast twisted misshappen forms.
** The Ciquali of the Hellswamp bear more than a passing resemblance to Lovecraft's Deep Ones.
** And then there's the Crypt Spawn....
** The Kleasa from the ''World of Lone Wolf'' series. A LivingShadow from another dimension that eats souls like candy. Worse, the only way you can beat it is by setting it free, to reap evil elsewhere.
* EliteMooks: The Drakkarim. Further in the series, the ante is upped with the elite of Drakkarim, the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Death Knights]].
* EmergencyEnergyTank: Touching a newly-discovered Lorestone instantly heals Lone Wolf fully -- but only this one time. Other circumstances allowing a complete healing can be found in the books, but they are always plot-related and can't be brought along (to be used, for example, during the fight against ThatOneBoss[[invoked]]). The one exception is Shamath's potion, [[spoiler:but it is found near the end of Lone Wolf's adventures, and it has [[TooAwesomeToUse another use anyway]].]]
* EmpathicWeapon
** Though no obvious evidence is presented in the books, the actions taken by the Sommerswerd to protect both its wielder and itself may prove that it has a spirit of its own. It will also blast any evil creature who tries to pick it up (as in Book 7) and Book 2 states that it will [[LoyalPhlebotinum lose its powers if wielded by one without the Kai gifts]].
** A darker variant is the Darklord sword Helshezag. The sword actually tries to compel Lone Wolf to ''butcher'' his enemies, bearing more than a passing resemblance to other cursed swords in fiction, such as [[Literature/TheElricSaga Stormbringer]] -- which Joe Dever states was in fact the direct inspiration for Helshezag.
* TheEmpire: The Darklands; Vassagonia; the Shadakine Empire.
* EnemyCivilWar: The Darklords ''really'' needed a system of succession that didn't involve a massive civil war every time someone whacked the current Archlord.
* EnergyAbsorption: The blade of the Sommerswerd can harmlessly absorb most offensive spells directed at its wielder. Sometimes, the energy is even used to heal Lone Wolf. However, the protection can rarely be foiled if the attack comes from an artifact at least as powerful as the Sword of the Sun, like with Kimah's [[ArtifactOfDoom Orb of Death]] or Vonotar's RingOfPower.
* EverythingsDeaderWithZombies: Vonotar's ghost fleet in Book 2.
* EverythingTryingToKillYou
** The number of death traps, cold-blooded assassins, evil armies, cursed artifacts, hostile fauna, poisonous (and man-eating) flora, malevolent undead, and hidden ancient evils sealed all over the place that Lone Wolf runs into means ''something'' is ''always'' trying to kill him. Even when he ''isn't'' in a war.
*** Book 1: Lone Wolf may barely escapes sinking in a bog that claims his horse, just to be attacked by a very poisonous snake next. Even lampshaded in the text:
--->''It seems that nature and the Darklords have conspired against you, but it does not shake your determination to reach the King.''
*** Book 6: Though it requires a series of choices you'd have to be a complete idiot to actually make, Lone Wolf can get killed by an evil ''taxidermist''.
*** Book 7: ''Castle Death'' is probably the worst about this trope. It's possible to run into magical ''cobwebs'' that try to kill Lone Wolf.
*** There are three rules to live by in all the books: Someone offering you hospitality and food? That's poisoned. Someone offering to help you? Is going to try and kill you in your sleep. Someone desperately begging for your help? Of ''course'' he's a Helghast, [[ThisLoserIsYou how many times are you going to fall for that trick?]]
*** Remember this is the series in which you can die fighting a ''door''. Not even a magic/sentient/evil/cursed door, but die trying to open a boring, rusted, ordinary door. Well, it's a door that you're trying to force open after failing the [[OncePerEpisode mandatory]] puzzle lock, while caught in a torrent of acid rain, so it's the rain that's damaging you rather than the door itself. Which doesn't take anything away from the fact that yes, there is an honest to god combat sequence with a door, complete with [[HitPoints Endurance]] and Combat Score, and you will die if you lose.
** ''Grey Star the Wizard'' has these too. The first book alone has: a room so evil just standing in it can kill you; prehensile swamp plants trying to eat you; man-sized frogs with poison skin that can fly(!!); a soul-eating Kleasa demon; a valley full of poison mist; and worst of all, a hive of thousands of giant acid-spitting preying mantises that you inevitably piss off and have to escape by climbing out of their lair -- ''from the bottom up.''
* EvilKnockoff
** In Book 19, Lone Wolf's evil clone comes after him.
** A similar predicament happens to Grey Star in Book 3 of his own series.
* EvilOldFolks: Lord Zahda; Archdruid Cadak
* {{Evil Overlord}}s: The Darklords and Wytch-King Shasarak have this trope written all over them.
* {{Evil Sorcerer}}s: Vonotar the Traitor; Lord Zahda; the Nadziranim; the Cener Druids...
* ExpandedUniverse: The ''Magnamund Companion''; the TabletopRPG; the ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novels...
* FaceHeelTurn: Shasarak the Wytch-King [[spoiler:was once a Shianti wizard, a member of the very group that sent Grey Star on his quest.]]
* FacelessEye: In the bonus story of the reprint of Book 7, Tavig faces down a creature called the All-Seeing One, a roughly humanoid creature whose head is just one big eye.
* FacelessGoons: The Drakkarim. To the point it can take a while for a newcomer to the series to even realize they're supposedly humans.
* FangsAreEvil
* {{Fiction 500}}: High-Mayor Cordas. Said to be the wealthiest man in Magnamund and able to order the construction of a skyship to be finished within a month for the sole purpose of helping Lone Wolf travel home more quickly.
* {{Fictionary}}: The Giak language, which has some fun grammar.
* FigureItOutYourself: "Let us say that the wisdom of the Kai and the lore of the Magicians' Guild can surpass the limitations of even time itself." Loi-Kymar seems to think that "We got here so fast because we teleported." is too easy.
** The Italian translation of that passage (which appeared at the end of the 3rd book) was even more heavy-handed, sounded something like this: "A Kai knight and a Guild magician have little patience for the constraints of such weak barriers like space and time!"
* {{Fingore}}: An ugly dwarf servant of Zahda gets his fingers blasted from daring to pick [[LoyalPhlebotinum the Sommerswerd]].
* FishPeople: Bhakish, Ciquali, Xlorg...
* FlamingSword
** The Sommerswerd has holy sunfire on its edge when it faces particularly evil foes.
** The Darklord blades, like Helshezag or the Dagger of Vashna, are surrounded by ''black flames'' when used.
** And in the Grand Master series, if Lone Wolf is a Sun Lord with Grand Weaponmastery, he can set any normal weapon's edge aflame for extra damage in battle.
* ForcedPrizeFight: In book 21, the New Order Kai Grandmaster must fight Dromodon the Invincible, the champion gladiator, after accidentally killing his intended opponent due to ''drinking from the wrong fountain''. While the Grandmaster is initially sorry to have to kill the man to earn his freedom, he "looks into his eyes" and somehow realizes that Dromodon [[spoiler:is a worshipper of [[BigBad Naar]]]], meaning it's okay to kill him. A fairly transparent attempt to keep the Grandmaster from appearing too morally grey.
* ForgedByTheGods: More specifically "a race that men would now call gods" for the Sommerswerd.
* GaidenGame
** The ''World of Lone Wolf'' books serve as this, following the wizard Grey Star who lives at the very southern tip of Magnamund, whereas Lone Wolf hangs out mainly in Northern Magnamund.
** Also, most of the [[UpdatedRerelease newly re-published old books]] have a new short adventure at the end where you take the role of one of the characters you have met during the course of the main adventure, each having their own unique gameplay style.
* [[VideoGameCrueltyPunishment Gamebook Cruelty Punishment]]: Over the course of the series there are times Lone Wolf can do things that are... morally grey at best. The penalties for such decisions take the form of difficult battles, losing out valuable items, or [[TheManyDeathsOfYou dying horribly]]. Lone Wolf is canonically TheMessiah, he should ''act'' like it.
** Averted in Book 2; when one of your travelling companions (you don't know which) tries to have you poisoned, you're better off killing the merchant than the one who actually did it. But played straight if you pick anyone else. The mercenary woman is bad enough, but if you pick one of the Knights of the White Mountain, he ''and his brother'' team up and become the hardest fight in the Kai books. They're even tougher to beat than [[spoiler:Darklord Haakon]]! And this takes place ''before'' you get the Sommerswerd. Aside from cheating or being ''very lucky'', there's no real way to win this fight.
* GargleBlaster: Bor-brew ale can put even a Kai Master in a coma.
* GenreSavvy: After 20 books, Lone Wolf realizes that Naar and his minions are ''obsessed'' with him. [[spoiler:He knew that if he tried to take the Moonstone back to the Shianti, then every servant of Naar would be trying to kill him before the week was up]]. So Lone Wolf passes the job to someone else, thinking that Naar's followers would be focused on himself instead. It works. Most of the threats the New Order Grandmaster encounters in Book 21 are coincidences; he only meets ''one'' Naar worshipper, and that is by accident.
* {{Giant Flyer}}s: Zlanbeast, Kraan, Itikar, Lavas... and a few dragons.
* GiantMook: Gourgaz
* GlobalAirship: Banedon's skyship, ''Sky Rider''. [[spoiler:After it gets shot down in Book 18, Lone Wolf gives Banedon the ship he got in the book, ''Cloud Dancer''.]]
* GlobalCurrencyException
** The various currencies can usually be spent interchangeably... but woe betide you if you try using the wrong currency as a bribe. Kika, the currency of the Darklands, takes this a step further: you can't spend it ''at all'' (except as a bribe in said Darklands). Basically, its purpose is to take up space in your Belt Pouch and to convince the naysayers at the Kai Monastery that, yes, these fiends ''do'' have an economy.
** One tavern in the New Order series will only accept Gold Crowns or Silver Lune. The felt currency your companion carries is useless and the tavernkeeper will ''kick you out'' if you offer Ren from the Autocracy of Bhanar since Bhanarese soldiers killed the tavernkeeper's son.
* GlowingEyelightsOfUndeath: Helghasts
* GodOfEvil: Naar
* GoodThingYouCanHeal: The Kai Discipline of Healing is a favored choice amongst most players, and for good reason. There are so many ways for Lone Wolf to get sliced and diced, stabbed, concussed, burnt, frozen, poisoned, contaminated, mind-fried, life-drained or just generally hurt, to make it a very good thing he can heal.
* GottaCatchThemAll: Books 6-11 involve searching for the seven lost Lorestones one by one.
* [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Grand Masters Who Actually Do Something]]: After the Magnakai series, nobody would blame Lone Wolf for wanting to sit back and train his acolytes in peace and let someone else handle the brushfires. But whenever a crisis emerges, he's always the first to step up to the plate to take care of business. It isn't until the New Order Kai series and his ascension to Supreme Mastery that he starts delegating the crisis du jour to his [[FeaturelessProtagonist lieutenant]].
* GreatBigBookOfEverything: In the beginning of Book 20, the Elder Magi give Lone Wolf what is essentially a ''travel guide'' to the Plane of Darkness. It's pretty much the only reason Lone Wolf has even a snowball's chance in (literally) Hell of succeeding.
* GreatGazoo: Alyss
* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: Although even smart guards would have a hard time against a psychic hero specialized in infiltration and camouflage, some over the series display the typical incompetence associated with this trope.
** For example, in ''Shadow on the Sand'', two Vassagonian gaolers believe their prisoner has escaped when they can't see him through the peephole, just because Lone Wolf is sitting against the door. And he isn't even doing it on purpose, but still gets the opportunity to ambush them when they open the cell.
** In ''Dawn of the Dragons'', the Eldenorian guards capturing Lone Wolf and bringing him before Prince Lutha take his gold, backpack and weapons... but not the weapon-like special items. Including the Sommerswerd!
*** This one was so glaring that the French version actually [[http://projectaon.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=general&action=display&thread=1574&page=1 changed the scene by adding an Eldenorian traitor who brings back his special items to Lone Wolf.]]
* GunsAreWorthless: ''Completely'' averted in this series. Anytime an enemy has one of the "primitive" Bor Muskets, Lone Wolf will either ''die instantly'' or face a random number roll that could still result in instant death. Apparently, wielding awesome PsychicPowers granted by the Sun God doesn't count for much against guns.
* HealingFactor: The various Healing disciplines.
* HealingHands: The various Healing disciplines, again.
* HealingPotion: A staple of the game; the most common kind is the Laumspur potion, brewed from the Laumspur herb you can find over most of Magnamund. There are other varieties, more or less efficient, like Rendalim's elixir, Lanurma, Oxydine, Oede herb, etc. Very useful even with the Healing discipline, since it's quite easy to get mangled beyond what your HealingFactor can quickly repair.
* HeelFaceTurn: The Slavemaster of Aarnak in Book 12, who has had enough of the Darklords and their destructive ways. [[spoiler:Later becomes the first president of Magador under his birth name, Kadharian.]]
* HellHound: Pretty much every dog in this series could count. Especially [[spoiler:Demonlord Tagazin, a ''huge sabretoothed jackal'', and one of the strongest foes in the series]]. Joe Dever ''really'' doesn't like dogs.
* HelpingHands
** The Rakhos in ''Castle Death''.
** The novelization of ''Fire on the Water'' also describes the severed limbs of the zombies from Vonotar's ghost fleet still moving on their own until hacked to pieces.
* HeroesPreferSwords: While there are other types of magic weapons, a few of which are even halfway decent, the best magic weapons are swords.
* HeroOfAnotherStory: Banedon is implied to be on his own adventures when he's offscreen, such as winning an airship staffed by gun-toting dwarves. You find that one out when he rescues Lone Wolf in ''Shadow on the Sand''. He starts out, like Silent Wolf, as a slacker student, and eventually becomes Guildmaster of the Brotherhood of the Crystal Star.
* HeroProtagonist
* [[HeroStoleMyBike Hero Stole My Horse]]: Repeatedly. As with Hero Stole My Flying Mount.
* HighFantasy
* HitPoints: Or Endurance Points, as they're known here.
* HolyHandGrenade
** The Sommerswerd. Uses the blessed power of light... to obliterate the enemies of the Kai.
** The Moonstone too. [[spoiler:In ''The Buccaneers of Shadaki'', just showing the artefact to an undead immediately destroys it.]]
* HookHand: In Book 5, during the palace prison escape path, you can meet "Hammerfist the Armourer", a huge weaponsmith with a hand replaced by a warhammer for both fighting and metalworking.
* {{Humanshifting}}: The Helghasts.
* IdiotBall: This being a ChooseYourOwnAdventure type of series, the player can make Lone Wolf hold it if he's faced with a situation where some of the choices are clearly dumber than the others. Some examples:
** Book 1: [[spoiler:If you fall into a tomb in a graveyard known for being the home to ancient horrors... why yes, do open the sarcophagus please, what could go wrong?]]
** Book 2: [[spoiler:If a zombie captain (that you've known when he was alive) asks you to put down the Sommerswerd so his soul could be freed... of course you can trust him and discard your magic weapon while on a ship full of undead.]]
** Book 3: [[spoiler:If you find a pretty golden bracelet on the body of an obviously mind-controlled Ice Barbarian, when it is known his people lacks metal and never fancied any jewelry, you can safely put it on your own wrist... Vonotar would just love to have a word with you.]]
* IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace: Joe Dever ''loves'' this trope, as is evident from such titles as ''[[DoomyDoomsOfDoom The Chasm of Doom]]'', ''The Kingdoms of Terror'', ''Castle Death'' and ''The Jungle of Horrors''.
* ImAHumanitarian
** The cannibal wretches of the Forbidden City.
** The ghouls in Tahou's "Cauldron".
* ImMelting: Many living deads (like the Vordaks and Helghasts or the Ixian boss undead) dissolves into foul-smelling liquids when destroyed.
* ImpersonatingTheEvilTwin: Lone Wolf taking the place of Wolf's Bane at the end of Book 19.
* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Sommerswerd, acquired in the ''second'' book. The most powerful sword in the series, it's somewhat of a GameBreaker until later books give enemies power-ups to counter it. It's still an incentive for people to read from the beginning. In that book, the Sommerswerd is in fact the SwordOfPlotAdvancement; as an OldSaveBonus it acts as the InfinityPlusOneSword in later books.
* InstantSedation
** {{Tranquillizer Dart}}s are used by Maouk in ''Shadow on the Sand''. In the same book, Lone Wolf can use a blowpipe and dart on a guard; the effects are instantenous.
** KnockoutGas in ''Castle Death'', filling some trapped rooms or delivered by an ugly dwarf blowing it in your face through a brass tube.
* InventoryManagementPuzzle
* JokerJury: Lone Wolf gets one such mock-trial in Book 7, ''Castle Death''. The sentence? "TheMaze!"
* LargeAndInCharge: Gourgaz
* LaserBlade: Darklord Haakon summons one from his magic stone to fight Lone Wolf.
* LastOfHisKind: Lone Wolf is the only survivor of the Kai Lords, until he rebuild the Kai Order in the Grand Master books.
* LetterMotif: If it has a double A in it (whether "it" is a creature, character or place) then it's ''trouble''. Possibly justified if one assumes that the only language in Magnamund that contains the "double A" phoneme is the one used by all of Naar's minions. If all the really evil stuff is being named by the really evil people using words in their [[BlackSpeech evil language]], the similarity makes a lot more sense.
** [[AC:Characters:]] Gnaag, Haakon, Ixiataaga, Kekataag the Avenger, Kraagenskûl, Magnaarn, Naar, the Shog'aash, Taktaal.
** [[AC:Creatures:]] Akraa'Neonor, Dentaag, Dholdaarg, Dhorgaan, Kraan, Muntaag, Plaak, Taan-spider.
** [[AC:Places:]] Aarnak, Dejkaata, Kaag, Haagadar, Maaken (Maakengorge, Maakenmire), Naaros, Xaagon, Zaaryx.
* LizardFolk: Gourgaz; Crocaryx
* LoadBearingBoss
** Lord Zahda and his Doomstone with Kazan-Oud.
** Deathlord Ixiataaga with Xaagon.
* LongRunningBookSeries
* LoyalPhlebotinum: The Sommerswerd can only be used to its full potential by a Kai Lord. If wielded in combat by anyone else, it is said that its power will fade and be lost forever. Furthermore, if a truly evil creature makes the mistake of holding the sword -- as an ugly dwarf servant of Lord Zahda painfully discovers in ''Castle Death'' -- it will [[{{Fingore}} cost him a few fingers]].
* LuckBasedMission: Pick a number from the Random Number Table. If it is 6 or less, [[GameOver "Your life and your quest end here."]] Anybody who tells you they read the books all the way through without cheating is lying. Well... that, or their OCD makes them insane enough create a new character each and every single time the RandomNumberGod frowns on them.
* MacGuffinGuardian
** [[EvilOverlord Lord Haakon]] himself, and the monsters he summons, must be vanquished to retrieve the Book of the Magnakai at the end of book 5, ''Shadow on the Sand''.
** The monstruous Dakomyd guards the first Lorestone in book 6, ''The Kingdoms of Terror''.
** The Crocaryx and the Zadragon in book 9, ''The Cauldron of Fear''.
** Book 20, ''The Curse of Naar'', can be said to be mostly a series of {{MacGuffin Guardian}}s, as several Demon Lords must be beaten to retrieve each time a new PlotCoupon.
* MadArtist: Chanda the Taxidermist
* MadScientist: The Cener Druids are the medieval equivalent of Mad Scientists. They specialize in experiments that surpass Josef Mengele in sadism and ''really'' love biological warfare. In the BackStory they [[spoiler:nearly wiped out the mighty Elder Magi with a plague]] and in [[spoiler:Book 13 they plan to do the same to ''everybody else'']].
* MagicAntidote: Oede Herb
* MagicKnight
** The Vakeros Order, servants of Mages that Lone Wolf eventually befriends.
** In the Grandmaster series, Lone Wolf can choose one of two styles of magic as a skill set to go along with his others. The Kai Lords themselves can be considered [[PsychicPowers psionic]] knights.
* {{Magitek}}: Present in some places. Most notably, the [[GlobalAirship skyships]] like Banedon's ''Skyrider'' and ''Cloud-Dancer'', and several of Naar's minions in Book 19.
* TheManBehindTheMan
** [[spoiler:Naar, King of the Darkness]] is the real BigBad of the entire series, and the one who created [[spoiler:the Darklords]]. Possibly subverted; though he's not mentioned in the first twelve books, being a [[spoiler:god of evil]], his existence was probably widely known already. He is heavily mentioned in the [[AllThereInTheManual novelizations]].
** A better example of this trope exists in the ''World of Lone Wolf'' books starring Grey Star. [[spoiler:SealedEvilInACan Agarash the Damned]] is TheManBehindTheMan to [[spoiler:Wytch-King Shasarak]].
* TheManyDeathsOfYou: Especially in the earlier books that read more like a Choose Your Own Adventure book. The sheer number of non-combat-related ways Lone Wolf can die in the series rivals ''VideoGame/{{Shadowgate}}''.
* MauveShirt: Don't get too attached to any of the named characters who get characterization and accompany Lone Wolf on any of his adventures. If they stick around for more than a few page turns, chances are they're going to die horribly. Depending on the path taken, examples of ill-fated Mauve Shirts can be found in Books 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, and 18. In other words, more than half the series. The guy's called "Lone Wolf" for a reason.\\\
There are exceptions, however, notably Vakeros Warrior Paido, Guildmaster Banedon and Captain Prarg. If one of them happens to die while they accompany Lone Wolf, the hero meets his end shortly thereafter (making these books somewhat {{Escort Mission}}s). [[spoiler:The three of them get captured by the enemy at some point, but are later rescued by Lone Wolf.]] Sadly, [[spoiler:Paido isn't an exception to the end. He was killed off-screen by Gnaag at the end of Book 10. Lone Wolf learns this in Book 20 when he finds Paido's soul being tortured in the Plane of Darkness. Ouch.]]
* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: Grey Star is incredulous at Kundi magic rituals; he can't actually sense any sorcery being performed whatsoever by their kooky shaman, yet the mantiz bite on his leg heals somehow and their shaman does manage to point the way to the Shadow Gate. One possibility is that the Shianti use Magic A and the Kundi use Magic B, but it's never confirmed.
* TheMaze: Lone Wolf faces this scenario in Book 7, after being caught by yet another evil overlord, stripped of his weapons, and sentenced to a maze. The maze isn't actually that big, but it's certainly riddled with lethal monsters. It is tricky in the sense that actually reaching the center [[spoiler:kills you]]. To continue with the story, Lone Wolf has to [[spoiler:cheat]].
* MeaningfulName: Magnamund is almost Latin for "big world".
* MedievalEuropeanFantasy: For the most part, although differently-themed civilisations are visited, and some parts of the world are heavily (and evilly) SteamPunk.
* MedievalStasis: Right from the {{Word of God}}, as Dever has stated that Magnamund does not have a "technological" future. The idea was hinted at in one of the deuterocanonical ''Legends'' novels, and was FanonDiscontinuity among most fans even before [[CanonDiscontinuity Dever confirmed it.]]\\\
This doesn't stop [[spoiler:a mecha wolf, a time bomb, and power-armored warriors wielding laser spears]] from appearing in Book 19, among other things. [[spoiler:Of course, this all takes place on the moon of a different planet.]]
* MindOverMatter
* {{Mineral MacGuffin}}s: The Moonstone, Lorestones and Doomstones.
* MirrorMatch
** Lone Wolf vs. Wolf's Bane.
** Grey Star vs. the Jahksa.
* MixAndMatchCritters
** Several beasts of Magnamund are these, like the Anarian Sky-snake or the Ixian Mhagani.
** Also, the Cener Druids' creations are often [[HybridMonster a mixture of various creatures]].
** However, it is even more prominent with beings of chaos, like the Daziarn's Agtah or the Plane of Darkness' Chaos-horde and Demons. The [[EldritchAbomination Chaos-master]] is a mix and match of many animals, all of which ''keep changing shape all the time''.
* MookLieutenant: Vordaks
* MoonLogicPuzzle: Some of the puzzles are not solvable solely from the information given, such as one puzzle where the answer is [[spoiler:0. You have to realize that sometimes, 0 means 10 instead of 0, as often when picking from the Random Number Chart in the books themselves.]]
* MoneyForNothing: Though it never becomes completely useless, money does become less useful in the later books. Justified since some of them are set in places that have little use for currency, such as an icy wasteland populated by TheUndead, [[spoiler:a jungle moon orbiting another planet]], and the Plane of Darkness (the series' equivalent to Hell).
* {{Mordor}}: A few examples in the series, most especially the Darklands.
* MuggedForDisguise: It is not rare for Lone Wolf to kill some EvilMinions for clothes before sneaking into enemy strongholds. This can happen in Book 5 to a Vassagonian messenger, in Book 12 to a Drakkar horseman, in Book 13 to a Cener Druid or in Book 16 with a Disciple of Vashna. It helps that most enemy {{Mooks}} are either FacelessGoons or InTheHood.
* MuggingTheMonster: Various rogues (robbers, thieves, bandits, pirates, backstabbers, grave diggers, pickpockets, brigands...) regularly try to mug Lone Wolf or his disciple in their travels. More often than not, it's the hero who ends up richer and the cutthroats dead. Later in the series, the book may not even involve the player in such encounters. You get an off-hand paragraph that you're set upon by bandits, demanding gold but instead [[CutscenePowerToTheMax "receiving a harsh lesson in the powers of a Kai Master"]].
* MushroomSamba
** The calacene mushrooms in Book 4.
** Possibly, Bor-brew ale in Book 8.
* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast
** Maybe a mild example here, but most people probably wouldn't be too eager to meet beings named "Kraagenskûl" or "Haakon", even if they weren't [[EvilOverlord Darklords]]. (On the other hand, Haakon was/is a fairly popular name for Norwegian royalty for more than 1000 years.)
** Another example is the eponymous "Castle Death" from Book 7, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Book 7 is one of the harder books in the series; the castle is full of monsters and traps, and that's ''before'' Lone Wolf gets to the Maze...
** Then there's the Deathlord of Ixia. Even the ''Darklords'' feared this guy. So will you.
* TheNecrocracy (Type I): Ixia
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Destroying the Rune that controls the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Soultaker]] in ''Rune War'' also left it stranded in Magnamund. As if having a pissed-off demon trapped on your world wasn't bad enough, [[spoiler:said demon kidnaps Lone Wolf at the end of the book.]]
* NintendoHard
** Book 11 concludes with three boss-level fights in close succession (one of which is virtually impossible [[BlessedWithSuck if you have the]] InfinityPlusOneSword) with hardly any chance to heal between the last two.
** Book 17 is pretty bad too. Nearly every enemy encounter verges on DemonicSpiders [[invoked]] territory, and the battles against the BigBad and his [[TheDragon Dragon]] are some of the hardest in the series. And just like the battles in Book 11, there is almost no chance to heal in between the boss fights. And in this case you might actually ''need'' the InfinityPlusOneSword to beat the boss. [[spoiler:Man, ''screw'' the Power Spike.]]
* NoBodyLeftBehind: Among others, the Darklords and Nadziranim fade into nothingness when killed. See also ImMelting.
* NoGearLevel: This can happen to the hero every couple of books. Notably in Book 2, after you get shipwrecked; in Book 5 and Book 9, if Lone Wolf has to get out of jail; and unavoidably in Book 7, ''Castle Death'', when thrown into TheMaze.
* NonstandardGameOver: If you inadvertently put the fortress of Ikaya on alert in Book 3, you get an ending where [[spoiler:you escape back home without dying OR completing your mission to capture Vonotar]] -- the only place in the whole series where you can fail your mission without dying.
* NotSoHarmlessVillain: When Roark first shows up in Book 6, Lone Wolf takes him down a peg or two with no effort. Later he [[spoiler:turns out to be a demon worshipper who sicks undead on Lone Wolf's ass]]. Then if you meet him in [[spoiler:Book 10]], he actually manages to [[spoiler:summon Demonlord Tagazin back to Magnamund]]. Finally, Lone Wolf meets Roark again in [[spoiler:Book 18, where he shows up as a ghost. A ghost with powerful telekinetic abilities who has a surprisingly high Combat Skill]]. Not bad for someone who isn't [[spoiler:originally]] a supernatural being or sorcerer.
* OhCrap: These are the words (or the Magnamund equivalent at least) that probably go through the minds of all the villains when Lone Wolf inevitably shows up to hand them their asses, and it shows. Book 12 has some good examples.
** The best one is probably from Vonotar the Traitor in Book 3:
-->''"{{Who dares}} disturb me?" he hisses, rising from the Brumalmarc throne, his eyes searching for an intruder. Upon seeing you, he emits a horrified gasp and fumbles for his black staff. He has the look of a criminal who has been discovered in the act of some dreadful crime.''
** Each time Lone Wolf meets the Crypt Spawns, the text makes it clear that this is his reaction.
* OldSaveBonus: Each book read about the same character gives bonuses to "rank", equipment, and one skill for each book. [[BagOfSpilling Except for whatever]] ''doesn't'' carry over, presumably for game balance. Although everything can be carried over until Book 13.
* OminousFloatingCastle (Type 3): Lone Wolf chases Wolf's Bane into one in Book 19.
* OmniscientMoralityLicense: Turns out the [[spoiler:Crocaryx]] in Book 9 were created by Kai for the sole purpose of guarding a Lorestone. Once said Lorestone is no longer in their possession, the narration announces that this is the beginning of the demise of their race. Makes one wonder when [[WhatMeasureIsANonhuman humans]] will [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness outlive their usefulness]].
* OncePerEpisode: Starting with Book 16, ''The Legacy of Vashna'', a dive through a Shadow Gate and a visit to the Plane of Darkness is mandatory for Lone Wolf in every book.
* OneRiotOneRanger: Lampshaded in book 4: "Your presence here is worth a hundred men."
* OneWingedAngel: The Nadziranim ("dark sorcerors") always adopt a more appropriate combat form before entering a fight; their favorite is that of an Ice Dragon (sometimes wielding a FlamingSword in addition to the deadly cold BreathWeapon).
* [[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname Only Known by His Nickname]]: "Lone Wolf" is not his birth name, nor even the name he was given when he first joined the monastery. It was "Silent Wolf" before he changed his name due to being the LastOfHisKind. Lone Wolf's birth name is never mentioned. ([[AllThereInTheManual At least, not in the gamebooks themselves.]])
* OnlySmartPeopleMayPass: Constantly. Sometimes the series gets cheeky by giving you a riddle with a numerical answer and asking you to turn to the page with that number.
* OrderReborn: Lone Wolf eventually rebuilds the Kai Monastery and trains several apprentices.
* OrphanedEtymology: In Book 4, a demonic enemy was briefly described as "satanic", even though Magnamund is a world totally unrelated to Earth and Christian tropes. The term is never used again.
* OurDragonsAreDifferent: The extinct Sun Dragons from the BackStory, the Lavas in the Grand Master books (which bear a passing resemblance to ''D&D'' Draconians), and in the appropriately-titled Book 18 ''Dawn of the Dragons'', [[spoiler:the dragons Naar intends to unleash on Magnamund to kill ''everything''.]]
* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Although Magnamund lacks most classical fantasy races (elves, gnomes, halflings...), the dwarves form the mountain kingdom of Bor are pretty much standard fare.
* OurLichesAreDifferent: Deathlord Ixiataaga. Fits in the undead sorceror mold, but he obviously never was human to begin with.
* OurOrcsAreDifferent: Giaks
* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. Which proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would readily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found in the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.
* PhantasySpelling: The Sommerswerd -- not sw'''o'''rd. It's Danish, or a derivative of some nordic tongue. The Sommlending (people of Sommerlund, the "Summer Land") tend to have nordic-derived names for places and objects, as well as being clearly nordic racially as well. A vowel shift appears to have occurred since they [[AllThereInTheManual sailed across the ocean from their original native islands on their mission from Kai]].
* PhlebotinumHandlingEquipment: Korlinium, a fibrous mineral looking like strands of polished silver, can hide the radiations of Good artifacts. Lone Wolf gets a Korlinium scabbard for the Sommerswerd, and in the New Order series his disciple carry the Moonstone in a Korlinium-laced satchel. The problem with those good radiations isn't that they are dangerous, but that many creatures of evil can readily detect them, and thus they would immediately swarm the protagonist if not for this precaution.
* {{Plaguemaster}}s: The Cener Druids
* PoweredByAForsakenChild: The [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Lake of Blood]] in Helgedad, the capital city of the Darklands. A sea of supernatural flames fed by the pain of those thrown into it. Even worse, the victims aren't able to die and remain trapped in a state of undying agony. [[spoiler:Fortunately, Lone Wolf blows up Helgedad and the Lake at the end of Book 12]].
* PowerupLetdown: In book 12 Lone Wolf can gain a chainmail jacket made from a special metal, and it can even be carried over into the Grandmaster series. It actually improves his health less than the regular chainmail he could get in the early books.
** [[AvertedTrope Averted]]: the page on which you obtain it states "Because it is so light, it can be worn beneath any padded or metallic body armour you may possess." You can stack the Magic Chain, Magic Vest, and the padded armor that is obtainable semi-regularly. The only time you ''cannot'' stack armor is the Bronin Vest & Chainmail Waistcoat, and only with each other.
* PrintLongRunners: 28 volumes, soon to be the intended 32.
* PsychicBlockDefense: The Mindshield, Psi-screen, and Kai-screen disciplines.
* PsychicPowers: Many of the Kai/Magnakai/Grand Master disciplines.
** [[SpeaksFluentAnimal Animal Kinship]]/[[TheBeastmaster Animal Control/Animal Mastery]];
** [[GoodThingYouCanHeal Healing]]/[[HealingFactor Curing]]/[[HealingHands Deliverance]];
** [[MindRape Mindblast]]/[[AgonyBeam Psi-Surge]]/[[YourHeadASplode Kai-Surge]];
** [[PsychicBlockDefense Mindshield/Psi-screen/Kai-screen]];
** MindOverMatter/Nexus/Grand Nexus;
** [[SpiderSense Sixth Sense]]/[[CombatClairvoyance Divination]]/[[AstralProjection Telegnosis]]...
* PuzzleBoss: Some enemies have no standard battle, or are better off avoided by using certain items or tactics. Two of the four Grey Star books have puzzle boss fights, for example, and the other two tend to fare better if you go into them with your thinking cap on.
* RageHelm: The Drakkarim always wear metal helmets with skull-shaped facemasks in battle. To the point this is often the main feature used to describe them.
* {{Ranger}}s: The Sommlending Border Rangers.
* RailRoading: There's usually more than one direct path to victory, but all books begin and end the same way, and if any major character dies as part of the plot, there's no way to save him. Sometimes the books draw out your attempts to save the doomed character, though.
* RedShirt: Lone Wolf shouldn't get too attached to any unnamed characters that travel with him either. For examples, see Book 17 and...
* RedShirtArmy: Book 4. By Kai and Ishir, Book 4.
* ReligionOfEvil: The Cener Druids and the Acolytes of Vashna.
* RightfulKingReturns: The New Order Grandmaster's mission in book 23 ''Mydnight's Hero'' is to return the exiled Prince Karvas to his country of Siyen so that he can be sworn in as king.
* [[RichBitch Rich Bastard]]: Roark, as the Lord of Amory, acts this way. [[spoiler:Only eviler, crossing the MoralEventHorizon on his ''very first appearance''.]]
* RingOfPower
** The Psychic Ring in Book 9; if you lack any magic weapon, it gives the only other fighting chance against [[ThatOneBoss Zakhan Kimah]].
** Vonotar the Traitor (in Book 11) and Prince Lutha (in Book 18) also have evil Rings of Power, which they try to kill Lone Wolf with.
* SamusIsAGirl: Briefly in Book 6; one of Lone Wolf's many enemies happens to be an evil knight in a suit of armor, and upon death, we see that she's a woman muffling her voice.
* ScaryBlackMan: Samu, who manages to be almost more badass than Grey Star ''without'' needing magical powers.
* SchizoTech: Magnamund may not have a technological future, but it's sure got a lot of technology in places. The [[{{Mordor}} Darklands]] are heavily industrialized, while the good guys' lands are locked in MedievalStasis.
* ScienceIsBad: The bad guys use a lot of technology; the Darklords use ironclad steamships and mechanical foundries, which have the double effect of fueling their war machine and polluting the environment for them ([[GreenAesop since they're weakened in clean, pristine environments]]). Science-fiction technology is also used on other worlds controlled by Naar. But Magnamund itself is kept in MedievalStasis if the Kai win, and Lone Wolf never uses any technological weaponry or devices except for a very few examples of {{Magitek}}, such as ''[[GlobalAirship Skyrider]]'' and the Crystal Explosive.
* SdrawkcabName: In Book 11, the Beholder of Yanis used to be known as Sinay.
* SealedEvilInACan: Quite a few of these appear as major and minor foes in the series. Two notable examples in the BackStory are Agarash the Damned, a powerful demon created by Naar that killed Nyxator and was sealed in another dimension by the Elder Magi, and Darklord Vashna, the mightiest of the Darklords and the first to be defeated by the Sommerswerd. The remains of Vashna and his army, along with their vengeful spirits, were sealed in the Maakengorge (a.k.a. the Chasm of Doom). These two examples subvert the usual path of this trope since, canonically [[spoiler:they ''never'' escape. Yes, they ''stay'' sealed, thanks to Lone Wolf and Grey Star]].
* SealedGoodInACan: Not quite a true example since they weren't actually sealed away, but the goodly gods Kai and Ishir are relegated to their own dimensions and can only provide aid to Magnamund indirectly. It is revealed in Book 19 that [[spoiler:their EvilCounterpart Naar can bypass the same limitation by using the Moonstone to open Shadowgates, allowing his minions to constantly harass Magnamund and Lone Wolf in particular]].
* SecondPersonNarration
* SequentialBoss: In Book 14, you face [[spoiler:a fire-breathing demonic monkey, whose corpse turns into a swarm of man-eating insects. After you deal with them, they come together and form an ice dragon.]]
* SituationalSword: The Sommerswerd, devastating against Undead, and deadly even for the Darklords, especially if you can get a ray of sun. [[spoiler:It is stated later it could be lethal even against [[BigBad Naar]].]]
* SkunkStripe: Grey Star is named so for the white forelock in his otherwise black hair. (And the "Star" part is because a star represents hope.)
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Kalte (Book 3); Ixia (Book 17)
* SnakePeople: Darklord Taktaal
* SpiderSense
** The Sixth Sense tree of disciplines, which often allow for Kai Lords to sense danger before it's too late.
** Grey Star gets his "Prophecy" spell, too, and also a "Psychomancy" spell that lets him examine objects by laying his hands on it. All of these abilities help remove forks in the road when you're at a crossroads in the books.
* SpinOff: The ''World of Lone Wolf'' series starring Grey Star would be a textbook example of this.
* SquishyWizard: Grey Star. He doesn't get armor, the only weapon he's any good with is his staff, and once he runs out of Willpower points he's pretty much boned. He also does not get Lone Wolf's regenerating health skills; apparently Shianti magic just doesn't cover healing.
* SoLastSeason
** Both played straight and subverted. The Kai and Magnakai skills of Books 1-12 are rendered almost obsolete by the new Grand Master Disciplines. Noncombat related Magnakai skills don't cut it against the new threats in the Grand Master books. Subverted since the gameplay bonuses from the Magnakai skills are still relevant such as the HealingFactor from Curing and the bonuses from Psi-Surge and Weaponmastery (though Weaponmastery is replaced by Grand Weaponmastery for balance issues).\\\
Many powers that you can select as Magnakai or Grand Master are simply improvements over existing powers. Yet there's no reason offered why you can't use Hunting in lieu of Huntmastery. In fact, even some of the gameplay benefits of discipline you should have disapear when improved versions of these powers become available. (Why do you still need to carry meals around when when you don't have huntmastery? You should still have Hunting which ''also'' allows you to get your own food.) The Project Aon versions have clarified that you ''should'' get the benefits of hunting as an OldSaveBonus -- but Hunting doesn't work in wastelands (remember Book 2) so won't work in Book 8 at least.
** Some magical items fall victim to this too. The Grandmaster series has a limited list of special items you can bring with you, which omits some trinkets that were very useful in the preceding books, like the Kalte Firesphere or the Psychic Ring. It is impled that Lone Wolf's newfound skills are making them obsolete -- by that point he can now see in the dark or create fire by himself, making the Kalte Firesphere redundant, and his PsychicPowers are so great that an AmplifierArtifact like the Psychic Ring no longer makes any difference.
** Grey Star's fourth and final book does provide him with a whole bunch of new magical powers that, surprisingly, do ''not'' replace his old ones, but act as new applications to the old abilities. Options to use the older powers still exist and sometimes you're better off with the weaker versions since they often burn less willpower points.
* SortingAlgorithmOfEvil: The defeat of the Darklords has the unfortunate side effect of angering their god Naar, who starts giving his remaining agents on Magnamund more direct support. When that fails, [[spoiler:Naar's personal armies attack Magnamund directly.]]
* StabTheSky: With the Sommerswerd at the very end of Book 2, just before blasting Darklord Zagarna with a ray of holy sunfire.
* SteamPunk: The Drakkar ironclads in Book 12, as well as the "Lajakeka" juggernaut.
* SummonMagic
** The Darklords and evil sorcerer types love to summon nasty things in a pinch.
** For the good guys, extra help can come from Shianti [[ElementalPowers Elementalism]] magic. Which elemental shows up is a bit random, and sometimes they hurt more than they help. Earth Elementals are notoriously stupid and slow.
* SwarmOfRats: [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/07cd/ill3.htm One of the many niceties]] welcoming you in ''Castle Death''.
* SwordBeam: That's how the Sommerswerd blasts any Darklord if it can get a ray of sun. [[spoiler:Or just from the energy accumulated by not using it for most of Book 12 until the end.]]
* TacticalSuicideBoss: There are very few weapons that can kill Helghast-level undead, and even less for Darklords or worse. (In the remake, it's commented that the Sommerswerd is the only ''Good'' weapon that can kill a Darklord.) If you don't have the Sommerswerd, there's almost always some way to use the [[HoistByHisOwnPetard villains' own magic weapons against them.]]
** Especially apparent with [[spoiler:the Helghast attacking the king in the updated remake of the first book. If he hadn't nonchalantly thrown a magic dagger at some poor sod, there would have been no way to stop it.]]
** Darklord Haakon can be vanquished without the Sommerswerd [[spoiler:by turning his magic gem against him, banishing him to another dimension.]]
* ATankardOfMooseUrine
** "Ferina Nog" in ''The Jungle of Horrors'', at least according to Paido. Lone Wolf finds it weak but doesn't have a problem drinking it.
** In the first book of the New Order series, some ale is described as having "a peculiar smell that makes you think of greasy animal hides."
* TaxidermyIsCreepy: Why you shouldn't trust Chanda the Taxidermist.
* TheTheTitle: 19 out of 33 books.
* ThievesGuild: In ''The Cauldron of Fear'', Lone Wolf can have to deal with Tahou's Thieves' Guild in order to reach the title Cauldron if he can't go there by legal means.
* TimeToUnlockMoreTruePotential: Happens once, when Lone Wolf discovers the Grand Master disciplines previously unknown to even exist (which even Sun Eagle couldn't do).
* TownWithADarkSecret: [[spoiler:Eshnar in Book 4. The moment you visit the town, you can tell there's something wrong. By then, it's too late.]]
* TrappedInAnotherWorld
** Lone Wolf's predicament in the Daziarn Plane in Book 11.
** The BigBad of Book 17 tries the same thing, only he sends Lone Wolf to the Plane of Darkness, a place with EverythingTryingToKillYou on steroids.
* TrialAndErrorGameplay: As with most gamebooks, this series has its share of moments where making the wrong choice will kill you without warning.
* TricksterArchetype: Alyss
* TurnCoat
** Vonotar [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Traitor]], who gets his comeuppance ''twice'' in the series.
** For the good guys' side, on the other hand, there's the Slavemaster of Aarnak.
** The BackStory mentions the Patar, the servants of the Elder Magi, who [[spoiler:allowed the Cener Druids access to the Elder Magi's knowledge, which they used to engineer a plague to almost wipe them out, ending the Age of the Old Kingdoms]].
* UltimateEvil
** Naar the King of the Darkness is never seen in his true form for most of the series. Being one of the PowersThatBe (an evil one), he might not ''have'' a true form. His preferred form, described in Book 19, is pretty damn creepy [[spoiler:especially if the reader hates spiders]].
** Another example from Book 1 is [[spoiler:the timeless evil in the Graveyard of the Ancients]]. Which is revealed to be [[spoiler:Naar itself]] in the rewrite.
* TheUndead: Very common henchmen among Lone Wolf's various enemies. Book 17 in particular is rife with them.
* {{Unwinnable}}
** In Book 2, you can miss getting [[spoiler:the Magic Spear]], and even if you do get it, choosing to do the right thing and give it to an ally to let him survive guarding a tunnel means that you ''will'' die about 5 page turns later. Thankfully fixed in the project Aon version (if you have Animal Kinship -- otherwise, you're still screwed and will die).
** Book 8 has you fight a timed battle against two Vordaks, with individual Combat Skill and Endurance scores (meaning, overkill won't help you for the other guy). For players starting with that book, you absolutely ''need'' a completely massive string of luck for both your Combat Skill that you rolled at the beginning and all four rounds you had to fight -- ''and'' all the CS-increasing items you could obtain during the journey -- ''and'' the Weaponmastery ability for the weapon you use against the enemies. Roll a 3 for your CS or get anything below an 8 during battle, you're screwed.
** In Book 17, ''The Deathlord of Ixia'', it is more or less impossible to win if you do not have the Sommerswerd ''from book 2'', since you have two fights against opponents with much higher Combat Skill than you and far more Endurance, and you have to fight them in a row with no healing, having already gone through the demonlord before the 2-round survival battle. This is particularly fun as the Sommerswerd will make several other books much harder.
* UpdatedRerelease: To go with getting a new publisher, all previously released books are being rereleased with new art, fixed typos, and a [[GaidenGame bonus adventure]] tacked on to the end. In the case of the first book, this also involves heavy re-writting in many areas -- notably having Lone Wolf participate in the doomed defense of the Kai Monastery rather than sitting it out due to [[TapOnTheHead an errant tree branch]].
* UpgradeArtifact: The Lorestones.
* UselessUsefulSpell
** Grey Star's Prophecy and Psychomancy are pretty good at eliminating variables when faced with a choice -- sometimes. Psychomancy can just give you a warped riddle that may or may not be right, and Prophecy sometimes completely fails to illustrate the nature of your impending doom. Use it when you're in a valley of poison gas, it just goes "GET OUT GET OUT GET OUT" without saying which way to go.
** The New Order series adds on "Astrology" to the list of Kai-Disciplines. It's supposed to let you look into the far future rather than the immediate future like Sixth Sense does, but the opportunities to use it come up so rarely it's like the author forgot he put it in the list (only once in the first New Order book, and not at all in the next two). The few times it comes up, you tend to get a VaguenessIsComing reading, too.
* UtilityMagic
** Kai-Alchemy (which has nothing to do with mixing magic chemicals, just go with it) is full of utility spells that help you out in a pinch, but not so much combat magic (that would be Magi-Magic, which at its highest level lets you do things like crush a man in armor like a paper cup).
** Elementalism (the Kai version, not the Shianti version) lets you do a number of things with small amounts of flame, dust, water and puffs of air, so it too falls under the "Utility Magic" label.
* VillainousBreakdown: Book 7's BigBad Zahda has a good one.
* VillainPedigree: The Drakkarim, fierce evil warriors wearing death masks, are more or less the same power level throughout the series, but Lone Wolf keeps getting better and they become less and less able to oppose him. In the "Kai" books, a single Drakkar can put up a good fight. In the "Magnakai" series, Drakkarim are only a real challenge if they attack in a group. In the "Grand Master series", they're completely out of their league: the only Drakkar that can still put up a fight against Lone Wolf is [[spoiler:their ''WarGod'' in Book 20, and Lone Wolf can ''still'' kick his ass and throw him into a lava pit.]]
* VirginSacrifice: Madelon in ''The Chasm of Doom''.
* VoluntaryShapeshifting
** The Helghasts, who are capable of mimicking human form, and are immune to non-magical weapons. Considering that their preferred form of attack is choking victims with their skeletal hands, it's probably best that ''Lone Wolf'' never invokes the ShapeshiftingSquick trope.
** Also the Nadziranim, who are fond of adopting a [[OneWingedAngel combat form]] before a fight through their BlackMagic, since in their natural state they're basically formless specters. The result ain't pretty.
** The Deathstalker [[spoiler:and its mate]], introduced in the New Order Kai series, went on a killing spree in a city and used its shapeshifting abilities to evade detection. Its natural form is some sort of horrible ape-like ''thing''. Hunting down a supernatural shapeshifting murderer in the dead of night in the middle of a small city is hands-down one of the best parts of Book 21.
* WeaksauceWeakness: The Darklords are severely weakened in ''clean and pristine environments''. Since Magnamund is a world in MedievalStasis (no huge polluting industries)... In Book 12, [[spoiler:they create a device that negates this weakness, allowing the Darklords to curb stomp most of Magnamund. Lone Wolf's goal is to get rid of this device]].
* WeMeetAgain: Archdruid Cadak to Lone Wolf, in book 14.
* WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes: Here it's more like "Why did it have to be flying flesh-eating tentacled brain monsters?" The Crypt Spawns are one of the few enemies that Lone Wolf actually ''fears'' throughout the series.
* WizardBeard: Lord Rimoah
* WizardNeedsFoodBadly: "You must now eat a meal or lose 3 EN."
* TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed: Sort of a justification, as after the first twelve books the BigBad Lone Wolf fought before is now dead and the other factions fight amongst themselves. However, the rest of the country has more than enough new ones to make up for it.
* WretchedHive
** Ragadorn, main city of the Wildlands.
** Vakovar, in Magador, even more so.
* WritersCannotDoMath: The ''difference'' between your Combat Skill and the enemy's is called the "combat ratio". It's not a ratio.
* XanatosGambit: These appear several times in the series; [[spoiler: the EvilPlan of the BigBad in Book 10]] is a great example. [[spoiler:Gnaag knew Lone Wolf would try to retrieve the last three Lorestones at Torgar and was lying in wait the entire time. If Lone Wolf didn't make it in time, Gnaag would have succeeded in destroying the Lorestones. If Lone Wolf DID make it in time (which, canonically, he does) Gnaag would have a chance to send all of them into the Daziarn (which segues into Book 11)]]. While this gambit fails to kill Lone Wolf, it does buy the Darklords [[spoiler:eight years]] to undo all of the progress Lone Wolf made against them. By the time [[spoiler:Lone Wolf escapes the Daziarn, the Darklords have all but conquered the world, leading into Book 12]].
* TheXOfY: About two-third of the book titles.
* XRaySparks: The lethal kind for [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/09tcof/ill15.htm one poor soldier]] when disintegrated by Zakhan Kimah's Orb of Death.
* YearInsideHourOutside: Both Lone Wolf and Grey Star spends only a few days in the Astral Plane of Daziarn, but to find out upon their return that years have gone by on Magnamund.
* YinYangBomb
** Zahda uses a Doomstone and a Lorestone.
** Lone Wolf himself can use the Sommerswerd and Darklord weapons like the Dagger of Vashna and Helshezag.
* YouAreNotReady: The goddess Ishir sending the powerful Shianti away in ancient times, fearing that they were interfering too much with the destiny of mere mortals, even though they meant no harm. [[spoiler:Well, ''most'' of them meant no harm -- Wytch King Shasarak is a rogue Shianti. Maybe Ishir was onto something...]]
* YouHaveFailedMe
** We learn in Book 12 that Darklord Kraagenskûl likes to whip out his AgonyBeam when his servants disappoint him.
** [[spoiler:Demoness Shamath, Archdruid Cadak, and Darklord Gnaag]] in Book 20 are good examples of what happens when you let down Naar. In the cases of [[spoiler:Gnaag and Cadak]], Naar wasn't satisfied with death; only eternal torment was enough to express his disappointment. And it turns out that this happens to ''everyone'' who worships Naar if they fail him and die.
----
''[[TheManyDeathsOfYou You are dead. Your life and your quest end here]].''
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to:

[[quoteright:227:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/LoneWolf.gif]]
[[caption-width-right:227:[[InfinityPlusOneSword The Sommerswerd]]]]

->''You are Lone Wolf. In a devastating attack, the Darklords have destroyed the monastery where you were learning the skills of the Kai Lords. You are the sole survivor.''

The '''''Lone Wolf''''' {{Gamebook}} series (plural, containing the Kai, Magnakai, Grand Master, and New Order series) were written by Joe Dever; the first book came out in 1984. As the opening quote tells us, the hero is the LastOfHisKind [[AnAdventurerIsYou Fighter/Ranger/Psionic Knight]] Lone Wolf, who escapes the BigBad's [[DoomedHometown destruction of the monastery]] where he and the rest of the Kai Order lived. In the course of his many adventures, Lone Wolf has to avenge his fallen brethren, foil the Darklords and other {{Evil Overlord}}s, try to rebuild the Kai Order, and otherwise save his SwordAndSorcery world Magnamund many, many times.

The books take many {{RPG}} elements and incorporate them into playing/reading, such as HitPoints (called Endurance points), "Combat Skill", skills (Kai / Magnakai / Grand Master Disciplines), and an inventory system. Each book can be read as a standalone adventure, but finishing a book allows one to [[OldSaveBonus gain an extra Discipline and carry over most (usually) of his inventory]]. You can cheat, but you can cheat at TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}} too.

There are 20 books out that follow Lone Wolf himself, then 8 after that following a student of his, with more being written. There's also a four-books ''World of Lone Wolf'' [[SpinOff spin-off]] that takes place in the same world, with Grey Star the Wizard as the hero. There are also 12 ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novelizations roughly covering the first 8 books, fleshing out characterization and the series mythology, as well as a ''Magnamund Companion'' guidebook. There are even ''two'' TabletopRPG versions of the books and a graphic novel spin-off. [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/blog/2011/08/lone-wolf-game-in-production/ A computer game is in the works]], though it's been stuck in DevelopmentHell for some time.

'''Kai series'''
* Flight from the Dark (1984)
* Fire on the Water (1984)
* The Caverns of Kalte (1984)
* The Chasm of Doom (1985)
* Shadow on the Sand (1985)

'''Magnakai series'''
* The Kingdoms of Terror (1985)
* Castle Death (1986)
* The Jungle of Horrors (1986)
* The Cauldron of Fear (1986)
* The Dungeons of Torgar (1987)
* The Prisoners of Time (1987)
* The Masters of Darkness (1988)

'''Grand Master series'''
* The Plague Lords of Ruel (1990)
* The Captives of Kaag (1991)
* The Darke Crusade (1991)
* The Legacy of Vashna (1991)
* The Deathlord of Ixia (1992)
* Dawn of the Dragons (1992)
* Wolf's Bane (1993)
* The Curse of Naar (1993)

'''New Order series'''
* Voyage of the Moonstone (1994)
* The Buccaneers of Shadaki (1994)
* Mydnight's Hero (1995)
* Rune War (1995)
* Trail of the Wolf (1997)
* The Fall of Blood Mountain (1997)
* Vampirium (1998)
* The Hunger of Sejanoz (1998)

'''World of Lone Wolf'''
* Grey Star the Wizard (1985)
* The Forbidden City (1986)
* Beyond the Nightmare Gate (1986)
* War of the Wizards (1986)

'''The Final Four'''[[note]][[UnCancelled Lone Wolf Books 29-32]], presumably a continuation of the New Order[[/note]]
* The Storms of Chai ([[ScheduleSlip 2011]])
* Untitled 30 (tba)
* Untitled 31 (tba)
* Untitled 32 (tba)

All the gamebooks up to ''Trail of the Wolf'' and a few of the others can, with the permission of Dever, be played online at [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/Main/Home Project Aon]].

Also of note is Joe Dever's ''FreewayWarrior'' series, which uses similar rules, but exchanges Magnamund for a ''Film/MadMax''-inspired post-holocaust setting.
----
!!''Lone Wolf'' and its [[SpinOff spin-offs]] provide examples of:

* AbsurdlySpaciousSewer: The Baga-darooz in Barrakeesh, and a few others.
* AlienNonInterferenceClause: The Shianti are forbidden from interfering in human affairs, even though [[spoiler:Wytch-king Shasarak, one of their number, is doing just that.]] Of course, when a human baby accidentally lands on their island, there AintNoRule about teaching him to use magic and "allowing" him to go into the world to deal with the threat.
* AllThereInTheManual
** The novelizations introduce several key characters such as Naar or Alyss. (Good luck knowing who or what Alyss is otherwise.)
** Also the ''Magnamund Companion''; nothing really vital, or that doesn't come up elsewhere, but loads and loads of awesome worldbuilding. As well as a ''Lone Wolf'' board game and a short Choose Your Own Adventure with Banedon as protagonist, providing some backdrop to Book 1.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: The Drakkarim, the Darklords, the Giaks and too many others to count.
** But not the Szalls, a Giak sub-race who fled enslavement by the Darklords and settled in the Wildlands. There's a spot in Book 2 where Szalls try to warn you ''not'' to go near a monster. (Though the little bastards do steal your horse afterwards.)
** The novelizations feature Carag, a Giak [[DefectorFromDecadence who turned against its masters]] and joined Lone Wolf. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, he is implied to have been killed by the Darklords by the end of ''The Claws of Helgedad''.]]
* AmplifierArtifact: The Pyschic Ring and the Grey Crystal Ring. They are implied to be useful only because Lone Wolf has strong PsychicPowers already. Their uses are very situational, however.
* AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent
** Lone Wolf's star apprentice (you name him) takes over in Book 21, starting over from relative scratch. And if you don't want to name him, you can use a table to combine two words to give him a supposedly cool name. Or more likely, something absurd like "Shield Sword".
** The ''World of Lone Wolf'' books feature Grey Star the Wizard, a young wunderkind trained in magic by the Shianti, beings so good at magic that the gods had to ask -- nicely -- for them to leave human beings alone. He's an orphan marooned on the rocks of their island by a storm, and finding him was serendipitous since they are forbidden to leave their island, yet there's this evil sorcerer taking over the world right outside. So they raise him, train him in their ways and send him off to topple an empire.
* AnimalAssassin: The Plaak in Book 12.
* AnimalisticAbomination: Demonlord Tagazin
* AnotherDimension: The books ''The Prisoners of Time'' and ''Beyond the Nightmare Gate'' involve Lone Wolf and Grey Star traveling to the Daziarn plane, outside the normal universe of Magnamund. In the Grand Master series, Lone Wolf makes repeated (and unwelcome) visits to the Plane of Darkness, [[BigBad Naar's]] home turf.
* AnticlimaxBoss
** [[spoiler:Darklords Zagarna (Book 2) and Gnaag (Book 12) are destroyed without a fight by the power of the Sommerswerd. In gameplay terms an anticlimax, but the satisfying and incredibly badass descriptions of these literal embodiments of evil being annihilated in a blast of holy sunfire makes up for it.]]
** [[spoiler:Wytch-king Shasarak and Agarash the Damned]] from the ''World of Lone Wolf'' books starring Grey Star might end up being these. The former can have a fearsome Combat Strength of 30, but that can be reduced to 10 if you take certain options in the pre-fight, making him significantly weaker. Grey Star beats the latter by simply [[spoiler:throwing the Moonstone at the gate Agarash is trying to pass through, thus preventing his escape]].
* ArrowsOnFire: Kai-alchemy grants this as a spell.
* ArtEvolution
** Darklord Gnaag's appearance between Book 8 and Book 12, which is primarily due to the change in illustration artists. The UpdatedRerelease changes his appearance further, again, due to a new artist.
** The Chaos-master's illustrations in Grey Star's series and then in ''The Prisoners of Time'' are also wildly different, but here it's completely justified in-story, since the Chaos-master is an EldritchAbomination who keeps changing shape all the time.
* [[ArtifactOfDeath Artifacts of Death]]: The Doomstones and Death Staff. If not already undead when starting to use them, you may become one soon.
* [[ArtifactOfDoom Artifacts of Doom]]: Many. Doomstones, Darklord weapons, the Death Staff, etc. And in ''The Skull of Agarash'' graphic novel, the eponymous demonic cranium.
* AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: The funerals of Lors Casis in ''The Buccaneers of Shadaki'', as the Elder Magi is passing over to the Plane of Light, leaving no body behind.
* TheAtoner: The Redeemers, a silent order of healers that helps Lone Wolf from time to time, are atoning not for their own misdeeds, but for the misdeeds of their ''ancestors'', [[spoiler:the Patar. The Patar played a key role in the near extinction of their former masters the Elder Magi by plague]]. Ashamed, they vowed that they and their descendants would dedicate themselves to fighting disease in all its forms.
* AttackReflector: The Sommerswerd can sometimes be used to volley a magical attack back at the caster. An example from ''Shadow on the Sand'' is the Vordak riding a Zlanbeast and firing on Banedon's skyship with a magic staff, who subsequently gets a taste of his own {{Fireball|s}}.
* BackFromTheBrink: Books 1 and 2 cover this for the country of Sommerlund, which Zagarna made his first target in his war. Books 8 through 12 seem to cover this for the entirety of Northern Magnamund, as it seems Gnaag is saving Sommerlund for last.
* BadBoss: The Darklords, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap-filled building just to set said traps off, or torturing underlings for kicks.
* BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil: Mentioned in some places, particularly as one of the reasons for the Exile of the Shianti. Their Moonstone had to be returned to them after being borrowed by Lone Wolf for a while because his home nation started to have way too many "good" things happening to it at once, like winter and autumn disappearing into an eternal spring.
* BarbarianTribe
** The Ice Barbarians of Kalte, for the bad guys.
** And, arguably, the Lost Tribe of the Kundi and the Masbate, for the good guys.
* BattleAura: Zakhan Kimah has this on steroids with his Orb of Death. The intro to his fight with Lone Wolf in Book 9 has him strolling across the battlefield nonchalantly, with the only normal soldier who dares strike him being instantly disintegrated. [[ThatOneBoss This is very likely to happen to Lone Wolf as well.]]
* BattleCry
** "For Sommerlund and the Kai!" -- Order of the Kai
** "Shaag Drakkarim!" -- Drakkarim [[labelnote:*]]"Shaag" = "Charge"[[/labelnote]]
** "SHEGGA-ASH-TAAG!" -- Giaks [[labelnote:*]]literally "Hunt and Kill!"[[/labelnote]]
* TheBattleDidntCount: Happens a couple times to Lone Wolf and once to Grey Star.
** When Lone Wolf defeats [[spoiler:the Rahkos in Book 7]], it will immediately kill him if he [[spoiler:turns his back on it]].
** A DoubleSubversion occurs in Book 11 when Lone Wolf fights [[spoiler:the Scarlet Warrior]]. The subversion occurs if Lone Wolf gets a one-hit KO on the random number table and actually ''kills'' him. It's doubly subverted since the incredibly contrived way the enemy dies means that [[spoiler:the last Lorestone is stolen anyway]].
** Grey Star's fight against [[spoiler:the Kleasa]] ends up being one of these as well. Even if Grey Star "wins" the fight -- which he might not, considering it's very though -- [[spoiler:the Kleasa]] still kicks his ass. [[spoiler:The LoveInterest Tanith]] has to make a HeroicSacrifice to save Grey Star [[spoiler:but she recovers at the end of the second book]].
* BeardOfEvil: Prince Lutha
* BearsAreBadNews: One rare actual bear he meets in the series (depending on if he has Animal Control or not) will either just leave him alone when he gets attacked by a pack of hungry Akataz, or he'll come to Lone Wolf's aid and [[CurbStompBattle curb stomp them]]. So it's bad news for Lone Wolf's ''enemies'', making this a nice change of pace from EverythingTryingToKillYou.
* BellyMouth: Darklord Zagarna is described in the novels as having a fanged maw in the belly, which is constantly feeding on Giak or human flesh.
* TheBerserker: Some enemies are described as entering fights in a state of rage, making them immune to basic psychic attacks. This is common with the Drakkarim; they're sometimes seen hacking at lowly soldiers on their side, like Giaks, just to reach their main foe.
* BigBad: While Naar, the King of the Darkness, is the ultimate BigBad of the setting, each series also has its own BigBad. Darklord Haakon is the BigBad in the Kai series, though he's not challenged until Book 5 and most of the Kai series sees "the Darklords" as a whole as the threat. Darklord Gnaag emerges as the main villain of the Magnakai series after he claims the title of Archlord in Book 8. Naar himself takes a more direct role in the Grandmaster series. The vampire Sejanoz becomes the BigBad midway through the New Order Kai series. Further south, the evil Wytch-King Shasarak runs the Shadakine Empire in the "World of Lone Wolf" books and he's Grey Star's nemesis.
* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: Itikars
* BigBadassWolf
** Lone Wolf himself draws on this symbolism with his name.
** BigBadWolves: Doomwolves, Hounds of Death, Taintor Wolves...
* BigBadEnsemble: Most of the time, Naar is essentially a BiggerBad, operating through various minions such as the Darklords, Archdruid Cadak, the Demoness Shamath and Agarash the Damned. They don't usually work together or have anything to do with each other, and some individual villains (Deathlord Ixiataaga as the prime example) act as independent {{Big Bad}}s of their own books but are only remotely linked to Naar.
* BilingualBonus: Some of the books include messages written in the [[ConLang Giak language]], which can give interesting hints if you can read them (with the help of the ''Magnamund Companion'').
* BlackAndWhiteMorality
* BlackMagic: Right-handed Magic, the evil counterpart to the Left-handed Magic used by Banedon and the other wizards of the Crystal Star. Used by the Nadziranim for such fun things as demon summoning, [[OneWingedAngel transformation]], various destructive spells (though to be fair, the Lefties have these too), and necromancy.
* BlackSpeech
** The Giak language, lingua franca of the Darklands and Drakkarim.
** There is also a "dark tongue" that only the Darklords have been seen using. It is described as a harsh, guttural language, with words and sounds that the mouths of men could never form.
* BlessedWithSuck: Or possibly TheComputerIsACheatingBastard, though replace "The Computer" with "The Author". The [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sommerswerd]], mentioned below, makes the next few books in the series much easier, but after that, Dever began compensating by making some fights ''harder'', or taking away non-combat options, if you have it. Perhaps the most egregious example is in Book 11, where having the Sommerswerd forces you into a battle that is almost unwinnable without cheating or massive good luck.\\\
And in Book 12, if you try to use it too soon... you just die. Since, if you draw it from its Korlinium scabbard in the Darklands, the release of holy energy will tell the entire forces of darkness where you are. The same goes for Books 17 and 20. Even an InfinityPlusOneSword is of little good when you're lit up like a Christmas tree and ripe for ''every evil creature in an entire realm of evil'' to converge on your location. On the other hand, if you do bring it along [[spoiler:it will ''vaporize'' the BigBad]].\\\
You know it's bad when there're fan justifications for the hero ''not'' to have his InfinityPlusOneSword for Book 11, and for continuity's sake Book 10 as well.
* BodyArmorAsHitPoints
* BodyHorror: The Beholder of Yanis in Book 11 used to be a pretty decent-looking guy until he [[DealWithTheDevil struck a bargain with the Chaos-master]].
* BoisterousBruiser
** The mercenary captain in Book 6.
** Thog the Barbarian in the novels.
* BottledHeroicResolve
** Adgana herb. The strongest CS-enhancing drug in the series, but with a risk of nasty addiction that can reduce the Endurance score -- permanently.
** Alether potion, too, with less enhancement but without the side effects. As a result, much more common; you can find a draught about [[OncePerEpisode Once per Book]].
* BowAndSwordInAccord: Starting with the Magnakai series, the hero can use a bow alongside melee weapons.
* ButThouMust: Since each book has to have 350 entries (except Book 5) and there's only one good ending, it's inevitable that some choices don't actually matter (you'll end up at the same destination page in a couple turns regardless of the choice). The entries are well-written enough (usually) that this doesn't seem like too forced.
* CanonImmigrant: Alyss, [[GreatGazoo the mischievous demigoddess]], originated in the ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novels penned by John Grant, but showed up in the proper adventure starting Book 16.
* CarnivoreConfusion: Book 14 has Lone Wolf storming the fortress city of Kaag. References are made to the Giak-spawning vats used to spawn Giaks as cannon fodder... and as an ''unlimited source of meat''. The other Giaks that handle and cook the meat in the kitchens don't seem to mind handling the flesh of their own kind. It is never stated if the Giaks [[ImAHumanitarian also eat it]], but it's quite likely.
* CastFromHitPoints: Some spells work by burning Endurance in the adventure where you play Banedon, and sometimes too in the Grandmaster books, with Kai-alchemy and Magi-magic.
* CelibateHero: Lone Wolf doesn't appear to have a canonical love interest in the main books, though ''Legend of Lone Wolf'' gives him a couple of female companions.
* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: In the first batch of Kai Disciplines, "disciplines" such as Hunting and Camouflage are listed right alongside powers like Sixth Sense and Mindblast.
* ChekhovsGun: As a staple of Gamebooks, any item found by the protagonist (even seemingly useless trinkets) can prove surprisingly useful later in the book -- or sometimes, one or two books further in the series. However, there are also plenty of random items that serve no purpose but to take up space in the backpack, and thus you must choose wisely what you keep. Also, it is quite possible to miss the specific path were any item happens to be used.
** That Kazim stone Grey Star gets tortured with in Book 1 of his series? [[spoiler:Those things become much more significant in Book 4.]]
** A negative version of this trope being the Black Crystal Cube from ''Shadow on the Sand''. It's not until later in the book that you learn [[spoiler:a) it attracts your enemies to your location, and b) it is going to explode in your hand if you don't throw it away fast enough]]. A similar one can be found in ''The Masters of Darkness'', and [[spoiler:if you keep it too long, it just kills you outright when exploding]].
* TheChessmaster: [[spoiler:Darklord Gnaag]], as revealed in ''The Claws of Helgedad'' and [[spoiler:Book 10.]]
* TheChosenOne: Lone Wolf himself.
* ChronicBackstabbingDisorder: The Darklords, as evidenced by Archlord Gnaag's reaction when he walks in on Lone Wolf (in disguise as Darklord Ghanesh's minion) slaying Darklord Taktaal: "Your master would be proud of you!" The fact that Darklord weapons like Helshezag and the Dagger of Vashna give ''combat bonuses'' when fighting other Darklords -- and are among the very few things, besides the Sommerswerd, which can kill a Darklord -- is further proof of their treacherous nature.
* CleanCut: Can happen with the Sommerswerd due to CutscenePowerToTheMax -- especially to TheUndead.
* ClearMyName: In Book 19, Lone Wolf is arrested for the crimes of his EvilKnockoff, Wolf's Bane.
* CombatTentacles: [[LongList Burrowcrawler, Crypt Spawns, Akraa'Neonor, Giant Meresquid, Roctopus, Octagtah, Ictakko, Stragnah, Korozon, Ixian Mhagani]]....
* CoolHorse: Wildwind. A gift from Gwynian the Sage, able to go over sixty miles per hour without ever slowing down.
* CoolSword
** All of the named swords in this series could be considered a Cool Sword:
*** the [[PhantasySpelling Sommerswerd]];
*** the [[AncestralWeapon Ironheart Broadsword]];
*** [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Helshezag]] ("Blacksword") and [[{{Fictionary}} Nadazgada]] ("Darkflame");
*** [[AlliterativeName Skarn-Ska]] ("Wolf's Blade").
** Lone Wolf can ''make'' a bunch of these with the new discipline of Kai Weaponcraft once he reach the rank of Kai Supreme Master. In the New Order Kai books, the protagonist receive one of these named weapon (an axe, sword or broadsword). These "Kai-weapons" all offer +5 CS normally and provide bonus CS depending on enemy type, environment, or time of day.
* CreepySouvenir: One Vassagonian warrior wears [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/04tcod/ill1.htm a necklace of shrunken heads]].
* CrystalDragonJesus: Nyxator. He created the Lorestones and inspired the Kai Order. He was also a ''literal'' dragon.
* DarkSkinnedBlond: Paido
* DeadlyDodging: Rarely comes into play, as most fight sequences are straightforward. There's an example in book 6, however: in the ruins of Castle Taunor, if Lone Wolf flees from the enraged monster waiting in ambush, you can lure it into jumping down a precipice by dodging at the last moment.
* DealWithTheDevil: The malevolent Chaos-master, who grants wishes with the expected Monkey's Paw twists.
* DeathWorld: The goal of the Darklords is to turn Magnamund into this for everyone but themselves.
* DemBones: Skeletons warriors constitute the main troops of the Ixian [[TheUndead Undead]].
* DemonicInvaders: The Agarashi, and to an extent the Darklords and their more inhuman minions.
* DepartureMeansDeath: The Darklords of Helgedad cannot survive outside the polluted atmosphere of the Darklands without special apparati, which can be magical, but can also include special breathing tanks. Of course, they are attempting to expand the Darklands through conquest.
* DiagonalCut: This is the fate of a Vordak in Book 5 if you have the Sommerswerd.
-->''You strike again, curving the golden blade in a great arc. It bites into the Vordak's neck, tearing through its unnatural body, and severing it diagonally from collarbone to hip.''
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu
** Book 11 has Lone Wolf take on the aforementioned Chaos-master, the equivalent of the Devil in the Daziarn. Even other physical gods are afraid of it. On the other hand, if you brought the Sommerswerd with you on this adventure, [[ThatOneBoss it's probably not a fight you'll win]].
** Book 20 has Lone Wolf doing this ''constantly''.
* DoomedHometown: The Kai Monastery at the beginning of the series.
* DoomMagnet: Whatever you do, ''never'' board the same ship/boat/ferry as Lone Wolf. You'll either be attacked by pirates, be the victim of sabotage, sunk by an ironclad battleship, attacked by a hungry sea serpent, captured by a giant fish-shaped boat crewed by a horde of [[TheUndead Undead]], ambushed and dragged to your death by hungry frogmen, have a {{necromancer}} stir up havoc in the taproom, or any combination of the above. Justified to an extent: Lone Wolf is such a powerful force for good that he naturally attracts evil.
* DoomyDoomsOfDoom: Doomwolves; the [[ArtifactOfDoom Doomstones]], mentioned above; the Doomlands of Naaros in Southern Magnamund; and of course Book 4: ''The Chasm of Doom'' (guest star: Barraka the Doomslayer).
* TheDragon: BigBad Naar has had several Dragons in the BackStory and throughout the series. The most notable was Agarash the Damned, described as his most powerful champion of evil. Agarash in turn had his own Dragon, the Deathlord Ixiataaga, the BigBad of Book 17. Ixiataaga even had his ''own'' Dragon, [[spoiler:Demonlord Tagazin]].
* DressingAsTheEnemy: Lone Wolf's infiltrating the Darklands while disguised as a Drakkar and (later) Darklord Ghanesh's servant in Book 12. See also the MuggedForDisguise examples.
* DualWielding: Technically not allowed. However, this hasn't stopped [[{{Munchkin}} some players]] to homebrew their own rules to gain the bonus of two magic weapons at once.
* DueToTheDead: Both paths in Book 8 lead to an example.
* DungeonBypass
** The only way to escape TheMaze in ''Castle Death''.
** Also, at the very end of ''War of the Wizards'', the armies of the BigBad are winning despite everything Grey Star have done. So what can the hero do? You use your magic to teleport directly to Shasarak and kill him personally.
* DwindlingParty
** In Book 4, the squad you bring with you is slowly killed off, and will be entirely dead by the end regardless of what path you take.
** Same thing in Book 3 with the three guides and sled dogs helping Lone Wolf travel the icy wastes of Kalte. By the time he reaches the title Cavern of Kalte, he's alone. However, there are paths where the guides actually survive and just turn back without Lone Wolf.
* DyingRace: The Elder Magi. In the second book of the New Order series, the Grandmaster can attend the funeral/ascension of one of the Magi. It is mentioned that fewer than a hundred Elder Magi remain, and their power is fading with each passing year. The Elder Magi accept their eventual demise, secure in the knowledge that the New Order Kai stand ready to take their place in the fight against evil.
* EldritchAbomination: Several enemies Lone Wolf encounters could be considered as such.
** Darklord Gnaag is essentially the Brundle Fly.
** The Agtah and their master the horrific Chaos-master of the Daziarn boast twisted misshappen forms.
** The Ciquali of the Hellswamp bear more than a passing resemblance to Lovecraft's Deep Ones.
** And then there's the Crypt Spawn....
** The Kleasa from the ''World of Lone Wolf'' series. A LivingShadow from another dimension that eats souls like candy. Worse, the only way you can beat it is by setting it free, to reap evil elsewhere.
* EliteMooks: The Drakkarim. Further in the series, the ante is upped with the elite of Drakkarim, the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Death Knights]].
* EmergencyEnergyTank: Touching a newly-discovered Lorestone instantly heals Lone Wolf fully -- but only this one time. Other circumstances allowing a complete healing can be found in the books, but they are always plot-related and can't be brought along (to be used, for example, during the fight against ThatOneBoss[[invoked]]). The one exception is Shamath's potion, [[spoiler:but it is found near the end of Lone Wolf's adventures, and it has [[TooAwesomeToUse another use anyway]].]]
* EmpathicWeapon
** Though no obvious evidence is presented in the books, the actions taken by the Sommerswerd to protect both its wielder and itself may prove that it has a spirit of its own. It will also blast any evil creature who tries to pick it up (as in Book 7) and Book 2 states that it will [[LoyalPhlebotinum lose its powers if wielded by one without the Kai gifts]].
** A darker variant is the Darklord sword Helshezag. The sword actually tries to compel Lone Wolf to ''butcher'' his enemies, bearing more than a passing resemblance to other cursed swords in fiction, such as [[Literature/TheElricSaga Stormbringer]] -- which Joe Dever states was in fact the direct inspiration for Helshezag.
* TheEmpire: The Darklands; Vassagonia; the Shadakine Empire.
* EnemyCivilWar: The Darklords ''really'' needed a system of succession that didn't involve a massive civil war every time someone whacked the current Archlord.
* EnergyAbsorption: The blade of the Sommerswerd can harmlessly absorb most offensive spells directed at its wielder. Sometimes, the energy is even used to heal Lone Wolf. However, the protection can rarely be foiled if the attack comes from an artifact at least as powerful as the Sword of the Sun, like with Kimah's [[ArtifactOfDoom Orb of Death]] or Vonotar's RingOfPower.
* EverythingsDeaderWithZombies: Vonotar's ghost fleet in Book 2.
* EverythingTryingToKillYou
** The number of death traps, cold-blooded assassins, evil armies, cursed artifacts, hostile fauna, poisonous (and man-eating) flora, malevolent undead, and hidden ancient evils sealed all over the place that Lone Wolf runs into means ''something'' is ''always'' trying to kill him. Even when he ''isn't'' in a war.
*** Book 1: Lone Wolf may barely escapes sinking in a bog that claims his horse, just to be attacked by a very poisonous snake next. Even lampshaded in the text:
--->''It seems that nature and the Darklords have conspired against you, but it does not shake your determination to reach the King.''
*** Book 6: Though it requires a series of choices you'd have to be a complete idiot to actually make, Lone Wolf can get killed by an evil ''taxidermist''.
*** Book 7: ''Castle Death'' is probably the worst about this trope. It's possible to run into magical ''cobwebs'' that try to kill Lone Wolf.
*** There are three rules to live by in all the books: Someone offering you hospitality and food? That's poisoned. Someone offering to help you? Is going to try and kill you in your sleep. Someone desperately begging for your help? Of ''course'' he's a Helghast, [[ThisLoserIsYou how many times are you going to fall for that trick?]]
*** Remember this is the series in which you can die fighting a ''door''. Not even a magic/sentient/evil/cursed door, but die trying to open a boring, rusted, ordinary door. Well, it's a door that you're trying to force open after failing the [[OncePerEpisode mandatory]] puzzle lock, while caught in a torrent of acid rain, so it's the rain that's damaging you rather than the door itself. Which doesn't take anything away from the fact that yes, there is an honest to god combat sequence with a door, complete with [[HitPoints Endurance]] and Combat Score, and you will die if you lose.
** ''Grey Star the Wizard'' has these too. The first book alone has: a room so evil just standing in it can kill you; prehensile swamp plants trying to eat you; man-sized frogs with poison skin that can fly(!!); a soul-eating Kleasa demon; a valley full of poison mist; and worst of all, a hive of thousands of giant acid-spitting preying mantises that you inevitably piss off and have to escape by climbing out of their lair -- ''from the bottom up.''
* EvilKnockoff
** In Book 19, Lone Wolf's evil clone comes after him.
** A similar predicament happens to Grey Star in Book 3 of his own series.
* EvilOldFolks: Lord Zahda; Archdruid Cadak
* {{Evil Overlord}}s: The Darklords and Wytch-King Shasarak have this trope written all over them.
* {{Evil Sorcerer}}s: Vonotar the Traitor; Lord Zahda; the Nadziranim; the Cener Druids...
* ExpandedUniverse: The ''Magnamund Companion''; the TabletopRPG; the ''Legends of Lone Wolf'' novels...
* FaceHeelTurn: Shasarak the Wytch-King [[spoiler:was once a Shianti wizard, a member of the very group that sent Grey Star on his quest.]]
* FacelessEye: In the bonus story of the reprint of Book 7, Tavig faces down a creature called the All-Seeing One, a roughly humanoid creature whose head is just one big eye.
* FacelessGoons: The Drakkarim. To the point it can take a while for a newcomer to the series to even realize they're supposedly humans.
* FangsAreEvil
* {{Fiction 500}}: High-Mayor Cordas. Said to be the wealthiest man in Magnamund and able to order the construction of a skyship to be finished within a month for the sole purpose of helping Lone Wolf travel home more quickly.
* {{Fictionary}}: The Giak language, which has some fun grammar.
* FigureItOutYourself: "Let us say that the wisdom of the Kai and the lore of the Magicians' Guild can surpass the limitations of even time itself." Loi-Kymar seems to think that "We got here so fast because we teleported." is too easy.
** The Italian translation of that passage (which appeared at the end of the 3rd book) was even more heavy-handed, sounded something like this: "A Kai knight and a Guild magician have little patience for the constraints of such weak barriers like space and time!"
* {{Fingore}}: An ugly dwarf servant of Zahda gets his fingers blasted from daring to pick [[LoyalPhlebotinum the Sommerswerd]].
* FishPeople: Bhakish, Ciquali, Xlorg...
* FlamingSword
** The Sommerswerd has holy sunfire on its edge when it faces particularly evil foes.
** The Darklord blades, like Helshezag or the Dagger of Vashna, are surrounded by ''black flames'' when used.
** And in the Grand Master series, if Lone Wolf is a Sun Lord with Grand Weaponmastery, he can set any normal weapon's edge aflame for extra damage in battle.
* ForcedPrizeFight: In book 21, the New Order Kai Grandmaster must fight Dromodon the Invincible, the champion gladiator, after accidentally killing his intended opponent due to ''drinking from the wrong fountain''. While the Grandmaster is initially sorry to have to kill the man to earn his freedom, he "looks into his eyes" and somehow realizes that Dromodon [[spoiler:is a worshipper of [[BigBad Naar]]]], meaning it's okay to kill him. A fairly transparent attempt to keep the Grandmaster from appearing too morally grey.
* ForgedByTheGods: More specifically "a race that men would now call gods" for the Sommerswerd.
* GaidenGame
** The ''World of Lone Wolf'' books serve as this, following the wizard Grey Star who lives at the very southern tip of Magnamund, whereas Lone Wolf hangs out mainly in Northern Magnamund.
** Also, most of the [[UpdatedRerelease newly re-published old books]] have a new short adventure at the end where you take the role of one of the characters you have met during the course of the main adventure, each having their own unique gameplay style.
* [[VideoGameCrueltyPunishment Gamebook Cruelty Punishment]]: Over the course of the series there are times Lone Wolf can do things that are... morally grey at best. The penalties for such decisions take the form of difficult battles, losing out valuable items, or [[TheManyDeathsOfYou dying horribly]]. Lone Wolf is canonically TheMessiah, he should ''act'' like it.
** Averted in Book 2; when one of your travelling companions (you don't know which) tries to have you poisoned, you're better off killing the merchant than the one who actually did it. But played straight if you pick anyone else. The mercenary woman is bad enough, but if you pick one of the Knights of the White Mountain, he ''and his brother'' team up and become the hardest fight in the Kai books. They're even tougher to beat than [[spoiler:Darklord Haakon]]! And this takes place ''before'' you get the Sommerswerd. Aside from cheating or being ''very lucky'', there's no real way to win this fight.
* GargleBlaster: Bor-brew ale can put even a Kai Master in a coma.
* GenreSavvy: After 20 books, Lone Wolf realizes that Naar and his minions are ''obsessed'' with him. [[spoiler:He knew that if he tried to take the Moonstone back to the Shianti, then every servant of Naar would be trying to kill him before the week was up]]. So Lone Wolf passes the job to someone else, thinking that Naar's followers would be focused on himself instead. It works. Most of the threats the New Order Grandmaster encounters in Book 21 are coincidences; he only meets ''one'' Naar worshipper, and that is by accident.
* {{Giant Flyer}}s: Zlanbeast, Kraan, Itikar, Lavas... and a few dragons.
* GiantMook: Gourgaz
* GlobalAirship: Banedon's skyship, ''Sky Rider''. [[spoiler:After it gets shot down in Book 18, Lone Wolf gives Banedon the ship he got in the book, ''Cloud Dancer''.]]
* GlobalCurrencyException
** The various currencies can usually be spent interchangeably... but woe betide you if you try using the wrong currency as a bribe. Kika, the currency of the Darklands, takes this a step further: you can't spend it ''at all'' (except as a bribe in said Darklands). Basically, its purpose is to take up space in your Belt Pouch and to convince the naysayers at the Kai Monastery that, yes, these fiends ''do'' have an economy.
** One tavern in the New Order series will only accept Gold Crowns or Silver Lune. The felt currency your companion carries is useless and the tavernkeeper will ''kick you out'' if you offer Ren from the Autocracy of Bhanar since Bhanarese soldiers killed the tavernkeeper's son.
* GlowingEyelightsOfUndeath: Helghasts
* GodOfEvil: Naar
* GoodThingYouCanHeal: The Kai Discipline of Healing is a favored choice amongst most players, and for good reason. There are so many ways for Lone Wolf to get sliced and diced, stabbed, concussed, burnt, frozen, poisoned, contaminated, mind-fried, life-drained or just generally hurt, to make it a very good thing he can heal.
* GottaCatchThemAll: Books 6-11 involve searching for the seven lost Lorestones one by one.
* [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Grand Masters Who Actually Do Something]]: After the Magnakai series, nobody would blame Lone Wolf for wanting to sit back and train his acolytes in peace and let someone else handle the brushfires. But whenever a crisis emerges, he's always the first to step up to the plate to take care of business. It isn't until the New Order Kai series and his ascension to Supreme Mastery that he starts delegating the crisis du jour to his [[FeaturelessProtagonist lieutenant]].
* GreatBigBookOfEverything: In the beginning of Book 20, the Elder Magi give Lone Wolf what is essentially a ''travel guide'' to the Plane of Darkness. It's pretty much the only reason Lone Wolf has even a snowball's chance in (literally) Hell of succeeding.
* GreatGazoo: Alyss
* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: Although even smart guards would have a hard time against a psychic hero specialized in infiltration and camouflage, some over the series display the typical incompetence associated with this trope.
** For example, in ''Shadow on the Sand'', two Vassagonian gaolers believe their prisoner has escaped when they can't see him through the peephole, just because Lone Wolf is sitting against the door. And he isn't even doing it on purpose, but still gets the opportunity to ambush them when they open the cell.
** In ''Dawn of the Dragons'', the Eldenorian guards capturing Lone Wolf and bringing him before Prince Lutha take his gold, backpack and weapons... but not the weapon-like special items. Including the Sommerswerd!
*** This one was so glaring that the French version actually [[http://projectaon.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=general&action=display&thread=1574&page=1 changed the scene by adding an Eldenorian traitor who brings back his special items to Lone Wolf.]]
* GunsAreWorthless: ''Completely'' averted in this series. Anytime an enemy has one of the "primitive" Bor Muskets, Lone Wolf will either ''die instantly'' or face a random number roll that could still result in instant death. Apparently, wielding awesome PsychicPowers granted by the Sun God doesn't count for much against guns.
* HealingFactor: The various Healing disciplines.
* HealingHands: The various Healing disciplines, again.
* HealingPotion: A staple of the game; the most common kind is the Laumspur potion, brewed from the Laumspur herb you can find over most of Magnamund. There are other varieties, more or less efficient, like Rendalim's elixir, Lanurma, Oxydine, Oede herb, etc. Very useful even with the Healing discipline, since it's quite easy to get mangled beyond what your HealingFactor can quickly repair.
* HeelFaceTurn: The Slavemaster of Aarnak in Book 12, who has had enough of the Darklords and their destructive ways. [[spoiler:Later becomes the first president of Magador under his birth name, Kadharian.]]
* HellHound: Pretty much every dog in this series could count. Especially [[spoiler:Demonlord Tagazin, a ''huge sabretoothed jackal'', and one of the strongest foes in the series]]. Joe Dever ''really'' doesn't like dogs.
* HelpingHands
** The Rakhos in ''Castle Death''.
** The novelization of ''Fire on the Water'' also describes the severed limbs of the zombies from Vonotar's ghost fleet still moving on their own until hacked to pieces.
* HeroesPreferSwords: While there are other types of magic weapons, a few of which are even halfway decent, the best magic weapons are swords.
* HeroOfAnotherStory: Banedon is implied to be on his own adventures when he's offscreen, such as winning an airship staffed by gun-toting dwarves. You find that one out when he rescues Lone Wolf in ''Shadow on the Sand''. He starts out, like Silent Wolf, as a slacker student, and eventually becomes Guildmaster of the Brotherhood of the Crystal Star.
* HeroProtagonist
* [[HeroStoleMyBike Hero Stole My Horse]]: Repeatedly. As with Hero Stole My Flying Mount.
* HighFantasy
* HitPoints: Or Endurance Points, as they're known here.
* HolyHandGrenade
** The Sommerswerd. Uses the blessed power of light... to obliterate the enemies of the Kai.
** The Moonstone too. [[spoiler:In ''The Buccaneers of Shadaki'', just showing the artefact to an undead immediately destroys it.]]
* HookHand: In Book 5, during the palace prison escape path, you can meet "Hammerfist the Armourer", a huge weaponsmith with a hand replaced by a warhammer for both fighting and metalworking.
* {{Humanshifting}}: The Helghasts.
* IdiotBall: This being a ChooseYourOwnAdventure type of series, the player can make Lone Wolf hold it if he's faced with a situation where some of the choices are clearly dumber than the others. Some examples:
** Book 1: [[spoiler:If you fall into a tomb in a graveyard known for being the home to ancient horrors... why yes, do open the sarcophagus please, what could go wrong?]]
** Book 2: [[spoiler:If a zombie captain (that you've known when he was alive) asks you to put down the Sommerswerd so his soul could be freed... of course you can trust him and discard your magic weapon while on a ship full of undead.]]
** Book 3: [[spoiler:If you find a pretty golden bracelet on the body of an obviously mind-controlled Ice Barbarian, when it is known his people lacks metal and never fancied any jewelry, you can safely put it on your own wrist... Vonotar would just love to have a word with you.]]
* IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace: Joe Dever ''loves'' this trope, as is evident from such titles as ''[[DoomyDoomsOfDoom The Chasm of Doom]]'', ''The Kingdoms of Terror'', ''Castle Death'' and ''The Jungle of Horrors''.
* ImAHumanitarian
** The cannibal wretches of the Forbidden City.
** The ghouls in Tahou's "Cauldron".
* ImMelting: Many living deads (like the Vordaks and Helghasts or the Ixian boss undead) dissolves into foul-smelling liquids when destroyed.
* ImpersonatingTheEvilTwin: Lone Wolf taking the place of Wolf's Bane at the end of Book 19.
* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Sommerswerd, acquired in the ''second'' book. The most powerful sword in the series, it's somewhat of a GameBreaker until later books give enemies power-ups to counter it. It's still an incentive for people to read from the beginning. In that book, the Sommerswerd is in fact the SwordOfPlotAdvancement; as an OldSaveBonus it acts as the InfinityPlusOneSword in later books.
* InstantSedation
** {{Tranquillizer Dart}}s are used by Maouk in ''Shadow on the Sand''. In the same book, Lone Wolf can use a blowpipe and dart on a guard; the effects are instantenous.
** KnockoutGas in ''Castle Death'', filling some trapped rooms or delivered by an ugly dwarf blowing it in your face through a brass tube.
* InventoryManagementPuzzle
* JokerJury: Lone Wolf gets one such mock-trial in Book 7, ''Castle Death''. The sentence? "TheMaze!"
* LargeAndInCharge: Gourgaz
* LaserBlade: Darklord Haakon summons one from his magic stone to fight Lone Wolf.
* LastOfHisKind: Lone Wolf is the only survivor of the Kai Lords, until he rebuild the Kai Order in the Grand Master books.
* LetterMotif: If it has a double A in it (whether "it" is a creature, character or place) then it's ''trouble''. Possibly justified if one assumes that the only language in Magnamund that contains the "double A" phoneme is the one used by all of Naar's minions. If all the really evil stuff is being named by the really evil people using words in their [[BlackSpeech evil language]], the similarity makes a lot more sense.
** [[AC:Characters:]] Gnaag, Haakon, Ixiataaga, Kekataag the Avenger, Kraagenskûl, Magnaarn, Naar, the Shog'aash, Taktaal.
** [[AC:Creatures:]] Akraa'Neonor, Dentaag, Dholdaarg, Dhorgaan, Kraan, Muntaag, Plaak, Taan-spider.
** [[AC:Places:]] Aarnak, Dejkaata, Kaag, Haagadar, Maaken (Maakengorge, Maakenmire), Naaros, Xaagon, Zaaryx.
* LizardFolk: Gourgaz; Crocaryx
* LoadBearingBoss
** Lord Zahda and his Doomstone with Kazan-Oud.
** Deathlord Ixiataaga with Xaagon.
* LongRunningBookSeries
* LoyalPhlebotinum: The Sommerswerd can only be used to its full potential by a Kai Lord. If wielded in combat by anyone else, it is said that its power will fade and be lost forever. Furthermore, if a truly evil creature makes the mistake of holding the sword -- as an ugly dwarf servant of Lord Zahda painfully discovers in ''Castle Death'' -- it will [[{{Fingore}} cost him a few fingers]].
* LuckBasedMission: Pick a number from the Random Number Table. If it is 6 or less, [[GameOver "Your life and your quest end here."]] Anybody who tells you they read the books all the way through without cheating is lying. Well... that, or their OCD makes them insane enough create a new character each and every single time the RandomNumberGod frowns on them.
* MacGuffinGuardian
** [[EvilOverlord Lord Haakon]] himself, and the monsters he summons, must be vanquished to retrieve the Book of the Magnakai at the end of book 5, ''Shadow on the Sand''.
** The monstruous Dakomyd guards the first Lorestone in book 6, ''The Kingdoms of Terror''.
** The Crocaryx and the Zadragon in book 9, ''The Cauldron of Fear''.
** Book 20, ''The Curse of Naar'', can be said to be mostly a series of {{MacGuffin Guardian}}s, as several Demon Lords must be beaten to retrieve each time a new PlotCoupon.
* MadArtist: Chanda the Taxidermist
* MadScientist: The Cener Druids are the medieval equivalent of Mad Scientists. They specialize in experiments that surpass Josef Mengele in sadism and ''really'' love biological warfare. In the BackStory they [[spoiler:nearly wiped out the mighty Elder Magi with a plague]] and in [[spoiler:Book 13 they plan to do the same to ''everybody else'']].
* MagicAntidote: Oede Herb
* MagicKnight
** The Vakeros Order, servants of Mages that Lone Wolf eventually befriends.
** In the Grandmaster series, Lone Wolf can choose one of two styles of magic as a skill set to go along with his others. The Kai Lords themselves can be considered [[PsychicPowers psionic]] knights.
* {{Magitek}}: Present in some places. Most notably, the [[GlobalAirship skyships]] like Banedon's ''Skyrider'' and ''Cloud-Dancer'', and several of Naar's minions in Book 19.
* TheManBehindTheMan
** [[spoiler:Naar, King of the Darkness]] is the real BigBad of the entire series, and the one who created [[spoiler:the Darklords]]. Possibly subverted; though he's not mentioned in the first twelve books, being a [[spoiler:god of evil]], his existence was probably widely known already. He is heavily mentioned in the [[AllThereInTheManual novelizations]].
** A better example of this trope exists in the ''World of Lone Wolf'' books starring Grey Star. [[spoiler:SealedEvilInACan Agarash the Damned]] is TheManBehindTheMan to [[spoiler:Wytch-King Shasarak]].
* TheManyDeathsOfYou: Especially in the earlier books that read more like a Choose Your Own Adventure book. The sheer number of non-combat-related ways Lone Wolf can die in the series rivals ''VideoGame/{{Shadowgate}}''.
* MauveShirt: Don't get too attached to any of the named characters who get characterization and accompany Lone Wolf on any of his adventures. If they stick around for more than a few page turns, chances are they're going to die horribly. Depending on the path taken, examples of ill-fated Mauve Shirts can be found in Books 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, and 18. In other words, more than half the series. The guy's called "Lone Wolf" for a reason.\\\
There are exceptions, however, notably Vakeros Warrior Paido, Guildmaster Banedon and Captain Prarg. If one of them happens to die while they accompany Lone Wolf, the hero meets his end shortly thereafter (making these books somewhat {{Escort Mission}}s). [[spoiler:The three of them get captured by the enemy at some point, but are later rescued by Lone Wolf.]] Sadly, [[spoiler:Paido isn't an exception to the end. He was killed off-screen by Gnaag at the end of Book 10. Lone Wolf learns this in Book 20 when he finds Paido's soul being tortured in the Plane of Darkness. Ouch.]]
* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: Grey Star is incredulous at Kundi magic rituals; he can't actually sense any sorcery being performed whatsoever by their kooky shaman, yet the mantiz bite on his leg heals somehow and their shaman does manage to point the way to the Shadow Gate. One possibility is that the Shianti use Magic A and the Kundi use Magic B, but it's never confirmed.
* TheMaze: Lone Wolf faces this scenario in Book 7, after being caught by yet another evil overlord, stripped of his weapons, and sentenced to a maze. The maze isn't actually that big, but it's certainly riddled with lethal monsters. It is tricky in the sense that actually reaching the center [[spoiler:kills you]]. To continue with the story, Lone Wolf has to [[spoiler:cheat]].
* MeaningfulName: Magnamund is almost Latin for "big world".
* MedievalEuropeanFantasy: For the most part, although differently-themed civilisations are visited, and some parts of the world are heavily (and evilly) SteamPunk.
* MedievalStasis: Right from the {{Word of God}}, as Dever has stated that Magnamund does not have a "technological" future. The idea was hinted at in one of the deuterocanonical ''Legends'' novels, and was FanonDiscontinuity among most fans even before [[CanonDiscontinuity Dever confirmed it.]]\\\
This doesn't stop [[spoiler:a mecha wolf, a time bomb, and power-armored warriors wielding laser spears]] from appearing in Book 19, among other things. [[spoiler:Of course, this all takes place on the moon of a different planet.]]
* MindOverMatter
* {{Mineral MacGuffin}}s: The Moonstone, Lorestones and Doomstones.
* MirrorMatch
** Lone Wolf vs. Wolf's Bane.
** Grey Star vs. the Jahksa.
* MixAndMatchCritters
** Several beasts of Magnamund are these, like the Anarian Sky-snake or the Ixian Mhagani.
** Also, the Cener Druids' creations are often [[HybridMonster a mixture of various creatures]].
** However, it is even more prominent with beings of chaos, like the Daziarn's Agtah or the Plane of Darkness' Chaos-horde and Demons. The [[EldritchAbomination Chaos-master]] is a mix and match of many animals, all of which ''keep changing shape all the time''.
* MookLieutenant: Vordaks
* MoonLogicPuzzle: Some of the puzzles are not solvable solely from the information given, such as one puzzle where the answer is [[spoiler:0. You have to realize that sometimes, 0 means 10 instead of 0, as often when picking from the Random Number Chart in the books themselves.]]
* MoneyForNothing: Though it never becomes completely useless, money does become less useful in the later books. Justified since some of them are set in places that have little use for currency, such as an icy wasteland populated by TheUndead, [[spoiler:a jungle moon orbiting another planet]], and the Plane of Darkness (the series' equivalent to Hell).
* {{Mordor}}: A few examples in the series, most especially the Darklands.
* MuggedForDisguise: It is not rare for Lone Wolf to kill some EvilMinions for clothes before sneaking into enemy strongholds. This can happen in Book 5 to a Vassagonian messenger, in Book 12 to a Drakkar horseman, in Book 13 to a Cener Druid or in Book 16 with a Disciple of Vashna. It helps that most enemy {{Mooks}} are either FacelessGoons or InTheHood.
* MuggingTheMonster: Various rogues (robbers, thieves, bandits, pirates, backstabbers, grave diggers, pickpockets, brigands...) regularly try to mug Lone Wolf or his disciple in their travels. More often than not, it's the hero who ends up richer and the cutthroats dead. Later in the series, the book may not even involve the player in such encounters. You get an off-hand paragraph that you're set upon by bandits, demanding gold but instead [[CutscenePowerToTheMax "receiving a harsh lesson in the powers of a Kai Master"]].
* MushroomSamba
** The calacene mushrooms in Book 4.
** Possibly, Bor-brew ale in Book 8.
* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast
** Maybe a mild example here, but most people probably wouldn't be too eager to meet beings named "Kraagenskûl" or "Haakon", even if they weren't [[EvilOverlord Darklords]]. (On the other hand, Haakon was/is a fairly popular name for Norwegian royalty for more than 1000 years.)
** Another example is the eponymous "Castle Death" from Book 7, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Book 7 is one of the harder books in the series; the castle is full of monsters and traps, and that's ''before'' Lone Wolf gets to the Maze...
** Then there's the Deathlord of Ixia. Even the ''Darklords'' feared this guy. So will you.
* TheNecrocracy (Type I): Ixia
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Destroying the Rune that controls the [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Soultaker]] in ''Rune War'' also left it stranded in Magnamund. As if having a pissed-off demon trapped on your world wasn't bad enough, [[spoiler:said demon kidnaps Lone Wolf at the end of the book.]]
* NintendoHard
** Book 11 concludes with three boss-level fights in close succession (one of which is virtually impossible [[BlessedWithSuck if you have the]] InfinityPlusOneSword) with hardly any chance to heal between the last two.
** Book 17 is pretty bad too. Nearly every enemy encounter verges on DemonicSpiders [[invoked]] territory, and the battles against the BigBad and his [[TheDragon Dragon]] are some of the hardest in the series. And just like the battles in Book 11, there is almost no chance to heal in between the boss fights. And in this case you might actually ''need'' the InfinityPlusOneSword to beat the boss. [[spoiler:Man, ''screw'' the Power Spike.]]
* NoBodyLeftBehind: Among others, the Darklords and Nadziranim fade into nothingness when killed. See also ImMelting.
* NoGearLevel: This can happen to the hero every couple of books. Notably in Book 2, after you get shipwrecked; in Book 5 and Book 9, if Lone Wolf has to get out of jail; and unavoidably in Book 7, ''Castle Death'', when thrown into TheMaze.
* NonstandardGameOver: If you inadvertently put the fortress of Ikaya on alert in Book 3, you get an ending where [[spoiler:you escape back home without dying OR completing your mission to capture Vonotar]] -- the only place in the whole series where you can fail your mission without dying.
* NotSoHarmlessVillain: When Roark first shows up in Book 6, Lone Wolf takes him down a peg or two with no effort. Later he [[spoiler:turns out to be a demon worshipper who sicks undead on Lone Wolf's ass]]. Then if you meet him in [[spoiler:Book 10]], he actually manages to [[spoiler:summon Demonlord Tagazin back to Magnamund]]. Finally, Lone Wolf meets Roark again in [[spoiler:Book 18, where he shows up as a ghost. A ghost with powerful telekinetic abilities who has a surprisingly high Combat Skill]]. Not bad for someone who isn't [[spoiler:originally]] a supernatural being or sorcerer.
* OhCrap: These are the words (or the Magnamund equivalent at least) that probably go through the minds of all the villains when Lone Wolf inevitably shows up to hand them their asses, and it shows. Book 12 has some good examples.
** The best one is probably from Vonotar the Traitor in Book 3:
-->''"{{Who dares}} disturb me?" he hisses, rising from the Brumalmarc throne, his eyes searching for an intruder. Upon seeing you, he emits a horrified gasp and fumbles for his black staff. He has the look of a criminal who has been discovered in the act of some dreadful crime.''
** Each time Lone Wolf meets the Crypt Spawns, the text makes it clear that this is his reaction.
* OldSaveBonus: Each book read about the same character gives bonuses to "rank", equipment, and one skill for each book. [[BagOfSpilling Except for whatever]] ''doesn't'' carry over, presumably for game balance. Although everything can be carried over until Book 13.
* OminousFloatingCastle (Type 3): Lone Wolf chases Wolf's Bane into one in Book 19.
* OmniscientMoralityLicense: Turns out the [[spoiler:Crocaryx]] in Book 9 were created by Kai for the sole purpose of guarding a Lorestone. Once said Lorestone is no longer in their possession, the narration announces that this is the beginning of the demise of their race. Makes one wonder when [[WhatMeasureIsANonhuman humans]] will [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness outlive their usefulness]].
* OncePerEpisode: Starting with Book 16, ''The Legacy of Vashna'', a dive through a Shadow Gate and a visit to the Plane of Darkness is mandatory for Lone Wolf in every book.
* OneRiotOneRanger: Lampshaded in book 4: "Your presence here is worth a hundred men."
* OneWingedAngel: The Nadziranim ("dark sorcerors") always adopt a more appropriate combat form before entering a fight; their favorite is that of an Ice Dragon (sometimes wielding a FlamingSword in addition to the deadly cold BreathWeapon).
* [[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname Only Known by His Nickname]]: "Lone Wolf" is not his birth name, nor even the name he was given when he first joined the monastery. It was "Silent Wolf" before he changed his name due to being the LastOfHisKind. Lone Wolf's birth name is never mentioned. ([[AllThereInTheManual At least, not in the gamebooks themselves.]])
* OnlySmartPeopleMayPass: Constantly. Sometimes the series gets cheeky by giving you a riddle with a numerical answer and asking you to turn to the page with that number.
* OrderReborn: Lone Wolf eventually rebuilds the Kai Monastery and trains several apprentices.
* OrphanedEtymology: In Book 4, a demonic enemy was briefly described as "satanic", even though Magnamund is a world totally unrelated to Earth and Christian tropes. The term is never used again.
* OurDragonsAreDifferent: The extinct Sun Dragons from the BackStory, the Lavas in the Grand Master books (which bear a passing resemblance to ''D&D'' Draconians), and in the appropriately-titled Book 18 ''Dawn of the Dragons'', [[spoiler:the dragons Naar intends to unleash on Magnamund to kill ''everything''.]]
* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Although Magnamund lacks most classical fantasy races (elves, gnomes, halflings...), the dwarves form the mountain kingdom of Bor are pretty much standard fare.
* OurLichesAreDifferent: Deathlord Ixiataaga. Fits in the undead sorceror mold, but he obviously never was human to begin with.
* OurOrcsAreDifferent: Giaks
* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. Which proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would readily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found in the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.
* PhantasySpelling: The Sommerswerd -- not sw'''o'''rd. It's Danish, or a derivative of some nordic tongue. The Sommlending (people of Sommerlund, the "Summer Land") tend to have nordic-derived names for places and objects, as well as being clearly nordic racially as well. A vowel shift appears to have occurred since they [[AllThereInTheManual sailed across the ocean from their original native islands on their mission from Kai]].
* PhlebotinumHandlingEquipment: Korlinium, a fibrous mineral looking like strands of polished silver, can hide the radiations of Good artifacts. Lone Wolf gets a Korlinium scabbard for the Sommerswerd, and in the New Order series his disciple carry the Moonstone in a Korlinium-laced satchel. The problem with those good radiations isn't that they are dangerous, but that many creatures of evil can readily detect them, and thus they would immediately swarm the protagonist if not for this precaution.
* {{Plaguemaster}}s: The Cener Druids
* PoweredByAForsakenChild: The [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Lake of Blood]] in Helgedad, the capital city of the Darklands. A sea of supernatural flames fed by the pain of those thrown into it. Even worse, the victims aren't able to die and remain trapped in a state of undying agony. [[spoiler:Fortunately, Lone Wolf blows up Helgedad and the Lake at the end of Book 12]].
* PowerupLetdown: In book 12 Lone Wolf can gain a chainmail jacket made from a special metal, and it can even be carried over into the Grandmaster series. It actually improves his health less than the regular chainmail he could get in the early books.
** [[AvertedTrope Averted]]: the page on which you obtain it states "Because it is so light, it can be worn beneath any padded or metallic body armour you may possess." You can stack the Magic Chain, Magic Vest, and the padded armor that is obtainable semi-regularly. The only time you ''cannot'' stack armor is the Bronin Vest & Chainmail Waistcoat, and only with each other.
* PrintLongRunners: 28 volumes, soon to be the intended 32.
* PsychicBlockDefense: The Mindshield, Psi-screen, and Kai-screen disciplines.
* PsychicPowers: Many of the Kai/Magnakai/Grand Master disciplines.
** [[SpeaksFluentAnimal Animal Kinship]]/[[TheBeastmaster Animal Control/Animal Mastery]];
** [[GoodThingYouCanHeal Healing]]/[[HealingFactor Curing]]/[[HealingHands Deliverance]];
** [[MindRape Mindblast]]/[[AgonyBeam Psi-Surge]]/[[YourHeadASplode Kai-Surge]];
** [[PsychicBlockDefense Mindshield/Psi-screen/Kai-screen]];
** MindOverMatter/Nexus/Grand Nexus;
** [[SpiderSense Sixth Sense]]/[[CombatClairvoyance Divination]]/[[AstralProjection Telegnosis]]...
* PuzzleBoss: Some enemies have no standard battle, or are better off avoided by using certain items or tactics. Two of the four Grey Star books have puzzle boss fights, for example, and the other two tend to fare better if you go into them with your thinking cap on.
* RageHelm: The Drakkarim always wear metal helmets with skull-shaped facemasks in battle. To the point this is often the main feature used to describe them.
* {{Ranger}}s: The Sommlending Border Rangers.
* RailRoading: There's usually more than one direct path to victory, but all books begin and end the same way, and if any major character dies as part of the plot, there's no way to save him. Sometimes the books draw out your attempts to save the doomed character, though.
* RedShirt: Lone Wolf shouldn't get too attached to any unnamed characters that travel with him either. For examples, see Book 17 and...
* RedShirtArmy: Book 4. By Kai and Ishir, Book 4.
* ReligionOfEvil: The Cener Druids and the Acolytes of Vashna.
* RightfulKingReturns: The New Order Grandmaster's mission in book 23 ''Mydnight's Hero'' is to return the exiled Prince Karvas to his country of Siyen so that he can be sworn in as king.
* [[RichBitch Rich Bastard]]: Roark, as the Lord of Amory, acts this way. [[spoiler:Only eviler, crossing the MoralEventHorizon on his ''very first appearance''.]]
* RingOfPower
** The Psychic Ring in Book 9; if you lack any magic weapon, it gives the only other fighting chance against [[ThatOneBoss Zakhan Kimah]].
** Vonotar the Traitor (in Book 11) and Prince Lutha (in Book 18) also have evil Rings of Power, which they try to kill Lone Wolf with.
* SamusIsAGirl: Briefly in Book 6; one of Lone Wolf's many enemies happens to be an evil knight in a suit of armor, and upon death, we see that she's a woman muffling her voice.
* ScaryBlackMan: Samu, who manages to be almost more badass than Grey Star ''without'' needing magical powers.
* SchizoTech: Magnamund may not have a technological future, but it's sure got a lot of technology in places. The [[{{Mordor}} Darklands]] are heavily industrialized, while the good guys' lands are locked in MedievalStasis.
* ScienceIsBad: The bad guys use a lot of technology; the Darklords use ironclad steamships and mechanical foundries, which have the double effect of fueling their war machine and polluting the environment for them ([[GreenAesop since they're weakened in clean, pristine environments]]). Science-fiction technology is also used on other worlds controlled by Naar. But Magnamund itself is kept in MedievalStasis if the Kai win, and Lone Wolf never uses any technological weaponry or devices except for a very few examples of {{Magitek}}, such as ''[[GlobalAirship Skyrider]]'' and the Crystal Explosive.
* SdrawkcabName: In Book 11, the Beholder of Yanis used to be known as Sinay.
* SealedEvilInACan: Quite a few of these appear as major and minor foes in the series. Two notable examples in the BackStory are Agarash the Damned, a powerful demon created by Naar that killed Nyxator and was sealed in another dimension by the Elder Magi, and Darklord Vashna, the mightiest of the Darklords and the first to be defeated by the Sommerswerd. The remains of Vashna and his army, along with their vengeful spirits, were sealed in the Maakengorge (a.k.a. the Chasm of Doom). These two examples subvert the usual path of this trope since, canonically [[spoiler:they ''never'' escape. Yes, they ''stay'' sealed, thanks to Lone Wolf and Grey Star]].
* SealedGoodInACan: Not quite a true example since they weren't actually sealed away, but the goodly gods Kai and Ishir are relegated to their own dimensions and can only provide aid to Magnamund indirectly. It is revealed in Book 19 that [[spoiler:their EvilCounterpart Naar can bypass the same limitation by using the Moonstone to open Shadowgates, allowing his minions to constantly harass Magnamund and Lone Wolf in particular]].
* SecondPersonNarration
* SequentialBoss: In Book 14, you face [[spoiler:a fire-breathing demonic monkey, whose corpse turns into a swarm of man-eating insects. After you deal with them, they come together and form an ice dragon.]]
* SituationalSword: The Sommerswerd, devastating against Undead, and deadly even for the Darklords, especially if you can get a ray of sun. [[spoiler:It is stated later it could be lethal even against [[BigBad Naar]].]]
* SkunkStripe: Grey Star is named so for the white forelock in his otherwise black hair. (And the "Star" part is because a star represents hope.)
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Kalte (Book 3); Ixia (Book 17)
* SnakePeople: Darklord Taktaal
* SpiderSense
** The Sixth Sense tree of disciplines, which often allow for Kai Lords to sense danger before it's too late.
** Grey Star gets his "Prophecy" spell, too, and also a "Psychomancy" spell that lets him examine objects by laying his hands on it. All of these abilities help remove forks in the road when you're at a crossroads in the books.
* SpinOff: The ''World of Lone Wolf'' series starring Grey Star would be a textbook example of this.
* SquishyWizard: Grey Star. He doesn't get armor, the only weapon he's any good with is his staff, and once he runs out of Willpower points he's pretty much boned. He also does not get Lone Wolf's regenerating health skills; apparently Shianti magic just doesn't cover healing.
* SoLastSeason
** Both played straight and subverted. The Kai and Magnakai skills of Books 1-12 are rendered almost obsolete by the new Grand Master Disciplines. Noncombat related Magnakai skills don't cut it against the new threats in the Grand Master books. Subverted since the gameplay bonuses from the Magnakai skills are still relevant such as the HealingFactor from Curing and the bonuses from Psi-Surge and Weaponmastery (though Weaponmastery is replaced by Grand Weaponmastery for balance issues).\\\
Many powers that you can select as Magnakai or Grand Master are simply improvements over existing powers. Yet there's no reason offered why you can't use Hunting in lieu of Huntmastery. In fact, even some of the gameplay benefits of discipline you should have disapear when improved versions of these powers become available. (Why do you still need to carry meals around when when you don't have huntmastery? You should still have Hunting which ''also'' allows you to get your own food.) The Project Aon versions have clarified that you ''should'' get the benefits of hunting as an OldSaveBonus -- but Hunting doesn't work in wastelands (remember Book 2) so won't work in Book 8 at least.
** Some magical items fall victim to this too. The Grandmaster series has a limited list of special items you can bring with you, which omits some trinkets that were very useful in the preceding books, like the Kalte Firesphere or the Psychic Ring. It is impled that Lone Wolf's newfound skills are making them obsolete -- by that point he can now see in the dark or create fire by himself, making the Kalte Firesphere redundant, and his PsychicPowers are so great that an AmplifierArtifact like the Psychic Ring no longer makes any difference.
** Grey Star's fourth and final book does provide him with a whole bunch of new magical powers that, surprisingly, do ''not'' replace his old ones, but act as new applications to the old abilities. Options to use the older powers still exist and sometimes you're better off with the weaker versions since they often burn less willpower points.
* SortingAlgorithmOfEvil: The defeat of the Darklords has the unfortunate side effect of angering their god Naar, who starts giving his remaining agents on Magnamund more direct support. When that fails, [[spoiler:Naar's personal armies attack Magnamund directly.]]
* StabTheSky: With the Sommerswerd at the very end of Book 2, just before blasting Darklord Zagarna with a ray of holy sunfire.
* SteamPunk: The Drakkar ironclads in Book 12, as well as the "Lajakeka" juggernaut.
* SummonMagic
** The Darklords and evil sorcerer types love to summon nasty things in a pinch.
** For the good guys, extra help can come from Shianti [[ElementalPowers Elementalism]] magic. Which elemental shows up is a bit random, and sometimes they hurt more than they help. Earth Elementals are notoriously stupid and slow.
* SwarmOfRats: [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/07cd/ill3.htm One of the many niceties]] welcoming you in ''Castle Death''.
* SwordBeam: That's how the Sommerswerd blasts any Darklord if it can get a ray of sun. [[spoiler:Or just from the energy accumulated by not using it for most of Book 12 until the end.]]
* TacticalSuicideBoss: There are very few weapons that can kill Helghast-level undead, and even less for Darklords or worse. (In the remake, it's commented that the Sommerswerd is the only ''Good'' weapon that can kill a Darklord.) If you don't have the Sommerswerd, there's almost always some way to use the [[HoistByHisOwnPetard villains' own magic weapons against them.]]
** Especially apparent with [[spoiler:the Helghast attacking the king in the updated remake of the first book. If he hadn't nonchalantly thrown a magic dagger at some poor sod, there would have been no way to stop it.]]
** Darklord Haakon can be vanquished without the Sommerswerd [[spoiler:by turning his magic gem against him, banishing him to another dimension.]]
* ATankardOfMooseUrine
** "Ferina Nog" in ''The Jungle of Horrors'', at least according to Paido. Lone Wolf finds it weak but doesn't have a problem drinking it.
** In the first book of the New Order series, some ale is described as having "a peculiar smell that makes you think of greasy animal hides."
* TaxidermyIsCreepy: Why you shouldn't trust Chanda the Taxidermist.
* TheTheTitle: 19 out of 33 books.
* ThievesGuild: In ''The Cauldron of Fear'', Lone Wolf can have to deal with Tahou's Thieves' Guild in order to reach the title Cauldron if he can't go there by legal means.
* TimeToUnlockMoreTruePotential: Happens once, when Lone Wolf discovers the Grand Master disciplines previously unknown to even exist (which even Sun Eagle couldn't do).
* TownWithADarkSecret: [[spoiler:Eshnar in Book 4. The moment you visit the town, you can tell there's something wrong. By then, it's too late.]]
* TrappedInAnotherWorld
** Lone Wolf's predicament in the Daziarn Plane in Book 11.
** The BigBad of Book 17 tries the same thing, only he sends Lone Wolf to the Plane of Darkness, a place with EverythingTryingToKillYou on steroids.
* TrialAndErrorGameplay: As with most gamebooks, this series has its share of moments where making the wrong choice will kill you without warning.
* TricksterArchetype: Alyss
* TurnCoat
** Vonotar [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Traitor]], who gets his comeuppance ''twice'' in the series.
** For the good guys' side, on the other hand, there's the Slavemaster of Aarnak.
** The BackStory mentions the Patar, the servants of the Elder Magi, who [[spoiler:allowed the Cener Druids access to the Elder Magi's knowledge, which they used to engineer a plague to almost wipe them out, ending the Age of the Old Kingdoms]].
* UltimateEvil
** Naar the King of the Darkness is never seen in his true form for most of the series. Being one of the PowersThatBe (an evil one), he might not ''have'' a true form. His preferred form, described in Book 19, is pretty damn creepy [[spoiler:especially if the reader hates spiders]].
** Another example from Book 1 is [[spoiler:the timeless evil in the Graveyard of the Ancients]]. Which is revealed to be [[spoiler:Naar itself]] in the rewrite.
* TheUndead: Very common henchmen among Lone Wolf's various enemies. Book 17 in particular is rife with them.
* {{Unwinnable}}
** In Book 2, you can miss getting [[spoiler:the Magic Spear]], and even if you do get it, choosing to do the right thing and give it to an ally to let him survive guarding a tunnel means that you ''will'' die about 5 page turns later. Thankfully fixed in the project Aon version (if you have Animal Kinship -- otherwise, you're still screwed and will die).
** Book 8 has you fight a timed battle against two Vordaks, with individual Combat Skill and Endurance scores (meaning, overkill won't help you for the other guy). For players starting with that book, you absolutely ''need'' a completely massive string of luck for both your Combat Skill that you rolled at the beginning and all four rounds you had to fight -- ''and'' all the CS-increasing items you could obtain during the journey -- ''and'' the Weaponmastery ability for the weapon you use against the enemies. Roll a 3 for your CS or get anything below an 8 during battle, you're screwed.
** In Book 17, ''The Deathlord of Ixia'', it is more or less impossible to win if you do not have the Sommerswerd ''from book 2'', since you have two fights against opponents with much higher Combat Skill than you and far more Endurance, and you have to fight them in a row with no healing, having already gone through the demonlord before the 2-round survival battle. This is particularly fun as the Sommerswerd will make several other books much harder.
* UpdatedRerelease: To go with getting a new publisher, all previously released books are being rereleased with new art, fixed typos, and a [[GaidenGame bonus adventure]] tacked on to the end. In the case of the first book, this also involves heavy re-writting in many areas -- notably having Lone Wolf participate in the doomed defense of the Kai Monastery rather than sitting it out due to [[TapOnTheHead an errant tree branch]].
* UpgradeArtifact: The Lorestones.
* UselessUsefulSpell
** Grey Star's Prophecy and Psychomancy are pretty good at eliminating variables when faced with a choice -- sometimes. Psychomancy can just give you a warped riddle that may or may not be right, and Prophecy sometimes completely fails to illustrate the nature of your impending doom. Use it when you're in a valley of poison gas, it just goes "GET OUT GET OUT GET OUT" without saying which way to go.
** The New Order series adds on "Astrology" to the list of Kai-Disciplines. It's supposed to let you look into the far future rather than the immediate future like Sixth Sense does, but the opportunities to use it come up so rarely it's like the author forgot he put it in the list (only once in the first New Order book, and not at all in the next two). The few times it comes up, you tend to get a VaguenessIsComing reading, too.
* UtilityMagic
** Kai-Alchemy (which has nothing to do with mixing magic chemicals, just go with it) is full of utility spells that help you out in a pinch, but not so much combat magic (that would be Magi-Magic, which at its highest level lets you do things like crush a man in armor like a paper cup).
** Elementalism (the Kai version, not the Shianti version) lets you do a number of things with small amounts of flame, dust, water and puffs of air, so it too falls under the "Utility Magic" label.
* VillainousBreakdown: Book 7's BigBad Zahda has a good one.
* VillainPedigree: The Drakkarim, fierce evil warriors wearing death masks, are more or less the same power level throughout the series, but Lone Wolf keeps getting better and they become less and less able to oppose him. In the "Kai" books, a single Drakkar can put up a good fight. In the "Magnakai" series, Drakkarim are only a real challenge if they attack in a group. In the "Grand Master series", they're completely out of their league: the only Drakkar that can still put up a fight against Lone Wolf is [[spoiler:their ''WarGod'' in Book 20, and Lone Wolf can ''still'' kick his ass and throw him into a lava pit.]]
* VirginSacrifice: Madelon in ''The Chasm of Doom''.
* VoluntaryShapeshifting
** The Helghasts, who are capable of mimicking human form, and are immune to non-magical weapons. Considering that their preferred form of attack is choking victims with their skeletal hands, it's probably best that ''Lone Wolf'' never invokes the ShapeshiftingSquick trope.
** Also the Nadziranim, who are fond of adopting a [[OneWingedAngel combat form]] before a fight through their BlackMagic, since in their natural state they're basically formless specters. The result ain't pretty.
** The Deathstalker [[spoiler:and its mate]], introduced in the New Order Kai series, went on a killing spree in a city and used its shapeshifting abilities to evade detection. Its natural form is some sort of horrible ape-like ''thing''. Hunting down a supernatural shapeshifting murderer in the dead of night in the middle of a small city is hands-down one of the best parts of Book 21.
* WeaksauceWeakness: The Darklords are severely weakened in ''clean and pristine environments''. Since Magnamund is a world in MedievalStasis (no huge polluting industries)... In Book 12, [[spoiler:they create a device that negates this weakness, allowing the Darklords to curb stomp most of Magnamund. Lone Wolf's goal is to get rid of this device]].
* WeMeetAgain: Archdruid Cadak to Lone Wolf, in book 14.
* WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes: Here it's more like "Why did it have to be flying flesh-eating tentacled brain monsters?" The Crypt Spawns are one of the few enemies that Lone Wolf actually ''fears'' throughout the series.
* WizardBeard: Lord Rimoah
* WizardNeedsFoodBadly: "You must now eat a meal or lose 3 EN."
* TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed: Sort of a justification, as after the first twelve books the BigBad Lone Wolf fought before is now dead and the other factions fight amongst themselves. However, the rest of the country has more than enough new ones to make up for it.
* WretchedHive
** Ragadorn, main city of the Wildlands.
** Vakovar, in Magador, even more so.
* WritersCannotDoMath: The ''difference'' between your Combat Skill and the enemy's is called the "combat ratio". It's not a ratio.
* XanatosGambit: These appear several times in the series; [[spoiler: the EvilPlan of the BigBad in Book 10]] is a great example. [[spoiler:Gnaag knew Lone Wolf would try to retrieve the last three Lorestones at Torgar and was lying in wait the entire time. If Lone Wolf didn't make it in time, Gnaag would have succeeded in destroying the Lorestones. If Lone Wolf DID make it in time (which, canonically, he does) Gnaag would have a chance to send all of them into the Daziarn (which segues into Book 11)]]. While this gambit fails to kill Lone Wolf, it does buy the Darklords [[spoiler:eight years]] to undo all of the progress Lone Wolf made against them. By the time [[spoiler:Lone Wolf escapes the Daziarn, the Darklords have all but conquered the world, leading into Book 12]].
* TheXOfY: About two-third of the book titles.
* XRaySparks: The lethal kind for [[http://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/09tcof/ill15.htm one poor soldier]] when disintegrated by Zakhan Kimah's Orb of Death.
* YearInsideHourOutside: Both Lone Wolf and Grey Star spends only a few days in the Astral Plane of Daziarn, but to find out upon their return that years have gone by on Magnamund.
* YinYangBomb
** Zahda uses a Doomstone and a Lorestone.
** Lone Wolf himself can use the Sommerswerd and Darklord weapons like the Dagger of Vashna and Helshezag.
* YouAreNotReady: The goddess Ishir sending the powerful Shianti away in ancient times, fearing that they were interfering too much with the destiny of mere mortals, even though they meant no harm. [[spoiler:Well, ''most'' of them meant no harm -- Wytch King Shasarak is a rogue Shianti. Maybe Ishir was onto something...]]
* YouHaveFailedMe
** We learn in Book 12 that Darklord Kraagenskûl likes to whip out his AgonyBeam when his servants disappoint him.
** [[spoiler:Demoness Shamath, Archdruid Cadak, and Darklord Gnaag]] in Book 20 are good examples of what happens when you let down Naar. In the cases of [[spoiler:Gnaag and Cadak]], Naar wasn't satisfied with death; only eternal torment was enough to express his disappointment. And it turns out that this happens to ''everyone'' who worships Naar if they fail him and die.
----
''[[TheManyDeathsOfYou You are dead. Your life and your quest end here]].''
----
[[redirect:Literature/LoneWolf]]
20th Jan '13 3:57:43 PM StFan
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The books take many {{RPG}} elements and incorporate them into playing/reading, such as HitPoints (called Endurance points), "Combat Skill", skills (Kai / Magnakai / Grand Master Disciplines), and an inventory system. Each book can be read as a standalone adventure, but finishing a book allows one to [[OldSaveBonus gain an extra Discipline and carry over most (usually) of his inventory]]. You can cheat, but you can cheat at Solitaire too.

to:

The books take many {{RPG}} elements and incorporate them into playing/reading, such as HitPoints (called Endurance points), "Combat Skill", skills (Kai / Magnakai / Grand Master Disciplines), and an inventory system. Each book can be read as a standalone adventure, but finishing a book allows one to [[OldSaveBonus gain an extra Discipline and carry over most (usually) of his inventory]]. You can cheat, but you can cheat at Solitaire TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}} too.
20th Jan '13 3:54:37 PM StFan
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* OurLichesAreDifferent: Deathlord Ixiataaga. Fits in the undead sorceror mold, but he obviously never was human to begin with.



* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. This proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would readily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found with the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.

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* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. This Which proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would readily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found with in the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.
20th Jan '13 3:48:36 PM StFan
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Added DiffLines:

* AnimalisticAbomination: Demonlord Tagazin
7th Jan '13 4:39:44 AM SeptimusHeap
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* NotSoHarmless: When Roark first shows up in Book 6, Lone Wolf takes him down a peg or two with no effort. Later he [[spoiler:turns out to be a demon worshipper who sicks undead on Lone Wolf's ass]]. Then if you meet him in [[spoiler:Book 10]], he actually manages to [[spoiler:summon Demonlord Tagazin back to Magnamund]]. Finally, Lone Wolf meets Roark again in [[spoiler:Book 18, where he shows up as a ghost. A ghost with powerful telekinetic abilities who has a surprisingly high Combat Skill]]. Not bad for someone who isn't [[spoiler:originally]] a supernatural being or sorcerer.

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* NotSoHarmless: NotSoHarmlessVillain: When Roark first shows up in Book 6, Lone Wolf takes him down a peg or two with no effort. Later he [[spoiler:turns out to be a demon worshipper who sicks undead on Lone Wolf's ass]]. Then if you meet him in [[spoiler:Book 10]], he actually manages to [[spoiler:summon Demonlord Tagazin back to Magnamund]]. Finally, Lone Wolf meets Roark again in [[spoiler:Book 18, where he shows up as a ghost. A ghost with powerful telekinetic abilities who has a surprisingly high Combat Skill]]. Not bad for someone who isn't [[spoiler:originally]] a supernatural being or sorcerer.
2nd Jan '13 6:56:48 AM StFan
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* DwindlingParty: In Book 4, the squad you bring with you is slowly killed off, and will be entirely dead by the end regardless of what path you take.

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* DwindlingParty: DwindlingParty
**
In Book 4, the squad you bring with you is slowly killed off, and will be entirely dead by the end regardless of what path you take.take.
** Same thing in Book 3 with the three guides and sled dogs helping Lone Wolf travel the icy wastes of Kalte. By the time he reaches the title Cavern of Kalte, he's alone. However, there are paths where the guides actually survive and just turn back without Lone Wolf.
1st Jan '13 5:59:12 PM StFan
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* BadBoss: The Darklords, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap filled building just to set them off and torturing underlings for kicks.

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* BadBoss: The Darklords, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap filled trap-filled building just to set them off and said traps off, or torturing underlings for kicks.



* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. This proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would easily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found with the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.

to:

* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. This proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would easily readily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found with the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.
1st Jan '13 5:44:37 PM StFan
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Added DiffLines:

* LizardFolk: Gourgaz; Crocaryx


Added DiffLines:

* OutscareTheEnemy: It is explained in ''The Magnamund Companion'' that Giaks are much more afraid of their officers than of the enemy. This proved a weakness early on, as the Somlending archers were quick to figure out that if you targeted the Giak commanders, their troops would easily disband in panic. This forced the Darklords to look for stronger, arrow-resistant platoon leaders, which they found with the huge Gourgaz {{lizardfolk}}s.
22nd Dec '12 12:20:41 PM Zarester
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* BadBoss: The Darklods, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap filled building just to set them off and torturing underlings for kicks.

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* BadBoss: The Darklods, Darklords, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap filled building just to set them off and torturing underlings for kicks.
22nd Dec '12 12:20:08 PM Zarester
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Added DiffLines:

* BadBoss: The Darklods, all over. They generally abuse their {{Mooks}} about as much as you'd expect, sending them into a trap filled building just to set them off and torturing underlings for kicks.
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