History Main / LoanShark

27th Aug '17 12:57:34 PM nombretomado
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* A large percentage of the early parts of ''[[AtelierSeries Atelier Judie]]'' is spent paying of a very high debt incurred to one of your party members in exchange for a place to stay. He doesn't threaten Judie with violence, but he's not very nice about it either.

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* A large percentage of the early parts of ''[[AtelierSeries Atelier Judie]]'' ''VideoGame/AtelierJudieTheAlchemistOfGramnad'' is spent paying of a very high debt incurred to one of your party members in exchange for a place to stay. He doesn't threaten Judie with violence, but he's not very nice about it either.
1st Aug '17 3:39:07 PM faunas
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* This was one of the way the ''Skoptzy'' recruited some of their members: they loaned money to people having a great need ot it, such as poor peasants or ruined businessmen, and, when they defaulted, the loaner came to claim his collaterals, which were the [[GroinAttack debtor's genitals]].

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* This was one of the way the ''Skoptzy'' ''[[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skoptsy Skoptsy]]'' recruited some of their members: they loaned money to people having a great need ot it, such as poor peasants or ruined businessmen, and, when they defaulted, the loaner came to claim his collaterals, which were the [[GroinAttack debtor's genitals]].
18th Jun '17 10:10:14 PM Gamermaster
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* In the old UsefulNotes/AppleII[=/=]TRS-80 game ''VideoGame/{{Taipan}}'', you can borrow money from Elder Brother Wu. The interest rate is quite high, and if you don't pay him back he'll eventually send thugs to beat you up.

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* In the old UsefulNotes/AppleII[=/=]TRS-80 UsefulNotes/AppleII/TRS-80 game ''VideoGame/{{Taipan}}'', you can borrow money from Elder Brother Wu. The interest rate is quite high, and if you don't pay him back he'll eventually send thugs to beat you up.
8th Jun '17 11:58:20 AM dragonfire5000
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** Given that the father's debts are owed to banks who appear to have harmed him mostly by refusing to extend further loans when they promised they would, even if the debts are large and his business is sunk one would think both the girl's prostitution and renunciation of her life and the father's intended suicide are a bit premature. They only get away with it because of the established use in anime of both tropes in situations of indebtedness.
1st Jun '17 3:25:49 PM faunas
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* According to "[[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s and popularized itself in the 1960s, while the old meaning could still be heard as late as the 1980s.

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* According to "[[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects interest, as well as collecting on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.harassment (e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money".money)". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s and popularized itself in the 1960s, while the old meaning could still be heard as late as the 1980s.
29th May '17 9:25:02 PM nombretomado
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* An episode of ''WKRPInCincinnati'' has the enforcer for this type of shark loitering in the station's lobby, waiting for loan-defaulter Johnny Fever to turn up. He was only given a vague description of what Johnny looks like, so of course HilarityEnsues.

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* An episode of ''WKRPInCincinnati'' ''Series/WKRPInCincinnati'' has the enforcer for this type of shark loitering in the station's lobby, waiting for loan-defaulter Johnny Fever to turn up. He was only given a vague description of what Johnny looks like, so of course HilarityEnsues.
23rd Apr '17 9:53:19 AM nombretomado
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* A tertiary character runs afoul of one of these in a SweetValleyHigh novel.

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* A tertiary character runs afoul of one of these in a SweetValleyHigh ''Literature/SweetValleyHigh'' novel.
22nd Apr '17 9:58:35 AM faunas
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* According to "[[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s, popularized itself in the 1960s, and could still be heard as late as the 1980s.

to:

* According to "[[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s, 1950s and popularized itself in the 1960s, and while the old meaning could still be heard as late as the 1980s.
22nd Apr '17 9:56:41 AM faunas
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* According to "[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s, popularized itself in the 1960s, and could still be heard as late as the 1980s.

to:

* According to "[http://scholarlycommons."[[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]", Deregulation]]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s, popularized itself in the 1960s, and could still be heard as late as the 1980s.
22nd Apr '17 9:55:51 AM faunas
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Added DiffLines:

* According to "[http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=wlulr Loan Sharks, Interest-Rate Caps, and Deregulation]", the term "loan shark" didn't originally mean "lender who charges high interest and uses physical violence (i.e. brute force) to charge when the debtors don't pay up on time", but rather "lender who charges high interest and sets low payment periods so that debtors will end up perpetually paying interest and who collects on the debt agressively but not physically violently, by means of harassment, by e.g. telling on the neighbours or the boss that the debtor owed money". It notes that the modern meaning of "loan shark" came up during the late 1950s, popularized itself in the 1960s, and could still be heard as late as the 1980s.
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