History Main / LivingLieDetector

26th Jul '16 5:31:09 AM WM-R
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The eponymous Takagi-san of ''Manga/KarakaiJouzuNoTakagiSan'' is able to tell pretty easily if the protagonist Nishikata lies to her. She does this through a combination of recognising Nishikata's tells (e.g. he tends to stammer or look away), a good understanding of his thought processes and deducing things.
4th Jul '16 11:28:23 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'': Axonn's [[MaskOfPower Mask of Truth]]. It can also see through disguises and illusions, and sense what's been hidden.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'': ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'': Axonn's [[MaskOfPower Mask of Truth]]. It can also see through disguises and illusions, and sense what's been hidden.
1st Jul '16 2:57:49 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who tend to be more socially adept than men) and easier with children ([[ChildrenAreInnocent who are obviously more naïve and inexperienced than adults]]). But it can backfire too -- many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them.

to:

* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who tend to be more socially adept than men) and easier with children ([[ChildrenAreInnocent who are obviously more naïve and inexperienced than adults]]). But it can backfire too -- many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them. Plus eye contact is considered rude or aggressive in many cultures, so they might just be uncomfortable.
1st Jul '16 2:53:38 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** For that matter, classes on how to fake these things are available in most schools. They call it "acting".
1st Jul '16 2:50:34 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Scott Adams, creator of ''Comicstrip/{{Dilbert}}'', claims his training in being a hypnotist gives him the ability to tell when most people are lying.

to:

* Scott Adams, creator of ''Comicstrip/{{Dilbert}}'', claims his training in being a hypnotist gives him the ability to tell when most people are lying. Along with complete mastery of persuasion. According to his blog he tried to tell them that when he was called for jury duty, and they patiently explained to him that ''that's not how that works''.
25th May '16 8:58:28 PM Chaosenvoy
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Phantom Troupe member Pakunoda has her own unique way of determining if someone is lying to her by checking their memories through physical contact. Trying to trick her with a false memory won't work, because she always uses a loaded question to bring the true memory forth, meaning you either have to tell her the truth or legitimately not know the answer to her questions.
22nd May '16 11:40:31 AM Raven_257
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the 2000 ''VideoGame/SpiderMan'' video game, a Spider-Man impersonator disrupts Doctor Octavius' new presentation and steals the technology. Comicbook/{{Daredevil}} corners the real Spidey for the crime. Thankfully, Daredevil uses his powers to realize that the real Spider-Man is innocent.
29th Apr '16 12:00:18 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who tend to be more socially adept than men) and easier with children. But it can backfire too -- many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them.

to:

* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who tend to be more socially adept than men) and easier with children.children ([[ChildrenAreInnocent who are obviously more naïve and inexperienced than adults]]). But it can backfire too -- many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them.
16th Apr '16 12:59:54 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheBalancedSword'', priests and other god-touched types are sometimes granted this ability by their patron god. It takes a lot of divine energy, and isn't always dependable, as it can be diverted or blocked by an antagonist force of comparable or greater power.
31st Mar '16 8:59:17 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who on average have better social skills than men) but easier with children.
** However, it can backfire; many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them.

to:

* Here's a tip: if you want to tell if someone is lying, look at their eyes. If they glance away just before, during or directly after a statement there's a chance they're lying. Liars have trouble looking their interrogators in the face and will try and divert their gaze when they can. This is harder with women (who on average have better social skills tend to be more socially adept than men) but and easier with children.
** However,
children. But it can backfire; backfire too -- many people are aware of this test, and will therefore make absolutely sure to look their questioner right in the face. Of course, if they suddenly stare directly after a conversation of only occasional glances, that's a giveaway as well. As with a polygraph test, the thing you're really looking for is a sudden change. And anyone with a form of autism has trouble with eye contact in general, so it won't work on them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 171. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LivingLieDetector