History Main / LiteCreme

1st Oct '17 10:42:42 AM FordPrefect
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Consumers during the age of mass food production in the 19th century lobbied against artificial foods being sold alongside "normal" food and demanded such food be distinctly labeled; margarine, for example, received a push to be dyed pink so consumers would not confuse it for actual butter, and for a while it was illegal in some places to sell margarine that was dyed butter-yellow (It's naturally white, and even today, margarine is dyed bright yellow whereas natural butter is pale). Company lobbyists learned using Lite Creme was an easy escape, as no one wanted an ominous "artificial" label on their product. Official nutritional labels on products are ''somewhat'' more informative, though overly technical writing can obscure this for the same reasons. Ingredients being listed in decreasing order does not specify actual amounts, nor does the use of several names to indicate variations on essentially the same ingredient.

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Consumers during the age of mass food production in the 19th century lobbied against artificial foods being sold alongside "normal" food and demanded such food be distinctly labeled; margarine, for example, received a push to be dyed pink so consumers would not confuse it for actual butter, and for a while it was illegal in some places to sell margarine that was dyed butter-yellow (It's (it's naturally white, and even today, margarine is dyed bright yellow whereas natural butter is pale). Company lobbyists learned using Lite Creme was an easy escape, as no one wanted an ominous "artificial" label on their product. Official nutritional labels on products are ''somewhat'' more informative, though overly technical writing can obscure this for the same reasons. Ingredients being listed in decreasing order does not specify actual amounts, nor does the use of several names to indicate variations on essentially the same ingredient.
16th Sep '17 7:16:25 PM Azaram
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** This is also why some diet sodas are '0 calories per serving, 10 calories per bottle'. If a serving is less than 10 calories, it gets rounded down, but a bottle is more than one serving (due to wanting to make the nutrition panel look better) so they have to add the full calorie count.
16th Sep '17 7:11:27 PM Azaram
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* 5-Hour Energy shot-drinks advertise themselves as having "about as much caffeine as a cup of coffee." They're actually referring to high-grade espresso, not normal coffee you'd see in diners or hamburger restaurants. Each bottle contains about 100 milligrams of caffeine, a higher concentration than all other energy drinks on the market and the usual amount in one caffeine ''pill''.
10th Sep '17 4:48:38 PM karstovich2
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* "Vegetable oil" can mean any of the thousands of different oils of plant origin, but mostly soy, corn, or sunflower oil. More often than not, they're made from seeds, which are botanically fruit rather than vegetables. And another common ingredient, canola oil, is a recent innovation.[[note]]"Canola" stands for '''CAN'''adian '''O'''il '''L'''ow '''A'''cid. Developed by Canadian researchers in the 1970s, it is a type of rapeseed oil intensively bred to have a low content of erucic acid. Though the term "rapeseed" has nothing to do with crime (it is derived from an old Latin word referring to turnips and rapini, which makes sense, as rapeseed is a cultivar of the same species that produces those crops), one can see why they went for "canola", originally a trademark, [[BrandNameTakeOver became genericized]] for low-erucic-acid rapeseed oil, even if it isn't from Canada.[[/note]]

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* "Vegetable oil" can mean any of the thousands of different oils of plant origin, but mostly soy, corn, or sunflower oil. More often than not, they're made from seeds, which are botanically fruit rather than vegetables. And another common ingredient, canola oil, is a recent innovation.[[note]]"Canola" stands for '''CAN'''adian '''O'''il '''L'''ow '''A'''cid. Developed by Canadian researchers in the 1970s, it is a type of rapeseed oil intensively bred to have a low content of erucic acid. Though The name was originally a trademark adopted for marketing reasons, because of the term "rapeseed" unfortunate name. (The name, by the way, has nothing to do with crime (it crime: it is derived from an old Latin word referring to turnips and rapini, which turnip greens--which are also called rapini or broccoli rabe from the same root. This makes sense, as rapeseed is a cultivar of the same species that produces those crops), one crops.) Despite the innocent background, you can see why they went for "canola", originally a trademark, the "canola" trademark [[BrandNameTakeOver became genericized]] for low-erucic-acid rapeseed oil, even if it isn't from Canada.[[/note]]
10th Sep '17 4:45:00 PM karstovich2
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* "Vegetable oil" can mean any of the thousands of different oils of plant origin, but mostly soy, corn, or sunflower oil. More often than not, they're made from seeds, which are botanically fruit rather than vegetables. And another common ingredient, canola oil, doesn't even exist naturally.[[note]]"Canola" stands for '''CAN'''adian '''O'''il '''L'''ow '''A'''cid, now a genericized trademark, referring to a type of rapeseed oil that's often procured through genetic modification. The fact that the natural source is called "rapeseed" had more than a little to do with the popularity of the term "canola."[[/note]]

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* "Vegetable oil" can mean any of the thousands of different oils of plant origin, but mostly soy, corn, or sunflower oil. More often than not, they're made from seeds, which are botanically fruit rather than vegetables. And another common ingredient, canola oil, doesn't even exist naturally.is a recent innovation.[[note]]"Canola" stands for '''CAN'''adian '''O'''il '''L'''ow '''A'''cid, now a genericized trademark, referring to '''A'''cid. Developed by Canadian researchers in the 1970s, it is a type of rapeseed oil that's often procured through genetic modification. The fact that intensively bred to have a low content of erucic acid. Though the natural source is called term "rapeseed" had more than a little has nothing to do with the popularity crime (it is derived from an old Latin word referring to turnips and rapini, which makes sense, as rapeseed is a cultivar of the term "canola."[[/note]]same species that produces those crops), one can see why they went for "canola", originally a trademark, [[BrandNameTakeOver became genericized]] for low-erucic-acid rapeseed oil, even if it isn't from Canada.[[/note]]
9th Sep '17 1:01:42 PM karstovich2
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The implication of qualities or ingredients in a product that aren't there because of certain words or spellings of words that vary from the standard. This is usually done to get around government regulations on truth in advertising laws. This is how you end up with products like fruit "punch" when a drink contains no actual fruit juice, "choc" or "choco" when something contains little to no actual chocolate, and "creme" spread that contains no dairy cream. The intent of the law was to prevent advertisers from using words like "chocolate" and "cream" to describe products that didn't contain the ingredients mentioned, but the feds didn't count on consumer illiteracy; too many people now assume that "froot with choco creme" is the same thing as "fruit with chocolate cream", and assume they're getting vitamins and minerals they really aren't. And advertisers happily take advantage of it.

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The implication of qualities or ingredients in a product that aren't there because of certain words or spellings of words that vary from the standard. This is usually done to get around government regulations on truth in advertising laws. This is how you end up with products like fruit "punch" when a drink contains no actual fruit juice, "choc" or "choco" when something contains little to no actual chocolate, and "creme" spread that contains no dairy cream. The intent of the law was to prevent advertisers from using words like "chocolate" and "cream" to describe products that didn't contain the ingredients mentioned, but the feds didn't count on consumer illiteracy; too many people now assume that "froot with choco creme" is the same thing as "fruit with chocolate cream", and assume they're getting vitamins vitamins, minerals, and minerals flavor they really aren't. And advertisers happily take advantage of it.
9th Jul '17 11:23:23 AM billybobfred
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** A common myth about UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken is that the chain's name [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/food/kfc.asp was changed to KFC, because they're not legally allowed to include "Chicken" in the title.]] The rumors said that Yum! Foods, the umbrella company that owns KFC, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut, had genetically engineered "Creature 57", variously suspected to be a headless and eight-legged chicken or some sort of shmoo-like monstrosity whose flesh could be processed in different ways to create the various meat-ish substances that their various chains use. For the record, they actually changed it because of the negative consumer connotations that went along with the word "fried" (and the state of Kentucky opportunistically trademarking the name).

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** A common myth about UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken is that the chain's name [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/food/kfc.asp was changed to KFC, because they're not legally allowed to include "Chicken" in the title.]] The rumors said that Yum! Foods, the umbrella company that owns KFC, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut, had genetically engineered "Creature 57", variously suspected to be a headless and eight-legged chicken or some sort of shmoo-like monstrosity whose flesh could be processed in different ways to create the various meat-ish substances that their various chains use. For the record, they actually changed it because of the negative consumer connotations that went along with the word "fried" (and "fried". ([[http://www.snopes.com/lost/kfc.asp The competing claim]] that it's ''really'' because the state of Kentucky opportunistically trademarking trademarked the name).name looks legit right up until you notice that it's filed under "[[FunWithAcronyms The Repository Of Lost Legends]]".)
17th Jun '17 1:26:40 AM Totema
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* Parodied in ''Series/TimAndEricAwesomeShowGreatJob'' with the phony lamb product, "H'amb". It's a ham loaf with the "essence of lamb" mixed in with it. It even comes with a lamb scent spray to drive the illusion further.
11th Jun '17 3:11:26 PM nombretomado
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* In the UK there are incredibly stringent guidelines as to what can legally be described as a Meat Sausage, so the cheaper variations (often sold en-mass by catering wholesalers) get around this by using various other phrases to describe the product. Bangers is one popular term used, as it's also a popular British slang term for actual sausages. A documentary by Creator/TheBBC a few years ago found that these products are mostly water and grain with very little meat in them (and often said meat is [[{{Squick}} not fit for human consumption).]] Basically [[YesMinister high fat emulsified offal tubes]].

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* In the UK there are incredibly stringent guidelines as to what can legally be described as a Meat Sausage, so the cheaper variations (often sold en-mass by catering wholesalers) get around this by using various other phrases to describe the product. Bangers is one popular term used, as it's also a popular British slang term for actual sausages. A documentary by Creator/TheBBC a few years ago found that these products are mostly water and grain with very little meat in them (and often said meat is [[{{Squick}} not fit for human consumption).]] Basically [[YesMinister [[Series/YesMinister high fat emulsified offal tubes]].
22nd May '17 1:53:29 PM Saber15
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** Zaxby's, a southern US fast food chain specializing in chicken, traditionally uses XtremeKoolLetterz in its menu items (i.e. salads are called Zalads). However, they specially ''avoid'' doing so with their chicken wings (and other chicken cuts), because "chicken wyngz" implies that they are ''not'' chicken wings.
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