History Main / LipLock

28th Mar '16 3:36:39 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The English dub of ''[[SakuraTaisen Sakura Wars: So Long, My Love]]'' makes no attempt to match the voices to the MouthFlaps outside of animated cutscenes. This makes the dialogue more natural at the expense of [[HongKongDub agreement between the visuals and spoken dialogue]].

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* The English dub of ''[[SakuraTaisen Sakura Wars: ''VideoGame/SakuraWars: [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove So Long, My Love]]'' makes no attempt to match the voices to the MouthFlaps outside of animated cutscenes. This makes the dialogue more natural at the expense of [[HongKongDub agreement between the visuals and spoken dialogue]].
30th Jan '16 9:36:06 PM smalltime
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* ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' was retitled ''Zootropolis'' in Europe and for the UK version the actors re-recorded lines with the city's alternative name, but the characters' mouth movements remain the same.
21st Jan '16 8:12:27 PM Adept
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In {{anime}}, the Japanese studios create the animation first, and then record the voices. This means that characters' mouth often just moves up and down, however, the larger the animation budget, the more effort animation studios make to make the lip flaps match the dialogue (''HoneyAndClover'' is a good example with mouth flaps that match the lines perfectly). With American cartoons, the voices are recorded first and the animation is built around them. This means the mouths move in a manner much more consistent with the dialogue, at the cost of making it more difficult to translate into another language. This difference can be very clearly seen in the English dub of ''Manga/{{Akira}}'', a Japanese animated movie which, unusually, recorded the voices before the animation and took pains to make the mouth flaps match the dialogue. The result is that the English version looks distinctly off. Ironically, live-action dub scripts are easier to write because the natural movements of the mouth while speaking are a lot more vague than in cartoons.

to:

In {{anime}}, the Japanese studios create the animation first, and then record the voices. This means that characters' mouth often just moves up and down, however, the larger the animation budget, the more effort animation studios make to make the lip flaps match the dialogue (''HoneyAndClover'' (''Manga/HoneyAndClover'' is a good example with mouth flaps that match the lines perfectly). With American cartoons, the voices are recorded first and the animation is built around them. This means the mouths move in a manner much more consistent with the dialogue, at the cost of making it more difficult to translate into another language. This difference can be very clearly seen in the English dub of ''Manga/{{Akira}}'', a Japanese animated movie which, unusually, recorded the voices before the animation and took pains to make the mouth flaps match the dialogue. The result is that the English version looks distinctly off. Ironically, live-action dub scripts are easier to write because the natural movements of the mouth while speaking are a lot more vague than in cartoons.
8th Jan '16 5:25:21 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ''SpiderRiders'' (of which an actual Japanese version may or may not exist) appears to feature this in spades, to the point where it takes several full episodes to get over the fact that most of the characters come off as having serious mental illnesses. Luckily, it seems like the actors (or the sound editors) get better and better as the series rolls on, so gratuitous pauses grow more and more rare. Strangely, some characters seem almost entirely exempt from this throughout the show.

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* ''SpiderRiders'' ''Anime/SpiderRiders'' (of which an actual Japanese version may or may not exist) appears to feature this in spades, to the point where it takes several full episodes to get over the fact that most of the characters come off as having serious mental illnesses. Luckily, it seems like the actors (or the sound editors) get better and better as the series rolls on, so gratuitous pauses grow more and more rare. Strangely, some characters seem almost entirely exempt from this throughout the show.
5th Nov '15 4:52:03 PM nombretomado
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* Besides the normal edits to the dialog necessary for timing, the North American dub of ''RanmaOneHalf'' used a video editing system ([=WordFit=])[[note]]Which used in nearly every other dub by Creator/TheOceanGroup[[/note]] to tweak the mouth-flaps.

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* Besides the normal edits to the dialog necessary for timing, the North American dub of ''RanmaOneHalf'' ''Anime/RanmaOneHalf'' used a video editing system ([=WordFit=])[[note]]Which used in nearly every other dub by Creator/TheOceanGroup[[/note]] to tweak the mouth-flaps.
24th Oct '15 7:19:11 PM nombretomado
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** Creator/NeilGaiman, who wrote the English script for ''PrincessMononoke'', said in an [[http://www.hollywoodgothique.com/gaiman.html interview]], "People have been asking if we reanimated it. There are two schools of thought coming out from the film. School of Thought #1 is that we reanimated the mouth movements. School #2 is that they must have made two different versions at the same time."

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** Creator/NeilGaiman, who wrote the English script for ''PrincessMononoke'', ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', said in an [[http://www.hollywoodgothique.com/gaiman.html interview]], "People have been asking if we reanimated it. There are two schools of thought coming out from the film. School of Thought #1 is that we reanimated the mouth movements. School #2 is that they must have made two different versions at the same time."
21st Oct '15 5:53:29 PM nombretomado
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* In countries with a long dubbing tradition, such as Spain, Germany, France or the Latin American countries, their translators, script adapters and voice actors are particulary well trained and experienced in dubbing, so they know how to deal with this situations efficiently most of the time. 'Specially when English is the original language, since most of imported media come from the US.
* {{Disney}} has handled the dubbing of some anime imports, such as the films of Miyazaki. They tend to be meticulous in [[{{Woolseyism}} reworking the dialog to fit the lips and the meaning of the original script]], even doing several takes in dubbing to see what works. Getting good voice actors doesn't hurt. Or the fact that the original creator has told Disney in no uncertain terms that gratuitous changes to the movies were to be avoided.

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* In countries with a long dubbing tradition, such as Spain, Germany, France or the Latin American countries, their translators, script adapters and voice actors are particulary particularly well trained and experienced in dubbing, so they know how to deal with this situations efficiently most of the time. 'Specially when English is the original language, since most of imported media come from the US.
* {{Disney}} Creator/{{Disney}} has handled the dubbing of some anime imports, such as the films of Miyazaki. They tend to be meticulous in [[{{Woolseyism}} reworking the dialog to fit the lips and the meaning of the original script]], even doing several takes in dubbing to see what works. Getting good voice actors doesn't hurt. Or the fact that the original creator has told Disney in no uncertain terms that gratuitous changes to the movies were to be avoided.
16th Oct '15 9:48:36 AM Karxrida
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** Both were the result of having pre-rendered cutscenes instead of the usual game-rendered ones; redoing the lip-syncing for the former is more expensive. And yet, they did it in some rare instances of ''[[KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 358/2 Days]]'' anyway: Namely, when [=DiZ=] says "She?" (referring to Xion), which in Japanese had the three-syllables lip moves of "Kanojo?"

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** Both were the result of having pre-rendered cutscenes instead of the usual game-rendered ones; redoing the lip-syncing for the former is more expensive. And yet, they did it in some rare instances of ''[[KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 358/2 Days]]'' anyway: Namely, when [=DiZ=] says "She?" (referring to Xion), which in Japanese had the three-syllables lip moves of "Kanojo?"
7th Oct '15 11:50:41 AM Pichu-kun
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Added DiffLines:

** Ash stands out as he's one of the very few characters who uses a surname regularly. His Japanese name is just "Satoshi" so he was given a surname in the dub because "Ash" is too short on its own.
22nd Sep '15 8:03:47 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* 4Kids' tendency to do this is parodied mercilessly in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5UfIRmkv28 this]] GagDub of ''VisualNovel/HigurashiNoNakuKoroNi'', along with the {{Macekre}}'d dialogue and premise.

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* 4Kids' tendency to do this is parodied mercilessly in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5UfIRmkv28 this]] GagDub of ''VisualNovel/HigurashiNoNakuKoroNi'', ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'', along with the {{Macekre}}'d dialogue and premise.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LipLock