History Main / LimitedAdvancementOpportunities

21st Sep '16 1:49:23 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Also, "Captain" is technically an honorific; it was his rank in the WEC before defecting. He is not actually part of the Resistance chain of command.
21st Sep '16 1:43:54 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the [[ComicBookTime sixty-odd years]] that ComicStrip/BeetleBailey has been in the Army, ''nobody'' at Camp Swampy has been promoted. Though one could make the case that nobody there deserves to be promoted.

to:

* In the [[ComicBookTime sixty-odd years]] that ComicStrip/BeetleBailey has been in the Army, ''nobody'' at Camp Swampy has been promoted. Though one could make the case that nobody there deserves to be promoted. In fact many of the characters (including Beetle) appear to still be in boot camp.
21st Sep '16 1:30:38 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The (reluctant) king (and he'd refuse the title) of this trope, however, has to be Vimes himself. When first encountered, he's a captain of the three-man Night Watch, who hide from criminals. The next time we see him he plans to retire after getting married. However, intrigued by the notion of a Watch that truly ''matters'', he accepts the rank of Commander--and, though he has to grit his teeth, the knighthood which goes with it. Later, after stopping a war (by arresting the armies involved) and demonstrating his willingness to do his duty no matter the consequences (by arresting the Patrician), he's made Duke of Ankh, rendering him the most powerful nobleman in the city (save, probably, Vetinari himself, since the evidence indicates he's from a noble family ... his aunt is ''Lady'' Roberta Meserole and he studied at the Assassin's Guild). The reason he fits the trope, despite all these promotions, is that what he actually does hasn't changed all that much ... it's just that he now has the ''authority'' to do it.

to:

** The (reluctant) king (and he'd refuse the title) of this trope, however, has to be Vimes himself. When first encountered, he's a captain of the three-man Night Watch, who hide from criminals. The next time we see him he plans to retire after getting married. However, intrigued by the notion of a Watch that truly ''matters'', he accepts the rank of Commander--and, though he has to grit his teeth, the knighthood which goes with it. Later, after stopping a war (by arresting the armies involved) and demonstrating his willingness to do his duty no matter the consequences (by arresting the Patrician), he's made Duke of Ankh, rendering him the most powerful nobleman in the city (save, probably, Vetinari himself, since the evidence indicates he's from a noble family ... his aunt is ''Lady'' Roberta Meserole and he studied at the Assassin's Guild). The reason he fits the trope, despite all these promotions, is that what he actually does hasn't changed all that much ... it's just that he now has the ''authority'' to do it. Vetenari once commented that Vimes maintaining his strong anti-authoritarian streak despite all this is "practically Zen".
7th Aug '16 4:07:47 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a spec-ops gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind]]. In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher-ups, though Buck has been occasionally asked with command-level work after becoming a Spartan-IV (which is rather ironic, give that he's now a SuperSoldier). There's also Sergeant John Forge of ''VideoGame/HaloWars'', who's been court-martialed so many times that his superiors will ''never'' promote him to officer despite his excellent command skills (that said, the above-mentioned Cutter respects Forge's skills enough to give him effective command of the ''Spirit of Fire''[='s=] entire Marine detachment).

to:

** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a spec-ops gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind]]. In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher-ups, though Buck has been occasionally asked with command-level work after becoming a Spartan-IV (which is rather ironic, give that he's now a SuperSoldier).
**
There's also Sergeant John Forge of ''VideoGame/HaloWars'', who's been court-martialed so many times that his superiors will ''never'' promote him to officer despite his excellent command skills (that said, the above-mentioned Cutter respects Forge's skills enough to give him effective command of the ''Spirit of Fire''[='s=] entire Marine detachment).
7th Aug '16 4:06:53 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a spec-ops gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind]]. In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher-ups, though Buck has been occasionally asked with command-level work after becoming a Spartan-IV (which is rather ironic, give that he's now a SuperSoldier). There's also Sergeant John Forge, who's been court-martialed so many times that his superiors will ''never'' promote him to officer despite his excellent command skills (that said, the above-mentioned Cutter respects Forge's skills enough to give him effective command of the ''Spirit of Fire''[='s=] entire Marine detachment).

to:

** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a spec-ops gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind]]. In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher-ups, though Buck has been occasionally asked with command-level work after becoming a Spartan-IV (which is rather ironic, give that he's now a SuperSoldier). There's also Sergeant John Forge, Forge of ''VideoGame/HaloWars'', who's been court-martialed so many times that his superiors will ''never'' promote him to officer despite his excellent command skills (that said, the above-mentioned Cutter respects Forge's skills enough to give him effective command of the ''Spirit of Fire''[='s=] entire Marine detachment).
7th Aug '16 4:06:06 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While Master Chief Petty Officer John-117 of ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' is at the top of the NCO rank ladder, he hasn't received a promotion for over two decades, despite being one of the main reasons why humanity hasn't gone extinct yet. On the other hand, he's also a SuperSoldier who was created precisely because the UNSC needed the most badass spec-ops troopers possible; as an officer, he would have to stay in the back-line more often, which would probably be a massive waste of his combat abilities, especially during a war where humanity needs every extra soldier it can get.
** Much as the example of [[Franchise/MassEffect Commander Shepard]], mentioned below, the Chief tends to exert influence far out of proportion to his actual rank (the Spartans were selected as much for brains as for brawn), though he's by both training and nature obedient even to authority figures he dislikes. ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'', however, shows what happens when a superior finally pushes him too far; he disobeys orders, arguably mutinies, and steals UNSC equipment. The result is that [[spoiler:the captain who issued the orders he ignored is cashiered by the UNSC, and the executive officer who listened to the Chief and also disobeyed orders to help him is promoted. Justified and exaggerated; the captain's plan was so ''stupid'' the entire rest of the ship stood with the Master Chief, even giving him a ship and some heavy weaponry]].
** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind.]] In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher ups.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
**
While Master Chief Petty Officer John-117 of ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' is at the top of the NCO rank ladder, he hasn't received a promotion for over two decades, despite being one of the main reasons why humanity hasn't gone extinct yet. On the other hand, he's also a SuperSoldier who was created precisely because the UNSC needed the most badass spec-ops troopers possible; as an officer, he would have to stay in the back-line more often, which would probably be a massive waste of his combat abilities, especially during a war where humanity needs every extra soldier it can get.
** Much as the example of [[Franchise/MassEffect Commander Shepard]], mentioned below, the Chief tends to exert influence far out of proportion to his actual rank (the Spartans were selected as much for brains as for brawn), though he's by both training and nature obedient even to authority figures he dislikes. ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'', however, shows what happens when a superior finally pushes him too far; he disobeys orders, arguably mutinies, and steals UNSC equipment. The result is that [[spoiler:the captain who issued the orders he ignored is cashiered by the UNSC, and the executive officer who listened to the Chief and also disobeyed orders to help him is promoted. promoted]]. Justified and exaggerated; the [[spoiler:the captain's plan was so ''stupid'' the entire rest of the ship stood with the Master Chief, even giving him a ship dropship and some heavy weaponry]].
** Invoked by other characters in the UNSC too. Edward Buck and James Cutter, a spec-ops gunnery sergeant and a small ship captain respectively, both have skills that could propel them far beyond their ranks but refuse to take promotions because [[AFatherToHisMen they don't want to leave their crew behind.]] behind]]. In both cases this is noted as a problem by the higher ups.higher-ups, though Buck has been occasionally asked with command-level work after becoming a Spartan-IV (which is rather ironic, give that he's now a SuperSoldier). There's also Sergeant John Forge, who's been court-martialed so many times that his superiors will ''never'' promote him to officer despite his excellent command skills (that said, the above-mentioned Cutter respects Forge's skills enough to give him effective command of the ''Spirit of Fire''[='s=] entire Marine detachment).
27th Jul '16 2:01:27 PM KamenRiderOokalf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Surprisingly averted in the ''{{Series/Lensman}}'' series, in which major characters often do get promotions and occasionally this even changes what they can do - for example, Rod "the Rock" Kinnison is promoted to Port Admiral which doesn't allow him to be in the thick of battle anymore (he's '''not''' happy once he realizes this). In the later books, though, the major characters get promoted to Unattached Lensman, whose official job description pretty much reads "Do whatever you think needs to be done and take anything you need in order to do it," so they don't necessarily have to leave the other characters behind.

to:

* Surprisingly averted in the ''{{Series/Lensman}}'' ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' series, in which major characters often do get promotions and occasionally this even changes what they can do - for example, Rod "the Rock" Kinnison is promoted to Port Admiral which doesn't allow him to be in the thick of battle anymore (he's '''not''' happy once he realizes this). In the later books, though, the major characters get promoted to Unattached Lensman, whose official job description pretty much reads "Do whatever you think needs to be done and take anything you need in order to do it," so they don't necessarily have to leave the other characters behind.
16th Jul '16 2:39:19 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Unseen University plays the trope very straight, as there are exactly eight levels of wizardry, and the number of people who can hold a rank has been fixed according to tradition for centuries. Because of this, no matter how good a wizard was, the only way he could hope to get a promotion is if a higher level wizard is promoted or dies, creating a vacancy at the next level to be filled. This ultimately created a tradition where many wizards who didn't feel like waiting for a vacancy to appear made a point of creating them via KlingonPromotion until Ridcully became Archchancellor and ended it by being unkillable.

to:

** The Unseen University plays the trope very straight, as there are exactly eight levels of wizardry, and the number of people who can hold a rank has been fixed according to tradition for centuries. Because of this, no matter how good a wizard was, the only way he could hope to get a promotion is if a higher level wizard is promoted or dies, creating a vacancy at the next level to be filled. This ultimately created a tradition where many wizards who didn't feel like waiting for a vacancy to appear made a point of creating them via KlingonPromotion until Ridcully became Archchancellor and ended it by being unkillable. It also helped that by that point in the series almost everybody who actually wanted the higher ranks had killed each other off; the faculty had to recruit Ridcully from private life just to fill the seat.
30th Jun '16 7:11:46 AM kyojikasshu
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** In "Best of Both Worlds" Riker was promoted to Captain. Count the pips on his collar, he's got four. Then in "Family", he's back to Commander again. [[FridgeLogic The only explanation]] is that he's somehow engineered a demotion for himself. Maybe he got Troi to say he was psychologically incapable of command or something. It'd explain why it took so long for him to get back to captain again. Why the writers felt the need to demote him is unclear; ''[[Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome Star Trek IV]]'' shows that there's no rule against the ship's commanding officer and first officer both holding the rank of Captain, and Picard would still have decades of seniority over Riker.
*** Most likely that since Star Trek seems to derive much of its structure from naval traditions, Riker's battlefield commission amounted to little more than a brevet rank. It may have been meant to be made official after the crisis had subsided, but due to Picard's return, Riker kept his old rank.

to:

*** In "Best of Both Worlds" Riker was promoted to Captain. Count the pips on his collar, he's got four. Then in "Family", he's back to Commander again. [[FridgeLogic The only explanation]] is that he's somehow engineered a demotion for himself. Maybe he got Troi to say he was psychologically incapable of command or something. It'd explain why it took so long for him to get back to captain again. Why the writers felt the need to demote him is unclear; ''[[Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome Star Trek IV]]'' shows that there's no rule against the ship's commanding officer and first officer both holding the rank of Captain, Captain (and the ''Enterprise''-A actually had ''three'' captains, due to Scotty's promotion to "Captain of Engineering" in ''[[Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock Star Trek III]][[note]]The ending of ''Star Trek IV'' showed Scotty wearing a commander's rank badge again, anticipating his promotion being nullified, but as Kirk was the only one officially punished, the next three films and "Relics" confirmed he kept the promotion[[/note]]), and Picard would still have decades of seniority over Riker.
*** Most likely that since Star Trek seems to derive much of its structure from naval traditions, Riker's battlefield commission amounted to little more than a brevet rank. It may have been meant to be made official after the crisis had subsided, but due to Picard's return, Riker kept his old rank. In addition, Spock (who actually captained the ''Enterprise'' after Kirk returned to the admiralty, albeit as a training ship) had served in Starfleet about twice as long as Riker had by the time of "The Best of Both Worlds", and Scotty had been in Starfleet even longer when he was promoted to captain.
19th Jun '16 2:29:48 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In TheThrawnTrilogy, Pellaeon was a sixty-year-old captain of an Imperial Star Destroyer. Being unwilling to rule, he just followed the Empire's current leaders and tried to scrape it back together again whenever those leaders inevitably fell, never getting promoted. But as time went on and he outlived those superiors, one of them [[YouAreInCommandNow put him in charge]] before fleeing into obscurity, and so by the HandOfThrawn duology he was Admiral Pellaeon, the Supreme Commander of the [[VestigialEmpire Imperial Remnant]]. And by the time of the Literature/NewJediOrder series, the Empire has expanded sufficiently that he was promoted again, to the same rank of ''Grand Admiral'' that his late mentor Thrawn had held.

to:

** In TheThrawnTrilogy, Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy, Pellaeon was a sixty-year-old captain of an Imperial Star Destroyer. Being unwilling to rule, he just followed the Empire's current leaders and tried to scrape it back together again whenever those leaders inevitably fell, never getting promoted. But as time went on and he outlived those superiors, one of them [[YouAreInCommandNow put him in charge]] before fleeing into obscurity, and so by the HandOfThrawn duology he was Admiral Pellaeon, the Supreme Commander of the [[VestigialEmpire Imperial Remnant]]. And by the time of the Literature/NewJediOrder series, the Empire has expanded sufficiently that he was promoted again, to the same rank of ''Grand Admiral'' that his late mentor Thrawn had held.
This list shows the last 10 events of 125. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LimitedAdvancementOpportunities