1 Days Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Main / LiesToChildren

8th May '16 9:02:32 PM intastiel
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* In ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'', Demonreach the GeniusLoci commiserates with Bob the knowledge spirit over the fact that Bob has to explain [[spoiler:the temporal ripples of a potential future catastrophe so terrible that its ''possibility'' is damaging the present]] using the analogy of a thrown rock. Harry Dresden, who had thought he had a fairly solid grasp of magical theory, is [[ImStandingRightHere a bit put out]].



* Atheists view religion as such and vice versa.


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* RealityIsOutToLunch in ''Webcomic/AwfulHospital'', so the beleaguered protagonist has to grope at understanding the infinite weirdness of the [[{{Multiverse}} Perception Range]] with ''children's books'' as references. Justified in that a being's subjective experience -- including the [[MindScrew content of some books]] -- is limited to what they're able and willing to perceive, and Fern has to start from Square One, but it leads to situations like Fern being knocked unconscious by a [[http://www.bogleech.com/awfulhospital/book1.html picture-book]] TomeOfEldritchLore that describes a {{reality warp|er}}ing EldritchAbomination in terms of a solipsistic undead cake.
28th Apr '16 7:36:25 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* This is a running gag with Calvin's Dad from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', as the page quote illustrates, but always taking it [[BlatantLies so far from reality]] it can hardly count as helpful. He also explains the workings of a lightbulb and vacuum cleaner as "[[AWizardDidIt magic]]".

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* ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'':
**
This is a running gag with Calvin's Dad from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', from as the page quote illustrates, but always taking it [[BlatantLies so far from reality]] it can hardly count as helpful. He also explains the workings of a lightbulb and vacuum cleaner as "[[AWizardDidIt magic]]".



** ''Both'' of Calvin's parents had some pretty unique ways to get him to eat his dinner. Early in the strip, when he wouldn't eat, his dad told him "that's a good idea, Calvin, because it's a plate of toxic waste that will turn you into a mutant if you eat it." He couldn't finish fast enough. While his mom objected to it that time, she did it herself in later strips, telling him that stuffed peppers were "monkey heads", that the rice in soup was maggots, and that her casserole was "spider pie". (Unfortunately, while such methods convinced Calvin to eat, they made his dad [[LostMyAppetite lose his appetite]].)



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1st Mar '16 3:34:11 PM merotoker
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* The ''ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}}'' "Fairy Tales?" is an extended rant against this type of thing, stating that even if it seems harmless, a lie is a lie, and it will still hurt. Of course, this being Jack Chick, he makes this point in the most hyperbolic way possible...

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* The ''ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}}'' "Fairy Tales?" "[[http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/1033/1033_01.asp?Store=True&C=C Fairy Tales?]]" is an extended rant against this type of thing, stating that even if it seems harmless, a lie is a lie, and it will still hurt. Of course, this being Jack Chick, he makes this point in the most hyperbolic way possible...



** The Fourth Doctor's education of Leela is pretty much entirely made up of this, since due to her extremely primitive background and absence of any education, even basic scientific principles seem like magic to her. It's bad enough when he's trying to explain to her what a robot is, so of course, when he's trying to explain genuinely mindbending SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology like how the TARDIS is BiggerOnTheInside, things quickly get absolutely nonsensical.

to:

** The Fourth Doctor's education of Leela is pretty much entirely made up of this, since due to her extremely primitive background and absence of any education, even basic scientific principles seem like magic to her. It's bad enough when he's trying to explain to her what a robot is, so of course, when he's trying to explain genuinely mindbending SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology MagicFromTechnology like how the TARDIS is BiggerOnTheInside, things quickly get absolutely nonsensical.



* ''[[VideoGame/DarkSeed Dark Seed II]]'' uses one as an odd plot point. Years ago, when Mike had nightmares of monsters coming out of his closet, his mother pretended to lock it. It's not locked. [[spoiler:It contains a portal to the Dark World]]. Yet Mike is [[YouShouldntKnowThisAlready incapable of opening it]] until someone reveals the deception to him. When confronted, his mother barely remembers it and can't believe he never figured it out.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/DarkSeed Dark Seed II]]'' uses one as an odd plot point. Years ago, when Mike had nightmares of monsters coming out of his closet, his mother pretended to lock it. It's not locked. [[spoiler:It contains a portal to the Dark World]]. World.]] Yet Mike is [[YouShouldntKnowThisAlready incapable of opening it]] until someone reveals the deception to him. When confronted, his mother barely remembers it and can't believe he never figured it out.



* ''WesternAnimation/MoralOrel'' Most of the stuff Orel is told could fall under this category (Children's Crusades being successful due to their innocence, etc.).

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* ''WesternAnimation/MoralOrel'' ''WesternAnimation/MoralOrel'': Most of the stuff Orel is told could fall under this category (Children's Crusades being successful due to their innocence, etc.).



* Talking to minors about drugs; If you tell them the facts that drugs make you feel really good and that some are okay in moderation, they'd likely run off and do them instead of doing their schoolwork, but telling them that all drugs are evil and the same runs the risk of them sneakily trying one drug, surviving and enjoying it, then thinking that all drugs are fine and then doing a harder drug that ruins their lives/kills them. People's views on telling minors about drugs varies a lot, but most choose to exaggerate the dangers for the sake of having a sober child, which to some is a NecessaryWeasel. Not that this is an exaggeration to everyone; the view that all illegal drugs are ridiculously more dangerous than the legal ones (like alcohol) is still strongly present in culture, even though it's ''at best'' a lie-to-children. Unfortunately, it is also complicated by the fact that many drugs' side effects are only obvious in the long-term; while the deleterious effects of methamphetamine abuse and addiction to various opiates and sedatives are fairly obvious within the course of a relatively short period of time, long-term abuse of many drugs can cause brain damage, cancer, liver failure, kidney problems, heart attacks, strokes, and other medical problems... a decade or more down the line, and not in 100% of users. This not only makes it hard to gauge how bad a drug is for you in the now, but also means that long-term studies of those who regularly use a given drug are necessary to demonstrate problems -- a difficult thing to study when many drugs are illegal. Tobacco and alcohol are the two drugs with the most well-studied long-term impacts, and both are known to cause severe health problems in a significant fraction of their regular users.

to:

* Talking to minors about drugs; If you tell them the facts that drugs make you feel really good and that some are okay in moderation, they'd likely run off and do them instead of doing their schoolwork, but telling them that all drugs are evil and the same runs the risk of them sneakily trying one drug, surviving and enjoying it, then thinking that all drugs are fine and then doing a harder drug that ruins their lives/kills them. People's views on telling minors about drugs varies a lot, but most choose to [[ScareEmStraight exaggerate the dangers dangers]] for the sake of having a sober child, which to some is a NecessaryWeasel. Not that this is an exaggeration to everyone; the view that all illegal drugs are ridiculously more dangerous than the legal ones (like alcohol) is still strongly present in culture, even though it's ''at best'' a lie-to-children. Unfortunately, it is also complicated by the fact that many drugs' side effects are only obvious in the long-term; while the deleterious effects of methamphetamine abuse and addiction to various opiates and sedatives are fairly obvious within the course of a relatively short period of time, long-term abuse of many drugs can cause brain damage, cancer, liver failure, kidney problems, heart attacks, strokes, and other medical problems... a decade or more down the line, and not in 100% of users. This not only makes it hard to gauge how bad a drug is for you in the now, but also means that long-term studies of those who regularly use a given drug are necessary to demonstrate problems -- a difficult thing to study when many drugs are illegal. Tobacco and alcohol are the two drugs with the most well-studied long-term impacts, and both are known to cause severe health problems in a significant fraction of their regular users.



*** Children are taught over-simplified "facts", like "UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire was destroyed in 476 A.D. by the barbarian invasion". In fact, the Roman Empire in its classic form perished almost two centuries before that date, and was in the process of collapse even longer for various economical and demographic reasons much more complex than a single invasion. In fact, the eastern half of the empire continued on for another thousand years, only ending with the fall of Constantinople in 1453. And a last remnant, the Despotate of Epirus, made it to 1479. The UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire, which claimed to be a successor, lasted until 1806, while the "Third Rome" of TsaristRussia survived until 1917. Such was the impact of the Roman Empire on historical memory that nations were claiming to be Roman Empires millennia after the Empire fell.

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*** Children are taught over-simplified "facts", like "UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire was destroyed in 476 A.D. by the barbarian invasion". In fact, the Roman Empire in its classic form perished almost two centuries before that date, and was in the process of collapse even longer for various economical and demographic reasons much more complex than a single invasion. In fact, the eastern half of the empire continued on for another thousand years, only ending with the fall of Constantinople in 1453. And a last remnant, the Despotate of Epirus, made it to 1479. The UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire, which claimed to be a successor, lasted until 1806, while the "Third Rome" of TsaristRussia UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia survived until 1917. Such was the impact of the Roman Empire on historical memory that nations were claiming to be Roman Empires millennia after the Empire fell.



*** Still other times, facts are fudged to make history seem nicer, or at least more clear-cut, than it really was. Historical figures' misdeeds are toned down or in some cases played up in order to create the appearance of clear heroes and villains who, in real life, were usually more morally gray. Often this ties in with propaganda, but sometimes it's just intended to avoid having to answer tough questions. After all, no one wants to have to explain something like the Trail of Tears to a 5-year-old.

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*** Still other times, facts are fudged to make history seem nicer, or at least more clear-cut, than it really was. Historical figures' misdeeds are toned down or in some cases played up in order to create the appearance of clear heroes [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade heroes]] and villains [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade villains]] who, in real life, were usually more morally gray. Often this ties in with propaganda, but sometimes it's just intended to avoid having to answer tough questions. After all, no one wants to have to explain something like the Trail of Tears to a 5-year-old.
12th Feb '16 2:51:26 PM TheDiego908
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*** "Spherical cows", which is a humorous term used in physics circles to describe the tendency to boil a complex thing down to its most basic components, in order to make calculations easier. The result is answers that are mathematically correct but inapplicable to reality. Comes from a joke where a farmer asked his physicist friend to come up with a way to make his milk cows more productive; the physicist indeed found a way but lamented that it only worked in the case of spherical cows floating in a perfect vacuum.

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*** "Spherical cows", which is a humorous term used in physics circles to describe the tendency to boil a complex thing down to its most basic components, in order to make calculations easier. The result is answers that are mathematically [[MathematiciansAnswer correct but inapplicable to reality.reality]]. Comes from a joke where a farmer asked his physicist friend to come up with a way to make his milk cows more productive; the physicist indeed found a way but lamented that it only worked in the case of spherical cows floating in a perfect vacuum.
30th Jan '16 10:11:05 PM AtticusOmundson
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-->--''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes''

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-->--''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes''
-->-- ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes''
28th Jan '16 7:01:17 AM FF32
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* In ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'', Jake English's grandmother tells him that she chose that last name because it was the name of her EvilStepmother's ex-husband, on the basis that Jake was too young to understand that it was actually the name of a powerful demon that said EvilStepmother feared and obeyed.

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* In ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'', Jake English's grandmother tells him that she chose that last name because it was the name of her EvilStepmother's WickedStepmother's ex-husband, on the basis that Jake was too young to understand that it was actually the name of a powerful demon that said EvilStepmother WickedStepmother feared and obeyed.
15th Jan '16 11:55:13 AM Anddrix
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*** UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton's laws of motion. While UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein's theory of relativity surpasses them scale-wise, they are still taught in high schools and lower-division college classes because they produce almost-identical results as long as you're dealing with masses and velocities in a familiar range, as opposed to things as small as atoms or things moving hundreds of kilometers per second. In fact, Newton's laws are such an accurate approximation over this range that our measurements can't tell the difference between the Newtonian and Einsteinian answers. And many high school teachers either don't understand Einstein's mechanics themselves, or if they do, [[ViewersAreMorons feel that their students won't]]. It's only when you extrapolate to extremes (size, mass, velocity, etc.) that Newtonian physics start to break down and you start to observe Einsteinian rules. Indeed, in the real world, people use Newtonian mechanics vastly more often than they use relativity, just because they're much easier to calculate and give the same answers unless you're dealing with microscopic objects or things on a planetary scale -- satellites are one of the few everyday objects that people deal with (thanks to satellite television and GPS) which actually have to take relativity into account.

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*** UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton's laws of motion. While UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein's theory of relativity surpasses them scale-wise, they are still taught in high schools and lower-division college classes because they produce almost-identical results as long as you're dealing with masses and velocities in a familiar range, as opposed to things as small as atoms or things moving hundreds of kilometers per second. In fact, Newton's laws are such an accurate approximation over this range that our measurements can't tell the difference between the Newtonian and Einsteinian answers. And many high school teachers either don't understand Einstein's mechanics themselves, or if they do, [[ViewersAreMorons feel that their students won't]].won't. It's only when you extrapolate to extremes (size, mass, velocity, etc.) that Newtonian physics start to break down and you start to observe Einsteinian rules. Indeed, in the real world, people use Newtonian mechanics vastly more often than they use relativity, just because they're much easier to calculate and give the same answers unless you're dealing with microscopic objects or things on a planetary scale -- satellites are one of the few everyday objects that people deal with (thanks to satellite television and GPS) which actually have to take relativity into account.
18th Dec '15 9:02:43 AM MrLavisherMoot
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* ''[[VideoGame/DarkSeed Dark Seed 2]]'' uses one as an odd plot point. Years ago, when Mike had nightmares of monsters coming out of his closet, his mother pretended to lock it. It's not locked. [[spoiler:It contains a portal to the Dark World]]. Yet Mike is [[YouShouldntKnowThisAlready incapable of opening it]] until someone reveals the deception to him. When confronted, his mother barely remembers it and can't believe he never figured it out.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/DarkSeed Dark Seed 2]]'' II]]'' uses one as an odd plot point. Years ago, when Mike had nightmares of monsters coming out of his closet, his mother pretended to lock it. It's not locked. [[spoiler:It contains a portal to the Dark World]]. Yet Mike is [[YouShouldntKnowThisAlready incapable of opening it]] until someone reveals the deception to him. When confronted, his mother barely remembers it and can't believe he never figured it out.
23rd Nov '15 3:55:23 PM CaptEquinox
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Added DiffLines:

* This is one of the core themes of ''Film/FindingNeverland''. Sylvia is dying, but hides her condition from her sons and herself, or plays it off as a "chest cold". She also denied the seriousness of her late husband's illness, so now the kids are on guard, especially Peter. J.M. Barrie encourages them to use imagination to create reality through plays and stories. But where do fantasies end and lies begin?
23rd Nov '15 2:24:31 PM Luigifan
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When things are strange and complicated, people like to explain them by analogy. Sometimes, this analogy is over simplified; for instance, while atoms are usually described as a proton-neutron nucleus with electrons orbiting it like planets round a star, in reality they don't resemble the solar system at all. However, it is still useful because it gives the listeners a simple concept they can grasp, while a more accurate explanation would confuse them or simply go over their heads. Once they've learned the analogy, they can continue to more complex topics that will eventually lead to the truth of the situation--or to another, more complicated set of lies.

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When things are strange and complicated, people like to explain them by analogy. Sometimes, this analogy is over simplified; for instance, while atoms are usually described as a proton-neutron nucleus with electrons orbiting it like planets round a star, in reality they don't resemble the solar system at all. However, it is still useful because it gives the listeners a simple concept they can grasp, while a more accurate explanation would confuse them or simply go over their heads. Once they've learned the analogy, they can continue to more complex topics that will eventually lead to the truth of the situation--or situation -- or to another, more complicated set of lies.



* The ''ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}}'' "Fairy Tales?" is an extended rant against this type of thing, stating that even if it seems harmless a lie is a lie and it will still hurt. Of course, this being Jack Chick he makes this point in the most hyperbolic way possible...

to:

* The ''ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}}'' "Fairy Tales?" is an extended rant against this type of thing, stating that even if it seems harmless harmless, a lie is a lie lie, and it will still hurt. Of course, this being Jack Chick Chick, he makes this point in the most hyperbolic way possible...



* ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues''. One of the jokes has normal children telling the Addams kids about the stork--Wednesday responds by explaining where babies ''really'' come from.

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* ''Film/AddamsFamilyValues''. One of the jokes has normal children telling the Addams kids about the stork--Wednesday stork -- Wednesday responds by explaining where babies ''really'' come from.



* Robert Enrico's last film, ''Film/MadeInWinter'', has a divorced father of three barricading himself in his farmhouse with his kids after their mom got custody. Similar to ''Film/LifeIsBeautiful'', he tells them this is just a game, and keeps them thinking that right through the police negotiations and up until the armored security forces and SWAT teams arrive and [[spoiler: he shoots the kids and himself]]. This is based on the real-life Andre Fourquet tragedy in 1969 in the village of Cestas in southern France, although Fourquet was honest with his children.

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* Robert Enrico's last film, ''Film/MadeInWinter'', has a divorced father of three barricading himself in his farmhouse with his kids after their mom got custody. Similar to ''Film/LifeIsBeautiful'', he tells them this is just a game, and keeps them thinking that right through the police negotiations and up until the armored security forces and SWAT teams arrive and [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he shoots the kids and himself]]. This is based on the real-life Andre Fourquet tragedy in 1969 in the village of Cestas in southern France, although Fourquet was honest with his children.



** In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', A history monk explains an aspect of time travel to Vimes using a metaphor involving jumping off a mountain as opposed to climbing it. Another monk complains that this is incredibly inaccurate, but the first doesn't care so long as Vimes understands what he needs to.
** In ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'', Death explains to Susan that telling children little lies about such "non-existent" beings as the Hogfather and the Tooth Fairy helps train them to believe in the "big lies"; abstract concepts such as justice and mercy.

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** In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', A a history monk explains an aspect of time travel to Vimes using a metaphor involving jumping off a mountain as opposed to climbing it. Another monk complains that this is incredibly inaccurate, but the first doesn't care so long as Vimes understands what he needs to.
** In ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'', Death explains to Susan that telling children little lies about such "non-existent" beings as the Hogfather and the Tooth Fairy helps train them to believe in the "big lies"; lies" -- abstract concepts such as justice and mercy.



* Merlin Athrawes in Creator/DavidWeber's ''{{Literature/Safehold}}'' series possesses enhanced abilities ''far'' beyond the human norm because he is a machine known as a [=PICA=]. However, the residents of the planet Safehold are trapped in anti-technology MedievalStasis and lack the foundation to understand this. Merlin explains his capabilities by comparing them to those attributed to legendary heroes called ''seijin'' ([[BilingualBonus Japanese for "holy men"]]). In particular, his access to high tech surveillance allowing Merlin to spy on just about anyone, anywhere, are explained as visions that allow him to see the present, but neither past nor future.

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* Merlin Athrawes in Creator/DavidWeber's ''{{Literature/Safehold}}'' series possesses enhanced abilities ''far'' beyond the human norm because he is a machine known as a [=PICA=]. However, the residents of the planet Safehold are trapped in anti-technology MedievalStasis and lack the foundation to understand this. Merlin explains his capabilities by comparing them to those attributed to legendary heroes called ''seijin'' ([[BilingualBonus Japanese for "holy men"]]). In particular, his access to high tech high-tech surveillance allowing Merlin to spy on just about anyone, anywhere, are explained as visions that allow him to see the present, but neither past nor future.



* In Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/TimePatrol", an instructor tells the recruits that they can get it because they come from industrialized eras; a Roman could not handle the idea of machines, and as for Babylonians, they have to be fed a line about a war between gods. When one recruit asks what they are being told, the answer is the truth but only as much as they can handle.

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* In Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/TimePatrol", an instructor tells the recruits that they can get it because they come from industrialized eras; a Roman could not handle the idea of machines, and as for Babylonians, they have to be fed a line about a war between gods. When one recruit asks what they are being told, the answer is the truth "the truth, but only as much as they can handle.handle".



--->'''The Doctor:''' You know when grown-ups tell you "everything's gonna be fine" you know they're probably lying to make you feel better?\\

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--->'''The Doctor:''' You know when grown-ups tell you "everything's gonna be fine" fine", you know they're probably lying to make you feel better?\\



** The Fourth Doctor's education of Leela is pretty much entirely made up of this, since due to her extremely primitive background and absence of any education even basic scientific principles seem like magic to her. It's bad enough when he's trying to explain to her what a robot is, so of course when he's trying to explain genuinely mindbending SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology like how the TARDIS is BiggerOnTheInside, things quickly get absolutely nonsensical.

to:

** The Fourth Doctor's education of Leela is pretty much entirely made up of this, since due to her extremely primitive background and absence of any education education, even basic scientific principles seem like magic to her. It's bad enough when he's trying to explain to her what a robot is, so of course course, when he's trying to explain genuinely mindbending SufficientlyAdvancedTechnology like how the TARDIS is BiggerOnTheInside, things quickly get absolutely nonsensical.



* In ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' Loretta repeatedly lies to her children, including telling Barney his father is (amongst others) Bob Barker.

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* In ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'', Loretta repeatedly lies to her children, including telling Barney his father is (amongst others) Bob Barker.



** Inverted and PlayedForLaughs, as Andy is accused of this by Barney after telling Opie that [[Literature/TheBible David's]] sling was made of leather. Barney insists that Andy is filling his son's head with lies; leather has no snap to it and any slingshot MUST be made of rubber, despite rubber (and slingshots--slings are a different invention) not existing in King David's time.

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** Inverted and PlayedForLaughs, as Andy is accused of this by Barney after telling Opie that [[Literature/TheBible David's]] sling was made of leather. Barney insists that Andy is filling his son's head with lies; leather has no snap to it and any slingshot MUST be made of rubber, despite rubber (and slingshots--slings slingshots -- slings are a different invention) not existing in King David's time.



** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the strip the page quote comes from. After a BeatPanel we get Calvin commenting to Hobbes about how "The trees are really sneezing today." Calvin himself decided he didn't care to hear the true, complicated answer.

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** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the strip the page quote comes from. After a BeatPanel BeatPanel, we get Calvin commenting to Hobbes about how "The trees are really sneezing today." Calvin himself decided he didn't care to hear the true, complicated answer.



* Many branches of theology or religious philosophy, Christian or otherwise, would say that it is impossible to speak of the divine or transcendental in any other way than through analogies that will always be imperfect. Others would say even that is impossible and that it can only be "described" through negations, stating what the transcendental is not but never what it is. A common criticism is that this idea doesn't actually mean anything since none of the terms can be defined. For example: "The Tao that can be spoken of is not the true Tao."

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* Many branches of theology or religious philosophy, Christian or otherwise, would say that it is impossible to speak of the divine or transcendental in any other way than through analogies that will always be imperfect. Others would say even that ''that'' is impossible and that it can only be "described" through negations, stating what the transcendental is not but never what it is. A common criticism is that this idea doesn't actually mean anything anything, since none of the terms can be defined. For example: "The Tao that can be spoken of is not the true Tao."



* Another sad example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas: Honest Hearts''. Randall Clark, an old, weary survivor leaves gifts of food and medicine for a group of starving children, watching over them from a distance and keeping him safe. When they begin to regard him as an angel or a God-figure, he does not want to shatter their illusions and leave them worse off when he dies. Thus, he leaves one final gift, and a note saying that he must depart deep into the mountains, but that he will always be watching over them. He then becomes known by those children's descendants as "[[AwesomeMcCoolName The Father in the Cave]]".

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* Another sad example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas: Honest Hearts''. Randall Clark, an old, weary survivor survivor, leaves gifts of food and medicine for a group of starving children, watching over them from a distance and keeping him them safe. When they begin to regard him as an angel or a God-figure, he does not want to shatter their illusions and leave them worse off when he dies. Thus, he leaves one final gift, and a note saying that he must depart deep into the mountains, but that he will always be watching over them. He then becomes known by those children's descendants as "[[AwesomeMcCoolName The Father in the Cave]]".



* In ''Webcomic/DragonMango''--how do you keep a little girl who can teleport out of a fight? [[http://dragon-mango.com/comic/chapter07/dm07-33.htm Tell her she has to watch the chickens, which the attackers are probably after.]]

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* In ''Webcomic/DragonMango''--how ''Webcomic/DragonMango'' -- how do you keep a little girl who can teleport out of a fight? [[http://dragon-mango.com/comic/chapter07/dm07-33.htm Tell her she has to watch the chickens, which the attackers are probably after.]]



** The main focus behind Butters in "Sarcastaball". Butters is led to believe that his sperm is the product of his most inner and pure emotions; leading him to spread it to others. To drink. The episode ends with Butters having an erection, and being Butters he summons his dad for answers; his father tells him [[spoiler: that it's a friend compass, it points towards his friends. Right now it points towards upwards, towards Jesus.]] ... [[HilarityEnsues Damn.]]

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** The main focus behind Butters in "Sarcastaball". Butters is led to believe that his sperm is the product of his most inner and pure emotions; leading him to spread it to others. To drink. The episode ends with Butters having an erection, and being Butters he summons his dad for answers; his father tells him [[spoiler: that [[spoiler:that it's a friend compass, it points towards his friends. Right now it points towards upwards, towards Jesus.]] ... [[HilarityEnsues Damn.]]



* Talking to minors about drugs; If you tell them the facts that drugs make you feel really good and that some are okay in moderation, they'd likely run off and do them instead of doing their schoolwork, but telling them that all drugs are evil and the same runs the risk of them sneakily trying one drug, surviving and enjoying it, then thinking that all drugs are fine and then doing a harder drug that ruins their lives/kills them. People's views on telling minors about drugs varies a lot, but most choose to exaggerate the dangers for the sake of having a sober child, which to some is a NecessaryWeasel. Not that this is an exaggeration to everyone; the view that all illegal drugs are ridiculously more dangerous than the legal ones (like alcohol) is still strongly present in culture, even though it's ''at best'' a lie-to-children. Unfortunately it is also complicated by the fact that many drugs' side effects are only obvious in the long-term; while the deleterious effects of methamphetamine abuse and addiction to various opiates and sedatives are fairly obvious within the course of a relatively short period of time, long-term abuse of many drugs can cause brain damage, cancer, liver failure, kidney problems, heart attacks, strokes, and other medical problems... a decade or more down the line, and not in 100% of users. This not only makes it hard to gauge how bad a drug is for you in the now, but also means that long-term studies of those who regularly use a given drug are necessary to demonstrate problems - a difficult thing to study when many drugs are illegal. Tobacco and alcohol are the two drugs with the most well-studied long-term impacts, and both are known to cause severe health problems in a significant fraction of their regular users.
* In moments of crisis (for example when someone dies or a natural disaster) adults tend to try to spare their kids from information that they perceive as potentially hurtful and tries to distract from or sugarcoat information. This of course usually serves to make the kid more anxious and less capable to cope with the situation. For this reason, local authorities maintain teams of Counselors and special advisers who are sent into primary schools where a traumatic event has recently taken place--part of their job being telling the teachers how to tell the kids what has happened. They also deal with parents who try to insist that the teachers enforce this trope when it's impossible. A blogger who escaped with her family just barely ahead of Hurricane Katrina later wrote that she had told her kids they were going on vacation. When the kids asked about the huge traffic jams and crowds of terror-stricken people, she said "everybody's going on vacation today." One presumes she told them the truth once they got to safety.

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* Talking to minors about drugs; If you tell them the facts that drugs make you feel really good and that some are okay in moderation, they'd likely run off and do them instead of doing their schoolwork, but telling them that all drugs are evil and the same runs the risk of them sneakily trying one drug, surviving and enjoying it, then thinking that all drugs are fine and then doing a harder drug that ruins their lives/kills them. People's views on telling minors about drugs varies a lot, but most choose to exaggerate the dangers for the sake of having a sober child, which to some is a NecessaryWeasel. Not that this is an exaggeration to everyone; the view that all illegal drugs are ridiculously more dangerous than the legal ones (like alcohol) is still strongly present in culture, even though it's ''at best'' a lie-to-children. Unfortunately Unfortunately, it is also complicated by the fact that many drugs' side effects are only obvious in the long-term; while the deleterious effects of methamphetamine abuse and addiction to various opiates and sedatives are fairly obvious within the course of a relatively short period of time, long-term abuse of many drugs can cause brain damage, cancer, liver failure, kidney problems, heart attacks, strokes, and other medical problems... a decade or more down the line, and not in 100% of users. This not only makes it hard to gauge how bad a drug is for you in the now, but also means that long-term studies of those who regularly use a given drug are necessary to demonstrate problems - -- a difficult thing to study when many drugs are illegal. Tobacco and alcohol are the two drugs with the most well-studied long-term impacts, and both are known to cause severe health problems in a significant fraction of their regular users.
* In moments of crisis (for example example, when someone dies or a natural disaster) disaster happens), adults tend to try to spare their kids from information that they perceive as potentially hurtful and tries try to distract from or sugarcoat or distract them from "hurtful" information. This This, of course course, usually serves to make the kid more anxious and less capable able to cope with the situation. For this reason, local authorities maintain teams of Counselors counselors and special advisers who are sent into primary schools where a traumatic event has recently taken place--part place -- part of their job being telling the teachers how to tell the kids what has happened. They also deal with parents who try to insist that the teachers enforce this trope when it's impossible. impossible.
**
A blogger who escaped with her family just barely ahead of Hurricane Katrina later wrote that she had told her kids they were going on vacation. When the kids asked about the huge traffic jams and crowds of terror-stricken people, she said "everybody's going on vacation today." One presumes she told them the truth once they got to safety.



*** Frictionless surfaces. Again, refers to the tendency to over-simplify problems by removing troublesome variables, in this case the effect of friction. In reality there is no such thing as a true frictionless surface--even a smooth surface with a high-grade lubricant on it will still produce ''some'' friction.
*** There's also the "paintbox" system, in which red, yellow and blue are called the "primary colors". If we're not lucky enough to get a decent physics education by high school, we may take this to our graves. In fact, there are two separate forms of primary color: the colors of light and the colors of pigment. The primary colors of light are red, green and blue, while the primary colors of pigment are magenta, yellow and cyan. Which, granted, are KINDA red, yellow and blue, but not quite.
*** UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton's laws of motion. While UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein's theory of relativity surpasses them scale-wise, they are still taught in high schools and lower-division college classes because they produce almost-identical results as long as you're dealing with masses and velocities in a familiar range, as opposed to things as small as atoms or things moving hundreds of kilometers per second. In fact, Newton's laws are such an accurate approximation over this range that our measurements can't tell the difference between the Newtonian and Einsteinian answers. And many high school teachers either don't understand Einstein's mechanics themselves, or if they do, [[ViewersAreMorons feel that their students won't]]. It's only when you extrapolate to extremes (size, mass, velocity, etc) that Newtonian physics start to break down and you start to observe Einsteinian rules. Indeed, in the real world, people use Newtonian mechanics vastly more often than they use relativity, just because they're much easier to calculate and give the same answers unless you're dealing with microscopic objects or things on a planetary scale--satellites are one of the few everyday objects that people deal with (thanks to satellite television and GPS) which actually have to take relativity into account.

to:

*** Frictionless surfaces. Again, refers to the tendency to over-simplify problems by removing troublesome variables, in this case the effect of friction. In reality reality, there is no such thing as a true frictionless surface--even surface -- even a smooth surface with a high-grade lubricant on it will still produce ''some'' friction.
*** There's also the "paintbox" system, in which red, yellow yellow, and blue are called the "primary colors". If we're not lucky enough to get a decent physics education by high school, we may take this to our graves. In fact, there are two separate forms of primary color: the colors of light and the colors of pigment. The primary colors of light are red, green green, and blue, while the primary colors of pigment are magenta, yellow yellow, and cyan. Which, granted, are KINDA red, yellow yellow, and blue, but not quite.
*** UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton's laws of motion. While UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein's theory of relativity surpasses them scale-wise, they are still taught in high schools and lower-division college classes because they produce almost-identical results as long as you're dealing with masses and velocities in a familiar range, as opposed to things as small as atoms or things moving hundreds of kilometers per second. In fact, Newton's laws are such an accurate approximation over this range that our measurements can't tell the difference between the Newtonian and Einsteinian answers. And many high school teachers either don't understand Einstein's mechanics themselves, or if they do, [[ViewersAreMorons feel that their students won't]]. It's only when you extrapolate to extremes (size, mass, velocity, etc) etc.) that Newtonian physics start to break down and you start to observe Einsteinian rules. Indeed, in the real world, people use Newtonian mechanics vastly more often than they use relativity, just because they're much easier to calculate and give the same answers unless you're dealing with microscopic objects or things on a planetary scale--satellites scale -- satellites are one of the few everyday objects that people deal with (thanks to satellite television and GPS) which actually have to take relativity into account.



*** The "Solar System-like atom" is still a common image and is generally presented to children when discussing atoms. And another thing about atoms--everyone is taught early on that atoms are the smallest things there are. That itself ignores protons, neutrons and electrons which are then said to be ''the'' smallest things there are. Then they tell you about quarks, which even escapes the realms of chemistry altogether.

to:

*** The "Solar System-like atom" is still a common image and is generally presented to children when discussing atoms. And another thing about atoms--everyone atoms -- everyone is taught early on that atoms are the smallest things there are. That itself ignores protons, neutrons neutrons, and electrons electrons, which are then said to be ''the'' smallest things there are. Then they tell you about quarks, which even escapes the realms of chemistry altogether.



*** Children are usually taught that there are two types of cells: Animal cells which are squishier and exist in animals, and Plant cells which have more rigid cell walls and chloroplasts and exist in plants. In reality, Animal and Plant cells are both examples of the many different Eukaryotic cells (which also include the likes of Fungi), and there are also a huge number of Prokaryotic cells. There is also variation within the different types of cell, for example, only green plant cells contain chloroplasts.

to:

*** Children are usually taught that there are two types of cells: Animal cells which are squishier and exist in animals, and Plant cells which have more rigid cell walls and chloroplasts and exist in plants. In reality, Animal and Plant cells are both examples of the many different Eukaryotic cells (which also include the likes of Fungi), and there are also a huge number of Prokaryotic cells. There is also variation within the different types of cell, cell; for example, only green plant cells contain chloroplasts.



* "North is up" when explaining how to read a map. While this is true for how the vast majority of maps are drawn (especially world maps) the orientation can really be any direction and it's best to check the compass rose on the particular map. Applying this misconception to world maps has also led to some ''vicious'' Eurocentric views going back to the 1400s, if not earlier.
* All flat world maps in general are distorted, although admittedly that's unavoidable. [[note]]Many different distortions are possible; see for example Webcomic/{{xkcd}} [[https://xkcd.com/977/ #977]].[[/note]] People should be taught to understand this, though. Especially when the ones emphasising the northern hemisphere are still so widely used and very problematic considering the power imbalance between the two hemispheres. (The classic example is when Greenland looks as big as Africa. In fact Africa is about 14 times bigger. That's how big the distortion is. Africa is always bigger than you think.)

to:

* "North is up" when explaining how to read a map. While this is true for how the vast majority of maps are drawn (especially world maps) maps), the orientation can really be any direction and it's best to check the compass rose on the particular map. Applying this misconception to world maps has also led to some ''vicious'' Eurocentric views going back to the 1400s, if not earlier.
* All flat world maps in general are distorted, although admittedly that's unavoidable. [[note]]Many different distortions are possible; see for example Webcomic/{{xkcd}} [[https://xkcd.com/977/ #977]].[[/note]] People should be taught to understand this, though. Especially when the ones emphasising the northern hemisphere are still so widely used and very problematic considering the power imbalance between the two hemispheres. (The classic example is when Greenland looks as big as Africa. In fact fact, Africa is about 14 times bigger. That's how big the distortion is. Africa is always bigger than you think.)



-->In fact, this is an engineering model, in the same way that, [for an] electrical resistor, we write down a model ''V = IR''--it's approximately true, but it's not really true; if I put enough current through the resistor, it goes boom, so the voltage is not always proportional to the current, but for some purposes the model is appropriate.

-->In particular, the model we're going to describe right now, which I call the substitution model, is the simplest model that we have for understanding how procedures work and how processes work--how procedures yield processes.

to:

-->In fact, this is an engineering model, in the same way that, [for an] electrical resistor, we write down a model ''V = IR''--it's IR'' -- it's approximately true, but it's not really true; if I put enough current through the resistor, it goes boom, so the voltage is not always proportional to the current, but for some purposes the model is appropriate.

-->In particular, the model we're going to describe right now, which I call the substitution model, is the simplest model that we have for understanding how procedures work and how processes work--how work -- how procedures yield processes.
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