History Main / LetsFightLikeGentlemen

18th Jun '16 12:28:30 AM gophergiggles
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* After an entire career of facing [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty opponents with questionable tactics or attire]] in the {{Wii}} ''VideoGame/PunchOut'', the final boss and World Champion Mr. Sandman is the only boxer in the game to not resort to using weapons, dirty / illegal moves, support like Soda Popinski's health-replenishing soda, or even improper boxing attire. During the Championship bout ''and'' the Title Defense rematch he gives you a straightforward and fair fight, ''and'' one that's more difficult than any other opponent in the game [[spoiler:save for SecretCharacter ''Franchise/DonkeyKong''.]]
10th Jun '16 8:45:59 AM MacedonianKing
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* In the middle of a fight scene in ''Film/{{SWAT}}'', Officer Street disarms the villain, holding him at gunpoint. (Although the clip has been removed from the gun, there's still a bullet in the chamber.) Instead of arresting him (or shooting him), Street ejects the bullet from the chamber, drops the gun, and continues fighting hand-to-hand.

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* In the middle of a fight scene in ''Film/{{SWAT}}'', Officer Street disarms the villain, holding him at gunpoint. (Although the clip magazine has been removed from the gun, there's still a bullet in the chamber.) Instead of arresting him (or shooting him), Street ejects the bullet from the chamber, drops the gun, and continues fighting hand-to-hand.
22nd May '16 7:24:52 PM Piando
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** During the Cell Saga of ''[[Manga/DragonBall DragonBall Z]]'', Cell plans on destroying the world! ...unless he can be defeated in a tournament, fair and square. He even sets boundaries, just like in the Tenkaichi Budokai, so there's a chance a powerful super-being like him could lose by ring-out. [[spoiler: The ring, though, gets annihilated after a while, making this example a subversion AFTER being played straight.]] However, it's worth noting that Cell only plans on following the rules until the moment arises that he realizes he could actually ''lose,'' at which point he starts cheating rather than face defeat.

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** During the Cell Saga of ''[[Manga/DragonBall DragonBall Z]]'', ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', Cell plans on destroying the world! ...unless he can be defeated in a tournament, fair and square. He even sets boundaries, just like in the Tenkaichi Budokai, so there's a chance a powerful super-being like him could lose by ring-out. [[spoiler: The ring, though, gets annihilated after a while, making this example a subversion AFTER being played straight.]] However, it's worth noting that Cell only plans on following the rules until the moment arises that he realizes he could actually ''lose,'' at which point he starts cheating rather than face defeat.






[[folder: Video Games ]]

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[[folder: Video Games ]]Games]]



* [[AntiHero Meta Knight]] of the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' franchise fits the mold. In most games in which he appears as a boss, Meta Knight will provide Kirby with a sword and will wait patiently until Kirby picks it up (barring ''Revenge of the Meta Knight'', which took place under [[RaceAgainstTheClock time constraint]]). It is difficult to tell if he is a gentleman antagonist/anti-hero or just a StealthMentor in the games, though. His anime incarnation is more openly a mentor.

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* [[AntiHero Meta Knight]] of the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' franchise fits the mold. In most games in which he appears as a boss, Meta Knight will provide Kirby with a sword and will wait patiently until Kirby picks it up (barring ''Revenge of the Meta Knight'', which took place under [[RaceAgainstTheClock time constraint]]). It is difficult to tell if he is a gentleman antagonist/anti-hero or just a StealthMentor in the games, though. His [[Anime/KirbyAndTheStars anime incarnation incarnation]] is more openly a mentor.
29th Apr '16 2:33:20 PM DarkHunter
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'': A not-insignificant portion of the fandom invokes this when it comes to [=PvP=] fights. Many players just want a fair, one-on-one duel against another player, rather than an all-out anything-goes slaughterfest. Each of the games provides ways to ensure a fair duel, but even discounting those, some Invaders will wait to attack their target until said target is free of distractions and fully healed up, and will look down on trying to heal mid-fight. This is taken so far that some players set up "Fight Clubs", where multiple players will be summoned/invade, with a "ring" made of prism stones, and then a series of honorable duels will be held, with other players spectating. It is considered extremely bad form to interrupt a Fight Club, and ''will'' result in absolutely everyone present teaming up to murder you for it.
23rd Apr '16 11:53:41 AM valos
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** A recurring example throughout the series is that the antagonists only ever settle conflicts via pokemon battle, with the main exception ([[spoiler:Ghetsis in Black/White attempting to sic his pokemon on you to preempt a battle entirely]]) being unexpected for that reason. Additionally, antagonists helpfully back down after a battle, which at least makes sense as they're effectively defenseless without their pokemon. Why the various criminals don't simply carry weapons of some kind is rarely mentioned in the series, but has been explained on occasion.
13th Apr '16 5:49:00 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Jervis Cottonbelly of Wrestling/{{Chikara}} has this attitude, always trying his best to follow the rules and asking only of his opponents that they do the same. It takes [[OutOfCharacterIsSeriousBusiness a lot]] for "the world sweetest man" to fight in an ungentlemanly manner.
24th Mar '16 5:09:58 AM SteveMB
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* ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'': In one of Bugs' confrontations with Yosemite Sam, he originally gets him to agree to this. It doesn't take long for him to get tired of it:
-->'''Yosemite Sam:''' "No more gentleman's stuff! From now on ya fights my way -- dirty!"
22nd Mar '16 8:29:48 PM merotoker
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* In ''Marvel versus DC'', WonderWoman manages to lift [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor's]] hammer, meaning she now has ''his'' power in addition to her own. (Meaning the power of ''two gods combined''.) When the time comes for her bought with ComicBook/{{Storm}} via cosmic decree, she realizes the unfair advantage she has - and ''[[HonorBeforeReason throws it away]]'', deciding to fight without it. (And ironically, because the outcome of each bout was [[PopularityPower determined by poll]], she loses.)

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* In ''Marvel versus DC'', WonderWoman Franchise/WonderWoman manages to lift [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor's]] hammer, meaning she now has ''his'' power in addition to her own. (Meaning the power of ''two gods combined''.) When the time comes for her bought bout with ComicBook/{{Storm}} via cosmic decree, she realizes the unfair advantage she has - and ''[[HonorBeforeReason throws it away]]'', deciding to fight without it. (And ironically, because the outcome of each bout was [[PopularityPower determined by poll]], she loses.)



* Invoked but invariably defied in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels; a certain nobleman known only as the Marquis of Fantailler got into multiple fights in his youth as a result of his silly name. He then created a set of rules intended to be a guideline to this sort of behavior (cynically noted in series as "rules governing where people weren't supposed to hit him", with the implication that he was a rubbish fighter who invariably lost). As CombatPragmatism is the norm in the Disc's cities, these rules are openly dismissed as rubbish by anyone who seriously understands fighting, and many people trying to fight by them have instead ended up being seriously beaten or even killed when their opponent refused to play by Fantailler's rules. Only one person in the series has not lost embarrassingly when using these rules -- Otto von Schriek, who, being a vampire, has enough SuperStrength and SuperSpeed that it's no hindrance to him.

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* Invoked but invariably defied in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels; a certain nobleman known only as the Marquis of Fantailler got into multiple fights in his youth as a result of his silly name. He then created a set of rules intended to be a guideline to this sort of behavior (cynically noted in series as "rules governing where people weren't supposed to hit him", with the implication that he was a rubbish fighter who invariably lost). As CombatPragmatism {{Combat Pragmatis|t}}m is the norm in the Disc's cities, these rules are openly dismissed as rubbish by anyone who seriously understands fighting, and many people trying to fight by them have instead ended up being seriously beaten or even killed when their opponent refused to play by Fantailler's rules. Only one person in the series has not lost embarrassingly when using these rules -- Otto von Schriek, who, being a vampire, has enough SuperStrength and SuperSpeed that it's no hindrance to him.



* Sparhawk and Martel's final duel in ''TheElenium'' takes this form. As both men are knights, and old former friends who have literally waited about a decade to face each other in combat, they fight in the honorable fashion, and allow each other a short breather when they grow tired, talking and assessing each other's styles while they rest before returning to trying to kill each other. For extra points, Martel suspects he's going to lose anyways, and ''knows'' he's going to die several attacks before the final blow falls because of his mastery of swordplay.

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* Sparhawk and Martel's final duel in ''TheElenium'' ''Literature/TheElenium'' takes this form. As both men are knights, and old former friends who have literally waited about a decade to face each other in combat, they fight in the honorable fashion, and allow each other a short breather when they grow tired, talking and assessing each other's styles while they rest before returning to trying to kill each other. For extra points, Martel suspects he's going to lose anyways, and ''knows'' he's going to die several attacks before the final blow falls because of his mastery of swordplay.



* Used repeatedly in the ''ChroniclesOfNarnia'' series. King Miraz in Prince Caspian, for example, is goaded into a duel by his treacherous underlings despite being in a position where his army should be victorious without effort. He fights High King Peter and for all his faults, certainly doesn't lack for courage nor does he attempt to cheat in the duel.

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* Used repeatedly in the ''ChroniclesOfNarnia'' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' series. King Miraz in Prince Caspian, for example, is goaded into a duel by his treacherous underlings despite being in a position where his army should be victorious without effort. He fights High King Peter and for all his faults, certainly doesn't lack for courage nor does he attempt to cheat in the duel.






* In ''TheCityHunter'', [[TheDragon Sang Kook]] and [[TheHero Yun Sung]] meet in a hospital. They move the fight to a basement, fight honorably, and don't try to pursue when Yun Sung, inevitably, wins.

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* In ''TheCityHunter'', ''Series/TheCityHunter'', [[TheDragon Sang Kook]] and [[TheHero Yun Sung]] meet in a hospital. They move the fight to a basement, fight honorably, and don't try to pursue when Yun Sung, inevitably, wins.



* Even if you steal another man's love interest, wreck his material possessions, try to kill him, or light him on fire, the only proper retribution is to get the offender [[TonightInThisVeryRing in that very ring]] and pin his shoulders to the mat for a three-count.
** It's not always that way: sometimes you have to [[GimmickMatches make him bleed or say "I Quit"]] instead.
** And really, it's subverted half the time. The Wrestling/ShawnMichaels vs. Wrestling/ChrisJericho feud, round two, with both men doing all kinds of bodily harm to each other in a high-profile Unsanctioned Match. An especially gratifying subversion came in that match when Jericho had Michaels in the Walls of Jericho, his signature submission hold. Michaels fought for the ropes and finally grabbed them, which in a normal wrestling match would mean that Jericho would have to break the hold. Usually, even in hardcore matches where people smash each other up with weapon after weapon and disqualification isn't even a possibility, the wrestlers still abide by rope breaks for some infuriating reason. However, here... Jericho just didn't release the hold. That is, until Michaels grabbed a fire extinguisher from under the ring and decked him with it.
** Because the way the kayfabe rulebook is set up a ref can't count a pin or accept a submission when a guy is holding the ropes. So the match can't end.

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* Even if you steal another man's love interest, wreck his material possessions, try to kill him, or light him on fire, the only proper retribution is to get the offender [[TonightInThisVeryRing in that very ring]] and pin his shoulders to the mat for a three-count.
**
three-count. It's not always that way: sometimes you have to [[GimmickMatches make him bleed or say "I Quit"]] instead.
** And really, it's subverted half the time. The Wrestling/ShawnMichaels vs. Wrestling/ChrisJericho feud, round two, with both men doing all kinds of bodily harm to each other in a high-profile Unsanctioned Match. An especially gratifying subversion came in that match when Jericho had Michaels in the Walls of Jericho, his signature submission hold. Michaels fought for the ropes and finally grabbed them, which in a normal wrestling match would mean that Jericho would have to break the hold. Usually, even in hardcore matches where people smash each other up with weapon after weapon and disqualification isn't even a possibility, the wrestlers still abide by rope breaks for some infuriating reason. However, here... Jericho just didn't release the hold. That is, until Michaels grabbed a fire extinguisher from under the ring and decked him with it.
**
it. Because the way the kayfabe rulebook is set up a ref can't count a pin or accept a submission when a guy is holding the ropes. So the match can't end.



* A strange example of this Trope is the death knights of Krynn from the ''{{Dragonlance}}'' setting, former Knights of Solamnia who were cursed by the gods with undead form for [[MoralEventHorizon unforgivable crimes]] such as treason or murder. Despite being AlwaysChaoticEvil undead abominations, they remember the code they held as Knights of Solamnia, and still fight honorably. They never attack by ambush, or before a foe can ready his weapon.

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* A strange example of this Trope is the death knights of Krynn from the ''{{Dragonlance}}'' ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' setting, former Knights of Solamnia who were cursed by the gods with undead form for [[MoralEventHorizon unforgivable crimes]] such as treason or murder. Despite being AlwaysChaoticEvil undead abominations, they remember the code they held as Knights of Solamnia, and still fight honorably. They never attack by ambush, or before a foe can ready his weapon.






* Dudley (pictured above), from the ''StreetFighter'' games, is the TropeNamer. A ScaryBlackMan at first glance, Dudley is a boxer of average stature, but comes from a very wealthy background and is both a scholar ''and'' a gentleman. The classically trained fighter often says to his opponent, "Let's fight like gentlemen!" before the round begins.

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* Dudley (pictured above), from the ''StreetFighter'' ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' games, is the TropeNamer.{{Trope Namer|s}}. A ScaryBlackMan at first glance, Dudley is a boxer of average stature, but comes from a very wealthy background and is both a scholar ''and'' a gentleman. The classically trained fighter often says to his opponent, "Let's fight like gentlemen!" before the round begins.









* [[RockyAndBullwinkle Mr. Peabody]] helps the Marquis of Queensbury write the rules of boxing in an episode of his segment.

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* [[RockyAndBullwinkle ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle'': Mr. Peabody]] Peabody helps the Marquis of Queensbury write the rules of boxing in an episode of his segment.






18th Mar '16 12:36:41 PM Willbyr
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* In ''Manga/AsuNoYoichi'', Yoichi will often gladly fight those who challenge him to a fight, and will often fight with whatever their opponent is using. So if it's a fistfight, he won't use his sword. However, if they fight him for less than pure motives, such as being paid to defeat him, then he pulls a WarriorPoet moment on them and then does a CurbStompBattle on them.

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* In ''Manga/AsuNoYoichi'', ''Manga/SamuraiHaremAsuNoYoichi'', Yoichi will often gladly fight those who challenge him to a fight, and will often fight with whatever their opponent is using. So if it's a fistfight, he won't use his sword. However, if they fight him for less than pure motives, such as being paid to defeat him, then he pulls a WarriorPoet moment on them and then does a CurbStompBattle on them.
17th Mar '16 3:17:22 PM thatother1dude
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' episode "Betrothed", Starfire challenges Blackfire for the throne of Tamaran, which Blackfire gladly accepts. Robin is about to help, but Galfore quickly tells him not to; helping either combatant in this type of fight results in her being disqualified. (And given that Starfire is Galfore's ward, he likely wanted to help even more than Robin did.) Note that while Starfire fights fair in this fight, Blackfire clearly does ''not'', using an enchanted necklace that makes her nearly invulnerable. (Unfortunately, [[StupidEvil she makes the mistake of gloating and telling Starfire that]]; Starfire manages to grab hold of the necklace and crush it, then win the fight.)

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' episode "Betrothed", Starfire challenges Blackfire for the throne of Tamaran, which Blackfire gladly accepts. Robin is about to help, but Galfore quickly tells him not to; helping either combatant in this type of fight results in her being disqualified. (And given that Starfire is Galfore's ward, he likely wanted to help even more than Robin did.) Note that while Starfire fights fair in this fight, Blackfire clearly does ''not'', using an enchanted necklace that makes her nearly invulnerable. (Unfortunately, [[StupidEvil [[EvilGloating she makes the mistake of gloating and telling Starfire that]]; Starfire manages to grab hold of the necklace and crush it, then win the fight.)
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