History Main / LawfulStupid

23rd Aug '16 7:14:52 AM Wildstar93
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* Hollyleaf of ''Literature/WarriorCats'' was turning into this before her [[spoiler: death, or disappearance, according to some.]]

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* Hollyleaf of ''Literature/WarriorCats'' was turning into this before her [[spoiler: death, or disappearance, according to some.]]]] Even Jayfeather had thought in ''Dark River'' that Hollyleaf was so into BlackAndWhiteMorality that she believes that those who follow the warrior code are good and those who don't are evil.
20th Aug '16 1:40:25 PM Monolaf317
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-->'''Gogo:''' ''(to Wasabi)'' Did you just put your blinker on?!\\
'''Wasabi:''' You have to indicate your turn! It's the law!\\
'''Gogo:''' ''(takes out gum)'' [[LetsGetDangerous That's. It.]]
20th Aug '16 4:24:06 AM Euodiachloris
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* [[PrinciplesZealot Stannis Baratheon]] from ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[PlayingWithATrope plays hard-ball with this trope]]. He's [[BrutalHonesty blunt and honest]] to a fault; he's also so very [[{{Determinator}} stubborn]] that, if he ''can'' compromise, it'll ordinarily be done only so reluctantly, you can practically hear him creak... or, he'll quickly do a 180 to shock everybody. But, that last is only if you can show him that he's wrong in a way that follows his ethics using sound reasoning; upon, which he'll back you to the hilt, regardless of what he thinks of you, personally. Yet, however much you might think all this would shoot him in the foot, he's proves that he's often got a point, which is correct in some way, and that he isn't blind as to the consequences. He wages a war of succession, tearing the kingdom apart to be king (he knows this going in; but, he also knows that being king means ''running the kingdom well'' -- a lesson others all-too-conveniently forget)... even though he doesn't actually want to be the king. He's the rightful heir, so there no question in his mind: by law and duty, it has to be done. However, he has a very good grasp of other people's self-serving intentions and capabilities, so knows full well few follow him with any of the duties he cares about in mind: which generally serves to make him despise most of them, even while he'll acknowledge enemies who don't follow him, yet do follow their own principles and laws to the best of their abilities. All these quirks make most political players write him off as merely a predictable killjoy. Which can undo them, if they buy into it too much -- ''[[TheStrategist and he often plays to that]], both in the field and court''. By the fifth book, he's still insisting on fighting the War of the Five Kings long after everyone else has stopped caring about it, yet is also one of the very few to have noticed what is going on beyond the Wall. Fighting the Others is ''also'' his duty, as he sees it. Yeah, it's complicated.

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* [[PrinciplesZealot Stannis Baratheon]] from ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[PlayingWithATrope plays hard-ball with this trope]]. He's [[BrutalHonesty blunt and honest]] to a fault; he's also so very [[{{Determinator}} stubborn]] that, if he ''can'' compromise, it'll ordinarily be done only so reluctantly, you can practically hear him creak... or, he'll quickly do a 180 to shock everybody. But, that last one is only achieved ''only'' if you can show him that he's wrong in a way that follows his ethics using sound reasoning; upon, which upon which, he'll back you to the hilt, regardless of what he personally thinks of you, personally. you. Yet, however much you might think all this would shoot him in the foot, he's proves that he's often got a point, which is (which is, moreover, correct in some way, crucial way) and that he isn't blind as to the consequences. He wages a war of succession, tearing the kingdom apart to be king (he knows this going in; but, he also knows that being king means ''running the kingdom well'' -- a lesson others all-too-conveniently forget)... even though he doesn't actually want to be the king. He's the rightful heir, so there no question in his mind: by law and duty, it has to be done. However, he has a very good grasp of other people's self-serving intentions and capabilities, so knows full well few follow him with any of the duties he cares about in mind: which generally serves to make him despise most of them, even while he'll acknowledge enemies who don't follow him, yet do follow their own principles and laws to the best of their abilities. All these outwardly hardline quirks make most political players write him off as merely a predictable killjoy. predictable, impractical killjoy who is impossible to work with. Which can undo them, if they buy into it too much -- ''[[TheStrategist and he often plays to that]], both in the field and in court''. By the fifth book, he's still insisting on fighting the War of the Five Kings long after everyone else has stopped caring about it, yet is also one of the very few to have noticed what is going on beyond the Wall. Fighting the Others is ''also'' his duty, as he sees it. Yeah, it's complicated.
8th Aug '16 6:08:23 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* In the original ''Anime/YuGiOh'', Isono (an employee of Kaiba's who acts as a referee during the Battle City finals) is a borderline example. He sticks adamantly to the rules of the game, even though something is obviously wrong (as in, Marik's demonic presence risking everyone's lives), and makes every call by the book. For example, a deleted scene from Yugi's duel with Marik has him rule that Yugi's drawing a card and setting it without confirming it is not allowed (if it's a monster, it's in the wrong slot) even though Yugi has a good reason for this. (Kaiba himself, however, overrules this ruling, saying it's "interesting" and the duel continues.)

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* In the original ''Anime/YuGiOh'', Isono (an employee of Kaiba's who acts as a referee during the Battle City finals) is a borderline example. He sticks adamantly to the rules of the game, even though something is obviously wrong (as in, Marik's demonic presence risking everyone's lives), and makes every call by the book. For example, a deleted scene from Yugi's duel with Marik has him rule that Yugi's drawing a card and setting it without confirming it is not allowed (if it's a monster, it's in the wrong slot) even though Yugi has a good reason for this. (Kaiba himself, however, overrules this ruling, saying it's "interesting" and the duel continues.) The worst example is when he forbid Yugi from helping Bakura, even though Bakura was ''dying'', because a duelist isn't allowed to make physical contact with an opponent.
7th Aug '16 3:47:23 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* In some of the spinoff-Franchise/{{Halo}} books, there is a small faction of [[ScaryDogmaticAliens The Covenant]] called The Governors of Contrition. While the normal Covenant place a large emphasis on the works of the [[{{Precursors}} Forerunners]] being holy, the Governors of Contrition take it to a huge extreme. They even consider [[TheVirus The Flood]] (a plague that turns people into space-zombies) to be worth embracing because it was created by the forerunners (which it wasn't [[spoiler:infact it's the other way round: The Flood in the form of the Precursers created the ''Forerunners'']]). Even the normally ridiculously dogmatic Covenant realize this is madness.

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* In some of the spinoff-Franchise/{{Halo}} books, ''Literature/HaloGhostsOfOnyx'', there is a small faction of [[ScaryDogmaticAliens The the Covenant]] called The Governors of Contrition. While the normal Covenant place a large emphasis on the works of the [[{{Precursors}} Forerunners]] being holy, the Governors of Contrition take it to a huge extreme. They even consider [[TheVirus The Flood]] (a plague that turns people into space-zombies) to be worth embracing because it was created by the forerunners Forerunners (which it wasn't [[spoiler:infact wasn't; [[spoiler:in fact it's the other way round: The Flood in the form of the Precursers created the ''Forerunners'']]). Even the normally ridiculously dogmatic Covenant realize this is madness.
4th Aug '16 10:18:17 AM Mooncalf
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** It's worth noting that the comic actually started out on a far less satirical note, with Dredd (and his fellow Judges) being far more idealistic. A very early comic had him risk his life to save a child, then telling a recruit that a Judge must be willing to sacrifice himself to protect a citizen. Later comics treated citizens as completely expendable, sometimes with the justification that they were just potential lawbreakers.
4th Aug '16 9:55:31 AM EdwardGil
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One of the issues that can arise that a writer must avoid with this trope this was known as the "World Created Last Thursday" problem. If there is an societal explosion being caused now by the party or some group not corresponding with the laws, or the laws just not working in general....why hasn't this been a problem before now? NobodyEverComplainedBefore?
4th Aug '16 9:24:40 AM Mooncalf
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In [[TabletopGames tabletop roleplaying games]], it's such a common behavior for paladins that it seems [[{{Flanderization}} this is what everyone]] ''[[{{Flanderization}} expects]]'' [[{{Flanderization}} paladins to do these days]]. In fact, it's ''so'' common that the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' {{Sourcebook}} ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' spends a good number of pages explaining how to be LawfulNeutral or LawfulGood ''without'' being a dimwit. ''[[WriterRevolt The creators themselves]]'' [[WriterRevolt got sick of it]].[[note]]However, they kind of failed, as the ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' is derisively referred to by players as "Book of [[StupidGood Sutpidly]] [[DumbIsGood Dumb Good]]'' because of how they handle Good and Evil in said book[[/note]]

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In [[TabletopGames tabletop roleplaying games]], it's such a common behavior for paladins that it seems [[{{Flanderization}} this is what everyone]] ''[[{{Flanderization}} expects]]'' [[{{Flanderization}} paladins to do these days]]. In fact, it's ''so'' common that the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' {{Sourcebook}} ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' spends a good number of pages explaining how to be LawfulNeutral or LawfulGood ''without'' being a dimwit. ''[[WriterRevolt The creators themselves]]'' [[WriterRevolt got sick of it]].[[note]]However, they kind of failed, as the ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' is derisively referred to by players as "Book of [[StupidGood Sutpidly]] Stupidly]] [[DumbIsGood Dumb Good]]'' because of how they handle Good and Evil in said book[[/note]]
book.[[/note]]
30th Jul '16 5:35:57 PM Monolaf317
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* Wasabi from ''Disney/BigHero6'' is the sort of person who will come to a complete stop at a red light and wait for it to change. At night. In an industrial area with no sign of traffic. While being chased by a murderous super-villain.

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* Wasabi from ''Disney/BigHero6'' is the sort of person who will come to a complete stop at a red light and wait for it to change. At night. In an industrial area with no sign of traffic. [[BreadEggsMilkSquick While being chased by a murderous super-villain. super-villain.]]
26th Jul '16 4:18:31 PM res20stupid
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* Played with in ''Series/InPlainSight'' - Marshal told his superiors that informing a mob boss that his girlfriend, who turned witness against him, is pregnant with his child is a ''very'' bad idea. Unfortunately they point out that the US Federal Government had attempted to do this before and the mobster successfully sued the government.
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