History Main / LavaIsBoilingKoolAid

16th Dec '15 2:39:37 AM LeithSol
Is there an issue? Send a Message
duplicate
* In ''Videogame/LaMulana'', lava has the same swimming physics and HP drain as water. You can even throw on a puny [[BadassCape ice cape]] and swim through it for almost no damage!
13th Dec '15 4:57:33 PM MyTimingIsOff
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** To be fair, it does as much damage as hitting the ground at terminal velocity per round. [[note]]Wait, isn't a round six seconds.

* In ''VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise'', the vast majority of [[LethalLavaLand Sweatmore Peak]] is spent traversing magma as if it were water. It damages Wario to do so unprotected; he needs the Sweatmore Hotpants to avoid this. Lower portions of the level have hotter magma that requires upgraded Hotpants to survive in it.
to:
* In ''VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise'', the vast majority of [[LethalLavaLand Sweatmore Peak]] is spent traversing magma as if it were water. It damages Wario to do so unprotected; he needs the Sweatmore Hotpants to avoid this. Lower portions of the level have hotter magma that requires upgraded Hotpants to survive in it.in.
13th Dec '15 1:31:43 PM REV6Pilot
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Not An Example. It's not stated to be lava, it doesn't work like lava, so it's no kind of lava. And do remember that All-Stars replaces the red fluid with murky brown water, so it could easily be a palete limitation (brown water in 8-bit graphics would likely be mistaken for the wood of the ships).
*** One of the endgame levels has a navy of ships sailing on lava like an ocean. Swimming underneath it is a viable option for completing the level.[[note]]Nothing is calling it lava, though. Maybe it's [[FridgeHorror a different red liquid?]][[/note]]
27th Nov '15 5:54:22 PM MyTimingIsOff
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* In ''VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise'', the vast majority of [[LethalLavaLand Sweatmore Peak]] is spent traversing magma as if it were water. It damages Wario to do so unprotected; he needs the Sweatmore Hotpants to avoid this. Lower portions of the level have hotter magma that requires upgraded Hotpants to survive in it.
21st Oct '15 2:17:34 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* [[http://www.thebookofbiff.com/comics/2007-02-14-0190.png This panel]] from ''TheBookOfBiff'' illustrates the trope perfectly.
to:
* [[http://www.thebookofbiff.com/comics/2007-02-14-0190.png This panel]] from ''TheBookOfBiff'' ''Webcomic/TheBookOfBiff'' illustrates the trope perfectly.
19th Oct '15 4:22:36 AM sisima70
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** To be fair, it does as much damage as hitting the ground at terminal velocity per round. [[note]]Wait, isn't a round six seconds.
1st Oct '15 6:02:36 PM SamTheAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from that of ketchup to over 100,000 times greater -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C (1,300-2,200 degrees F). Even the smallest flows will blister the skin before one can get close enough to touch it, while large amounts can burn you to death from much farther away. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
to:
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from that of ketchup to over 100,000 times greater much thicker than peanut butter -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow yellow to red light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C (1,300-2,200 degrees F). Even the smallest flows will blister the skin before one can get close enough to touch it, while large amounts can burn you to death cause fatal burns from much farther away. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
24th Sep '15 5:12:47 PM SamTheAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from low, with water-like fluidity, to 100,000 times greater -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C (1,300-2,200 degrees F). Even the smallest flows will blister the skin before one can get close enough to touch it, while large amounts can burn you to death from much farther away. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
to:
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from low, with water-like fluidity, that of ketchup to over 100,000 times greater -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C (1,300-2,200 degrees F). Even the smallest flows will blister the skin before one can get close enough to touch it, while large amounts can burn you to death from much farther away. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
17th Sep '15 9:38:15 AM SamTheAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from low, with water-like fluidity, to 100,000 times greater -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C; coming within forty feet (12 m) of it can inflict fatal burns. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
to:
Real Life lava is molten rock. (The subterranean version is called magma.) Imagine an entire lake of electric-stove heating elements, all glowing red-hot. Its viscosity, or thickness, ranges from low, with water-like fluidity, to 100,000 times greater -- what you would expect of a liquid ''rock''. It is an opaque emitter of reddish-yellow light. Its temperature is typically 700-1200 degrees C; coming within forty feet (12 m) of it C (1,300-2,200 degrees F). Even the smallest flows will blister the skin before one can inflict fatal burns.get close enough to touch it, while large amounts can burn you to death from much farther away. It is often accompanied by volcanic gas that can contain elements that you do ''not'' want to breathe.
12th Jul '15 5:35:14 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In "The Desolation of Smaug" Thorin boats down a channel of molten gold in a wheelbarrow. An iron wheelbarrow. Gold melts above 1000 degrees Centigrade.
to:
* In "The Desolation of Smaug" ''Film/TheHobbitTheDesolationOfSmaug'': Thorin boats down a channel of molten gold in a wheelbarrow. An iron wheelbarrow. Gold melts above 1000 degrees Centigrade.
This list shows the last 10 events of 276. Show all.