History Main / LaserGuidedAmnesia

16th Jun '17 11:43:44 AM TrendingToon1
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* When Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' accidentally hits her sister, Anna, in the head with her ice magic, her parents bring them to a troll colony to save her. The oldest troll then alters Anna's memories of Elsa's magic so she won't remember her sister has powers. The grown up Anna later learns of Elsa's powers and accepts them, but she never regains her old memories.

to:

* When Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' accidentally hits her sister, Anna, in the head with her ice magic, her parents bring them to a troll colony to save her. The oldest troll then alters Anna's memories of Elsa's magic so she won't remember her sister has powers.powers "to be safe". The grown up Anna later learns of Elsa's powers and accepts them, but she never regains her old memories.
3rd Jun '17 11:27:32 PM AthenaBlue
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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E10FaceTheRaven "Face The Raven"]], Rigsy is dosed with Retcon (see the ''Torchwood'' entry below) so he'll forget his being lured to -- and framed for murder on -- the trap street.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E10FaceTheRaven "Face The the Raven"]], Rigsy is dosed with Retcon (see the ''Torchwood'' entry below) so he'll forget his being lured to -- and framed for murder on -- the trap street.
3rd Jun '17 9:12:00 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/DoctorWho''
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames "The War Games"]], Jamie and Zoe are returned to their respective times and have their memories altered so that they don't remember The Doctor as part of his punishment from the Time Lords.
** In the following season during the beginning of the Jon Pertwee era, the Doctor is exiled on Earth by the Time Lords with his knowledge of time travel wiped from his memory to prevent him from repairing his TARDIS and escaping.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho''
''Series/DoctorWho'':
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames "The War Games"]], Jamie and Zoe are returned to their respective times and have their memories altered so that they don't remember The the Doctor as part of his punishment from the Time Lords.
** In the following season season, during the beginning of the Jon Pertwee era, the Doctor is exiled on Earth by the Time Lords with his knowledge of time travel wiped from his memory to prevent him from repairing his TARDIS and escaping.



** Series 6 introduces the Silence, who have the power to make people forget about them as soon as they look away. Which means they could be ''anywhere and everywhere''...'''[[ParanoiaFuel and they are.]]''' They also leave you with a post-hypnotic suggestion. In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon "Day of the Moon"]], the Doctor manages to use their own ability to foil some of their plans by [[spoiler:recording a video of one of the Silence saying "you should kill us on sight" and then broadcasting it during the Apollo 11 landing; everybody then starts to unconsciously kill the Silence and then forgets about it]].
*** On his quest to be alone the Doctor picks up this trick and uses it to make all of his data in the Inforarium and in all databases that copy from it essentially useless, since it's forgotten as soon as the reader looks away.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E1AsylumOfTheDaleks "Asylum of the Daleks"]], [[spoiler:the entire Dalek species]] lose their memories of The Doctor.

to:

** Series 6 introduces the Silence, who have the power to make people forget about them as soon as they look away. Which means they could be ''anywhere and everywhere''... '''[[ParanoiaFuel and they are.]]''' They also leave you with a post-hypnotic suggestion. In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon "Day of the Moon"]], the Doctor manages to use their own ability to foil some of their plans by [[spoiler:recording a video of one of the Silence saying "you should kill us on sight" and then broadcasting it during the Apollo 11 landing; everybody then starts to unconsciously kill the Silence and then forgets about it]].
*** On his quest to be alone alone, the Doctor picks up this trick and uses it to make all of his data in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33ShortTheInforarium the Inforarium Inforarium]] and in all databases that copy from it essentially useless, since it's forgotten as soon as the reader looks away.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E1AsylumOfTheDaleks "Asylum of the Daleks"]], [[spoiler:the entire Dalek species]] lose their memories of The the Doctor.
3rd Jun '17 9:10:06 PM AthenaBlue
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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E10FaceTheRaven "Face The Raven"]], Rigsy is dosed with Retcon (see the ''Torchwood'' entry above) so he'll forget his being lured to -- and framed for murder on -- the trap street.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E10FaceTheRaven "Face The Raven"]], Rigsy is dosed with Retcon (see the ''Torchwood'' entry above) below) so he'll forget his being lured to -- and framed for murder on -- the trap street.
3rd Jun '17 9:06:29 PM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animation]]Animated]]
* When Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' accidentally hits her sister, Anna, in the head with her ice magic, her parents bring them to a troll colony to save her. The oldest troll then alters Anna's memories of Elsa's magic so she won't remember her sister has powers. The grown up Anna later learns of Elsa's powers and accepts them, but she never regains her old memories.
* In ''WesternAnimation/HotelTransylvania'', Dracula tries to do this on Johnny and fails due to Johnny's contact lenses blocking the effect.



* The final resolution of ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerbTheMovieAcrossThe2ndDimension'': all the kids agree to have their memories of the day wiped in order to keep Perry. Isabella used this to give Phineas a ForcefulKiss, knowing she wouldn't remember. Though Perry kept a secret stash of photos on his digital camera.



* When Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' accidentally hits her sister, Anna, in the head with her ice magic, her parents bring them to a troll colony to save her. The oldest troll then alters Anna's memories of Elsa's magic so she won't remember her sister has powers. The grown up Anna later learns of Elsa's powers and accepts them, but she never regains her old memories.
* In ''WesternAnimation/HotelTransylvania'', Dracula tries to do this on Johnny and fails due to Johnny's contact lenses blocking the effect.
* The final resolution of ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerbTheMovieAcrossThe2ndDimension'': all the kids agree to have their memories of the day wiped in order to keep Perry. Isabella used this to give Phineas a ForcefulKiss, knowing she wouldn't remember. Though Perry kept a secret stash of photos on his digital camera.



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* The film ''Film/TheVow'' is based on a real life story of this.
* The ''Film/{{Paycheck}}'' film features literally Laser Guided Amnesia (neurons destroyed with lasers), as a method to prevent engineers to trade out top secret technology after finishing their assignment.
** It also appears to work flawlessly, but can only be used for erasing short periods of time (up to a few weeks). For longer periods, they switch to a chemical agent which is supposed to do the same job. It doesn't work quite as well, leaving behind pieces of memories.
** In the original Creator/PhillipKDick short story, this is basically what motivates the protagonist to have to seek out the company that hired him and a find a way back in, since the memories are literally ''burned'' meaning there's no way to co-operate with the police (who know he's been up to something illegal) and thus avoid prosecution.

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]
* Discussed in ''Film/TheAdjustmentBureau''. The film ''Film/TheVow'' is based on a real life story of this.
adjusters threaten to reset David: ''"Your emotions, your memories, your entire personality will be expunged."''
* The ''Film/{{Paycheck}}'' film features literally Laser Guided Amnesia (neurons destroyed with lasers), entire ''[[Film/TheBourneSeries Bourne]]'' (''Identity'', ''Supremacy'', ''Ultimatum'') series of films have a protagonist who has amnesia induced by a [[HeroicBSOD psychotic break while on a mission]]. His amnesia could be organic as a method well as psychological, since it's implied that [[spoiler:he and his fellow assassins are/were taking some sort of medication to prevent engineers to trade out top secret technology after finishing supplement their assignment.
**
conditioning, and he's obviously not taking it anymore.]] It also appears could be why he can't recover any of his memories, despite his best efforts.
* A strange mix of anterograde and retrograde amnesia is played for laughs in ''Film/CleanSlate'', where Dana Carvey's character has forgotten his entire past ''and'' forgets the events of each day as soon as he goes
to work flawlessly, but can only be sleep.
* In ''Film/{{Cypher}}'', AppliedPhlebotinum is
used for erasing short periods as a brainwashing tool in order to turn employees of time (up to a few weeks). For longer periods, MegaCorp into unknowing corporate spies. Whilst they switch to don't completely forget about their formers lives, the corp makes their new "fake" lives such a chemical agent which facsimile of the old one that they never notice.
* The central premise of ''Film/DarkCity''. A man wakes up with no memories of his identity, but has lingering emotional resonance with certain people and places. How much of his personality
is supposed to do truly his remains a mystery -- it's implied that his love for his wife is genuine, but at the same job. time, he's also driven to visit Shell Beach, a place everyone's visited but nobody can describe its location. [[spoiler: It doesn't work quite as well, leaving behind pieces of memories.
** In
exist, until the original Creator/PhillipKDick short story, this is basically what motivates end when he makes it exist. He finds his mindwiped wife there, and the protagonist to have to seek out the company that hired movie ends before revealing whether her feelings toward him and a find a way back in, since the memories are literally ''burned'' meaning there's no way to co-operate with the police (who know he's been up to something illegal) and thus avoid prosecution.were genuine or induced.]]



* ''Film/XMen'':
** ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' features quite possibly one of the most painful instances of this trope. An antagonist loads a gun with Adamantium bullets, knowing he can't kill {{Wolverine}} with them, but intends to give him Laser Guided Amnesia by shooting him in the head. He succeeds, wiping Wolverine's memory with no other side-effects. Wolverine's "memories don't grow back", but his ability to speak, read, walk, recognize police cars, hide from police cars, etc, do.
** In ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', Charles [[spoiler: uses a kiss goodbye to wipe out Moira's memories the last few weeks, and of where he and the newly formed X-Men are]]. This is notably against his current philosophy in the comics, but very much in keeping with his modus operandi in the comics produced in the early 1960s.
* The Neuralizer from ''Film/MenInBlack'', also known as the [[BuffySpeak "flashy thing"]]. It can be set for a specific length of time and leaves the victim in a brief trance so a cover story can be planted to maintain PlausibleDeniability. Agents are also issued special sunglasses to prevent accidental self-neuralization.



* The entire ''[[Film/TheBourneSeries Bourne]]'' (''Identity'', ''Supremacy'', ''Ultimatum'') series of films have a protagonist who has amnesia induced by a [[HeroicBSOD psychotic break while on a mission]]. His amnesia could be organic as well as psychological, since it's implied that [[spoiler:he and his fellow assassins are/were taking some sort of medication to supplement their conditioning, and he's obviously not taking it anymore.]] It could be why he can't recover any of his memories, despite his best efforts.
* In ''Film/SupermanII'', among many other superpowers that [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands pop up]] [[AssPull out of]] [[DeusExMachina nowhere,]] Superman is revealed to have the ability to remove specific memories with a kiss. This becomes a bit more disturbing in ''Film/SupermanIVTheQuestForPeace'', where he comes pretty close to using this power as a date rape drug.
* Happens to Alice and Spence Parks in the first ''Film/ResidentEvil'' movie as a side effect of being rendered unconscious by sleep gas.
* In the 2009 film ''Film/{{Push}}'', there exist people called Wipers, who can temporarily or permanently erase memories, useful as there are other people in that universe who can read minds and memories. Wipers can wipe all memory up to a certain point, or try to wipe only certain memories relating to specific topic, but the accuracy of the wipe is determined by their skill.
* A strange mix of anterograde and retrograde amnesia is played for laughs in ''Clean Slate'', where Dana Carvey's character has forgotten his entire past ''and'' forgets the events of each day as soon as he goes to sleep.
* In ''Film/{{Cypher}}'', AppliedPhlebotinum is used as a brainwashing tool in order to turn employees of a MegaCorp into unknowing corporate spies. Whilst they don't completely forget about their formers lives, the corp makes their new "fake" lives such a facsimile of the old one that they never notice.
* The central premise of ''Film/DarkCity''. A man wakes up with no memories of his identity, but has lingering emotional resonance with certain people and places. How much of his personality is truly his remains a mystery -- it's implied that his love for his wife is genuine, but at the same time, he's also driven to visit Shell Beach, a place everyone's visited but nobody can describe its location. [[spoiler: It doesn't exist, until the end when he makes it exist. He finds his mindwiped wife there, and the movie ends before revealing whether her feelings toward him were genuine or induced.]]



* Discussed in ''Film/TheAdjustmentBureau''. The adjusters threaten to reset David: ''"Your emotions, your memories, your entire personality will be expunged."''
* In ''Film/WhiteTiger'', "Naydenov" cannot remember his true name, his military unit, his date of birth or where he went to school. He can remember how to drive a tank, though.
* In ''Film/TheWolfman2010'', [[spoiler: it's not so much that he forgot, but rather Lawrence's memories were ''re-written'' so that real memories of his werewolf father killing his mother were made to appear that she had killed herself with a razor.]]

to:

* Discussed in ''Film/TheAdjustmentBureau''. The adjusters threaten Neuralizer from ''Film/MenInBlack'', also known as the [[BuffySpeak "flashy thing"]]. It can be set for a specific length of time and leaves the victim in a brief trance so a cover story can be planted to reset David: ''"Your emotions, your maintain PlausibleDeniability. Agents are also issued special sunglasses to prevent accidental self-neuralization.
* The ''Film/{{Paycheck}}'' film features literally Laser Guided Amnesia (neurons destroyed with lasers), as a method to prevent engineers to trade out top secret technology after finishing their assignment.
** It also appears to work flawlessly, but can only be used for erasing short periods of time (up to a few weeks). For longer periods, they switch to a chemical agent which is supposed to do the same job. It doesn't work quite as well, leaving behind pieces of memories.
** In the original Creator/PhillipKDick short story, this is basically what motivates the protagonist to have to seek out the company that hired him and a find a way back in, since the memories are literally ''burned'' meaning there's no way to co-operate with the police (who know he's been up to something illegal) and thus avoid prosecution.
* In the 2009 film ''Film/{{Push}}'', there exist people called Wipers, who can temporarily or permanently erase
memories, your entire personality will be expunged."''
useful as there are other people in that universe who can read minds and memories. Wipers can wipe all memory up to a certain point, or try to wipe only certain memories relating to specific topic, but the accuracy of the wipe is determined by their skill.
* Happens to Alice and Spence Parks in the first ''Film/ResidentEvil'' movie as a side effect of being rendered unconscious by sleep gas.
* In ''Film/SupermanII'', among many other superpowers that [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands pop up]] [[AssPull out of]] [[DeusExMachina nowhere,]] Superman is revealed to have the ability to remove specific memories with a kiss. This becomes a bit more disturbing in ''Film/SupermanIVTheQuestForPeace'', where he comes pretty close to using this power as a date rape drug.
%%* The film ''Film/TheVow'' is based on a real life story of this.
* In ''Film/WhiteTiger'', "Naydenov" cannot remember his true name, his military unit, his date of birth or where he went to school. He can remember how to drive a tank, though.
though.
* In ''Film/TheWolfman2010'', [[spoiler: it's [[spoiler:it's not so much that he forgot, but rather Lawrence's memories were ''re-written'' ''rewritten'' so that real memories of his werewolf father killing his mother were made to appear that she had killed herself with a razor.]]]]
* ''Film/XMen'':
** ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' features quite possibly one of the most painful instances of this trope. An antagonist loads a gun with Adamantium bullets, knowing he can't kill {{Wolverine}} with them, but intends to give him Laser Guided Amnesia by shooting him in the head. He succeeds, wiping Wolverine's memory with no other side-effects. Wolverine's "memories don't grow back", but his ability to speak, read, walk, recognize police cars, hide from police cars, etc, do.
** In ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', Charles [[spoiler: uses a kiss goodbye to wipe out Moira's memories the last few weeks, and of where he and the newly formed X-Men are]]. This is notably against his current philosophy in the comics, but very much in keeping with his modus operandi in the comics produced in the early 1960s.



* ''The Recognition of Shakuntala'', an episode from the [[OlderThanYouThink Ancient]] [[UsefulNotes/IndianLanguages Sanskrit]] epic ''Literature/{{Mahabharata}}'' that was later [[AscendedExtra Expanded]] into a theatrical drama by the Indian playwright Kalidasa around the 1st century BC, is probably the UrExample of this trope. It's a [[BoyMeetsGirl Girl Meets Boy]] story revolving around a woman named Shakuntala who meets a guy named Dushyanta and they get married, only for him to get cursed with [[EasyAmnesia Amnesia]] and completely forget her. The only way to lift the curse is to show him the ring that he gave her, but she loses the ring in a river. She eventually finds the ring by the end of the story, makes him remember, and then they live HappilyEverAfter.
* In Creator/DanAbnett's ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novel ''Traitor General'', [[spoiler:Sturm]]'s "mind-lock" prevents him from remembering his life before his capture, though he has formed memories since.
* In ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'', magical therapists sometimes work through this. So-called "sowers of oblivion" can make someone forget any person completely, provided that a proper personal trinket is given away. Said trinket acts like a storage for wiped-out memory, so if wiped-out person touches it, memories all come back. The opposite is "sowers of memories" and they deal in {{Brainwash|ed}}ing {{Muggle}}s.
* Subverted in ''Literature/TheCurrentsOfSpace'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov.
* In the Literature/{{Deryni}} novels, the clergy assigned to Rhemuth's Cathedral of Saint George and Saint Hilary's Basilica (including Brother Jerome, the sacristan and Duncan's chaplain Father Shandon) are regular victims of this trope. A Transfer Portal is located in the cathedral sacristy, and another is in Duncan's study at the basilica; inconvenient clerics often must to be dealt with to maintain TheMasquerade and allow Deryni to secretly use them. Eventually, the issue is remarked upon: Duncan says of Shandon, "He's discreet and he's loyal——and I can make sure he doesn't remember anything he oughtn't. I don't like to do that, but sometimes there's no choice."
* Premise of the 1973 spy thriller ''The Tightrope Men''. The protagonist wakes up in a hotel room in Oslo, not only unable to remember who he is, but with an entirely different face and identity. It turns out that [[spoiler:he was kidnapped, brainwashed, and cosmetically altered to cover the abduction of the scientist he resembles. The only thing keeping him sane is that he still ''can'' remember some things, like his name, from his previous life -- the brainwashing was a hastily-done "butcher's job".]] The author Desmond Bagley said he thought up the most terrifying circumstance you could find yourself in and then wrote the novel around it.
** Bagley had previously used the amnesia motif in ''Landslide'' (1967), whose protagonist has forgotten all personal information, ''including'' [[MistakenIdentity his own name]], in a car accident. That he hasn't forgotten the geology he studied before the accident becomes a minor plot point. He may or may not be a guy who was a fairly sociopathic criminal before the accident -- two people were in the car and he doesn't know which one he is. [[spoiler:He never does learn his previous identity, but he (and people who've come to like him) conclude that since he's a decent person now, it doesn't matter.]]
* Subverted in ''The Wrong Reflection'' by Gillian Bradshaw. TheHero wakes up not knowing his own face or history and not fully able to operate in society. He needs help in figuring out that he has basic human rights and in one example, doesn't know what an 'oak tree' is. He knows science inside and out but the concept of 'muzzling' is a mystery.

to:

* ''The Recognition of Shakuntala'', an episode from In ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'', the [[OlderThanYouThink Ancient]] [[UsefulNotes/IndianLanguages Sanskrit]] epic ''Literature/{{Mahabharata}}'' that was later [[AscendedExtra Expanded]] into a theatrical drama by the Indian playwright Kalidasa around the 1st century BC, is probably the UrExample of this trope. It's a [[BoyMeetsGirl Girl Meets Boy]] story revolving around a woman named Shakuntala who meets a guy named Dushyanta and they get married, fairies have mind-wiping technology which can be fine-tuned to suppress only for him to get cursed with [[EasyAmnesia Amnesia]] and completely forget her. specific memories.
**
The only way process is not perfect, however. Exposure to lift stimuli regarding the curse is to show him the ring that he gave her, but she loses the ring in a river. She eventually finds the ring by the end of the story, makes him remember, and then they live HappilyEverAfter.
* In Creator/DanAbnett's ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novel ''Traitor General'', [[spoiler:Sturm]]'s "mind-lock" prevents him from remembering his life before his capture, though he has formed
repressed memories since.
* In ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'', magical therapists sometimes work through this. So-called "sowers of oblivion"
can make someone forget any person completely, provided bring them back. Of course, the fairies monitor most subjects of this to ensure that this never happens. And since they run a proper personal trinket is given away. Said trinket acts like huge {{Masquerade}}, the odds of a storage for wiped-out memory, so if wiped-out person touches it, fairie-induced amnesiac regaining their relevant memories all come back. The opposite is "sowers of memories" and they deal in {{Brainwash|ed}}ing {{Muggle}}s.
* Subverted in ''Literature/TheCurrentsOfSpace'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov.
are extremely low.
* In ''Literature/TheBees'' Flora's mind is wiped after she fails her second test, reducing her to the Literature/{{Deryni}} novels, level of her kin on the clergy assigned to Rhemuth's Cathedral surface. But something of Saint George herself lingers under the surface and Saint Hilary's Basilica (including Brother Jerome, her mind is restored after hearing the sacristan and Duncan's chaplain Father Shandon) are regular victims of this trope. A Transfer Portal is located in the cathedral sacristy, and another is in Duncan's study at the basilica; inconvenient clerics often must to be dealt with to maintain TheMasquerade and allow Deryni to secretly use them. Eventually, the issue is remarked upon: Duncan says of Shandon, "He's discreet and he's loyal——and I can make sure he doesn't remember anything he oughtn't. I don't like to do that, but sometimes there's no choice."
* Premise of the 1973 spy thriller ''The Tightrope Men''. The protagonist wakes up in a hotel room in Oslo, not only unable to remember who he is, but with an entirely different face and identity. It turns out that [[spoiler:he was kidnapped, brainwashed, and cosmetically altered to cover the abduction of the scientist he resembles. The only thing keeping him sane is that he still ''can'' remember some things, like his name, from his previous life -- the brainwashing was a hastily-done "butcher's job".]] The author Desmond Bagley said he thought up the most terrifying circumstance you could find yourself in and then wrote the novel around it.
** Bagley had previously used the amnesia motif in ''Landslide'' (1967), whose protagonist has forgotten all personal information, ''including'' [[MistakenIdentity his own name]], in a car accident. That he hasn't forgotten the geology he studied before the accident becomes a minor plot point. He may or may not be a guy who was a fairly sociopathic criminal before the accident -- two people were in the car and he doesn't know which one he is. [[spoiler:He never does learn his previous identity, but he (and people who've come to like him) conclude that since he's a decent person now, it doesn't matter.]]
* Subverted in ''The Wrong Reflection'' by Gillian Bradshaw. TheHero wakes up not knowing his own face or history and not fully able to operate in society. He needs help in figuring out that he has basic human rights and in one example, doesn't know what an 'oak tree' is. He knows science inside and out but the concept of 'muzzling' is a mystery.
HiveMind.



* In the Literature/VorkosiganSaga:
** In ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Chief of Imperial Security Simon Illyan's implanted eidetic memory chip breaks down and has to be removed before it will kill him. Though he doesn't suffer any retrograde amnesia, for him to suddenly go from perfect memory to normal memory is treated as something almost as bad, and he does suffer from a period of anterograde amnesia for several weeks as his brain has to "relearn" how to memorize things for itself.
** In ''Literature/ShardsOfHonor'' Bothari is given a brutal drug-aided memory-suppression to remove politically inconvenient memories (mutinying and murdering his commanding officer, who thoroughly deserved it). He manages to hold on to a few memories, however.
*** Elena Visconti, a POW who had been raped and tortured by both Bothari and his CO, had her memories removed because the surgeons felt sorry for her. Of course, when she got home the psych officers promptly removed the blocks. Twenty years later, she's still a bitter, angry wreck. NiceJobBreakingItHero.
* In ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'', the fairies have mind-wiping technology which can be fine-tuned to suppress only specific memories.
** The process is not perfect, however. Exposure to stimuli regarding the repressed memories can bring them back. Of course, the fairies monitor most subjects of this to ensure that this never happens. And since they run a huge {{Masquerade}}, the odds of a fairie-induced amnesiac regaining their relevant memories are extremely low.
* In Creator/UmbertoEco's ''The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana'', the protagonist suffers from amnesia that leaves him with only his semantic memory, erasing whatever he had made a personal connection with. He's left with memories of the books he's read and of various subconscious procedures (e.g., writing his name on a check), but not of his wife or his childhood.

to:

* Lucy Pavlov of ''Literature/BlondeBombshell'' has forgotten about everything except the last five years. Her search for why is a large part of the plot.
* ''Literature/BreakingTheWall'': Early in ''Thirteen Orphans'', several characters are subjected to the spell that strips them specifically of memories pertaining to their shared heritage of descendants of an emperor and his advisers who were exiled from their homeland. All other memories remain intact, though when one of the antagonists, raised in this knowledge all his life, is hit by the spell he loses ''all'' memory.
* In ''Literature/BubbleWorld'', memory blockers were meant to erase players' memory of three weeks before entering Bubble World; instead they erased ''all'' of it. Freesia's comes back very gradually.
* In the Literature/VorkosiganSaga:
** In ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Chief of Imperial Security Simon Illyan's implanted eidetic memory chip breaks down
''Literature/CahillWitchChronicles'', the protagonists and has other witches are able to make people forget specific events. They use this to keep the fact that they are witches secret, to avoid being captured and burned at the stake. However, they cannot do this very often, as it uses up magic power, and they have to look at the person they are doing it to -- which is bad news for any witch who did magic in public.
* In Jeramey Kraatz's ''Literature/TheCloakSociety'', Shade can and does erase memories. [[spoiler:She erased the first six years of Mallory's life, and also all of Alex's memories of his nanny, because Alex had preferred the nanny to her.]]
* In ''Confessions of a D-list Supervillian'' Mechani-Cal used a device to help the world forget their addiction to the Defeated mind-control bugs. Later it is used on his new girlfriend and Superhero Aphrodite by her EX to forget her feelings for Mechani-Cal.
%%* Subverted in ''Literature/TheCurrentsOfSpace'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov.
* In ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'', the female protagonist is raped and impregnated by her father, and institutes this on herself to such an extent that she can literally remember almost nothing but her own name. Later, when the memories return by force, a DeusExMachina takes them away again until she can grow strong enough to deal with them.
* In the ''Literature/{{Deryni}}'' novels, the clergy assigned to Rhemuth's Cathedral of Saint George and Saint Hilary's Basilica (including Brother Jerome, the sacristan and Duncan's chaplain Father Shandon) are regular victims of this trope. A Transfer Portal is located in the cathedral sacristy, and another is in Duncan's study at the basilica; inconvenient clerics often must
to be removed before it will kill him. Though dealt with to maintain TheMasquerade and allow Deryni to secretly use them. Eventually, the issue is remarked upon: Duncan says of Shandon, "He's discreet and he's loyal —— and I can make sure he doesn't suffer any retrograde amnesia, for him remember anything he oughtn't. I don't like to suddenly go do that, but sometimes there's no choice."
* ''Literature/DianaTregarde'': In ''Burning Water'', Tezcatlipoca sets up a magical trap that has a similar effect to this trope. After Diana trips it during a mystic probe of one of the murder sites, she still ''has'' all her knowledge. However, she is unable to make the mental connections that will identify the murders as Aztec rituals unless someone else points it out or she gets a piece of information via clue-by-four.
* In the prologue of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', an Angel whose arrival on Paradise is witnessed by a farm boy wipes the memory of the encounter
from perfect boy's mind, but leaves everything else intact, making it seem as if the kid fell asleep on the job.
* In ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'', [[spoiler:the serum associated with the Abnegation can erase memories]].
* ''Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse'':
** Happens to the Eighth Doctor in the ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures''. Fitz initially [[LockedOutOfTheLoop tries to keep him this way]], as it's also a case of TraumaInducedAmnesia, following the Doctor's HeroicBSOD after the ''first'' time he [[WhereIWasBornAndRazed destroyed his home planet]], and Fitz is afraid he'll be even worse when he remembers than he was right after he did it. But, after a while, Fitz decides he's [[DiscussedTrope had enough of this trope]] and thinks the Doctor is just faking so he doesn't have to face the AwfulTruth:
--->"''You don't remember anyone or anything, except when you do, of course. You can't operate the TARDIS any more, except when you can. You don't know what happens in the future, except when you do. Drop the act, it got old years ago.''"
* In ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''
** Any use of mind magic, including memory modification, is against the Seven Laws of Magic. Violating this law can be punishable by death so the necessary magics are regulated by the White Council. However, this restriction only applies to human users of magic.
** [[IntrepidReporter Susan Rodriguez]] gives a year of her
memory to normal memory is treated as something almost as bad, and he does suffer from a period of anterograde amnesia Harry's [[OurFairiesAreDifferent Faerie]] [[TheFairFolk Godmother]], Leanansidhe, in exchange for several weeks as his brain has Harry to "relearn" how to memorize things for itself.
** In ''Literature/ShardsOfHonor'' Bothari is given
stop suffering the effects of a brutal drug-aided memory-suppression to remove politically inconvenient broken bargain. Lea takes all the memories (mutinying that Susan had of being in a personal relationship with Harry. She got better. [[FromBadToWorse Then it got worse]]. [[spoiler:Harry is able to get her to remember by invoking their love for each other]].
** Queen Mab, Lea's monarch, carefully strips [[spoiler:Harry Dresden of all his knowledge of fire-based magic
and murdering of his commanding officer, who thoroughly deserved it). He manages to hold on to a few memories, however.
*** Elena Visconti, a POW who had been raped and tortured by both Bothari and
blasting rod for his CO, had her memories removed own protection, because the surgeons felt sorry for her. his enemies could track any fire he cast and be on him instantly. Of course, when she got home the psych officers promptly removed the blocks. Twenty years later, she's still a bitter, angry wreck. NiceJobBreakingItHero.
* In ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'', the fairies have mind-wiping technology which can be fine-tuned to suppress
didn't tell him and it was only specific memories.
** The process is not perfect, however. Exposure to stimuli regarding
by the repressed memories can bring them back. Of course, work of God did Harry regain some of the fairies monitor most subjects missing memories]].
** When discussing ghosts with Lea, Harry learns ghosts are primarily made
of this memories. This leads to ensure Lea admitting that this never happens. And since memory is stored in more places than just the three-pound flesh. The Universe itself remembers. Within the current universe, if one looks carefully, they run a huge {{Masquerade}}, could find the odds beginning of the Universe. This leads Harry [[spoiler:to get a fairie-induced amnesiac regaining their relevant memories are extremely low.
ghost to push past the memory wipe done on him in his life and remember details about his murder]].
* ''Literature/EddieLaCrosse'': In Creator/UmbertoEco's ''The Mysterious Flame of Sword-Edged Blonde'', Queen Loana'', Rhiannon has always claimed to have no memories of anything whatsoever before the day she met her future husband, King Phillip. This doesn't matter much until she's accused of infanticide and black magic, which naturally raises questions about her character and history. It turns out that [[spoiler:she doesn't have any memories from before that because she wasn't originally human, being a goddess who deliberately chose to incarnate as a human without any memory of who she really was.]]
* In ''Literature/FalseMemory'', Dr. Ahriman does this to damn near everybody around him. He has all his patients and most of his staff conditioned to respond to code words, which allow him to put them into a hypnotic trance and make them do whatever he wants. Sometimes it's practical, but it's often really, really [[{{Squick}} squicky]].
* In ''Literature/TheFirstFifteenLivesOfHarryAugust'', this of two ways to essentially kill a [[BornAgainImmortality kalachakra]] is this: [[IdentityAmnesia The Forgetting]]. It involves a MemoryWipingCrew carefully attaching a number of electrical nodes to the head of the subject and injecting a chemical cocktail into their veins, which wipes the mind of the subject. The subject is then killed and reborn with no memory of previous lives (other than a strong sense of deja vu) [[spoiler:unless the subject is a [[PhotographicMemory mnemonic]] like Harry, with perfect recall of all previous lives, who by the end of the book has survived two Forgettings both at the hands of Vincent, although the book isn't explicit as to whether or not Vincent simply screwed up during the procedure]].
* Creator/SergeiLukyanenko's ''Literature/{{Genome}}'' features a progressive mindwipe (from birth to present, keeping the victim aware of the process) as capital punishment in a regicide case. The body is then sold to a willing bidder, although
the protagonist suffers from amnesia that rightfully assumes being the UnwittingPawn. [[spoiler: A fugitive transhuman female leaves him with only his semantic memory, erasing whatever he had made a personal connection with. He's left with the mindwiped transhuman male body and the stolen (or liberated) digital male personality of her [[TheChessmaster creator/lover]]. Now assume that said lover knows how to [[GrandTheftMe download himself]].]]
* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's
memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has a HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the books most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his badassery and various skills and languages he's read and of various subconscious procedures (e.g., writing his name on a check), but not of his wife or his childhood.picked up before the mind wipe, though.



* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's Literature/HumanxCommonwealth universe, a technique called "selective mindwipe" can be employed to surgically remove memories from a person's brain. The Commonwealth itself only uses mindwipe in cases of particularly heinous crimes, as an alternative to execution, but there are insinuations that it's used by less savory groups to prevent people from ratting them out. The most often cited use of mindwipe is on the members of the [[EvilutionaryBiologist Meliorare Society]].
* Creator/SergeiLukyanenko's ''Literature/{{Genome}}'' features a progressive mindwipe (from birth to present, keeping the victim aware of the process) as capital punishment in a regicide case. The body is then sold to a willing bidder, although the protagonist rightfully assumes being the UnwittingPawn. [[spoiler: A fugitive transhuman female leaves with the mindwiped transhuman male body and the stolen (or liberated) digital male personality of her [[TheChessmaster creator/lover]]. Now assume that said lover knows how to [[GrandTheftMe download himself]].]]
* The last three books of the ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series hinge on a spell that makes ''the whole world'' forget that one of the main characters ever existed, including fabricating memories to compensate for events she was present for or even ''responsible for'' and it makes people forget she exists right when they are looking at her. To the point of being able to literally walk naked down a crowded camp and almost no-one looking twice. Because of a contamination in the spell, though, it starts to unravel the world of magic as a whole.
* In Simon Hawke's ''Literature/TimeWars'' series, the 27th Century {{time travel}}lers have a LaserGuidedAmnesia technique they use on contemporary people who have been involved with them. However, in ''The Nautilus Sanction'', which involves the BigBad stealing a Russian nuclear sub, equipping it with a [[TimeTravel time machine]] and bringing Creator/JulesVerne on board, they decide that giving Verne amnesia might interfere with the creative mind, and so they arrange to keep an eye on his subsequent work.
* In Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/PuckOfPooksHill'', Puck makes the children forget meeting him each time they part, then restores their memories when he meets them again, to prevent their talking about what he told them. In the sequel, ''Rewards and Fairies'', they start trying to outwit him to hold onto their memories, but he's always a step ahead. The last story ends with the status quo in place, and it's not clear whether Puck will ultimately let them keep their memories or make them forget forever.
* In Creator/DanielKeysMoran's ''The Last Dancer'' an extremely long-lived (possibly effectively immortal) human from the distant past, future or a different time-stream (in-universe they are not substantially different concepts) arrives on earth several tens of thousands of years ago local time. Because of their long lifetimes, one of the abilities his society has developed is a method of "archiving" your own memories - like ZIP for the brain - so that your brain doesn't fill up over the eons, while still being able to retain older memories. Exceptionally long periods of meditation are required to organize and archive your memories in this way, which can result in a sort of self-imposed amnesia since you can decide what memories will get archived. He then suffers from head trauma that gives him LaserGuidedAmnesia and he mostly forgets his history, retaining the knowledge that yeah, he lives for a very very long time and a few scattered recent memories that he tries to piece back together over time. Averted in a sense because all his archived memories are still present, only it takes his brain a couple hundred years to heal over and recover the memories until he reaches a point where it all snaps back into place.



* The more recent ''[[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Star Wars]]'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] novels have Jacen Solo discovering a method of short-term memory erasure, which he uses to hide from his apprentice, and others, memories that would point to his being a [[spoiler:Sith Lord]]. It's called "rubbing".
* In Creator/JamesSwallow's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' novel ''[[Literature/BloodAngels Deus Sanguinius]]'', when Sachiel discovers Inquisitor Stele communing with a daemon, they inflict amnesia on him.
* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''[[Literature/ChroniclesOfChaos The Orphans of Chaos]]'', the five child leads are repeatedly targeted by LaserGuidedAmnesia whenever they discover their pasts, who their captors are, or how to remove the RestrainingBolt each of them has.
** Wright's ''[[Literature/TheGoldenOecumene The Golden Age]]'' opens with Phaethon first learning that he did something so disgraceful that he ought to be ashamed to show his face, and being urged by a Neptunian to flee at once to them, so they can repair his damaged memory and personality. Things progress from there until the plot verges on a GambitPileup.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', this is inflicted on Grey Knight aspirants, of ''all'' their lives before they became Grey Knights, as a means of protecting them against Chaos. In Ben Counter's ''Literature/GreyKnights'', Alaric explains that he had been taught that it would be done to him, but he doesn't remember being taught it. Then, [[IncorruptiblePurePureness none of them have ever succumbed to Chaos]], so it did have its benefits.
* Sharon Farber's chilling short story "When the Old Man Waves the Banner" is built on anterograde amnesia, induced with brain surgery; this being the only way the rebels can send an assassin to kill a dictator who can telepathically detect and deflect assassins. The protagonist has all his memories up to the operation, but can no longer recall recent events beyond the past 10 seconds or so. Against expectations, he survives after the assassination, with unfortunate consequences.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', this is inflicted on Grey Knight aspirants, Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' universe, a technique called "selective mindwipe" can be employed to surgically remove memories from a person's brain. The Commonwealth itself only uses mindwipe in cases of ''all'' their lives before they became Grey Knights, particularly heinous crimes, as a means of protecting an alternative to execution, but there are insinuations that it's used by less savory groups to prevent people from ratting them against Chaos. out. The most often cited use of mindwipe is on the members of the [[EvilutionaryBiologist Meliorare Society]].
*
In Ben Counter's ''Literature/GreyKnights'', Alaric explains Creator/SusannaClarke's ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', Mr. Segundus tries to remember his visit to Mr. Norrell's by writing it down. He finds that his memory changes every time he looks at it and finally concludes that he had been taught will never remember and burns his account.
* In Creator/DanielKeysMoran's ''The Last Dancer'' an extremely long-lived (possibly effectively immortal) human from the distant past, future or a different time-stream (in-universe they are not substantially different concepts) arrives on earth several tens of thousands of years ago local time. Because of their long lifetimes, one of the abilities his society has developed is a method of "archiving" your own memories - like ZIP for the brain - so
that it would be done to him, but he your brain doesn't remember fill up over the eons, while still being taught it. Then, [[IncorruptiblePurePureness none able to retain older memories. Exceptionally long periods of them have ever succumbed meditation are required to Chaos]], so organize and archive your memories in this way, which can result in a sort of self-imposed amnesia since you can decide what memories will get archived. He then suffers from head trauma that gives him LaserGuidedAmnesia and he mostly forgets his history, retaining the knowledge that yeah, he lives for a very very long time and a few scattered recent memories that he tries to piece back together over time. Averted in a sense because all his archived memories are still present, only it did have its benefits.
takes his brain a couple hundred years to heal over and recover the memories until he reaches a point where it all snaps back into place.
* Sharon Farber's chilling short [[Literature/{{Dragons}} The Last Dragon Chronicles]]: Happens to [[spoiler:Tam]] with regards, from [[spoiler:Zanna.]]
* In ''Lyra and Bon Bon and the Mares from S.M.I.L.E.'', the use of a mirror and a spell called Reflection Deflection induces this.
* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', it's mentioned that every time Jedao is attached to someone, their memories of that period are wiped out afterwards.
* ''The Recognition of Shakuntala'', an episode from the [[OlderThanYouThink Ancient]] [[UsefulNotes/IndianLanguages Sanskrit]] epic ''Literature/{{Mahabharata}}'' that was later [[AscendedExtra Expanded]] into a theatrical drama by the Indian playwright Kalidasa around the 1st century BC, is probably the UrExample of this trope. It's a [[BoyMeetsGirl Girl Meets Boy]]
story "When the Old Man Waves the Banner" is built on anterograde amnesia, induced revolving around a woman named Shakuntala who meets a guy named Dushyanta and they get married, only for him to get cursed with brain surgery; this being the [[EasyAmnesia Amnesia]] and completely forget her. The only way to lift the rebels can send an assassin curse is to kill show him the ring that he gave her, but she loses the ring in a dictator who can telepathically detect river. She eventually finds the ring by the end of the story, makes him remember, and deflect assassins. then they live HappilyEverAfter.
* In ''Literature/{{Matched}}'', everyone is required to take around three pills.
The protagonist red pill wipes your memory of the last 2 days. This is used to keep people from remembering things that are out of the ordinary.
* In ''Literature/TheMazeRunner'', every Glader
has had all his memories up to of his life before the operation, but can no longer recall recent events beyond Glade erased, save for their names.
* In Donald E. Westlake's final novel, ''Memory'',
the past 10 seconds or so. Against expectations, he survives protagonist, Paul Cole, suffers brain damage after the assassination, sleeping with unfortunate consequences.another man's wife. At first, he's fine, but as the story goes on, he loses most of his memory function. He can remember things, but they leak out of his head. [[spoiler:[[DownerEnding It does not end well.]]]]
* ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'':
** Prior to ''City of Bones'', Jocelyn brought Clary to Magnus Bane every two years to have her memories of the Shadowhunter world wiped.
** In ''City of Heavenly Fire'', [[spoiler:Asmodeus takes all of Simon's memories of Clary and the Shadow World from him as part of the deal to return everybody from Edom to Earth. This is both because he relishes human memories and he knows it will hurt all of Simon's friends, especially Isabelle, to be forgotten by him. Magnus is able to restore some fragments of Simon's memories, but for the most part he has to start over from scratch]].
** Magnus Bane can induce it, such as his work on Clary. However, he can't undo it.
* In Creator/UmbertoEco's ''The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana'', the protagonist suffers from amnesia that leaves him with only his semantic memory, erasing whatever he had made a personal connection with. He's left with memories of the books he's read and of various subconscious procedures (e.g., writing his name on a check), but not of his wife or his childhood.
* In Creator/ErinMorgenstern's ''Literature/TheNightCircus'', Marco uses his ability to remove memories frequently. [[spoiler:Chandresh]] in particular grows a bit unstable because of what he has to removed.
* ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'': Kellen Tavadon was made to forget [[spoiler:his older sister, Idalia, who raised him until he was six years old, after she was banished from the city of Armethalieh when she was sixteen for being a Wildmage. Even after he reunites with her, he's never able to regain the lost memories.]]
* In the ''Literature/ParadoxTrilogy'', this is one of the methods used by the Eyes to uphold the {{Masquerade}}. However, it doesn't always work, and those who regain their memories are KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade. [[spoiler:The protagonist, Devi, has her memory erased at the end of the first book, and regains it partway through the second]].



** In the Discworld novel ''Discworld/SoulMusic'', Death goes to join the Klatchian Foreign Legion out in the desert in order to forget his duties. It doesn't really work for him but the humans there have forgotten nearly everything, including their own ''names''. The only things they remember is the sand, you won't forget the sand.
* In ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''
** Any use of mind magic, including memory modification, is against the Seven Laws of Magic. Violating this law can be punishable by death so the necessary magics are regulated by the White Council. However, this restriction only applies to human users of magic.
** [[IntrepidReporter Susan Rodriguez]] gives a year of her memory to Harry's [[OurFairiesAreDifferent Faerie]] [[TheFairFolk Godmother]], Leanansidhe, in exchange for Harry to stop suffering the effects of a broken bargain. Lea takes all the memories that Susan had of being in a personal relationship with Harry. She got better. [[FromBadToWorse Then it got worse]]. [[spoiler:Harry is able to get her to remember by invoking their love for each other]].
** Queen Mab, Lea's monarch, carefully strips [[spoiler:Harry Dresden of all his knowledge of fire-based magic and of his blasting rod for his own protection, because his enemies could track any fire he cast and be on him instantly. Of course, she didn't tell him and it was only by the work of God did Harry regain some of the missing memories]].
** When discussing ghosts with Lea, Harry learns ghosts are primarily made of memories. This leads to Lea admitting that memory is stored in more places than just the three-pound flesh. The Universe itself remembers. Within the current universe, if one looks carefully, they could find the beginning of the Universe. This leads Harry [[spoiler:to get a ghost to push past the memory wipe done on him in his life and remember details about his murder]].
* In ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'', the female protagonist is raped and impregnated by her father, and institutes this on herself to such an extent that she can literally remember almost nothing but her own name. Later, when the memories return by force, a DeusExMachina takes them away again until she can grow strong enough to deal with them.

to:

** In the Discworld ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/SoulMusic'', Death goes to join the Klatchian Foreign Legion out in the desert in order to forget his duties. It doesn't really work for him but the humans there have forgotten nearly everything, including their own ''names''. The only things they remember is the sand, you won't forget the sand.
* In ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''
** Any use of mind magic, including memory modification, is against
L. Jagi Lamplighter's ''[[Literature/ProsperosDaughter Prospero Lost]]'', Tybalt, Miranda's familiar, says that the Seven Laws Eleusinian Mysteries were an attempt to gain the secrets of Magic. Violating this law the cats, and explains that everyone must drink from Lethe to return to life, except cats, who can be punishable by death live without that eight more times. (If a cat hasn't learned to stay out of trouble after nine tries, they figure he might as well start over.) The Mysteries tried to make the initiates Demeter's adopted children, and so the necessary magics are regulated Maiden's adopted siblings, so she would let them off out of nepotism.
* In Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/PuckOfPooksHill'', Puck makes the children forget meeting him each time they part, then restores their memories when he meets them again, to prevent their talking about what he told them. In the sequel, ''Rewards and Fairies'', they start trying to outwit him to hold onto their memories, but he's always a step ahead. The last story ends with the status quo in place, and it's not clear whether Puck will ultimately let them keep their memories or make them forget forever.
* In ''Literature/QuestionQuest'', Humphrey tells Lacuna that when Rose [[ItMakesSenseInContext went to hell in a handbasket]], he took 100 years worth of Lethe water to forget her, figuring he'd be dead and with her again
by the White Council. However, time it wore off.
* Creator/LJagiLamplighter's ''Literature/RachelGriffin'': In ''The Raven, the Elf, and Rachel'', Rachel suffers
this restriction only applies to human users of magic.
** [[IntrepidReporter Susan Rodriguez]] gives
near a year of magical tree. Given that her memory to Harry's [[OurFairiesAreDifferent Faerie]] [[TheFairFolk Godmother]], Leanansidhe, in exchange for Harry to stop suffering has always been absolutely perfect, this terrifies her. [[spoiler:Shortly after, the effects of a broken bargain. Lea takes all raven and the elf reveal that the raven's "Oblivion" is its chief tool to maintain the stability of the universe and protect refugees from other universes.]]
* In ''Literature/{{Relativity}},'' Sara has her
memories repeatedly wiped by a device from the future. After it's been used several times, other characters begin to realize that Susan had she's starting to lose bits of being in herself other that which was erased intentionally.
* In ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'', magical therapists sometimes work through this. So-called "sowers of oblivion" can make someone forget any person completely, provided that
a proper personal relationship with Harry. She got better. [[FromBadToWorse Then it got worse]]. [[spoiler:Harry trinket is able to get her to remember by invoking their love given away. Said trinket acts like a storage for each other]].
** Queen Mab, Lea's monarch, carefully strips [[spoiler:Harry Dresden of all his knowledge of fire-based magic and of his blasting rod for his own protection, because his enemies could track any fire he cast and be on him instantly. Of course, she didn't tell him and it was only by the work of God did Harry regain some of the missing memories]].
** When discussing ghosts with Lea, Harry learns ghosts are primarily made of memories. This leads to Lea admitting that memory is stored in more places than just the three-pound flesh. The Universe itself remembers. Within the current universe,
wiped-out memory, so if one looks carefully, they could find the beginning of the Universe. This leads Harry [[spoiler:to get a ghost to push past the memory wipe done on him in his life and remember details about his murder]].
* In ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'', the female protagonist is raped and impregnated by her father, and institutes this on herself to such an extent that she can literally remember almost nothing but her own name. Later, when the
wiped-out person touches it, memories return by force, a DeusExMachina takes them away again until she can grow strong enough to all come back. The opposite is "sowers of memories" and they deal in {{Brainwash|ed}}ing {{Muggle}}s.
* In the ''Literature/{{Slated}}'' series, slating wipes a person's memories clean.
* In ''Literature/TheSouthernReachTrilogy'', every returning member of the eleventh expedition into the EldritchLocation Area X reappeared back at their homes
with them.no memory of what happened in the area or how they'd gotten back.



* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** In ''Literature/LegacyOfTheForce'', Jacen Solo discovers a method of short-term memory erasure, which he uses to hide from his apprentice, and others, memories that would point to his being a [[spoiler:Sith Lord]]. It's called "rubbing".
* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', Dalinar Kholin (one of the four main protagonists) once visited the Nightwatcher, an enigmatic entity that will grant anyone who visits her some minor boon in exchange for exacting an approximately equal cost of her choosing. As a result, all memories of his late wife have been erased, and even her name just sounds like *sssh* when someone else says it. It is as yet unclear whether this was the price or the boon.
* The last three books of the ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series hinge on a spell that makes ''the whole world'' forget that one of the main characters ever existed, including fabricating memories to compensate for events she was present for or even ''responsible for'' and it makes people forget she exists right when they are looking at her. To the point of being able to literally walk naked down a crowded camp and almost no-one looking twice. Because of a contamination in the spell, though, it starts to unravel the world of magic as a whole.
* In ''Literature/ThoseThatWake'', everyone that ever knew Laura doesn't remember her at all, including her parents.
** In the sequel, ''What We Become'', Laura can't remember a thing about the previous book, and everyone she knows remembers her like nothing had happened.
* Premise of the 1973 spy thriller ''The Tightrope Men''. The protagonist wakes up in a hotel room in Oslo, not only unable to remember who he is, but with an entirely different face and identity. It turns out that [[spoiler:he was kidnapped, brainwashed, and cosmetically altered to cover the abduction of the scientist he resembles. The only thing keeping him sane is that he still ''can'' remember some things, like his name, from his previous life -- the brainwashing was a hastily-done "butcher's job".]] The author Desmond Bagley said he thought up the most terrifying circumstance you could find yourself in and then wrote the novel around it.
** Bagley had previously used the amnesia motif in ''Landslide'' (1967), whose protagonist has forgotten all personal information, ''including'' [[MistakenIdentity his own name]], in a car accident. That he hasn't forgotten the geology he studied before the accident becomes a minor plot point. He may or may not be a guy who was a fairly sociopathic criminal before the accident -- two people were in the car and he doesn't know which one he is. [[spoiler:He never does learn his previous identity, but he (and people who've come to like him) conclude that since he's a decent person now, it doesn't matter.]]
* In Simon Hawke's ''Literature/TimeWars'' series, the 27th Century {{time travel}}lers have a LaserGuidedAmnesia technique they use on contemporary people who have been involved with them. However, in ''The Nautilus Sanction'', which involves the BigBad stealing a Russian nuclear sub, equipping it with a [[TimeTravel time machine]] and bringing Creator/JulesVerne on board, they decide that giving Verne amnesia might interfere with the creative mind, and so they arrange to keep an eye on his subsequent work.
* In Creator/RuthFrancesLong's ''Literature/TheTreacheryOfBeautifulThings'', the nix makes Jenny forget Jack. Later, the potion to put Jenny into a delusion is called Lethe water; though she breaks through, that may be her power as the May Queen. [[spoiler:In the {{denouement}}, Jack has forgotten until he meets her.]]
* In the 13th century ''Literature/VolsungaSaga'', the evil queen Grimhild serves an oblivion potion to the hero Sigurd that makes him forget his fiancé Brynhild, but nothing else.
* In the Literature/VorkosiganSaga:
** In ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Chief of Imperial Security Simon Illyan's implanted eidetic memory chip breaks down and has to be removed before it will kill him. Though he doesn't suffer any retrograde amnesia, for him to suddenly go from perfect memory to normal memory is treated as something almost as bad, and he does suffer from a period of anterograde amnesia for several weeks as his brain has to "relearn" how to memorize things for itself.
** In ''Literature/ShardsOfHonor'' Bothari is given a brutal drug-aided memory-suppression to remove politically inconvenient memories (mutinying and murdering his commanding officer, who thoroughly deserved it). He manages to hold on to a few memories, however.
*** Elena Visconti, a POW who had been raped and tortured by both Bothari and his CO, had her memories removed because the surgeons felt sorry for her. Of course, when she got home the psych officers promptly removed the blocks. Twenty years later, she's still a bitter, angry wreck. NiceJobBreakingItHero.
* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'':
** This is inflicted on Grey Knight aspirants, of ''all'' their lives before they became Grey Knights, as a means of protecting them against Chaos. In Ben Counter's ''Literature/GreyKnights'', Alaric explains that he had been taught that it would be done to him, but he doesn't remember being taught it. Then, [[IncorruptiblePurePureness none of them have ever succumbed to Chaos]], so it did have its benefits.
** In Creator/JamesSwallow's ''Literature/BloodAngels'' novel ''Deus Sanguinius'', when Sachiel discovers Inquisitor Stele communing with a daemon, they inflict amnesia on him.
** In Creator/DanAbnett's ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novel ''Traitor General'', [[spoiler:Sturm]]'s "mind-lock" prevents him from remembering his life before his capture, though he has formed memories since.
* Sharon Farber's chilling short story "When the Old Man Waves the Banner" is built on anterograde amnesia, induced with brain surgery; this being the only way the rebels can send an assassin to kill a dictator who can telepathically detect and deflect assassins. The protagonist has all his memories up to the operation, but can no longer recall recent events beyond the past 10 seconds or so. Against expectations, he survives after the assassination, with unfortunate consequences.



* In L. Jagi Lamplighter's ''[[Literature/ProsperosDaughter Prospero Lost]]'', Tybalt, Miranda's familiar, says that the Eleusian Mysteries were an attempt to gain the secrets of the cats, and explains that everyone must drink from Lethe to return to life, except cats, who can live without that eight more times. (If a cat hasn't learned to stay out of trouble after nine tries, they figure he might as well start over.) The Mysteries tried to make the initiates Demeter's adopted children, and so the Maiden's adopted siblings, so she would let them off out of nepotism.
* In Donald E. Westlake's final novel, ''Memory'', the protagonist, Paul Cole, suffers brain damage after sleeping with another man's wife. At first, he's fine, but as the story goes on, he loses most of his memory function. He can remember things, but they leak out of his head. [[spoiler:[[DownerEnding It does not end well.]]]]
* In ''Literature/{{Matched}}'', everyone is required to take around three pills. The red pill wipes your memory of the last 2 days. This is used to keep people from remembering things that are out of the ordinary.
* In ''Literature/FalseMemory'', Dr. Ahriman does this to damn near everybody around him. He has all his patients and most of his staff conditioned to respond to code words, which allow him to put them into a hypnotic trance and make them do whatever he wants. Sometimes it's practical, but it's often really, really [[{{Squick}} squicky]].
* Happens to the Eighth Doctor in the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures. Fitz initially [[LockedOutOfTheLoop tries to keep him this way]], as it's also a case of TraumaInducedAmnesia, following the Doctor's HeroicBSOD after the ''first'' time he [[WhereIWasBornAndRazed destroyed his home planet]], and Fitz is afraid he'll be even worse when he remembers than he was right after he did it. But, after a while, Fitz decides he's [[DiscussedTrope had enough of this trope]] and thinks the Doctor is just faking so he doesn't have to face the AwfulTruth:
-->"''You don't remember anyone or anything, except when you do, of course. You can't operate the TARDIS any more, except when you can. You don't know what happens in the future, except when you do. Drop the act, it got old years ago.''"
* Early in the Jane Lindskold book ''[[Literature/BreakingTheWall Thirteen Orphans]]'', several characters are subjected to the spell that strips them specifically of memories pertaining to their shared heritage of descendants of an emperor and his advisers who were exiled from their homeland. All other memories remain intact, though when one of the antagonists, raised in this knowledge all his life, his hit by the spell he loses ''all'' memory.
* In the 13th century ''Literature/VolsungaSaga'', the evil queen Grimhild serves an oblivion potion to the hero Sigurd that makes him forget his fiancé Brynhild, but nothing else.
* In ''Confessions of a D-list Supervillian'' Mechani-Cal used a device to help the world forget their addiction to the Defeated mind-control bugs. Later it is used on his new girlfriend and Superhero Aphrodite by her EX to forget her feelings for Mechani-Cal.
* In Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/AWorldCalledMaanerek", the hero had his mind blanked to see what would happen in another culture. Then it was blanked again and the original restored. Turns out it wasn't as neat as they thought -- he remembers something both ways.



* In ''Literature/QuestionQuest'', Humphrey tells Lacuna that when Rose [[ItMakesSenseInContext went to hell in a handbasket]], he took 100 years worth of Lethe water to forget her, figuring he'd be dead and with her again by the time it wore off.
* ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'':
** Prior to ''City of Bones'', Jocelyn brought Clary to Magnus Bane every two years to have her memories of the Shadowhunter world wiped.
** In ''City of Heavenly Fire'', [[spoiler:Asmodeus takes all of Simon's memories of Clary and the Shadow World from him as part of the deal to return everybody from Edom to Earth. This is both because he relishes human memories and he knows it will hurt all of Simon's friends, especially Isabelle, to be forgotten by him. Magnus is able to restore some fragments of Simon's memories, but for the most part he has to start over from scratch]].
** Magnus Bane can induce it, such as his work on Clary. However, he can't undo it.
* In Creator/RuthFrancesLong's ''Literature/TheTreacheryOfBeautifulThings'', the nix makes Jenny forget Jack. Later, the potion to put Jenny into a delusion is called Lethe water; though she breaks through, that may be her power as the May Queen. [[spoiler:In the {{denouement}}, Jack has forgotten until he meets her.]]
* In Creator/ErinMorgenstern's ''Literature/TheNightCircus'', Marco uses his ability to remove memories frequently. [[spoiler:Chandresh]] in particular grows a bit unstable because of what he has to removed.
* In Creator/SusannaClarke's ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', Mr. Segundus tries to remember his visit to Mr. Norrell's by writing it down. He finds that his memory changes every time he looks at it and finally concludes that he will never remember and burns his account.
* In the ''Literature/{{Slated}}'' series, slating wipes a person's memories clean.
* [[Literature/{{Dragons}} The Last Dragon Chronicles]]: Happens to [[spoiler:Tam]] with regards, from [[spoiler:Zanna.]]
* In Literature/TheStormlightArchive, Dalinar Kholin (one of the four main protagonists) once visited the Nightwatcher, an enigmatic entity that will grant anyone who visits her some minor boon in exchange for exacting an approximately equal cost of her choosing. As a result, all memories of his late wife have been erased, and even her name just sounds like *sssh* when someone else says it. It is as yet unclear whether this was the price or the boon.
* In ''Literature/ThoseThatWake'', everyone that ever knew Laura doesn't remember her at all, including her parents.
** In the sequel, ''What We Become'', Laura can't remember a thing about the previous book, and everyone she knows remembers her like nothing had happened.
* In ''[[Literature/DianaTregarde Burning Water]]'', Tezcatlipoca sets up a magical trap that has a similar effect to this trope. After Diana trips it during a mystic probe of one of the murder sites, she still ''has'' all her knowledge. However, she is unable to make the mental connections that will identify the murders as Aztec rituals unless someone else points it out or she gets a piece of information via clue-by-four.
* Lucy Pavlov of ''Literature/BlondeBombshell'' has forgotten about everything except the last five years. Her search for why is a large part of the plot.
* In ''Literature/TheMazeRunner'', every Glader has had all his memories of his life before the Glade erased, save for their names.
* In ''Literature/TheSouthernReachTrilogy'', every returning member of the eleventh expedition into the EldritchLocation Area X reappeared back at their homes with no memory of what happened in the area or how they'd gotten back.
* In Creator/LJagiLamplighter's ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Raven, the Elf, and Rachel]]'', Rachel suffers this near a magical tree. Given that her memory has always been absolutely perfect, this terrifies her. [[spoiler:Shortly after, the raven and the elf reveal that the raven's "Oblivion" is its chief tool to maintain the stability of the universe and protect refugees from other universes.]]
* In ''Literature/BubbleWorld'', memory blockers were meant to erase players' memory of three weeks before entering Bubble World; instead they erased ''all'' of it. Freesia's comes back very gradually.
* In the ''Literature/ParadoxTrilogy'', this is one of the methods used by the Eyes to uphold the {{Masquerade}}. However, it doesn't always work, and those who regain their memories are KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade. [[spoiler:The protagonist, Devi, has her memory erased at the end of the first book, and regains it partway through the second]].
* In ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'', [[spoiler:the serum associated with the Abnegation can erase memories]].
* In Jeramey Kraatz's ''Literature/TheCloakSociety'', Shade can and does erase memories. [[spoiler:She erased the first six years of Mallory's life, and also all of Alex's memories of his nanny, because Alex had preferred the nanny to her.]]
* In ''Literature/TheFirstFifteenLivesOfHarryAugust'', this of two ways to essentially kill a [[BornAgainImmortality kalachakra]] is this: [[IdentityAmnesia The Forgetting]]. It involves a MemoryWipingCrew carefully attaching number of electrical nodes to the head of the subject and injecting a chemical cocktail into their veins, which wipes the mind of the subject. The subject is then killed and reborn with no memory of previous lives (other than a strong sense of deja vu) [[spoiler:unless the subject is a [[PhotographicMemory mnemonic]] like Harry, with perfect recall of all previous lives, who by the end of the book has survived two Forgettings both at the hands of Vincent, although the book isn't explicit as to whether or not Vincent simply screwed up during the procedure]].
* In the ''Literature/CahillWitchChronicles'', the protagonists and other witches are able to make people forget specific events. They use this to keep the fact that they are witches secret, to avoid being captured and burned at the stake. However, they cannot do this very often, as it uses up magic power, and they have to look at the person they are doing it to - which is bad news for any witch who did magic in public.
* In ''Literature/TheBees'' Flora's mind is wiped after she fails her second test, reducing her to the level of her kin on the surface. But something of herself lingers under the surface and her mind is restored after hearing the HiveMind.
* In ''[[Literature/EddieLaCrosse The Sword-Edged Blonde]]'', Queen Rhiannon has always claimed to have no memories of anything whatsoever before the day she met her future husband, King Phillip. This doesn't matter much until she's accused of infanticide and black magic, which naturally raises questions about her character and history. It turns out that [[spoiler:she doesn't have any memories from before that because she wasn't originally human, being a goddess who deliberately chose to incarnate as a human without any memory of who she really was.]]
* In ''Literature/{{Relativity}},'' Sara has her memories repeated wiped by a device from the future. After it's been used several times, other characters begin to realize that she's starting to lose bits of herself other that was was erased intentionally.
* In ''Lyra and Bon Bon and the Mares from S.M.I.L.E.'', the use of a mirror and a spell called Reflection Deflection induces this.
* In the prologue of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', an Angel whose arrival on Paradise is witnessed by a farm boy wipes the memory of the encounter from boy's mind, but leaves everything else intact, making it seem as if the kid fell asleep on the job.
* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his badassery and various skills and languages he's picked up before the mind wipe, though.
* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', it's mentioned that every time Jedao is attached to someone, their memories of that period are wiped out afterwards.

to:

* In ''Literature/QuestionQuest'', Humphrey tells Lacuna that when Rose [[ItMakesSenseInContext went Creator/PoulAnderson's "Literature/AWorldCalledMaanerek", the hero had his mind blanked to hell see what would happen in a handbasket]], he took 100 years worth of Lethe water to forget her, figuring he'd be dead and with her another culture. Then it was blanked again by the time it wore off.
* ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'':
** Prior to ''City of Bones'', Jocelyn brought Clary to Magnus Bane every two years to have her memories of the Shadowhunter world wiped.
** In ''City of Heavenly Fire'', [[spoiler:Asmodeus takes all of Simon's memories of Clary
and the Shadow World from him as part of the deal to return everybody from Edom to Earth. This is both because he relishes human memories and he knows it will hurt all of Simon's friends, especially Isabelle, to be forgotten by him. Magnus is able to restore some fragments of Simon's memories, but for the most part he has to start over from scratch]].
** Magnus Bane can induce it, such as his work on Clary. However, he can't undo it.
* In Creator/RuthFrancesLong's ''Literature/TheTreacheryOfBeautifulThings'', the nix makes Jenny forget Jack. Later, the potion to put Jenny into a delusion is called Lethe water; though she breaks through, that may be her power as the May Queen. [[spoiler:In the {{denouement}}, Jack has forgotten until he meets her.]]
* In Creator/ErinMorgenstern's ''Literature/TheNightCircus'', Marco uses his ability to remove memories frequently. [[spoiler:Chandresh]] in particular grows a bit unstable because of what he has to removed.
* In Creator/SusannaClarke's ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'', Mr. Segundus tries to remember his visit to Mr. Norrell's by writing it down. He finds that his memory changes every time he looks at it and finally concludes that he will never remember and burns his account.
* In the ''Literature/{{Slated}}'' series, slating wipes a person's memories clean.
* [[Literature/{{Dragons}} The Last Dragon Chronicles]]: Happens to [[spoiler:Tam]] with regards, from [[spoiler:Zanna.]]
* In Literature/TheStormlightArchive, Dalinar Kholin (one of the four main protagonists) once visited the Nightwatcher, an enigmatic entity that will grant anyone who visits her some minor boon in exchange for exacting an approximately equal cost of her choosing. As a result, all memories of his late wife have been erased, and even her name just sounds like *sssh* when someone else says it. It is as yet unclear whether this was the price or the boon.
* In ''Literature/ThoseThatWake'', everyone that ever knew Laura doesn't remember her at all, including her parents.
** In the sequel, ''What We Become'', Laura can't remember a thing about the previous book, and everyone she knows remembers her like nothing had happened.
* In ''[[Literature/DianaTregarde Burning Water]]'', Tezcatlipoca sets up a magical trap that has a similar effect to this trope. After Diana trips it during a mystic probe of one of the murder sites, she still ''has'' all her knowledge. However, she is unable to make the mental connections that will identify the murders as Aztec rituals unless someone else points it
original restored. Turns out or she gets a piece of information via clue-by-four.
* Lucy Pavlov of ''Literature/BlondeBombshell'' has forgotten about everything except the last five years. Her search for why is a large part of the plot.
* In ''Literature/TheMazeRunner'', every Glader has had all his memories of his life before the Glade erased, save for their names.
* In ''Literature/TheSouthernReachTrilogy'', every returning member of the eleventh expedition into the EldritchLocation Area X reappeared back at their homes with no memory of what happened in the area or how they'd gotten back.
* In Creator/LJagiLamplighter's ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Raven, the Elf, and Rachel]]'', Rachel suffers this near a magical tree. Given that her memory has always been absolutely perfect, this terrifies her. [[spoiler:Shortly after, the raven and the elf reveal that the raven's "Oblivion" is its chief tool to maintain the stability of the universe and protect refugees from other universes.]]
* In ''Literature/BubbleWorld'', memory blockers were meant to erase players' memory of three weeks before entering Bubble World; instead they erased ''all'' of it. Freesia's comes back very gradually.
* In the ''Literature/ParadoxTrilogy'', this is one of the methods used by the Eyes to uphold the {{Masquerade}}. However,
it doesn't always work, and those who regain their memories are KilledToUpholdTheMasquerade. [[spoiler:The protagonist, Devi, has her memory erased at the end of the first book, and regains it partway through the second]].
* In ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'', [[spoiler:the serum associated with the Abnegation can erase memories]].
* In Jeramey Kraatz's ''Literature/TheCloakSociety'', Shade can and does erase memories. [[spoiler:She erased the first six years of Mallory's life, and also all of Alex's memories of his nanny, because Alex had preferred the nanny to her.]]
* In ''Literature/TheFirstFifteenLivesOfHarryAugust'', this of two ways to essentially kill a [[BornAgainImmortality kalachakra]] is this: [[IdentityAmnesia The Forgetting]]. It involves a MemoryWipingCrew carefully attaching number of electrical nodes to the head of the subject and injecting a chemical cocktail into their veins, which wipes the mind of the subject. The subject is then killed and reborn with no memory of previous lives (other than a strong sense of deja vu) [[spoiler:unless the subject is a [[PhotographicMemory mnemonic]] like Harry, with perfect recall of all previous lives, who by the end of the book has survived two Forgettings both at the hands of Vincent, although the book isn't explicit as to whether or not Vincent simply screwed up during the procedure]].
* In the ''Literature/CahillWitchChronicles'', the protagonists and other witches are able to make people forget specific events. They use this to keep the fact that they are witches secret, to avoid being captured and burned at the stake. However, they cannot do this very often, as it uses up magic power, and they have to look at the person they are doing it to - which is bad news for any witch who did magic in public.
* In ''Literature/TheBees'' Flora's mind is wiped after she fails her second test, reducing her to the level of her kin on the surface. But something of herself lingers under the surface and her mind is restored after hearing the HiveMind.
* In ''[[Literature/EddieLaCrosse The Sword-Edged Blonde]]'', Queen Rhiannon has always claimed to have no memories of anything whatsoever before the day she met her future husband, King Phillip. This doesn't matter much until she's accused of infanticide and black magic, which naturally raises questions about her character and history. It turns out that [[spoiler:she doesn't have any memories from before that because she
wasn't originally human, as neat as they thought -- he remembers something both ways.
* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''[[Literature/ChroniclesOfChaos The Orphans of Chaos]]'', the five child leads are repeatedly targeted by LaserGuidedAmnesia whenever they discover their pasts, who their captors are, or how to remove the RestrainingBolt each of them has.
** Wright's ''[[Literature/TheGoldenOecumene The Golden Age]]'' opens with Phaethon first learning that he did something so disgraceful that he ought to be ashamed to show his face, and
being urged by a goddess who deliberately chose Neptunian to incarnate as a human without any flee at once to them, so they can repair his damaged memory of who she really was.]]
* In ''Literature/{{Relativity}},'' Sara has her memories repeated wiped by a device
and personality. Things progress from there until the future. After it's been used several times, other characters begin plot verges on a GambitPileup.
* Subverted in ''The Wrong Reflection'' by Gillian Bradshaw. TheHero wakes up not knowing his own face or history and not fully able
to realize operate in society. He needs help in figuring out that she's starting to lose bits of herself other that was was erased intentionally.
* In ''Lyra
he has basic human rights and Bon Bon and the Mares from S.M.I.L.E.'', the use of a mirror and a spell called Reflection Deflection induces this.
* In the prologue of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', an Angel whose arrival on Paradise is witnessed by a farm boy wipes the memory of the encounter from boy's mind, but leaves everything else intact, making it seem as if the kid fell asleep on the job.
* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he
in one example, doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for what an 'oak tree' is. He knows science inside and out but the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his badassery and various skills and languages he's picked up before the mind wipe, though.
* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', it's mentioned that every time Jedao
concept of 'muzzling' is attached to someone, their memories of that period are wiped out afterwards.a mystery.


Added DiffLines:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E8TheLieOfTheLand "The Lie of the Land"]]: At the end, [[spoiler:after the Monks are forced to retreat from Earth, they make everyone but the main characters, who are immune, forget their six-month rule of the planet, using their RealityWarper powers to erase most physical traces of their reign.]]
3rd Jun '17 5:27:36 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn]]'', on the second playthrough, Ike regains a piece of his memory Sephiran erased from him to protect him and Mist. [[spoiler:As a child, he witnessed his father Greil/Gawain kill his mother Elena when unde the effect of the Fire Emblem itself, and went temporarily insane]].
* In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', [[PlayerCharacter The Avatar]] is afflicted by this and s/he ends up taken in by Chrom and his BadassCrew, the Shepherds. [[spoiler: With good reason: it turns out s/he is the ''ApocalypseMaiden'' of the game, whose future self (who was possessed by Grima, the fell dragon) was the cause of the amnesia in the first place when he/she tried to merge with The Avatar.]]
** Similarly, at some point the Shepherds can recruit a character named Morgan who ''also'' suffers of this. He or she can only remember one person: [[spoiler: his mother/her father... the aforementioned Avatar.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'':
**
In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'', on the second playthrough, Ike regains a piece of his memory Sephiran erased from him to protect him and Mist. [[spoiler:As a child, he witnessed his father Greil/Gawain kill his mother Elena when unde the effect of the Fire Emblem itself, and went temporarily insane]].
* In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', ** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'':
***
[[PlayerCharacter The Avatar]] is afflicted by this and s/he ends up taken in by Chrom and his BadassCrew, the Shepherds. [[spoiler: With good reason: it turns out s/he is the ''ApocalypseMaiden'' of the game, whose future self (who was possessed by Grima, the fell dragon) was the cause of the amnesia in the first place when he/she tried to merge with The Avatar.]]
** *** Similarly, at some point the Shepherds can recruit a character named Morgan who ''also'' suffers of this. He or she can only remember one person: [[spoiler: his mother/her father... the aforementioned Avatar.]]



* Played with in ''Snatcher'', where Gillian Seed and his wife, Jamie, remember nothing about who they are or where they come from, though they somehow find out their names and the fact that they are married.

to:

* Played with in ''Snatcher'', ''VideoGame/{{Snatcher}}'', where Gillian Seed and his wife, Jamie, remember nothing about who they are or where they come from, though they somehow find out their names and the fact that they are married.
19th May '17 11:48:17 AM MikeW
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** It's revealed that after a fight, the children of the Purple Man decided to "help" Matt by using a machine to broadcast their powers worldwide, telling everyone to forget Matt Murdock was Daredevil and DD was a hero. Matt himself didn't realize it until he went to visit girlfriend Kristen in costume and she was thrown, asking him if he wanted to leave a message with Matt. He went to Foggy to unmask, which caused Foggy to remember but Matt decided it was better Kristen and everyone else didn't.
** This leads to complications with those DD knows. Elektra no longer remembers so she thinks she was "cheating" on Matt when she was with Daredevil. And Spider-Man notices holes in his memory and forces DD to admit what happened (although not his real name).
16th May '17 9:35:26 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his {{badass}}ery and various skills and languages he's picked up before the mind wipe, though.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his {{badass}}ery badassery and various skills and languages he's picked up before the mind wipe, though.
14th May '17 11:58:35 AM Kakai
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* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]].

to:

* In ''Literature/TheGirlFromTheMiraclesDistrict'', someone has wiped out Robin's memories of his identity and his past, as well as his supernatural abilities (he doesn't know he has HealingFactor, for example), leaving only a few spots [[spoiler:that for the most part turn out to be fake memories implanted to keep him stable]]. He still retains his {{badass}}ery and various skills and languages he's picked up before the mind wipe, though.
* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', it's mentioned that every time Jedao is attached to someone, their memories of that period are wiped out afterwards.
13th May '17 1:54:50 PM nombretomado
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* In [[MyLittlePonyTheMentallyAdvancedSeries Rainbow Dash Presents: Spiderses]], Big [=McIntosh=], unlike Twilight, doesn't remember that he's in a story being read by Celestia. Celestia [[LampshadeHanging Lampshades]] this.

to:

* In [[MyLittlePonyTheMentallyAdvancedSeries [[WebVideo/MyLittlePonyTheMentallyAdvancedSeries Rainbow Dash Presents: Spiderses]], Big [=McIntosh=], unlike Twilight, doesn't remember that he's in a story being read by Celestia. Celestia [[LampshadeHanging Lampshades]] this.
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