History Main / LandmarkSale

22nd Sep '16 9:31:03 AM TheCheshireCat
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* And, in a subversion, a gentleman from Arizona bought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge_(Lake_Havasu_City) London Bridge]] and the city of London duly dismantled it and shipped it out to Arizona. (They built [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge another one]] in its place). Rumor has it that the purchaser was dismayed because he thought he was buying the much more iconic [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_bridge Tower Bridge]], though the Other Wiki insists that this has been Jossed.

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* And, in a subversion, a gentleman from Arizona bought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge_(Lake_Havasu_City) London Bridge]] and the city of London duly dismantled it and shipped it out to Arizona. (They built [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge another one]] in its place). Rumor has it that the purchaser was dismayed because he thought he was buying the much more iconic [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_bridge Tower Bridge]], though the Other Wiki insists that this has been Jossed. He also made a profit on the sale (the value of the bridge as a tourist attraction raising the value of the land where it was placed, which he owned), so it doesn't really matter whether or not it was the bridge he meant to buy since he still came out ahead.
19th Sep '16 3:31:40 AM DaibhidC
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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].

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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' ''ComicBook/ThargsFutureShocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
19th Sep '16 3:31:23 AM DaibhidC
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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].

to:

* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
18th Sep '16 1:34:32 PM DaibhidC
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Added DiffLines:

* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
31st Aug '16 9:50:17 AM Necrodomo
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* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]

to:

* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic Atlantic. The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]
31st Aug '16 9:49:23 AM Necrodomo
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* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the ''buyer'' is the con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the prince collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it worth far more than what he paid for the building.]]

to:

* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' is turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the Atlantic The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]
31st Aug '16 9:46:09 AM Necrodomo
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Added DiffLines:

* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the ''buyer'' is the con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the prince collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it worth far more than what he paid for the building.]]
2nd Jul '16 9:15:37 AM Andyroid
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* WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes loves this gag. In ''Bowery Bugs'' WesternAnimation/BugsBunny even successfully sells the Brooklyn Bridge after telling the story of how a man made a dive from it (after being [[KarmicTrickster hounded and tricked]] by Bugs endlessly).

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* WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes loves this gag.
**
In ''Bowery Bugs'' WesternAnimation/BugsBunny even successfully sells the Brooklyn Bridge after telling the story of how a man made a dive from it (after being [[KarmicTrickster hounded and tricked]] by Bugs endlessly).endlessly).
** In ''WesternAnimation/TheDucksters'', Porky Pig is a game show contestant who is offered such prizes as the Rocky Mountains, the La Brea Tar Pits, and the Rock of Gibraltar.
22nd Apr '16 5:06:55 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Those "name your own star" things you see on late-night TV (or in magazine adverts).

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* Those "name your own star" things you see on late-night TV (or in magazine adverts).adverts), [[http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/826/can-you-pay-35-to-get-a-star-named-after-you as our friends at The Straight Dope elaborate here]].
21st Apr '16 11:25:42 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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** The London Eye was also up for sale at the end of Series 1. [[HeyItsThatGuy Inspector]] [[Literature/HerculePoirot Japp]] fell for it.

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** The London Eye was also up for sale at the end of Series 1. [[HeyItsThatGuy Inspector]] Inspector [[Literature/HerculePoirot Japp]] fell for it.
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