History Main / LandmarkSale

2nd Jan '17 1:41:10 AM Borghen
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* Italian actor Totò sold nothing less than the Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) to a gullible american tourist in "Totòtruffa '62" ("Totòscam '62").
19th Nov '16 10:06:34 PM gemmabeta2
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TruthInTelevision in the early 20th century. Yes, there were actually people who were [[WhoWouldBeStupidEnough stupid enough]].[[note]] The attempt to sell the Eiffel Tower was helped by the fact that the tower was originally meant to be a temporary structure, so it wasn't too surprising that a company would be allowed to buy it, dismantle it, and use it for scrap metal. So yes, not as stupid as most fictional examples, who do not even have a whole show of governmental officials who want to do it discreetly.[[/note]]

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TruthInTelevision in the early 20th century. Yes, there were actually people who were [[WhoWouldBeStupidEnough stupid enough]].[[note]] The attempt to sell the Eiffel Tower was helped by the fact that the tower was originally meant to be a temporary structure, so it wasn't too surprising that a company would be allowed to buy it, dismantle it, and use it for scrap metal. Furthermore, the people "selling" the Brooklyn Bridge were not literally selling the bridge (and expecting the buyers to take the structure home with them); instead they were selling the right to collect tolls over it. So yes, not as stupid as most fictional examples, who do not even have a whole show of governmental officials who want to do it discreetly.[[/note]]
10th Oct '16 5:33:39 PM HeroGal2347
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* ''Series/TheATeam'': In the episode "[[Recap/TheATeamS4E5TheRoadToHope The Road to Hope]]", Hannibal, discussing how suspicious their latest client is, says she should be selling the Brooklyn bridge. Face [[ComicallyMissingThePoint responds that the Brooklyn bridge goes for more than she's offering]], which he knows [[ConMan thanks to pulling that particular con himself]].
22nd Sep '16 9:31:03 AM TheCheshireCat
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* And, in a subversion, a gentleman from Arizona bought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge_(Lake_Havasu_City) London Bridge]] and the city of London duly dismantled it and shipped it out to Arizona. (They built [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge another one]] in its place). Rumor has it that the purchaser was dismayed because he thought he was buying the much more iconic [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_bridge Tower Bridge]], though the Other Wiki insists that this has been Jossed.

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* And, in a subversion, a gentleman from Arizona bought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge_(Lake_Havasu_City) London Bridge]] and the city of London duly dismantled it and shipped it out to Arizona. (They built [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Bridge another one]] in its place). Rumor has it that the purchaser was dismayed because he thought he was buying the much more iconic [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_bridge Tower Bridge]], though the Other Wiki insists that this has been Jossed. He also made a profit on the sale (the value of the bridge as a tourist attraction raising the value of the land where it was placed, which he owned), so it doesn't really matter whether or not it was the bridge he meant to buy since he still came out ahead.
19th Sep '16 3:31:40 AM DaibhidC
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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].

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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' ''ComicBook/ThargsFutureShocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
19th Sep '16 3:31:23 AM DaibhidC
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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].

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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future ''ComicBook/ThargsFuture Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
18th Sep '16 1:34:32 PM DaibhidC
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* In Creator/AlanMoore's ''Future Shocks'' strip "Grawks Bearing Gifts" in ''Comicbook/TwoThousandAD'', the Grawks are alien (and stereotypically Australian) tourists, who have people lining up to play this con on them, until [[spoiler: they reveal that under Galactic Law ''all these sales are valid'', and they now own the planet]].
31st Aug '16 9:50:17 AM Necrodomo
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* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]

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* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic Atlantic. The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]
31st Aug '16 9:49:23 AM Necrodomo
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* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the ''buyer'' is the con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the prince collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it worth far more than what he paid for the building.]]

to:

* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is consists of detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what the many steps that this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted require. This trope is ultimately subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the that [[spoiler:the ''buyer'' is turns out to be the real con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the Atlantic The prince then collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it - a policy worth far more than what he had paid for the building.]]
31st Aug '16 9:46:09 AM Necrodomo
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Added DiffLines:

* David Macaulay's lavishly illustrated series of young adult books on the construction of various types of buildings (''Castle'', ''Cathedral'', ''City'', and so forth) has a book entitled ''Unbuilding'' that plays with this trope. The plot revolves around an elaborate scheme by a Middle Eastern prince to buy the Empire State Building, dismantle it piece by piece, and ship it overseas to be rebuilt as a landmark in his home country. Most of the book is detailed descriptions and intricate illustrations of what this enormous disassembly process would take. Subverted in that[[spoiler: in this case, the ''buyer'' is the con artist. At the end of the book, the ship carrying the pieces of the Empire State Building mysteriously sinks in the Atlantic, and the prince collects on an insurance policy that he had taken out on it worth far more than what he paid for the building.]]
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