History Main / KingBobTheNth

23rd Nov '16 1:07:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* Played straight in the ''GeneCatlow'' fanfic The Basalt City Chronicles, in which Priest-Emperor Zaykar Kh'Naral is the 24th of that name. His grandfather was Rraghan Kh'Naral CDLXVII (The 467th). It's said that their dynasty reaches back into prehistoric times.

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* Played straight in the ''GeneCatlow'' ''Webcomic/GeneCatlow'' fanfic The Basalt City Chronicles, in which Priest-Emperor Zaykar Kh'Naral is the 24th of that name. His grandfather was Rraghan Kh'Naral CDLXVII (The 467th). It's said that their dynasty reaches back into prehistoric times.
8th Nov '16 4:04:25 AM MrInitialMan
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** They also seem to think that Polgara and Belgarath are hereditary names, and so the current one has an ordinal up in the hundreds--because the Tolnedrans can't wrap their minds around the fact that it's been the same two people all along.
3rd Sep '16 11:01:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* The numbering of the kings and emperors of the HolyRomanEmpire not surprisingly is a bit chaotic, even though the ordinal numbers go up as high as 7 (Henry (Heinrich) VII and Charles (Karl) VII); whether a king was crowned Holy Roman Emperor or not did not affect the ordinal number. However, as at various points you had a ruler appointing his eldest son co-ruler and having him crowned during his lifetime in a bid to turn the elective monarchy into a hereditary one or two rulers vying for the title, often when either the great feudal lords or the pope set up an "anti-emperor". Co-rulers who predeceased their fathers and anti-emperors usually did have a number assigned to them, but that rule was not strictly enforced. In one case they may also have forgotten that there already was a king or emperor of the same name and number, thus the list includes two rulers called Louis (Ludwig) IV, to wit Louis the Child (r. 900-911) and Louis the Bavarian (1314-1347). There are also rulers listed as Henry (VI.) (crowned in 1147 as co-ruler of Conrad III, but predeceased him) and one called Henry (VII.) (he was the son of Frederick II, crowned as co-emperor in 1222, but deposed by his father after he rebelled against him) as well as Henry VI (1169-1197) and Henry VII (1308-1313). Another complication occurred when Frederick of Habsburg came to the throne: when he was made king in 1440, he was assigned the number IV, counting his Habsburg predecessor Frederick the Fair (anti-king to Louis IV the Bavarian 1314-1330) as legitimate, but when he was crowned as Holy Roman Emperor in 1452 he was renumbered Frederick III.

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* The numbering of the kings and emperors of the HolyRomanEmpire UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire not surprisingly is a bit chaotic, even though the ordinal numbers go up as high as 7 (Henry (Heinrich) VII and Charles (Karl) VII); whether a king was crowned Holy Roman Emperor or not did not affect the ordinal number. However, as at various points you had a ruler appointing his eldest son co-ruler and having him crowned during his lifetime in a bid to turn the elective monarchy into a hereditary one or two rulers vying for the title, often when either the great feudal lords or the pope set up an "anti-emperor". Co-rulers who predeceased their fathers and anti-emperors usually did have a number assigned to them, but that rule was not strictly enforced. In one case they may also have forgotten that there already was a king or emperor of the same name and number, thus the list includes two rulers called Louis (Ludwig) IV, to wit Louis the Child (r. 900-911) and Louis the Bavarian (1314-1347). There are also rulers listed as Henry (VI.) (crowned in 1147 as co-ruler of Conrad III, but predeceased him) and one called Henry (VII.) (he was the son of Frederick II, crowned as co-emperor in 1222, but deposed by his father after he rebelled against him) as well as Henry VI (1169-1197) and Henry VII (1308-1313). Another complication occurred when Frederick of Habsburg came to the throne: when he was made king in 1440, he was assigned the number IV, counting his Habsburg predecessor Frederick the Fair (anti-king to Louis IV the Bavarian 1314-1330) as legitimate, but when he was crowned as Holy Roman Emperor in 1452 he was renumbered Frederick III.
30th Aug '16 1:00:50 PM Morgenthaler
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* In the ''{{Worldwar}}'' series by Creator/HarryTurtledove, the Race is governed by a 50,000 year old imperial dynasty headed by the Ssumaz family. The current emperor is "37th Emperor Risson".

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* In the ''{{Worldwar}}'' ''Literature/{{Worldwar}}'' series by Creator/HarryTurtledove, the Race is governed by a 50,000 year old imperial dynasty headed by the Ssumaz family. The current emperor is "37th Emperor Risson".
16th Aug '16 11:50:18 PM PaulA
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* Non-aristocratic examples:
** ''Diplomatic Immunity'', a novel of the Literature/VorkosiganSaga, reveals that the Quaddies - a society only a couple of centuries old - have no surnames, so they add numbers for disambiguation. A major character is Garnet Five, who is never called simply Garnet in the story. There were at least four others when she was born, but she's not related to the any of them. The highest number mentioned is Leo Ninety-nine, the original Leo being a folk hero.
** In ''Literature/TheStarBeast'', John Thomas Stuart XI's family has kept up their naming tradition for a long time, despite various ups and downs. His greatgrandfather (VIII) was the explorer who found a dog-sized alien critter and brought it back to Earth as a pet.
7th Aug '16 10:19:33 AM Morgenthaler
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** ''Diplomatic Immunity'', a novel of the VorkosiganSaga, reveals that the Quaddies - a society only a couple of centuries old - have no surnames, so they add numbers for disambiguation. A major character is Garnet Five, who is never called simply Garnet in the story. There were at least four others when she was born, but she's not related to the any of them. The highest number mentioned is Leo Ninety-nine, the original Leo being a folk hero.

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** ''Diplomatic Immunity'', a novel of the VorkosiganSaga, Literature/VorkosiganSaga, reveals that the Quaddies - a society only a couple of centuries old - have no surnames, so they add numbers for disambiguation. A major character is Garnet Five, who is never called simply Garnet in the story. There were at least four others when she was born, but she's not related to the any of them. The highest number mentioned is Leo Ninety-nine, the original Leo being a folk hero.



* ''MisterRogersNeighborhood'' had King [[PunnyName Friday XIII]] of the Land of Make-Believe.

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* ''MisterRogersNeighborhood'' ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood'' had King [[PunnyName Friday XIII]] of the Land of Make-Believe.
3rd Aug '16 11:47:28 PM bwburke94
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Often, if a work wants to portray a decaying or at least very old kingdom with entrenched rulers, they will have a leader who has a number[[note]]called an ordinal[[/note]], after their name (e.g. King Bob IX). These are always written in Roman numerals and the large ones can actually be TruthInTelevision: France, for example, had 18 Kings Louises[[note]]technically they only had 17; Louis XVII never actually ruled but royalists proclaimed him the 'rightful king' from 1793-95 and when his uncle reclaimed the throne in 1814 he took the name Louis XVIII in deference to this[[/note]].

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Often, if a work wants to portray a decaying or at least very old kingdom with entrenched rulers, they will have a leader who has a number[[note]]called an ordinal[[/note]], after their name (e.g. King Bob IX). These are always written in Roman numerals and the large ones can actually be TruthInTelevision: France, for example, had 18 Kings Louises[[note]]technically they only had 17; Louis named Louis[[note]]Louis XVII never actually ruled but royalists proclaimed him the 'rightful king' from 1793-95 and when his uncle reclaimed the throne in 1814 he took the name Louis XVIII in deference to this[[/note]].
2nd Aug '16 9:31:19 AM JamesAustin
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* In the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever British peerage]], a hereditary peer of the realm gets a number with his ''title'' rather than with his ''name'': thus "The Nth Duke of Somewhere". If a title lapses and is later created again, the numbering starts over again. E.g., Andrew Russell is the 15th Duke of Bedford, of the Fifth Creation (1694) of that title; the First Creation was in 1414; and before that, there were two creations of Earls of Bedford, one of which remains as a subsidiary title of the Duke of Bedford, so the Duke of Bedford is also the (N+4)th Earl of Bedford, as the Dukedom was created for the 5th Earl. (This isn't entirely academic; if the male heirs of the first Duke ever die out, the heir of a younger son of the fourth Earl will become Earl ''but not Duke'' of Bedford.) The Duke is also the 15th Marquess of Tavistock (the title was given to the 5th Earl at the same time as his dukedom); however, the person usually who ''uses'' the title and is thus ''called'' Lord Tavistock is the Duke's (eldest and thus far only) son Henry, as a courtesy title--but although Lord Tavistock ''uses'' that title, he is not actually the 15th Marquess of Tavistock (which is his father) or the 16th (which he will only become when his father dies). Now, although Andrew Russell is (among other titles) an earl, he is not the Earl Russell: that's his distant cousin John Francis Russell, 7th Earl Russell, heir of a title created for the junior line descending from [[Creator/EarlRussell John Russell]], third son of the 6th Duke. On yet another hand, the Duke is also the 19th ''Baron'' Russell, a title awarded to his ancestor in 1539 for services to UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor...which is not to be confused with the title [[NamesTheSame Baron Russell]] ''of Liverpool'', which belongs to the descendants of an unrelated Victorian and Edwardian-era journalist and Liberal politician (the 2nd Baron Russell of Liverpool and the [[Creator/BertrandRussell 3rd Earl Russell]] sent a joint letter to the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Times]]'' in 1951 clarifying that "that neither of us is the other"). And now you know why it's critically important to include both the number and the full title when referring to British peers on first reference.

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* In the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever British peerage]], a hereditary peer of the realm gets a number with his ''title'' rather than with his ''name'': thus "The Nth Duke of Somewhere". If a title lapses and is later created again, the numbering starts over again. E.g., Andrew Russell is the 15th Duke of Bedford, of the Fifth Creation (1694) of that title; the First Creation was in 1414; and before that, there were two creations of Earls of Bedford, one of which remains as a subsidiary title of the Duke of Bedford, so the Duke of Bedford is also the (N+4)th Earl of Bedford, as the Dukedom was created for the 5th Earl. (This isn't entirely academic; if the male heirs of the first Duke ever die out, the heir of a younger son of the fourth Earl will become Earl ''but not Duke'' of Bedford.) The Duke is also the 15th Marquess of Tavistock (the title was given to the 5th Earl at the same time as his dukedom); however, the person usually who ''uses'' the title and is thus ''called'' Lord Tavistock is the Duke's (eldest and thus far only) son Henry, as a courtesy title--but although Lord Tavistock ''uses'' that title, he is not actually the 15th Marquess of Tavistock (which is his father) or the 16th (which he will only become when his father dies). Now, although Andrew Russell is (among other titles) an earl, he is not the Earl Russell: that's his distant cousin John Francis Russell, 7th Earl Russell, heir of a title created for the junior line descending from [[Creator/EarlRussell [[UsefulNotes/EarlRussell John Russell]], third son of the 6th Duke. On yet another hand, the Duke is also the 19th ''Baron'' Russell, a title awarded to his ancestor in 1539 for services to UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor...which is not to be confused with the title [[NamesTheSame Baron Russell]] ''of Liverpool'', which belongs to the descendants of an unrelated Victorian and Edwardian-era journalist and Liberal politician (the 2nd Baron Russell of Liverpool and the [[Creator/BertrandRussell 3rd Earl Russell]] sent a joint letter to the ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Times]]'' in 1951 clarifying that "that neither of us is the other"). And now you know why it's critically important to include both the number and the full title when referring to British peers on first reference.
25th Jul '16 12:33:39 AM sylviaviridian
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* In ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss'', we find out when his full title is used that Peony is Emperor Peony IX. His father was Emperor Karl VI, and there's a statue of a different Emperor Karl in Keterburg.
13th Jul '16 5:42:12 PM Shishkahuben
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** The Kings of the Andals, the Rhoynar, and the First Men in do this, sometimes more formally as "the Nth of his name." Since the books are set at the beginning of a new dynasty that comes from a different naming culture than the founding dynasty (Robert Baratheon was the first king of the Seven Kingdoms to be actually named Bob, not [[FaentastycLaenguage Jaerhaehaerysgargon]]), most of the kings we actually see are only the first of their name, but the previous Targaryen dynasty had racked up five Aegons, two Viseryses, two Jaeheryses, and two Aeryses.

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** The Kings of the Andals, the Rhoynar, and the First Men in do this, sometimes more formally as "the Nth of his name." Since the books are set at the beginning of a new dynasty that comes from a different naming culture than the founding dynasty (Robert Baratheon was the first king of the Seven Kingdoms to be actually named Bob, not [[FaentastycLaenguage Jaerhaehaerysgargon]]), Jaerhaehaerysgargon), most of the kings we actually see are only the first of their name, but the previous Targaryen dynasty had racked up five Aegons, two Viseryses, two Jaeheryses, and two Aeryses.



* In Creator/SuzetteHadenElgin 's Ozark cycle, the men of Ozark like to recycle names (as opposed to the women, who must be Properly Named by the Grannies from numerological principles), using numbers to distinguish. Complicated because the names are used just because someone likes the sound of them, and the numbers do not indicate direct descent, but just the number of times that name has been used... "John Jacob Traveler the Hundredth" means only that there were 99 John Jacob Travelers before him.
* In Creator/JohnBoyd 's LastStarshipFromEarth, numbers indicate descent in a professional "dynasty". However, priests, in a one-upsmanship contest between Irish and Jewish factions (ItMakesSenseInContext) bend this by simply counting the number of alleged priests in their families. The ludicrous Father Kelly XL "apparently decided to count his ancestors who were Druid priests."

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* In Creator/SuzetteHadenElgin Suzette Haden Elgin 's Ozark cycle, the men of Ozark like to recycle names (as opposed to the women, who must be Properly Named by the Grannies from numerological principles), using numbers to distinguish. Complicated because the names are used just because someone likes the sound of them, and the numbers do not indicate direct descent, but just the number of times that name has been used... "John Jacob Traveler the Hundredth" means only that there were 99 John Jacob Travelers before him.
* In Creator/JohnBoyd John Boyd 's LastStarshipFromEarth, Last Starship From Earth, numbers indicate descent in a professional "dynasty". However, priests, in a one-upsmanship contest between Irish and Jewish factions (ItMakesSenseInContext) bend this by simply counting the number of alleged priests in their families. The ludicrous Father Kelly XL "apparently decided to count his ancestors who were Druid priests."



** The Elves, in contrast, never reused names; there are several likely reasons for this, the most obvious being that they're immortal so it would be akward. Yet seven of the Ruling Stewards of Gondor were named for Elves of the First Age (Denethor twice, Orodreth, Ecthelion twice, Egalmoth, Turgon); one may wonder what the Elves thought of that.

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** The Elves, in contrast, never reused names; there are several likely reasons for this, the most obvious being that they're immortal so it would be akward.awkward. Yet seven of the Ruling Stewards of Gondor were named for Elves of the First Age (Denethor twice, Orodreth, Ecthelion twice, Egalmoth, Turgon); one may wonder what the Elves thought of that.


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* The City of Brass, capital city and trade center of the Plane of Fire in ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' is ruled by Hakim Khalid Suleiman XXIII. Outsiders, such as Hakim, a jinn, do not biologically age past a certain point, and may remain in power indefinitely, barring outside influence.
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