History Main / KillerApp

24th Aug '16 10:18:30 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card, along with a CD-ROM drive, became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to clones, [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips from a myriad of semiconductor manufacturers, but that's another story.

to:

* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card, along with a CD-ROM drive, became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to clones, IDE (later SATA) CD-ROM drives, [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips from a myriad of semiconductor manufacturers, but that's another story.
24th Aug '16 10:18:04 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card, along with a CD-ROM drive, became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.

to:

* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card, along with a CD-ROM drive, became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to clones, [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, chips from a myriad of semiconductor manufacturers, but that's another story.
24th Aug '16 10:17:22 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.

to:

* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card card, along with a CD-ROM drive, became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.
24th Aug '16 10:16:04 PM RAMChYLD
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* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.

to:

* The Sound Blaster card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port.port, and the necessary proprietary CD-ROM interface connector for hooking a CD-ROM drive up to, back when CD-ROM drives required a proprietary connector[[note]]and the only other option was an extremely pricey SCSI card with SCSI CD-ROM drive combo, since IDE CD-ROM drives didn't exist at that time[[/note]]. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.
23rd Aug '16 7:08:51 PM nombretomado
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* This trope is mostly inverted when it comes to Japan, as they have not taken to either system much like its competition. So far, the closest the 360 has to a killer app there is a hit game that boosts sales for a week or so then they fall back to just selling a few thousand a week until the next hit game. These "boost" games include ''BlueDragon'' (AkiraToriyama's involvement helped, too), ''AceCombat6'', ''VideoGame/TalesOfVesperia'' (which is the best-selling 360 game in Japan and was even sold with [=360s=] for a while, so it was a {{Fanboy}} issue when it was later ported to the [=PS3=]) and ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheLastHope''.

to:

* This trope is mostly inverted when it comes to Japan, as they have not taken to either system much like its competition. So far, the closest the 360 has to a killer app there is a hit game that boosts sales for a week or so then they fall back to just selling a few thousand a week until the next hit game. These "boost" games include ''BlueDragon'' (AkiraToriyama's (Creator/AkiraToriyama's involvement helped, too), ''AceCombat6'', ''VideoGame/TalesOfVesperia'' (which is the best-selling 360 game in Japan and was even sold with [=360s=] for a while, so it was a {{Fanboy}} issue when it was later ported to the [=PS3=]) and ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheLastHope''.
23rd Aug '16 10:02:44 AM SirBlah
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Added DiffLines:

** An earlier Killer App for the format was Series/PlanetEarth, one of the first nature documentaries entirely shot in HD and one of the first television series to take advantage of the new format. Unsurprisingly with all the SceneryPorn it contained it quickly became a chart-topper back in the early days of the format.
15th Aug '16 5:06:05 PM bt8257
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** ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' is the absolute [=GameCube=] killer app, its quality '''far''' surpassed its predecessor, and it's still being played [[TournamentPlay competitively]] more than 10 years after its release, a life of a FightingGame surpassed only by ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' by '''1 year'''.

to:

** ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' is the absolute [=GameCube=] GameCube killer app, its quality '''far''' surpassed its predecessor, and it's still being played [[TournamentPlay competitively]] more than 10 years after its release, a life of a FightingGame surpassed only by ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' by '''1 year'''.
14th Aug '16 4:23:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''AlienVsPredator'' and ''{{Tempest}} 2000'' were this for the otherwise ill-fated [[UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar Jaguar]].

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* ''AlienVsPredator'' ''VideoGame/AlienVsPredator'' and ''{{Tempest}} ''VideoGame/{{Tempest}} 2000'' were this for the otherwise ill-fated [[UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar Jaguar]].
6th Aug '16 11:16:01 PM DavidDelony
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* The Sound Blaster card was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.

to:

* The Sound Blaster card card, introduced in 1989, was not only compatible with the existing Ad Lib card, which already had support for a number of MS-DOS games, it also supported digital sound. The real clincher was the inclusion of a joystick port. This meant that only one card was needed to turn the boring, business-focused UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer into a game machine. Combined with the then-new VGA graphics standard, it was also an UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} killer, at least in the U.S. While the card was quite popular among PC gamers around the turn of the decade because the addition of music and sound made the games that much better than the old PC speaker, the card needed a killer app on its own. PC buyers weren't exactly keen on playing games on a joystick and the price wasn't really tempting. It wasn't until Myst was ported to the PC that the card became a standard feature in [=PCs=]. The Sound Blaster itself was soon made obsolete thanks to [=DirectX=] and generic sound chips, but that's another story.
4th Aug '16 12:47:39 PM Morgenthaler
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* Like the GameBoyAdvance, XboxLiveArcade has sold mainly on a stream of solid indie, ranging from ''GeometryWars'' to ''VideoGame/SplosionMan''.

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* Like the GameBoyAdvance, XboxLiveArcade has sold mainly on a stream of solid indie, ranging from ''GeometryWars'' ''VideoGame/GeometryWars'' to ''VideoGame/SplosionMan''.
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