History Main / KickedUpstairs

13th Aug '17 5:53:53 AM ANTMuddle
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* In ''Series/TheShield'' [[spoiler: this is Vic's final fate. In exchange for his confession, he stays out of prison - provided that he shows up for work at 9AM sharp for three years writing reports as a desk jockey.]]
-->'''Marita''': "It's suit and tie here, so on your lunch hour, go home and change."

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* In ''Series/TheShield'' [[spoiler: this is Vic's final fate. In exchange for his confession, he stays out of prison - provided that he shows up for work at 9AM sharp for puts in three full years writing reports as a desk jockey.]]
-->'''Marita''': "It's suit and tie here, so on your lunch here. Lunch hour, go home and change."
12th Aug '17 7:02:38 PM ANTMuddle
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-->'''Marita''': "We're suit and tie here, so on your lunch hour, go home and change."

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-->'''Marita''': "We're "It's suit and tie here, so on your lunch hour, go home and change."
9th Aug '17 10:52:18 PM Toadofsteel
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Added DiffLines:

** Trying to avoid this is how Riker ended up being Picard's XO for over fifteen years. He was repeatedly offered commands of his own, but kept turning them down because he felt being the XO of the flagship was more prestigious than captain of a small cruiser. Many people take issue with this, because he is effectively stalling the careers of those under him in doing so, with particular regard to Data. The Novelverse has him undergo a minor HeelRealization on this matter, which is how he ends up taking the post of the USS Titan.
16th Jul '17 10:24:12 AM nombretomado
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*** By the first half of the 20th Century, the House of Lords was clearly the subordinate House of Parliament, and any aspiring politician had to make their way through the House of Commons instead. However, this created a nuisance; until 1958, appointing a life member of the House of Lords was practically impossible unless you were making someone a [[BritishCourts Law Lord]]; a seat in the Lords came with a hereditary peerage which would be inherited by the Lord in question's son, along with the seat. Inevitably, some sons of Lords ended up wanting their own political careers, only to be effectively barred from doing so because their fathers died and they inherited their seats in the House of Lords. The most famous (and last) of these cases was Tony Benn, whose father had been a WW2 government minister who had been rewarded with a peerage for his service. When he died, Benn inherited the peerage and was stripped of his position as an MP. This was given an added dimension by Benn's own political stance: he was committed to the abolition of peerages and the House of Lords altogether. In 1963, a bill was passed allowing for the disclaiming of hereditary peerages, and Benn subsequently retook his position as an MP. This is, however, largely moot since the Lords Reform of 1999; as hereditary peers are no longer automatically Lords unless having been elected by other hereditary peers. A person in Tony Benn's position can just decide to not run for Lords, at which point they have the same right to elect and be elected to the Commons.

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*** By the first half of the 20th Century, the House of Lords was clearly the subordinate House of Parliament, and any aspiring politician had to make their way through the House of Commons instead. However, this created a nuisance; until 1958, appointing a life member of the House of Lords was practically impossible unless you were making someone a [[BritishCourts Law Lord]]; a seat in the Lords came with a hereditary peerage which would be inherited by the Lord in question's son, along with the seat. Inevitably, some sons of Lords ended up wanting their own political careers, only to be effectively barred from doing so because their fathers died and they inherited their seats in the House of Lords. The most famous (and last) of these cases was Tony Benn, whose father had been a WW2 [=WW2=] government minister who had been rewarded with a peerage for his service. When he died, Benn inherited the peerage and was stripped of his position as an MP. This was given an added dimension by Benn's own political stance: he was committed to the abolition of peerages and the House of Lords altogether. In 1963, a bill was passed allowing for the disclaiming of hereditary peerages, and Benn subsequently retook his position as an MP. This is, however, largely moot since the Lords Reform of 1999; as hereditary peers are no longer automatically Lords unless having been elected by other hereditary peers. A person in Tony Benn's position can just decide to not run for Lords, at which point they have the same right to elect and be elected to the Commons.
13th Jul '17 12:39:58 PM HiddenWindshield
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* In '''WesternAnimation/LeroyAndStitch''', Pleakley is promoted to the chair of Earth studies at G.A.C.C., the Galactic Alliance Community College, but he is disappointed to find that he doesn't give lectures or teach classes; his job title is supervising professor.

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* In '''WesternAnimation/LeroyAndStitch''', ''WesternAnimation/LeroyAndStitch'', Pleakley is promoted to the chair of Earth studies at G.A.C.C., the Galactic Alliance Community College, but he is disappointed to find that he doesn't give lectures or teach classes; his job title is supervising professor.
8th Jul '17 2:14:44 PM bfunc
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*** Since it is [[ResignationsNotAccepted technically impossible for an MP to resign his/her seat]] in the House of Commons, [=MP=]s who wish to resign are appointed by the Chancellor to "an office of profit under the Crown" which automatically disqualifies them from sitting. Thus, an MP who wants to resign is given a rather impressive LargeHamTitle with no duties or income, either "Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Three Chiltern Hundreds of Stoke, Desborough and Burnham" or "Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead." ''These'' positions are held until someone else wishes to resign, which may be mere minutes if someone else wants to resign. or, in the case of multiple resignations on the same day, the appointee can request the Chancellor release them from their "duties" within minutes of their appointment. This legal fiction is so entrenched that when Gerry Adams, a Sinn Fein politician who [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles didn't want to be an officer of the British Crown]] resigned his seat without applying for these offices he was appointed to them anyway, with an apology and a pittance cheque, since the office has to be "an office of profit", i.e. at least nominally paid, for the exemption to apply from the British government which stated that there was no other way in which he could leave the Commons.

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*** Since it is [[ResignationsNotAccepted technically impossible for an MP to resign his/her seat]] in the House of Commons, [=MP=]s who wish to resign are appointed by the Chancellor to "an office of profit under the Crown" which automatically disqualifies them from sitting. Thus, an MP who wants to resign is given a rather impressive LargeHamTitle with no duties or income, income[[note]]technically there has to be ''some'' income or it's not an "office of profit", but it doesn't have to be ... and isn't ... ''much'' income[[/note]], either "Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Three Chiltern Hundreds of Stoke, Desborough and Burnham" or "Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead." ''These'' positions are held until someone else wishes to resign, which may be mere minutes if someone else wants to resign. or, in the case of multiple resignations on the same day, the appointee can request the Chancellor release them from their "duties" within minutes of their appointment. This legal fiction is so entrenched that when Gerry Adams, a Sinn Fein politician who [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles didn't want to be an officer of the British Crown]] resigned his seat without applying for these offices he was appointed to them anyway, with an apology and a pittance cheque, since the office has to be "an office of profit", i.e. at least nominally paid, for the exemption to apply from the British government which stated that there was no other way in which he could leave the Commons.
8th Jul '17 1:59:03 PM bfunc
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*** The (unseen) events preceding the film are actually a lot more like the RealLife military, where it's generally "Up or Out" (if you're passed over for promotion twice, then congratulations, you're retired, whether you wanted to do so or not). There has been some criticism of this, but it's mainly focused on lower-ranking officers whose jobs are primarily technical (and there just aren't any positions available at a higher rank) as opposed to command officers.
27th Jun '17 2:21:29 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/AmericanPsycho'': Patrick Bateman has some sort of vaguely defined but lofty position in Mergers and Acquisitions that gives him a secretary and a nice office but requires him only to watch television and plan lunches.
27th Jun '17 2:16:32 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** At the end, his superiors show up in Sanford begging him to come back, realising that he was [[OneManArmy the only thing]] preventing London from being overtaken by [[NiceJobBreakingItHero a permanent crime wave]].
24th Jun '17 4:05:30 PM Statzkeen
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* Another example involving the American presidency: UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson supposedly said of his appointment of UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan as minister to Russia: "It was as far as I could send him out of my sight, and where he could do the least harm. I would have sent him to the North Pole[[note]]where no human being had ever been at the time; in modern terms it's more or less equivalent to "I would have sent him to Mars"[[/note]] if we had kept a minister there." Unfortunately Buchanan's constant KickedUpstairs status gave people the impression that he had extensive experience in politics. Instead of getting kicked out of politics altogether like he should have been, he eventually became one of the worst Presidents in American history. The [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar secession of the Southern states]] might have been crushed in 1860 were it not for Buchanan's dithering. By the time Lincoln took over as President, it was too late to stop the Civil War. Indeed, the main reason Buchanan was elected president to begin with was that, due to being ambassador to Britain in 1854, he was not associated with either side of the debate over the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

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* Another example involving the American presidency: UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson supposedly said of his appointment of UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan as minister to Russia: "It was as far as I could send him out of my sight, and where he could do the least harm. I would have sent him to the North Pole[[note]]where no human being had ever been at the time; in modern terms it's more or less equivalent to "I would have sent him to Mars"[[/note]] if we had kept a minister there." Unfortunately Buchanan's constant KickedUpstairs status gave people the impression that he had extensive experience in politics. Instead of getting kicked out of politics altogether like he should have been, he eventually became one of the worst Presidents in American history. The [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar secession of the Southern states]] might have been crushed in 1860 were it not for Buchanan's dithering. By the time Lincoln took over as President, it was too late to stop the Civil War.Confederacy had already formed. Indeed, the main reason Buchanan was elected president to begin with was that, due to being ambassador to Britain in 1854, he was not associated with either side of the debate over the Kansas-Nebraska Act.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.KickedUpstairs