History Main / Keigo

25th Jun '17 11:08:21 AM nombretomado
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The honorific ''o''- or ''go''- (or less commonly, ''mi''- or ''on''-), tacked onto the front of a noun referring to a person, it can mean respect. When the noun is an object, it is known as a 'beautifying prefix', and adds a sense of class to the object described, and makes the speaker seem refined. There are a few nouns (''ocha'' == tea, ''omizu'' == water, ''gohan'' == rice, et cetera) which are almost always referred to in this way. Certain nouns like 'sake' sound slightly vulgar without the ''o''- prefix, and dropping the prefix is mostly restricted to men in casual settings. One of the features of a KansaiRegionalAccent is adding ''o''- to words that Kanto speakers wouldn't, such as ''o-soba'' == soba noodles and ''o-mame-chan'' == beans (with [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseHonorifics chan]] added for cuteness.) The ''o'' prefix was also used in women's names: a woman named Matsu would be "Matsu" for her family and "Omatsu" for everyone else (unless another honorific was used, then the "o" was dropped). This has faded out of usage after WorldWarTwo.

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The honorific ''o''- or ''go''- (or less commonly, ''mi''- or ''on''-), tacked onto the front of a noun referring to a person, it can mean respect. When the noun is an object, it is known as a 'beautifying prefix', and adds a sense of class to the object described, and makes the speaker seem refined. There are a few nouns (''ocha'' == tea, ''omizu'' == water, ''gohan'' == rice, et cetera) which are almost always referred to in this way. Certain nouns like 'sake' sound slightly vulgar without the ''o''- prefix, and dropping the prefix is mostly restricted to men in casual settings. One of the features of a KansaiRegionalAccent is adding ''o''- to words that Kanto speakers wouldn't, such as ''o-soba'' == soba noodles and ''o-mame-chan'' == beans (with [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseHonorifics chan]] added for cuteness.) The ''o'' prefix was also used in women's names: a woman named Matsu would be "Matsu" for her family and "Omatsu" for everyone else (unless another honorific was used, then the "o" was dropped). This has faded out of usage after WorldWarTwo.
UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
16th Apr '17 10:33:10 PM WanderingBrowser
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Added DiffLines:

* In the Japanese version of ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', the Chinese fiancee Shampoo uses excessively formal/polite manners of speech to cement her FunnyForeigner status: as an AnimeChineseGirl, this implies that she only knows how to speak Japanese due to reliance on somewhat outdated tourist's translation manuals. In the English dub, this is instead changed to YouNoTakeCandle speech patterns, which indicates the "she's bad at Japanese" concept in a way that's readily graspable without needing to understand the different levels of language. Plus, it fits her status as an equivalent to the NubileSavage character.
24th Nov '16 6:23:02 PM Valiona
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* In ''Manga/FairyTail'', Wendy uses this on most people except for Carla, her long-time Exceed companion. When Sherria, one of Wendy's new friends, asks her how the injuries she sustained in their battle are doing, Wendy thanks her with "Arigato gozaimasu," prompting Sherria to lightly chide her a bit for using keigo on a friend, at which point Wendy sheepishly apologizes and says she can't help it.
6th Nov '16 1:16:54 PM wootzits
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* ''Manga/KeroroGunsou''

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* ''Manga/KeroroGunsou''''Manga/SgtFrog'': being a classical ninja, Dororo speaks extremely politely and self-effacingly.
14th Oct '16 11:26:58 PM PhysicalStamina
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* [[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/picturegalleries/9140782/Sign-Language-week-195.html?image=14 Because there are situations when an automatic translation is bad, please be careful]].

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* [[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/picturegalleries/9140782/Sign-Language-week-195.html?image=14 uk/travel/sign-language/Sign-Language-week-195/sign2/ Because there are situations when an automatic translation is bad, please be careful]].
28th May '16 6:14:22 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In the ''MahouSenseiNegima'' manga Negi usually uses Keigo with everyone other than very close old friends. This realization shocks the girls of his class when it is pointed out that he always uses Keigo with them but addresses [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend Anya]] much more informally, leading those with crushes on him to worry that Anya might be his "favorite girl."

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* In the ''MahouSenseiNegima'' ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'' manga Negi usually uses Keigo with everyone other than very close old friends. This realization shocks the girls of his class when it is pointed out that he always uses Keigo with them but addresses [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend Anya]] much more informally, leading those with crushes on him to worry that Anya might be his "favorite girl."
17th May '16 9:12:38 PM SamCurt
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* In ''Manga/ThreeLeavesThreeColors'', Youko despite being hit by a case of RichesToRags and thus no longer an {{Ojou}}, still speaks this, down to using "watakushi" instead of plain "watashi". Futaba is amazed to meet someone who actually ''talks'' that way too.
21st Mar '16 4:01:03 AM Adept
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* ''HanaYoriDango''

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* ''HanaYoriDango''''Manga/HanaYoriDango''



* ''KeroroGunsou''

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* ''KeroroGunsou''''Manga/KeroroGunsou''
22nd Feb '16 12:29:45 PM drewski
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(The ThirdPersonPerson aspect was added in the subtitles.)

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(The ::(The ThirdPersonPerson aspect was added in the subtitles.)
22nd Feb '16 12:29:13 PM drewski
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::(The ThirdPersonPerson aspect was added in the subtitles.)

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::(The (The ThirdPersonPerson aspect was added in the subtitles.)
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