History Main / KarmaMeter

8th Feb '18 6:15:43 PM nombretomado
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* In ''[[NexusWar Nexus Clash]]'', every character has a Morality score, adjusted in small or large ways by most of the actions they can take. The Elder Power [[KnightTemplar Namm]], the god of justice and morality, maintains the Karma Meter and requires that Angels stay on the side of Good to keep using their powers. His archrival [[ManipulativeBastard Tlacolotl]] ''also'' pays attention to it, requiring that Demons remain Evil to use ''their'' powers. [[spoiler:It's a trap. Namm defines "Good" as whatever will help him win the war no matter who gets hurt, and Tlacolotl is all too willing to egg his enemy on so long as Namm's zealotry produces an unending stream of wounded souls willing to turn demon for vengeance. Player characters have shed a great deal of blood, ink and tears trying - often unsuccessfully - to find definitions of good and evil that don't simply play into the agendas of the aforementioned deities.]]

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* In ''[[NexusWar Nexus Clash]]'', ''VideoGame/NexusClash'', every character has a Morality score, adjusted in small or large ways by most of the actions they can take. The Elder Power [[KnightTemplar Namm]], the god of justice and morality, maintains the Karma Meter and requires that Angels stay on the side of Good to keep using their powers. His archrival [[ManipulativeBastard Tlacolotl]] ''also'' pays attention to it, requiring that Demons remain Evil to use ''their'' powers. [[spoiler:It's a trap. Namm defines "Good" as whatever will help him win the war no matter who gets hurt, and Tlacolotl is all too willing to egg his enemy on so long as Namm's zealotry produces an unending stream of wounded souls willing to turn demon for vengeance. Player characters have shed a great deal of blood, ink and tears trying - often unsuccessfully - to find definitions of good and evil that don't simply play into the agendas of the aforementioned deities.]]
4th Feb '18 9:53:46 AM AHI-3000
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* As mentioned in the page quote, ''VideoGame/InFamous'' (as well as its sequels ''VideoGame/Infamous2'' and ''VideoGame/InfamousSecondSon'') revolves around [[BlackAndWhiteMorality binary moral decisions]] that affect the gameplay and story. The PlayerCharacter (Cole [=MacGrath=] in the first two games, Delsin Rowe in the third), can either choose to be Good (helping out civilians and cops, non-lethally capturing defeated enemies), or Evil (acting as a ruthless, selfish prick who casually murders anyone who gets in their way). The path they choose will give them different superpowers, and eventually [[MultipleEndings different endings]].
30th Jan '18 2:50:16 PM spooky_sombra
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', [[TheMostDangerousVideoGame Sburb]] seems to have a version of this to determine whether the death of a [[PhysicalGod God Tier]] player is [[HeroicSacrifice Heroic]], [[KarmicDeath Just]], or neither, [[KilledOffForReal killing]] off the player in question if their death falls under one of the aforementioned categories, or [[ResurrectiveImmortality resurrecting]] the player if neither criteria are met. [[spoiler: This system can be gamed, however, and numerous god-tier characters end up dying an unwarranted death over the course of the plot due to this]].

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', [[TheMostDangerousVideoGame Sburb]] seems to have a version of this to determine whether the death of a [[PhysicalGod God Tier]] player is [[HeroicSacrifice Heroic]], [[KarmicDeath Just]], or neither, [[KilledOffForReal killing]] off the player in question if their death falls under one of the aforementioned categories, or but [[ResurrectiveImmortality resurrecting]] the player if neither criteria are met. [[spoiler: This system can be gamed, however, and numerous god-tier characters end up dying an unwarranted death over the course of the plot due to this]].
22nd Jan '18 1:39:50 AM spooky_sombra
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', [[TheMostDangerousVideoGame Sburb]] seems to have a version of this to determine whether the death of a [[PhysicalGod God Tier]] player is [[HeroicSacrifice Heroic]], [[KarmicDeath Just]], or neither, [[KilledOffForReal killing]] off the player in question if their death falls under one of the aforementioned categories, or [[ResurrectiveImmortality resurrecting]] the player if neither criteria are met. [[spoiler: This system can be gamed, however, and numerous god-tier characters end up dying an unwarranted death over the course of the plot due to this]].
15th Jan '18 8:36:18 AM thatother1dude
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4 (then again, having better equipment means better loot to pilfer off their corpses.) If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers. Of course, any given trip through the subways of DC is going to result in some unintentional added saintliness for the simple fact that killing Feral Ghouls, which are everywhere in the metro stations, adds a little bit of positive karma.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4 (then again, having better equipment means better loot to pilfer off their corpses.) If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers. Of course, any given trip through the subways of DC is going to result in some unintentional added saintliness for the simple fact that killing Feral Ghouls, which are everywhere in the metro stations, adds a little bit of positive karma.



** ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' completely removes karma, partially because [[NoCampaignForTheWicked your ability to play as an evil character is pretty severely limited]] (except in ''Nuka-World'') and partly because the devs had a hard time finding an actual use for it in ''New Vegas''.

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** ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' completely removes karma, partially because [[NoCampaignForTheWicked your ability to play as an evil character is pretty severely limited]] (except in ''Nuka-World'') and partly because the devs had a hard time finding an actual use for realized it wasn't being used very much in ''3'' or ''New Vegas''.
14th Jan '18 11:36:15 AM nombretomado
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* Nippon Ichi games (''LaPucelle Tactics'', ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'', ''VideoGame/PhantomBrave'' and ''VideoGame/MakaiKingdom'') have invisible {{Karma Meter}}s that are affected by killing off your own teammates, an action that can easily be accidentally done, and a source of "easy" experience. This affects the ending in some of the games. The latest game allows you to follow a different path of the story after beating the game to be a bad guy. (Oddly, only demons are actually punished by the plot for doing this; humans get power-ups.)

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* Nippon Ichi games (''LaPucelle Tactics'', (''VideoGame/LaPucelleTactics'', ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'', ''VideoGame/PhantomBrave'' and ''VideoGame/MakaiKingdom'') have invisible {{Karma Meter}}s that are affected by killing off your own teammates, an action that can easily be accidentally done, and a source of "easy" experience. This affects the ending in some of the games. The latest game allows you to follow a different path of the story after beating the game to be a bad guy. (Oddly, only demons are actually punished by the plot for doing this; humans get power-ups.)
12th Jan '18 12:01:10 PM DeeeFoo
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* VideoGame/RedSteel features many one-on-one sword duels. If you defeat the opponent, you have the option of killing them or sparing them. Sparing them gives you Honor points. After learning Focus, you can choose to shoot an enemy's weapon to disarm them. Sparing them after disarming them will give you honor points.
14th Dec '17 11:02:19 PM LlamaAdventure
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4. If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers. Of course, any given trip through the subways of DC is going to result in some unintentional added saintliness for the simple fact that killing Feral Ghouls, which are everywhere in the metro stations, adds a little bit of positive karma.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4. 4 (then again, having better equipment means better loot to pilfer off their corpses.) If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers. Of course, any given trip through the subways of DC is going to result in some unintentional added saintliness for the simple fact that killing Feral Ghouls, which are everywhere in the metro stations, adds a little bit of positive karma.
29th Nov '17 10:26:32 PM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/CryOfFear'' more or less uses this idea, in the same manner as ''Franchise/SilentHill'', to determine which ending you get. There are technically two endings, one good and one bad. In any case, the bad ending has [[spoiler:Simon killing himself]], and just ''how'' bad it gets depends on two choices. If Simon [[spoiler:chooses to avoid fighting [[ThatOneBoss Carcass]] after Sophie's suicide, Simon kills Sophie [[IfICantHaveYou so nobody can take her away after he's gone]], and apologizes to his doctor Purnell for being too far gone to be saved.]] If Simon [[spoiler:chooses not to trust the Doctor with the only gun he can find after [[BagOfSpilling losing all his items in a train crash]], Simon kills Doctor Purnell in the ending, [[YouHaveFailedMe realizing that all Purnell did was give him the push he needed to end it all]] but asking whoever finds their corpses to not let Sophie know what happened.]] If Simon [[spoiler:does ''both'', he kills both Sophie and Purnell, hoping that the scene he leaves behind traumatizes whoever discovers it.]] If, however, Simon [[spoiler:chooses to stay and fight Carcass and trust the Doctor, he staves off of suicide - but he still suffers a horrific hallucination and guns down a pair of police officers during it.]] There's also a joke ending for collecting a strange package and putting it in a mailbox early in a NewGamePlus, which overrides your choices - [[spoiler:Simon arrives home just before the finale to see the package was delivered to himself. He opens it, finds a bottle of pills, and decides to take them, finding himself in the finale from the dev's previous mod ''VideoGame/AfraidOfMonsters'' instead, complete with [[GoIntoTheLight running towards a light at the end of a tunnel]]... only for that light to be the headlights of a car that runs him over. The scene goes back to the very beginning, the site of the car crash that lead to all the crazy things that went on throughout the game, and it turns out ''Afraid of Monsters''[='=] protagonist David Leatherhoff was at the wheel, apparently falling off the wagon after his game and being too stoned to drive properly.]]

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* ''VideoGame/CryOfFear'' more or less uses this idea, in the same manner as ''Franchise/SilentHill'', to determine which ending you get. There are technically two endings, one good and one bad. In any case, the bad ending has [[spoiler:Simon killing himself]], and just ''how'' bad it gets depends on two choices. If Simon [[spoiler:chooses chooses to avoid fighting [[ThatOneBoss Carcass]] Carcass after Sophie's suicide, it [[spoiler:apparently influences Sophie into [[DrivenToSuicide committing suicide]], Simon kills Sophie [[IfICantHaveYou so nobody can take her away after he's gone]], and apologizes to his doctor Purnell for being too far gone to be saved.]] If Simon [[spoiler:chooses chooses not to trust the Doctor with Doctor, who has so far done nothing but get in the way, [[spoiler:with the only gun he can find after [[BagOfSpilling losing all his items in a train crash]], Simon kills Doctor Purnell in the ending, [[YouHaveFailedMe realizing that all Purnell did was give him the push he needed to end it all]] but asking whoever finds their corpses to not let Sophie know what happened.]] If Simon [[spoiler:does ''both'', [[spoiler:both avoids fighting Carcass ''and'' refuses to trust the Doctor, he kills both Sophie and Purnell, hoping that the scene he leaves behind traumatizes whoever discovers it.]] If, however, Simon [[spoiler:chooses to stay and fight Carcass and trust the Doctor, he staves off of suicide - but he still suffers a horrific hallucination and guns down a pair of police officers during it.]] It crosses over with EarnYourHappyEnding as well, as the "good" choices in both cases make something more difficult about the game. The former is the more immediately-obvious one, as Carcass is [[ThatOneBoss one of the most difficult bosses in the game]], so it's nice for you to be able to skip it. The latter takes a while to fully play out, as the Doctor [[spoiler:shoots Simon in the shoulder after he makes his decision, permanently cutting the player's total health. If you refused to give him the gun, you lose less health from it, and you get to use it after defeating him in a boss fight. If you trust him, though, he cuts your health bar further, and deals greater damage per hit in the later fight, but you get his .357 Magnum revolver after the fight instead of the gun he wanted you to give him, which deals twice the damage.]] There's also a joke ending you can get in a NewGamePlus for collecting finding a strange package early on and putting setting it in a mailbox early in a NewGamePlus, mailbox, which overrides locks you into that ending regardless of your choices - [[spoiler:Simon arrives home just before ends up going through the finale to see the package was delivered to himself. He opens it, finds a bottle of pills, and decides to take them, finding himself in the normal finale from the dev's previous mod ''VideoGame/AfraidOfMonsters'' instead, complete with [[GoIntoTheLight running towards a light at the end of a tunnel]]... only for release ''VideoGame/AfraidOfMonsters'', and learns that light to be the headlights of a car that runs him over. The scene goes back to person behind the very beginning, the site wheel of the car crash that lead to all crashed into him in the crazy things that went on throughout introduction and set off the game, and it turns out ''Afraid entire series of Monsters''[='=] events was none other than ''[=AoM=]'''s protagonist David Leatherhoff was at the wheel, apparently falling off the wagon after - [[{{Retraux}} still appearing]] in his game ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'' style and being too speaking in text rather than voice, [[MythologyGag having gotten stoned before heading out to drive properly.drive]].]]
27th Nov '17 6:12:06 PM Kadorhal
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Except for the GoldenSnitch event, typically no act is more than three to five times more evil or good than any other. This leads to the odd situation where a character with a perfect record of finding lost pets and helping old ladies with their groceries can [[NoKillLikeOverkill bludgeon a school bus of Girl Scouts to death and pour napalm on their corpses while singing hymns to Satan and scarfing down a stack of Kitten Burgers]] and at worst go from "saintly" to "very good" on the Karma Meter. And unless the Karma changes are limited to plot events, go right back to "saintly" by killing some monsters or giving money to beggars.

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Except for the GoldenSnitch event, typically no act is more than three to five times more evil or good than any other. This leads to the odd situation where a character with a perfect record of finding lost pets and helping old ladies with their groceries can [[NoKillLikeOverkill [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill bludgeon a school bus of Girl Scouts to death and pour napalm on their corpses while singing hymns to Satan and scarfing down a stack of Kitten Burgers]] and at worst go from "saintly" to "very good" on the Karma Meter. And unless the Karma changes are limited to plot events, go right back to "saintly" by [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman killing some monsters monsters]] or giving money to beggars.



** In ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', if you manage to take down a Big Daddy that's guarding a Little Sister, you can chose to either kill the Little Sister, or "rescue" her by removing the symbiote that allows her to harvest ADAM. The first option earns you twice as much ADAM from each Little Sister, but the second option nets you occasional gifts from a benefactor who wants you to save them, in the form of ADAM and special plasmids. Whether you save or harvest Little Sisters also determines which of the MultipleEndings you get. This meter is terribly unforgiving: harvest just two of 21 Little Sisters and you earn the game's opprobrium.
*** There are two v/o files recorded for the bad ending in ''Bioshock''. Both have the exact same text, but the tone of voice is entirely different; if you only gave in to your lust for ADAM once, Dr. Tenenbaum sounds weary and resigned when describing your descent into evil, but if you've killed multiple Little Sisters, she's filled with righteous fury at you.
*** The aforementioned gifts actually render the karma meter meaningless, because it actually makes the choice mathematical rather than ethical -- killing the Little Sisters gets you more ADAM ''now'', but freeing them gives better rewards in the long run, in the form of more ADAM, plus plasmids and tonics you either no longer have to buy, or couldn't buy to begin with.

to:

** In ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', if you manage to take down a Big Daddy that's guarding a Little Sister, you can chose to either kill the Little Sister, or "rescue" her by removing the symbiote that allows her to harvest ADAM. The first option earns you twice as much ADAM from each Little Sister, but the second option nets you occasional gifts from a benefactor who wants you to save them, in the form of ADAM and special plasmids. Whether you save or harvest Little Sisters also determines which of the MultipleEndings you get. This meter is terribly unforgiving: harvest just two of 21 Little Sisters and you earn the game's opprobrium.
***
opprobrium. There are are, however, two v/o voiceover files recorded for the bad ending in ''Bioshock''. Both have the exact same text, but the tone of voice is entirely different; if you only gave in to your lust for ADAM once, Dr. Tenenbaum sounds weary and resigned when describing your descent into evil, but if you've killed multiple Little Sisters, she's filled with righteous fury at you.
*** The aforementioned gifts actually render the karma meter meaningless, because it actually makes the choice mathematical rather than ethical -- killing the Little Sisters gets you more ADAM ''now'', but freeing them gives better rewards in the long run, in the form of more ADAM, plus plasmids and tonics you either no longer have to buy, or couldn't buy to begin with. Not to mention you can also break the system by [[GoodBadBugs causing a pair of extra Little Sisters to spawn]], allowing you to reap the immediate rewards of harvesting two of them and still go for the good ending.



* ''VideoGame/CryOfFear'' more or less uses this idea, in the same manner as ''Franchise/SilentHill'', to determine which ending you get. There are technically two endings, one good and one bad. In any case, the bad ending has [[spoiler:Simon killing himself]], and just ''how'' bad it gets depends on two choices. If Simon [[spoiler:chooses to avoid fighting [[ThatOneBoss Carcass]] after Sophie's suicide, Simon kills Sophie [[IfICantHaveYou so nobody can take her away after he's gone]], and apologizes to his doctor Purnell for being too far gone to be saved.]] If Simon [[spoiler:chooses not to trust the Doctor with the only gun he can find after [[BagOfSpilling losing all his items in a train crash]], Simon kills Doctor Purnell in the ending, [[YouHaveFailedMe realizing that all Purnell did was give him the push he needed to end it all]] but asking whoever finds their corpses to not let Sophie know what happened.]] If Simon [[spoiler:does ''both'', he kills both Sophie and Purnell, hoping that the scene he leaves behind traumatizes whoever discovers it.]] If, however, Simon [[spoiler:chooses to stay and fight Carcass and trust the Doctor, he staves off of suicide - but he still suffers a horrific hallucination and guns down a pair of police officers during it.]] There's also a joke ending for collecting a strange package and putting it in a mailbox early in a NewGamePlus, which overrides your choices - [[spoiler:Simon arrives home just before the finale to see the package was delivered to himself. He opens it, finds a bottle of pills, and decides to take them, finding himself in the finale from the dev's previous mod ''VideoGame/AfraidOfMonsters'' instead, complete with [[GoIntoTheLight running towards a light at the end of a tunnel]]... only for that light to be the headlights of a car that runs him over. The scene goes back to the very beginning, the site of the car crash that lead to all the crazy things that went on throughout the game, and it turns out ''Afraid of Monsters''[='=] protagonist David Leatherhoff was at the wheel, apparently falling off the wagon after his game and being too stoned to drive properly.]]



* The ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' games have Mega Man turning light or dark through certain actions. Kicking pigs and donating to the church were the biggest ones. It doesn't affect the plot, except for some dialogue and weapon opportunities. This was later elaborated on in the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games, where "evil" Battle Chips darkened [=MegaMan=]'s soul and lowered his HP.

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* The ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' games have Mega Man turning light or dark through certain actions. Kicking pigs and donating to the church were the biggest ones. It doesn't affect the plot, except for some dialogue and weapon opportunities. This was later elaborated on in the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games, games from ''4'' onwards, where "evil" Dark Chips ("evil" Battle Chips Chips) darkened [=MegaMan=]'s soul and lowered his HP.HP by one point for every time he used one, in return for making them more readily available the more you use them(at positive karma they only appear when you're really in a bind; at sufficiently low levels, they're available whenever you want) and making them ''incredibly'' powerful, on par with [[LimitBreak Program Advances]].



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'' only offers a general karma meter. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' has the karma meter, plus an AllianceMeter. They also feature a series of status elements such as "grave robber", "child killer", and "slaver", depending on the choices made. Certain characters will react differently to different combinations of these -- for example, some stores will only sell to people with negative karma, [[EvenEvilHasStandards but still balk at selling to a child murderer]]. The only truly bad effect of negative karma turns up in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'', in which towns will pay for bounty hunters to attack the player -- but killing bounty hunters results in a further drop in karma, creating an unstoppable downward spiral...
** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4. If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout|1}}'' only offers a general karma meter. ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' has the karma meter, plus an AllianceMeter. They also feature a series of status elements such as "grave robber", "child killer", and "slaver", depending on the choices made. Certain characters will react differently to different combinations of these -- for example, some stores will only sell to people with negative karma, [[EvenEvilHasStandards but still balk at selling to a child murderer]]. The only truly bad effect of negative karma turns up in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'', ''Fallout 2'', in which towns will pay for bounty hunters to attack the player -- but killing bounty hunters results in a further drop in karma, creating an unstoppable downward spiral...
** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has drawbacks for both negative AND positive karma -- Talon Company Mercenaries will begin randomly spawning to attack you if your Karma hits Very High, while Regulators will start gunning for you if your Karma hits Very Low. Talon Company mercs are rather nasty, spawning with energy weapons, Combat Armor, and high-quality assault rifles, even if you're level 4. If there's a single subversion in ''Fallout 3'' of this trope, it's the Impartial Mediation Perk that offers +30 Speech...so long as you are Neutral. This is the ''only'' benefit offered in the game for staying Neutral, if you don't count the ability to recruit a few Neutral-only companions and avoiding energy weapon death at the hands of Talon Company Mercs or Peacekeepers. Of course, any given trip through the subways of DC is going to result in some unintentional added saintliness for the simple fact that killing Feral Ghouls, which are everywhere in the metro stations, adds a little bit of positive karma.



** ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' completely removes karma, partially because [[NoCampaignForTheWicked your ability to play as an evil character is pretty severely limited]] (except in ''Nuka-World'').

to:

** ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' completely removes karma, partially because [[NoCampaignForTheWicked your ability to play as an evil character is pretty severely limited]] (except in ''Nuka-World'').''Nuka-World'') and partly because the devs had a hard time finding an actual use for it in ''New Vegas''.



* In ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Deus Ex: Human Revolution]]'', an invisible, completely secret karma meter (based on how many people you killed) will flavor Jensen's ending monologue along good, neutral, or evil lines. For example, if you did a PacifistRun (or killed very few enemies besides the bosses), he'll say something about how he resisted the urge to abuse his power. The kill count will also affect some NPC dialogue and actions throughout the story.

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Deus Ex: Human Revolution]]'', ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'', an invisible, completely secret karma meter (based on how many people you killed) will flavor Jensen's ending monologue along good, neutral, or evil lines. For example, if you did a PacifistRun (or killed very few enemies besides the bosses), he'll say something about how he resisted the urge to abuse his power. The kill count will also affect some NPC dialogue and actions throughout the story.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.KarmaMeter