History Main / JustifiedExtraLives

18th Apr '16 10:04:38 AM thatother1dude
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A form of GameplayAndStoryIntegration.

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A form of GameplayAndStoryIntegration. Compare JustifiedSavePoint.
18th Apr '16 9:54:09 AM thatother1dude
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** AE used this earlier in ''VideoGame/AdventureQuest''. While losing a battle actually causes you to die and meet TheGrimReaper, he has always [[DeathTakesAHoliday filled his soul quota for the day]] by the time you reach him.
*** This may be FridgeBrilliance, considering what you were doing up until the point that you died.
* ''DragonQuest'' and other old JRPG titles has a common function for the church: when a member is killed in combat, the local CrystalDragonJesus is capable of reviving the character in an exchange for a donation.
** ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'' uses a Cloning Lab instead of a church to fit its sci-fi setting. When the service is used, the dead character is cloned into a new being possessing the old one's abilities and memories. [[spoiler:This also happens in canon at least once, as your entire party is killed in the crash of Gaila with the planet Palma, but Tyler had everyone cloned.]]

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** * AE used this earlier in ''VideoGame/AdventureQuest''. While losing a battle actually causes you to die and meet TheGrimReaper, he has always [[DeathTakesAHoliday filled his soul quota for the day]] by the time you reach him.
*** This may be FridgeBrilliance, considering what you were doing up until the point that you died.
* ''DragonQuest'' and other old JRPG titles has ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'': When a common function for the church: when a party member is killed in combat, the local CrystalDragonJesus is capable of reviving the character in an exchange for a donation.
** ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'' uses a Cloning Lab instead of a church to fit its sci-fi setting. * ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'': When the service is used, a party member dies, the dead character is cloned into a new being possessing the old one's abilities and memories. [[spoiler:This also happens in canon at least once, as your entire party is killed in the crash of Gaila with the planet Palma, but Tyler had everyone cloned.]]
18th Apr '16 9:24:57 AM thatother1dude
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* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI'', the player character is plugged into a machine that accesses your ancestor's memories. When you die, it's called "memory desynchronization", and you have to access the memory again and do it the way your ancestor did it; i.e., the right way.
** Gets interesting when you realise what else causes desynchronisation. Apparently said Ancestor did a perfect, never injured, never even seen, 100% run through. {{Badass}}.
*** Considering most injuries would either severely cripple or kill him, he'd pretty much have to do it in a perfect go.

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* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI'', the player character is plugged into a machine that accesses your ancestor's memories. When you die, it's called "memory desynchronization", and you have to access the memory again and do it the way your ancestor did it; i.e., the right way.
** Gets interesting when you realise what else causes desynchronisation. Apparently said Ancestor
way. This implies the real ancestor was so {{badass}} that they did a perfect, never injured, never even seen, 100% run through. {{Badass}}.
*** Considering most injuries would either severely cripple or kill him, he'd pretty much have to do it in a perfect go.
through.
18th Apr '16 9:16:10 AM thatother1dude
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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', each character is actually six identical clones (officially referred to as a "six-pack" and usually [[DrinkingGame tracked with one]]), to get around the fact that any imaginable action or thought is treasonous (and treason is a capital crime).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'': [=AIs=] have backups stashed somewhere on [[{{Cyberspace}} The Grid]].
* ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' featured 'life insurance' in the form of Gold Cross. For a modest fee, they'll grow a new clone from your corpse, or keep one as a backup.
* ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' allows "digital characters", such as ghosts and artificial intelligences, to store backups of their code on other servers so that they can be restored to life.
* EclipsePhase allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.
[[/folder]]



!!Non-Video Game Examples

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'': The unfinished Philosophers' Stone will not restore human life, but serves to act as extra lives for the homunculi. Thus, one can kill a homunculus either by destroying the stone, or by killing them over and over again until they run out of lives. How does this work? [[spoiler:The stone contains lives of the people sacrificed. So they run out of people to kill in their place!]]
* The source of Alucard's indestructibility in ''{{Hellsing}}'' is that as blood is the currency of life, he has as many extra lives as there are people he has drained unto death. How many is that? Approximately ''3.4 million''.
** This becomes a problem when [[spoiler:he's tricked into eating Lieutenant Schrodinger. Due to how Schrodinger works, Alucard ceases to exist in this reality until he can destroy ''every single one'' of those lives. This takes several decades.]]
* ''Manga/OnePiece'' has the Revive-Revive Fruit that allows one to come back to life after dying once. A downside to is that if the user's body deteriorates before the spirit reaches it, the user will come back to life in that form, as such with Brook, a living skeleton.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/The6thDay '': The villain has access to {{cloning|Gambit}} at $1.2 billion a pop, and plenty of billions to burn, so the GoldfishPoopGang keeps coming back. This does ''not'' apply to the hero.
* ''Film/WhatDreamsMayCome'': [[spoiler:People in heaven can choose reincarnation.]]
* Nicky of ''Film/LittleNicky'' lives in Hell, so when he goes to Earth, dying just sends him back home, and he can just walk right out again.
-->'''Demon:''' What happened? You were gone for two seconds!
-->'''Nicky:''' There was a bright light... attached to a lot of metal!
-->'''Satan:''' That's a train, son. Don't stand in front of it.
** This becomes plot-important later on, as he uses it as a shortcut to get back to Hell, [[spoiler:and ends up in ''Heaven'' when he makes a HeroicSacrifice.]]
* In ''Film/BillAndTed's Bogus Journey'', the duo revive multiple times because they [[ChessWithDeath beat Death at chess]]... and battleship... and monopoly... and basically every other game you can name.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* In ReadyPlayerOne, a meta-example occurs: death in the OASIS resets your avatar to first level and you lose all your stuff. However, [[spoiler: the protagonist won an "extra life" coin for playing a perfect game of Pac-Man. He didn't know until his avatar died that the coin was an extra life token.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* On ''Series/DoctorWho'' the Doctor had a well-established way of regeneration with [[TheNthDoctor a new appearance]], but it was limited to twelve regenerations, thirteen bodies total. When he reached the limit, the Time Lords chose to give him a new round of lives.
** The episode "Heaven Sent" features a unique variant of this trope as the Doctor keeps dying and loading up a backup copy of himself from a hard drive, and then dying and loading up a backup copy, in a massive cycle that lasts for 4.5 ''billion'' years.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', each character is actually six identical clones (officially referred to as a "six-pack" and usually [[DrinkingGame tracked with one]]), to get around the fact that any imaginable action or thought is treasonous (and treason is a capital crime).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'': [=AIs=] have backups stashed somewhere on [[{{Cyberspace}} The Grid]].
* ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' featured 'life insurance' in the form of Gold Cross. For a modest fee, they'll grow a new clone from your corpse, or keep one as a backup.
* ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' allows "digital characters", such as ghosts and artificial intelligences, to store backups of their code on other servers so that they can be restored to life.
* EclipsePhase allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'' features the communist robot Ran, who is built so crappily that even a slight poke can kill him. Cue his creator building a Ran factory which teleports a new Ran exactly where the old one died.
** This being ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'', this is used, abused and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d [[IncrediblyLamePun to death and back]].
--> '''Ran''': But Mommy, isn't rebuilding me expensive?\\
'''Kalinka''': No, Ran, you're made with really, really cheap Soviet parts.\\
'''Ran''': But if you replace me every time-\\
'''Kalinka''': ''Really, really'' cheap Soviet parts.\\
'''Ran''': But wouldn't it be-\\
'''Kalinka''': '''''Really, really cheap Soviet parts!'''''
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' does this with Kenny, who was killed off every episode for about six seasons before getting around to explaining how he kept coming back: his mom gives birth to a new Kenny every time. A later episode revealed that [[spoiler:not only does Kenny remember ''every time he's died'', but this ability is somehow connected to the cult of Cthulhu.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldHis9Lives'', God decides to give more lives to ComicStrip/{{Garfield}} and Odie because he thought their last life (blown up by an alien fleet) put them in an "unfair position".
* WesternAnimation/{{F|uturama}}ry, when asking the What-If Machine "What if that stuff I said?" on life being like a video game, is killed but walks in from off screen declaring "I had an extra man". An interesting use of the trope in that he was justified in coming back to life in reality BECAUSE life was like a video game.
* It is ridiculously hard to permanently kill [[TheTransformers a Transformer]] in any medium, mostly because they're mechanical beings who can be reassembled after taking massive amounts of damage. Nothing short of shooting them in the spark will do it... and even then there are artifacts like the Matrix or Vector Sigma which can undo that. The best way to kill a Transformers is [[MerchandiseDriven to not have a toy of them on the shelves]].
[[/folder]]
27th Mar '16 9:05:02 PM skidoo23
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Added DiffLines:

** The episode "Heaven Sent" features a unique variant of this trope as the Doctor keeps dying and loading up a backup copy of himself from a hard drive, and then dying and loading up a backup copy, in a massive cycle that lasts for 4.5 ''billion'' years.
25th Feb '16 3:27:05 PM Morgenthaler
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* The premise of ''ShadowOfDestiny'' is your character using time travel to prevent his death; if you fail to do so you can just go back in time and try again. Note that it ''is'' possible to die permanently, [[spoiler: by running out of time in the final level, touching your past self, or failing to return to the present when your time machine tells you to.]] You can still reload your saved game, though.
* ''FullThrottle'', the story is told as [[TheHero Ben]]'s backflash. If you die, he'll mention there's something wrong and let you try again.

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* The premise of ''ShadowOfDestiny'' ''Videogame/ShadowOfDestiny'' is your character using time travel to prevent his death; if you fail to do so you can just go back in time and try again. Note that it ''is'' possible to die permanently, [[spoiler: by running out of time in the final level, touching your past self, or failing to return to the present when your time machine tells you to.]] You can still reload your saved game, though.
* ''FullThrottle'', ''Videogame/FullThrottle'', the story is told as [[TheHero Ben]]'s backflash. If you die, he'll mention there's something wrong and let you try again.



* ''AlienVsPredator'' on the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar had the Alien able to lay eggs in Marines. If you died, you would continue from the new alien that was hatched.

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* ''AlienVsPredator'' ''Videogame/AlienVsPredator'' on the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar had the Alien able to lay eggs in Marines. If you died, you would continue from the new alien that was hatched.
29th Nov '15 7:19:18 PM nombretomado
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-->-- The manual for ''[[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Sylvester and Tweety: Cagey Capers]]'' for SegaGenesis

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-->-- The manual for ''[[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Sylvester and Tweety: Cagey Capers]]'' for SegaGenesis
UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis
17th Nov '15 1:49:46 PM Eddy1215
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Manga/OnePiece'' has the Revive-Revive Fruit that allows one to come back to life after dying once. A downside to is that if the user's body deteriorates before the spirit reaches it, the user will come back to life in that form, as such with Brook, a living skeleton.
5th Nov '15 3:06:29 PM Prfnoff
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* The UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} game ''Walker'' justifies this by each of your three lives being a different mech. They are even referred to as Walker One, Two and Three.

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* The UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} game ''Walker'' ''VideoGame/{{Walker}}'' justifies this by each of your three lives being a different mech. They are even referred to as Walker One, Two and Three.



* In ''Brute Force'', a dead player is replaced with a clone created for the purpose. This is expensive.

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* In ''Brute Force'', ''VideoGame/BruteForce'', a dead player is replaced with a clone created for the purpose. This is expensive.



* ''{{Crackdown}}'' features clone replacements. In fact the "Extract" option just instantly kills your character and pulls up the menu to choose where you want to respawn. It's only the loss of your current progress towards the next upgrade level that prevents it being a better method of transport than driving to get across town.
* ''{{Spore}}'': The Cell and Creature phases show that every time you die, you emerge as another member of your species, ready to continue. The Space phase explains extra lives as a combination of "advanced cloning technology" and "emergency consciousness transferal", having you re-emerge as a freshly-cloned pilot with a rebuilt ship after dying. If you happen to explode on your own planet, the pieces of your old ship will still be falling from the sky as your new ship flies up through them.

to:

* ''{{Crackdown}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}'' features clone replacements. In fact the "Extract" option just instantly kills your character and pulls up the menu to choose where you want to respawn. It's only the loss of your current progress towards the next upgrade level that prevents it being a better method of transport than driving to get across town.
* ''{{Spore}}'': ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'': The Cell and Creature phases show that every time you die, you emerge as another member of your species, ready to continue. The Space phase explains extra lives as a combination of "advanced cloning technology" and "emergency consciousness transferal", having you re-emerge as a freshly-cloned pilot with a rebuilt ship after dying. If you happen to explode on your own planet, the pieces of your old ship will still be falling from the sky as your new ship flies up through them.
22nd Oct '15 12:44:29 PM Morgenthaler
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* In ''ShadowMan'', killing Mike [=LeRoi=] sends him to Deadside just like everyone else. Unlike everyone else, once there, he becomes Shadow Man, whose powers include the ability to cross back over to certain locations in the world of the living.

to:

* In ''ShadowMan'', ''VideoGame/ShadowMan'', killing Mike [=LeRoi=] sends him to Deadside just like everyone else. Unlike everyone else, once there, he becomes Shadow Man, whose powers include the ability to cross back over to certain locations in the world of the living.



* ''AliensInfestation'' for the DS has you controlling a four Marine fireteam, one soldier at a time. If one Marine is killed, another will take their place. There are a couple of wrinkles: if your fireteam is short a member or two, you can find other Marines to join your fireteam throughout each level (They'll refuse if you already have a full fireteam.) Also, if a Marine gets incapacitated by an alien, they're dragged off to a nearby lair instead of killed, and can be rescued. [[spoiler: If they are mortally wounded again, however, an alien will burst out of their chest.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales: The Quest for Gold'', Huey, Dewey and Louie's stages give you three chances; one for each nephew. [[FridgeHorror So if you beat the game on your last life, does that mean the other two nephews were]] KilledOffForReal?

to:

* ''AliensInfestation'' ''VideoGame/AliensInfestation'' for the DS has you controlling a four Marine fireteam, one soldier at a time. If one Marine is killed, another will take their place. There are a couple of wrinkles: if your fireteam is short a member or two, you can find other Marines to join your fireteam throughout each level (They'll refuse if you already have a full fireteam.) Also, if a Marine gets incapacitated by an alien, they're dragged off to a nearby lair instead of killed, and can be rescued. [[spoiler: If they are mortally wounded again, however, an alien will burst out of their chest.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales: ''VideoGame/DuckTales: The Quest for Gold'', Huey, Dewey and Louie's stages give you three chances; one for each nephew. [[FridgeHorror So if you beat the game on your last life, does that mean the other two nephews were]] KilledOffForReal?



* In ''V2000'', the manual makes the player one of a number of pilots who fly drone craft remotely. Stocks and manufacturing capacity are both limited, so priority is given to those pilots who prove the most effective against TheVirus and penetrate the furthest into its domain. A magnificent example. One that falls apart as soon as hidden trophies start giving lives, but magnificent.
* The way ''AlienShooter'' describes extra lives is this: the scientists have finally found the method to dodge death, so [[ChekhovsGun they give you several in the beginning]] and several additional lives during your mission, after you pay them loads of money.
* ''{{Tenchu}}'' uses the NinjaLog for extra lives--you didn't die, you replaced yourself with a log. It only works if you die by via combat or trap damage though, falling into a pit means you need to start the level over.

to:

* In ''V2000'', ''VideoGame/V2000'', the manual makes the player one of a number of pilots who fly drone craft remotely. Stocks and manufacturing capacity are both limited, so priority is given to those pilots who prove the most effective against TheVirus and penetrate the furthest into its domain. A magnificent example. One that falls apart as soon as hidden trophies start giving lives, but magnificent.
* The way ''AlienShooter'' ''VideoGame/AlienShooter'' describes extra lives is this: the scientists have finally found the method to dodge death, so [[ChekhovsGun they give you several in the beginning]] and several additional lives during your mission, after you pay them loads of money.
* ''{{Tenchu}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Tenchu}}'' uses the NinjaLog for extra lives--you didn't die, you replaced yourself with a log. It only works if you die by via combat or trap damage though, falling into a pit means you need to start the level over.
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