History Main / JustifiedExtraLives

21st Aug '16 12:26:06 PM nombretomado
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* EclipsePhase allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.

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* EclipsePhase ''TabletopGame/EclipsePhase'' allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.
8th Jul '16 2:11:10 PM rjd1922
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* As a SpiritualSuccessor to ''VideoGame/SystemShock'', ''VideoGame/{{BioShock|1}}'' has the Vita-Chambers, which work similarly. to the resurrection chambers.
** ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' doesn't have Vita-Chambers: instead the respawns are Elizabeth dragging the OnlyMostlyDead Booker to cover and reviving him. If Booker runs out of health in the sections where he's separated from Elizabeth there's a hallucination-like sequence where he appears in his office from the start of the game and walking through the door puts him back in the fight. The endgame [[TheReveal Reveal]] explains this as [[spoiler: Booker ''actually dying'', and the Luteces recruiting an AlternateUniverse Booker and starting the game's events over from the beginning offscreen - [[ExpendableAlternateUniverse something they've already done dozens of times before the game starts]].]]

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* As a SpiritualSuccessor to ''VideoGame/SystemShock'', ''VideoGame/{{BioShock|1}}'' has the Vita-Chambers, which work similarly. similarly to the resurrection chambers.
** ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'' doesn't have Vita-Chambers: instead the respawns are Elizabeth dragging the OnlyMostlyDead Booker to cover and reviving him. If Booker runs out of health in the sections where he's separated from Elizabeth there's a hallucination-like sequence where he appears in his office from the start of the game and walking through the door puts him back in the fight. The endgame [[TheReveal Reveal]] explains this as [[spoiler: Booker ''actually dying'', and the Luteces recruiting an AlternateUniverse Booker and starting the game's events over from the beginning offscreen - [[ExpendableAlternateUniverse something they've already done dozens of times before the game starts]].]]
25th Jun '16 2:14:57 PM N8han11
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** No, his soul is snatched back by the Elder God. In the others, his soul seems to have become strong enough to reform itself. This is mostly because [[spoiler: only the Blood Reaver can "kill" Raziel by imprisoning him, and only Raziel can kill Kain.]]
24th May '16 9:17:09 AM ThatBitterTase
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Added DiffLines:

* The first time you die in ''Final Fantasy Legends II'', you arrive in Valhalla, where Odin agrees to resurrect you as long as, at some point in the future, you fight him. After that, each time you die, Odin brings you right back where you were. [[spoiler:You fight Odin near the end of the game. After he dies, you have to reload a saved game following future deaths.]]
6th May '16 9:36:27 AM Hanz
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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' have New-U stations, which basically creates an in-universe respawn point for anyone registered in the system. It's also implied to be the reason for the infinitely respawning enemies. It's repeatedly lampshaded (the second game actually has a mission where the goal is to kill yourself, because you'll respawn afterward anyway) and a bit prone to fridge logic (in ''2'', the BigBad is the CEO of the company who owns the New-U stations, which raises the question of why he doesn't just take you out of the system). WordOfGod states that the New-U stations [[GameplayAndStorySegregation are simply a game mechanic and not within the universe]] (which still doesn't explain the fact that Jack pays you to commit suicide in a sidequest).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' have New-U stations, which basically creates an in-universe respawn point for anyone registered in the system. It's also implied to be the reason for the infinitely respawning enemies. It's repeatedly lampshaded (the second game actually has a mission where the goal is to kill yourself, because you'll respawn afterward anyway) and a bit prone to fridge logic (in ''2'', the BigBad is the CEO of the company who owns the New-U stations, which raises the question of why he doesn't just take you out of the system). WordOfGod states that Eventually, the concept of the New-U stations [[GameplayAndStorySegregation are was retconned out of the setting and they're now simply a game mechanic and not within the universe]] (which still doesn't explain the fact that Jack pays you to commit suicide in a sidequest).gameplay mechanic.
18th Apr '16 10:04:38 AM thatother1dude
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A form of GameplayAndStoryIntegration.

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A form of GameplayAndStoryIntegration. Compare JustifiedSavePoint.
18th Apr '16 9:54:09 AM thatother1dude
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** AE used this earlier in ''VideoGame/AdventureQuest''. While losing a battle actually causes you to die and meet TheGrimReaper, he has always [[DeathTakesAHoliday filled his soul quota for the day]] by the time you reach him.
*** This may be FridgeBrilliance, considering what you were doing up until the point that you died.
* ''DragonQuest'' and other old JRPG titles has a common function for the church: when a member is killed in combat, the local CrystalDragonJesus is capable of reviving the character in an exchange for a donation.
** ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'' uses a Cloning Lab instead of a church to fit its sci-fi setting. When the service is used, the dead character is cloned into a new being possessing the old one's abilities and memories. [[spoiler:This also happens in canon at least once, as your entire party is killed in the crash of Gaila with the planet Palma, but Tyler had everyone cloned.]]

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** * AE used this earlier in ''VideoGame/AdventureQuest''. While losing a battle actually causes you to die and meet TheGrimReaper, he has always [[DeathTakesAHoliday filled his soul quota for the day]] by the time you reach him.
*** This may be FridgeBrilliance, considering what you were doing up until the point that you died.
* ''DragonQuest'' and other old JRPG titles has ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'': When a common function for the church: when a party member is killed in combat, the local CrystalDragonJesus is capable of reviving the character in an exchange for a donation.
** ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'' uses a Cloning Lab instead of a church to fit its sci-fi setting. * ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarII'': When the service is used, a party member dies, the dead character is cloned into a new being possessing the old one's abilities and memories. [[spoiler:This also happens in canon at least once, as your entire party is killed in the crash of Gaila with the planet Palma, but Tyler had everyone cloned.]]
18th Apr '16 9:24:57 AM thatother1dude
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* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI'', the player character is plugged into a machine that accesses your ancestor's memories. When you die, it's called "memory desynchronization", and you have to access the memory again and do it the way your ancestor did it; i.e., the right way.
** Gets interesting when you realise what else causes desynchronisation. Apparently said Ancestor did a perfect, never injured, never even seen, 100% run through. {{Badass}}.
*** Considering most injuries would either severely cripple or kill him, he'd pretty much have to do it in a perfect go.

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* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI'', the player character is plugged into a machine that accesses your ancestor's memories. When you die, it's called "memory desynchronization", and you have to access the memory again and do it the way your ancestor did it; i.e., the right way.
** Gets interesting when you realise what else causes desynchronisation. Apparently said Ancestor
way. This implies the real ancestor was so {{badass}} that they did a perfect, never injured, never even seen, 100% run through. {{Badass}}.
*** Considering most injuries would either severely cripple or kill him, he'd pretty much have to do it in a perfect go.
through.
18th Apr '16 9:16:10 AM thatother1dude
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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', each character is actually six identical clones (officially referred to as a "six-pack" and usually [[DrinkingGame tracked with one]]), to get around the fact that any imaginable action or thought is treasonous (and treason is a capital crime).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'': [=AIs=] have backups stashed somewhere on [[{{Cyberspace}} The Grid]].
* ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' featured 'life insurance' in the form of Gold Cross. For a modest fee, they'll grow a new clone from your corpse, or keep one as a backup.
* ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' allows "digital characters", such as ghosts and artificial intelligences, to store backups of their code on other servers so that they can be restored to life.
* EclipsePhase allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.
[[/folder]]



!!Non-Video Game Examples

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'': The unfinished Philosophers' Stone will not restore human life, but serves to act as extra lives for the homunculi. Thus, one can kill a homunculus either by destroying the stone, or by killing them over and over again until they run out of lives. How does this work? [[spoiler:The stone contains lives of the people sacrificed. So they run out of people to kill in their place!]]
* The source of Alucard's indestructibility in ''{{Hellsing}}'' is that as blood is the currency of life, he has as many extra lives as there are people he has drained unto death. How many is that? Approximately ''3.4 million''.
** This becomes a problem when [[spoiler:he's tricked into eating Lieutenant Schrodinger. Due to how Schrodinger works, Alucard ceases to exist in this reality until he can destroy ''every single one'' of those lives. This takes several decades.]]
* ''Manga/OnePiece'' has the Revive-Revive Fruit that allows one to come back to life after dying once. A downside to is that if the user's body deteriorates before the spirit reaches it, the user will come back to life in that form, as such with Brook, a living skeleton.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/The6thDay '': The villain has access to {{cloning|Gambit}} at $1.2 billion a pop, and plenty of billions to burn, so the GoldfishPoopGang keeps coming back. This does ''not'' apply to the hero.
* ''Film/WhatDreamsMayCome'': [[spoiler:People in heaven can choose reincarnation.]]
* Nicky of ''Film/LittleNicky'' lives in Hell, so when he goes to Earth, dying just sends him back home, and he can just walk right out again.
-->'''Demon:''' What happened? You were gone for two seconds!
-->'''Nicky:''' There was a bright light... attached to a lot of metal!
-->'''Satan:''' That's a train, son. Don't stand in front of it.
** This becomes plot-important later on, as he uses it as a shortcut to get back to Hell, [[spoiler:and ends up in ''Heaven'' when he makes a HeroicSacrifice.]]
* In ''Film/BillAndTed's Bogus Journey'', the duo revive multiple times because they [[ChessWithDeath beat Death at chess]]... and battleship... and monopoly... and basically every other game you can name.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* In ReadyPlayerOne, a meta-example occurs: death in the OASIS resets your avatar to first level and you lose all your stuff. However, [[spoiler: the protagonist won an "extra life" coin for playing a perfect game of Pac-Man. He didn't know until his avatar died that the coin was an extra life token.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* On ''Series/DoctorWho'' the Doctor had a well-established way of regeneration with [[TheNthDoctor a new appearance]], but it was limited to twelve regenerations, thirteen bodies total. When he reached the limit, the Time Lords chose to give him a new round of lives.
** The episode "Heaven Sent" features a unique variant of this trope as the Doctor keeps dying and loading up a backup copy of himself from a hard drive, and then dying and loading up a backup copy, in a massive cycle that lasts for 4.5 ''billion'' years.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'', each character is actually six identical clones (officially referred to as a "six-pack" and usually [[DrinkingGame tracked with one]]), to get around the fact that any imaginable action or thought is treasonous (and treason is a capital crime).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Alternity}}'': [=AIs=] have backups stashed somewhere on [[{{Cyberspace}} The Grid]].
* ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' featured 'life insurance' in the form of Gold Cross. For a modest fee, they'll grow a new clone from your corpse, or keep one as a backup.
* ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' allows "digital characters", such as ghosts and artificial intelligences, to store backups of their code on other servers so that they can be restored to life.
* EclipsePhase allows anyone to make digital backups of their consciousness that can be "resleeved" in a new body (though you need to pay for it or you could end up in whatever cheap morph Firewall found for you). There are also cortical stack implants that can save a character's memories up until death.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'' features the communist robot Ran, who is built so crappily that even a slight poke can kill him. Cue his creator building a Ran factory which teleports a new Ran exactly where the old one died.
** This being ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'', this is used, abused and {{lampshade|Hanging}}d [[IncrediblyLamePun to death and back]].
--> '''Ran''': But Mommy, isn't rebuilding me expensive?\\
'''Kalinka''': No, Ran, you're made with really, really cheap Soviet parts.\\
'''Ran''': But if you replace me every time-\\
'''Kalinka''': ''Really, really'' cheap Soviet parts.\\
'''Ran''': But wouldn't it be-\\
'''Kalinka''': '''''Really, really cheap Soviet parts!'''''
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' does this with Kenny, who was killed off every episode for about six seasons before getting around to explaining how he kept coming back: his mom gives birth to a new Kenny every time. A later episode revealed that [[spoiler:not only does Kenny remember ''every time he's died'', but this ability is somehow connected to the cult of Cthulhu.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldHis9Lives'', God decides to give more lives to ComicStrip/{{Garfield}} and Odie because he thought their last life (blown up by an alien fleet) put them in an "unfair position".
* WesternAnimation/{{F|uturama}}ry, when asking the What-If Machine "What if that stuff I said?" on life being like a video game, is killed but walks in from off screen declaring "I had an extra man". An interesting use of the trope in that he was justified in coming back to life in reality BECAUSE life was like a video game.
* It is ridiculously hard to permanently kill [[TheTransformers a Transformer]] in any medium, mostly because they're mechanical beings who can be reassembled after taking massive amounts of damage. Nothing short of shooting them in the spark will do it... and even then there are artifacts like the Matrix or Vector Sigma which can undo that. The best way to kill a Transformers is [[MerchandiseDriven to not have a toy of them on the shelves]].
[[/folder]]
27th Mar '16 9:05:02 PM skidoo23
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Added DiffLines:

** The episode "Heaven Sent" features a unique variant of this trope as the Doctor keeps dying and loading up a backup copy of himself from a hard drive, and then dying and loading up a backup copy, in a massive cycle that lasts for 4.5 ''billion'' years.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JustifiedExtraLives