History Main / JustTrainWrong

21st May '17 2:39:48 AM TomWalpertac2
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[[folder:Other]]
* Though difficult to classify, this listing of scenic US train rides has a miss-matched [[http://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/the-most-scenic-train-rides-across-america/ss-BBAwS4g#image=1 front page image]]. With a selection of railroads to choose from, they chose a non-US train?
[[/folder]]
8th May '17 11:41:30 PM Killerweinerdog
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* ''WesternAnimation/ThePolarExpress'': Things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive. Also, while the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer in others.

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* ''WesternAnimation/ThePolarExpress'': Things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive. Also, while [[note]]The usage of alternating forward and reverse to control the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in train's sliding is actually ''more'' plausible than the most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer glaring issue to rail enthusiasts: that being that the violent, sudden manner in others.which the engineer repeatedly switched from forward to reverse and back again should have torn the running gear to pieces.[[/note]]
18th Apr '17 1:56:51 AM Khathi
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** On the other hand, when the Soviet Union captured the previously Japanese held Southern Sakhalin, they found it uneconomical to regauge the Japanese-built railways, as they were built to the narrow Cape gauge (1067 mm) and with the light ballasting and loading gauges incompatible with the much heavier Soviet standards, so adapting the network to them essentially boiled down to rebuilding the whole railway anew, which they simply hadn't had the resources after the devastating war. Though they eventually widened the loading gauge and used the Soviet-made rolling stock with the Cape-adapted bogies, only after the TurnOfTheMillenium, when the island's oil industry overloaded the railway, the project to regauge the Sakhalin network took off in earnest, and it's projected to lag a fair bit into the New Twenties.
14th Apr '17 2:36:56 PM danlansdowne
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** However, First Great Western have started to paint their units green with white stripes sort of kind of similar to the British Railways DMU livery so it might almost convince in the future. However, the headcode is for a trainload of ballast empties via Mountsorrel..

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** However, First Great Western have started to paint their units green with white stripes sort of kind of similar to the British Railways DMU livery so it might almost convince in the future. However, the headcode is for a trainload of ballast empties via Mountsorrel..Mountsorrel.



* Unrealistic scale is common in rail modelling. For example curves are usually much tighter compared to the width of the track than on a real railway, simply because a true scale curve would be enormous, and wheels and rails are usually thicker-than-scale for sufficient strength. Some scales, such as OO scale common in the United Kingdom, have trains that aren't quite the right size for the model tracks. Most modellers don't mind this, but "fine scale" modellers strive for greater precision.

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* Unrealistic scale is common in rail modelling. For example curves are usually much tighter compared to the width of the track than on a real railway, simply because a true scale curve would be enormous, and wheels and rails are usually thicker-than-scale for sufficient strength. Some scales, such as OO scale common in the United Kingdom, have trains that aren't quite the right size for the model tracks. Most modellers don't mind this, but "fine scale" modellers strive for greater precision. Indeed, the availability of closer-to-realistic model railway equipment has increased dramatically since the 1990s.
7th Apr '17 1:36:21 PM TokoWH
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** A recent theatrical production of the film apparently involved a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_08 British Rail Class 08]], which is a 1950s diesel locomotive. What's worse is it was apparently on loan from the National Railway Museum, who really ought to know better! However, the 08 was needed to propel the other locomotive involved, an 1870s Great Northern Railway "Single" locomotive incapable of moving on its own.

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** A recent theatrical production of the film apparently involved a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_08 British Rail Class 08]], which is a 1950s diesel locomotive. What's worse is it was apparently on loan from the National Railway Museum, who really ought to know better! However, the 08 was needed to propel the other locomotive involved, an 1870s Great Northern Railway "Single" locomotive incapable of moving on its own.



* A recent ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' book (''not'' one by the Rev. Awdry) has Gordon call Emily [[https://twitter.com/bengoldacre/status/696379488893018112 a tank engine]]. The author apparently thought that was just another word for steam engine, rather than specifically referring to one without a tender. Emily has a tender. It also has her say that she prefers to go "slow and steady", when she's based on a Sterling Single, specifically designed for speed.

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* A recent ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' book (''not'' one by the Rev. Awdry) has Gordon call Emily [[https://twitter.com/bengoldacre/status/696379488893018112 a tank engine]]. The author apparently thought that was just another word for steam engine, rather than specifically referring to one without a tender. Emily has a tender. It also has her say that she prefers to go "slow and steady", when she's based on a Sterling Single, specifically designed for speed.



** However, First Great Western have recently started to paint their units green with white stripes sort of kind of similar to the British Railways DMU livery so it might almost convince in the future. However, the headcode is for a trainload of ballast empties via Mountsorrel..

to:

** However, First Great Western have recently started to paint their units green with white stripes sort of kind of similar to the British Railways DMU livery so it might almost convince in the future. However, the headcode is for a trainload of ballast empties via Mountsorrel..



** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had led to praise for their strength and tank-like construction.

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** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had led to praise for their strength and tank-like construction.
15th Mar '17 6:21:19 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/MiniMetro'':
** Many of the non-realistic elements can be forgiven for catering to the RuleOfFun. Passengers will accept any destination station corresponding to the icons that represent them, trains can only hold up to six passengers at a time with carriages adding six more each, trains can be easily removed from, added to, or relocated within the system with little delay, and so on.
** However, one particular element stands out: The game refers to the high-speed trains you can get in Osaka as ''Shinkansen''. ''Shinkansen'' is the name of the ''network'' of high-speed railways in Japan, not the term used for an individual train.
27th Feb '17 9:26:31 AM erforce
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* In ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'', the train copies the above mistake of operating a train from a low platform station (in reality a Paris freight terminal). The consist also includes a Pullman day coach, which never would have operated in the Orient Express (in the UK and Europe, Pullmans are not sleeping cars).

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* In ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'', ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress1974'', the train copies the above mistake of operating a train from a low platform station (in reality a Paris freight terminal). The consist also includes a Pullman day coach, which never would have operated in the Orient Express OrientExpress (in the UK and Europe, Pullmans are not sleeping cars).



* ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'':

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* ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'':''Film/TheGirlOnTheTrain'':
10th Feb '17 3:48:38 PM StFan
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* Another show that makes this mistake is {{Murdoch Mysteries}}, which has twice depicted Canadian trains using stock footage of British and Swiss trains.

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* Another show that makes this mistake is {{Murdoch Mysteries}}, ''Series/MurdochMysteries'', which has twice depicted Canadian trains using stock footage of British and Swiss trains.
27th Jan '17 3:18:45 PM StFan
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Easily, the number one mistake is showing a steam locomotive without a tender or bunker and tanks--which usually means that it doesn't have any fuel or water and therefore can't move. Other common departures from reality might involve a RunawayTrain's safety systems [[FailsafeFailure failing]] without any justifiable reason, or the wrong kind of train or rolling stock for the script. But, hey, most viewers don't know or care what the proper train would look like.

Cases of anachronistic locomotives and rolling stock are more forgiveable, for most of the same reasons given in sister tropes involving [[ArtisticLicenseShips ships]], [[JustPlaneWrong aircraft]] or [[TanksButNoTanks armoured vehicles.]] Sometimes there are simply no serviceable examples still in existence, or the surviving examples are stabled at preserved railway lines far from their original area of operation and are too expensive to transport, leaving the production team with a choice between this trope or CaliforniaDoubling. Even when you manage to make locomotive and rolling stock match the period and the location, they're often in a livery from an earlier or later period of their service lifespan, and the owners may well be reluctant to have them repainted for filming.

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Easily, the number one mistake is showing a steam locomotive without a tender or bunker and tanks--which tanks -- which usually means that it doesn't have any fuel or water and therefore can't move. Other common departures from reality might involve a RunawayTrain's safety systems [[FailsafeFailure failing]] without any justifiable reason, or the wrong kind of train or rolling stock for the script. But, hey, most viewers don't know or care what the proper train would look like.

Cases of anachronistic locomotives and rolling stock are more forgiveable, forgivable, for most of the same reasons given in sister tropes involving [[ArtisticLicenseShips ships]], [[JustPlaneWrong aircraft]] or [[TanksButNoTanks armoured vehicles.]] Sometimes there are simply no serviceable examples still in existence, or the surviving examples are stabled at preserved railway lines far from their original area of operation and are too expensive to transport, leaving the production team with a choice between this trope or CaliforniaDoubling. Even when you manage to make locomotive and rolling stock match the period and the location, they're often in a livery from an earlier or later period of their service lifespan, and the owners may well be reluctant to have them repainted for filming.



[[folder:Anime]]
* Sl Man and Poppo-chan from ''[[{{Franchise/Anpanman}} Sorieke! Anpanman]]''. Despite being in a fantasy land, they seem to run without a coal tender, which is required for engines like them.
** Also, SL Man can go underwater, which would've washed out his firebox.

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[[folder:Anime]]
[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* Sl SL Man and Poppo-chan from ''[[{{Franchise/Anpanman}} Sorieke! Anpanman]]''. Despite being in a fantasy land, they seem to run without a coal tender, which is required for engines like them. \n** Also, SL Man can go underwater, which would've washed out his firebox.



[[folder:Comics]]

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[[folder:Comics]][[folder:Comic Books]]



* A ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' Seventh Doctor story had a London suburban train stolen by evil aliens who planned to eat the passengers. The artist created very detailed and realistic drawings of the train - unfortunately it was of a very distinctive design which was constructed for the suburban railways in Glasgow and never ran in London.



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Comic Strips]]
* A ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' Seventh Doctor story had a London suburban train stolen by evil aliens who planned to eat the passengers. The artist created very detailed and realistic drawings of the train -- unfortunately it was of a very distinctive design which was constructed for the suburban railways in Glasgow and never ran in London.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* ''WesternAnimation/ThePolarExpress'': Things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive. Also, while the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer in others.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* The poster for the film ''Film/{{Creep 2004}}'' depicts a 1972 [=Mk1=] stock Northern Line train -- the stock was withdrawn four years before the film was released.

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* The poster for the film ''Film/{{Creep 2004}}'' ''Film/Creep2004'' depicts a 1972 [=Mk1=] stock Northern Line train -- the stock was withdrawn four years before the film was released.



* In ''Film/{{Titanic 1997}}'', in the scene at Southampton, an American switcher is briefly seen on the dockside. Not quite the glaring error it appears to be, as the Southern Railway company ''did'' operate a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USATC_S100_Class S100-class]] switchers bought as war-surplus from the US Army Transportation Corps, but they weren't even designed until the middle of the 1940s. Someone in the set design team was trying to be too clever for their own good.

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* In ''Film/{{Titanic 1997}}'', ''Film/{{Titanic|1997}}'', in the scene at Southampton, an American switcher is briefly seen on the dockside. Not quite the glaring error it appears to be, as the Southern Railway company ''did'' operate a few [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USATC_S100_Class S100-class]] switchers bought as war-surplus from the US Army Transportation Corps, but they weren't even designed until the middle of the 1940s. Someone in the set design team was trying to be too clever for their own good.



* ''Film/{{Super 8}}'' featured a train which was, to all appearances, violating the existing class five freight speed limits...not to mention the fact that the most viable routing for the train (as shown in some of the viral material) was over Conrail tracks in 1979. Why is this a problem? Conrail inherited a broken down physical plant from the railroads which merged into it, meaning that there were slow orders all around. Potentially averted given who was doing the shipping...but given the number of derailments that occurred under the Penn Central in the years leading up to Conrail's formation, an incident of seriously questionable judgment.

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* ''Film/{{Super 8}}'' ''Film/Super8'' featured a train which was, to all appearances, violating the existing class five freight speed limits...not to mention the fact that the most viable routing for the train (as shown in some of the viral material) was over Conrail tracks in 1979. Why is this a problem? Conrail inherited a broken down physical plant from the railroads which merged into it, meaning that there were slow orders all around. Potentially averted given who was doing the shipping...but given the number of derailments that occurred under the Penn Central in the years leading up to Conrail's formation, an incident of seriously questionable judgment.



** In RealLife, the locomotive used, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_No._3 Sierra No. 3]], would have a hard time reaching even 65 MPH ''on a good day'', much less 88. Like electric engines, however, steam engines have the advantage of being measured in terms of pure Tractive Effort: their limiting factor is the amount of steam pressure they can generate and how long they have to build up momentum. As the engineer says, if you get the boiler hotter than Hades and have a long stretch of straight track and are willing to risk the whole thing blowing up or flying off the tracks, its possible- the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casey_Jones#Death Casey Jones wreck]] involved an engine with nearly identical stats pushed to an 80 mph "cannonball" run while hauling a light six-car train (with some help from a downhill stretch of track).
** Doc Brown states that the logs he has created for Marty to throw into the stolen locomotive are made mostly out of anthracite coal. While anthracite does burn much more efficiently than wood, it can also be incredibly difficult to ignite, especially when it isn't broken into very small pieces. The engine in the film was also designed to burn wood, which allow too much or too little air draft to ignite the coal even if Marty did have the time to sit there and baby it. The AuthorsSavingThrow here is the "mostly"- if the logs consisted of finely-ground anthracite mixed with a firework-style oxidizer, it would be a rather effective way to force-feed the engine oxygen and fuel. Or blow it up like the test model.
** The last component is steam generation- you would want as much water in the tender tank as possible, but you'd also have to make sure that it didn't flood the boiler either. [[note]]High heat + Empty boiler = KABOOM!... but High Heat + too much water = Also KABOOM! + blast wave of superheated steam![[/note]] Doc does mention that the boiler will catastrophically explode if it reaches a certain pressure, and during the last minute of the scene, rivets and seams are visibly failing and spewing vapor or jets of superheated water. Also, the train explicitly does retain the tender in the script (Doc commands the engineer and fireman to "uncouple the cars from the tender"). In RealLife, the tenders were often physically attached to the engine and could not be removed without significant effort anyway.
* ''ThePolarExpress'' - things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive.
** Yeah, but its a ''[[AWizardDidIt magic]]'' train.
** Also, while the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer in others.

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** In RealLife, the locomotive used, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_No._3 Sierra No. 3]], would have a hard time reaching even 65 MPH ''on a good day'', much less 88. Like electric engines, however, steam engines have the advantage of being measured in terms of pure Tractive Effort: their limiting factor is the amount of steam pressure they can generate and how long they have to build up momentum. As the engineer says, if you get the boiler hotter than Hades and have a long stretch of straight track and are willing to risk the whole thing blowing up or flying off the tracks, its possible- it's possible -- the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casey_Jones#Death Casey Jones wreck]] involved an engine with nearly identical stats pushed to an 80 mph "cannonball" run while hauling a light six-car train (with some help from a downhill stretch of track).
** Doc Brown states that the logs he has created for Marty to throw into the stolen locomotive are made mostly out of anthracite coal. While anthracite does burn much more efficiently than wood, it can also be incredibly difficult to ignite, especially when it isn't broken into very small pieces. The engine in the film was also designed to burn wood, which allow too much or too little air draft to ignite the coal even if Marty did have the time to sit there and baby it. The AuthorsSavingThrow here is the "mostly"- "mostly" -- if the logs consisted of finely-ground anthracite mixed with a firework-style oxidizer, it would be a rather effective way to force-feed the engine oxygen and fuel. Or blow it up like the test model.
** The last component is steam generation- generation -- you would want as much water in the tender tank as possible, but you'd also have to make sure that it didn't flood the boiler either. [[note]]High heat + Empty boiler = KABOOM!... but High Heat + too much water = Also KABOOM! + blast wave of superheated steam![[/note]] Doc does mention that the boiler will catastrophically explode if it reaches a certain pressure, and during the last minute of the scene, rivets and seams are visibly failing and spewing vapor or jets of superheated water. Also, the train explicitly does retain the tender in the script (Doc commands the engineer and fireman to "uncouple the cars from the tender"). In RealLife, the tenders were often physically attached to the engine and could not be removed without significant effort anyway.
* ''ThePolarExpress'' - things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive.
** Yeah, but its a ''[[AWizardDidIt magic]]'' train.
** Also, while the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer in others.
anyway.



* In the blockbuster film ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', at the beginning of the ComicBook/BlackWidow interrogation scene, we see an establishing shot of a Norfolk Southern freight train with American locomotives passing by the ratty looking warehouse where Natasha is [[strike:being interrogated]] conducting an interrogation. The only problem is that the scene is set in Russia, which is not only several thousand miles away from the nearest Norfolk Southern locomotive, but wouldn't even be the correct track gauge if such a locomotive happened to be imported.
** The producers were aware of problem and digitally [[BrandX removed the NS logo and lettering]], but the black on white NS paint scheme is nevertheless unmistakable as well as the North American railroad industrial design.
*** The scene was shot in Cleveland (a good stand in for post-collapse Russia) and [[http://hamptonroads.com/2012/05/norfolk-southern-locomotive-has-avengers-cameo filming a passing train]] was a spur of the moment decision.

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* In the blockbuster film ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', at the beginning of the ComicBook/BlackWidow interrogation scene, we see an establishing shot of a Norfolk Southern freight train with American locomotives passing by the ratty looking warehouse where Natasha is [[strike:being interrogated]] conducting an interrogation. The only problem is that the scene is set in Russia, which is not only several thousand miles away from the nearest Norfolk Southern locomotive, but wouldn't even be the correct track gauge if such a locomotive happened to be imported.
**
imported. The producers were aware of problem and digitally [[BrandX removed the NS logo and lettering]], but the black on white NS paint scheme is nevertheless unmistakable as well as the North American railroad industrial design.
***
design. The scene was shot in Cleveland (a good stand in for post-collapse Russia) and [[http://hamptonroads.com/2012/05/norfolk-southern-locomotive-has-avengers-cameo filming a passing train]] was a spur of the moment decision.



* In {{Murder on the Orient Express}}, the train copies the above mistake of operating a train from a low platform station (in reality a Paris freight terminal). The consist also includes a Pullman day coach, which never would have operated in the Orient Express (in the UK and Europe, Pullmans are not sleeping cars).

to:

* In {{Murder on the Orient Express}}, In ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress'', the train copies the above mistake of operating a train from a low platform station (in reality a Paris freight terminal). The consist also includes a Pullman day coach, which never would have operated in the Orient Express (in the UK and Europe, Pullmans are not sleeping cars).



* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkoEE1i0CX8 The teaser trailer]] for the 2016 film adaptation of ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'', which swaps the book's London setting for the more picturesque environs of the Metro-North Railroad's Hudson Line in New York's Westchester County, suggests the filmmakers used both the Hudson Line (along that river; the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardsley-on-Hudson_(Metro-North_station) Ardsley-on-Hudson station]] can be seen in some scenes) and the New Haven Line (along Long Island Sound going into Connecticut, as its name suggests). In real life, the red-trimmed M8s of the latter (seen in one shot from above) would never be used on the Hudson Line, where Emily Blunt is shown on the interiors of what appear to be the M7s that are actually used. Also, there are no pedestrian tunnels under the Hudson Line's tracks; the one shown is on the Harlem Line in White Plains.

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* ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'':
**
[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkoEE1i0CX8 The teaser trailer]] for the 2016 film adaptation of ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'', adaptation, which swaps the book's London setting for the more picturesque environs of the Metro-North Railroad's Hudson Line in New York's Westchester County, suggests the filmmakers used both the Hudson Line (along that river; the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardsley-on-Hudson_(Metro-North_station) Ardsley-on-Hudson station]] can be seen in some scenes) and the New Haven Line (along Long Island Sound going into Connecticut, as its name suggests). In real life, the red-trimmed M8s of the latter (seen in one shot from above) would never be used on the Hudson Line, where Emily Blunt is shown on the interiors of what appear to be the M7s that are actually used. Also, there are no pedestrian tunnels under the Hudson Line's tracks; the one shown is on the Harlem Line in White Plains.



[[folder: Literature]]

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[[folder: Literature]][[folder:Literature]]



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* ''{{Chuggington}}'' has taken a lot of artistic licence with regard to railway operations:

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* ''{{Chuggington}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Chuggington}}'' has taken a lot of artistic licence with regard to railway operations:



* A common error in many cartoons is for steam engines to be operated by only the driver (engineer in American terms), with the fireman being mysteriously absent.
** Slighty TruthInTelevision: smaller tank engines used for shunting or short lines were able to be operated by one person most of the time, but not large mainline tender engines.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'': Astrotrain's locomotive form has no tender. More forgivable in this case than in others, because of the whole "really an alien robot" thing, but it still ruins any chance of him passing as a proper locomotive.
** A little less forgivable in his spotlight episode ''Triple Takeover'', set in 1985, where he tries to assemble an army of trains at a busy station- and almost all the trains look like 1930s' diesel locomotives, including a few experimental models (one of which resembles the Burlington Pioneer Zephyr), scrapped or retired decades before events of that time.

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* A common error in many cartoons is for steam engines to be operated by only the driver (engineer in American terms), with the fireman being mysteriously absent.
** Slighty
absent. Slightly TruthInTelevision: smaller tank engines used for shunting or short lines were able to be operated by one person most of the time, but not large mainline tender engines.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'': Astrotrain's locomotive form has no tender. More forgivable in this case than in others, because of the whole "really an alien robot" thing, but it still ruins any chance of him passing as a proper locomotive.
**
locomotive. A little less forgivable in his spotlight episode ''Triple Takeover'', "Triple Takeover", set in 1985, where he tries to assemble an army of trains at a busy station- station -- and almost all the trains look like 1930s' diesel locomotives, including a few experimental models (one of which resembles the Burlington Pioneer Zephyr), scrapped or retired decades before events of that time.



* Runaway trains just do not happen in normal operation, due to the entire braking system being designed in a fail-safe manner. Any loss of pressure in the brake line or command authority in an electric control system will automatically apply the brakes on any set of wagons built after the 1870s, and most heavily-laden trains had a brake van/caboose at the rear before that. Almost all passenger and many freight locomotives contain alertness features that sense if there is a live operator and stop the train if there is not.\\
\\
That said, the fail safety of the braking system can be disabled by accident [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciurea_rail_disaster as in the 1917 Ciurea train disaster]], which leads to a number of runaway incidents every year. However, in modern times, due to brake test requirements, runaways are usually just parked cars or trainsets that get loose from a yard.\\
\\

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* Runaway trains just do not happen in normal operation, due to the entire braking system being designed in a fail-safe manner. Any loss of pressure in the brake line or command authority in an electric control system will automatically apply the brakes on any set of wagons built after the 1870s, and most heavily-laden trains had a brake van/caboose at the rear before that. Almost all passenger and many freight locomotives contain alertness features that sense if there is a live operator and stop the train if there is not.\\
\\
\\\
That said, the fail safety of the braking system can be disabled by accident [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciurea_rail_disaster as in the 1917 Ciurea train disaster]], which leads to a number of runaway incidents every year. However, in modern times, due to brake test requirements, runaways are usually just parked cars or trainsets that get loose from a yard.\\
\\
\\\



17th Jan '17 11:58:54 PM FurryKef
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** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had lead to praise for their strength and tank like construction.

to:

** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had lead led to praise for their strength and tank like tank-like construction.
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