History Main / JustTrainWrong

17th Jan '17 11:58:54 PM FurryKef
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** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had lead to praise for their strength and tank like construction.

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** With the same accident, there was also praise about how well the at the time new train had stood up with just superficial damage and just one fatality. It was said to be "built like a tank", and there were many comments about "if it had been one of the old trains this would have been much worse". This was ironic and wrong in two ways. Firstly modern trains, like modern cars, are designed to crumple in accidents to reduce the impact forces on passengers (unlike older trains and cars that often really were built like tanks), and the fact that there was little damage showed that really the forces on the train had been very little. Secondly the "old trains" that had been recently replaced had been involved in many accidents during their nearly 30 years in service, many far more serious (including 4 100mph + head on collisions) yet all had involved far less casualties than would be expected, and that had lead led to praise for their strength and tank like tank-like construction.
11th Jan '17 1:21:25 AM FurryKef
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** In Russia the engineer who ran over someone is given a mandatory leave and psychologic counseling, because the authorities recognose that engineer ''cannot'' do anything about something or someone suddenly appearing on the tracks. ''It is on the books'', and there's a rumor (probably being spread by Russian Railways to educate the public) that engineers are trained ''not'' to apply the brakes if something appears on tracks within stopping distance. This is probably untrue, as it risks derailment, but is ''does'' work somewhat as a tactic to ScareEmStraight.

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** In Russia the engineer who ran over someone is given a mandatory leave and psychologic counseling, because the authorities recognose recognise that engineer ''cannot'' do anything about something or someone suddenly appearing on the tracks. ''It is on the books'', and there's a rumor (probably being spread by Russian Railways to educate the public) that engineers are trained ''not'' to apply the brakes if something appears on tracks within stopping distance. This is probably untrue, as it risks derailment, but is ''does'' work somewhat as a tactic to ScareEmStraight.
9th Jan '17 9:41:45 PM dmcreif
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*''Series/BetterCallSaul'': "Five-O" opens with Mike Ehrmantraut arriving by train into Albuquerque, New Mexico, ostensibly having traveled straight from Philadelphia after killing the two corrupt cops that set up his son's murder. However, 1) he's shown getting off a New Mexico Rail Runner train, which is the commuter railroad that connects Albuquerque to Santa Fe to the north and Belen to the south. In reality, Mike should be getting off Amtrak's ''Southwest Chief'', as that passes through Albuquerque. 2) [[AnachronismStew The scene takes place in 2002. The New Mexico Rail Runner didn't begin service until 2006.]]
**This is actually a common goof, as during season 2, New Mexico Rail Runner trains can be seen in the background of a few shots when Mike is working the booth at the courthouse parking lot, again in scenes set before 2006.
1st Dec '16 11:36:14 AM cantab
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* Unrealistic scale is common in rail modelling. For example curves are usually much tighter compared to the width of the track than on a real railway, simply because a true scale curve would be enormous, and wheels and rails are usually thicker-than-scale for sufficient strength. Some scales, such as OO scale common in the United Kingdom, have trains that aren't quite the right size for the model tracks. Most modellers don't mind this, but "fine scale" modellers strive for greater precision.
29th Nov '16 4:50:08 PM sethtriggs
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* ''Film/KingKong1976'' has a scene where Kong stops and attacks a New York City subway train. One car is picked up off the tracks, properly causing it to go dark as they are electrically powered via third rail. Then when Kong tosses the train to the ground, it ''explodes''.
29th Nov '16 4:45:27 PM sethtriggs
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** Then, when the train crashes, the unpowered coaches explode and burn instead of just the locomotive.
25th Nov '16 3:34:57 PM MidnightMan
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* The poster for the film ''Film/{{Creep 2004}}'' depicts a 1972 Mk1 stock Northern Line train -- the stock was withdrawn four years before the film was released.

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* The poster for the film ''Film/{{Creep 2004}}'' depicts a 1972 Mk1 [=Mk1=] stock Northern Line train -- the stock was withdrawn four years before the film was released.



* ''Enigma'' features 1950s [=MK1=] British Rail Stock (with Eastern Region numbering) in a scene that takes place near Bletchley in 1943. This is quite common due to the large number of BR Mk1s in preservation (and the large number built; they were a standard carriage used throughout the system, replacing many previous designs, and the last of them weren't taken out of service until 2005), compared to the accurate pre-war types which are in comparison quite rare. The Mk1s are also all steel construction, whereas earlier types were often wooden framed or wooden bodied, which didn't help their survival.

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* ''Enigma'' features 1950s [=MK1=] [=Mk1=] British Rail Stock (with Eastern Region numbering) in a scene that takes place near Bletchley in 1943. This is quite common due to the large number of BR Mk1s [=Mk1s=] in preservation (and the large number built; they were a standard carriage used throughout the system, replacing many previous designs, and the last of them weren't taken out of service until 2005), compared to the accurate pre-war types which are in comparison quite rare. The Mk1s [=Mk1s=] are also all steel construction, whereas earlier types were often wooden framed or wooden bodied, which didn't help their survival.



** Gallery cars of the type depicted do not have a bridge over the aisle, they have stairs on either side of the isle to reach their respective sides of the mezzanine.

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** Gallery cars of the type depicted do not have a bridge over the aisle, they have stairs on either side of the isle aisle to reach their respective sides of the mezzanine.



* ''Film/DancerInTheDark'': This [[http://www.treinfoto2000.be/Locomotieven/Nohab/Odense/GreatNorthern.jpg locomotive]] appears in the film. Great Northern never owned any of this model of locomotive, which was built by Nohab in Sweden for the European market, but the film-makers thought it was the closest they could find to an American-style diesel.

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* ''Film/DancerInTheDark'': This [[http://www.treinfoto2000.be/Locomotieven/Nohab/Odense/GreatNorthern.jpg locomotive]] appears in the film. Great Northern never owned any of this model of locomotive, which was built by Nohab [=NoHAB=] in Sweden for the European market, but the film-makers thought it was the closest they could find to an American-style diesel. diesel.
** To be fair, this ''is'' a GM EMD construction licensed to [=NoHAB=], pretty much an EMD F7 adapted for Europe. The EMD bulldog noses should be a dead giveaway. Nevertheless, the three headlights, the cabs on both ends and the side buffers and couplings are typical for European locomotives (the only double-cabbed US carbody diesels were six-axle Baldwin shark noses).



* ''ThePolarExpress'' - things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake.
** Yeah, but its a ''[[AWizardDidIT magic]]'' train

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* ''ThePolarExpress'' - things like the rolling stock bending around a mountain peak or a 100% decline, the length of the train keeps varying from five to about a dozen coaches etc etc. And let's not start on the scene with the train crossing the frozen body of water and slithering across the ice like a snake.snake while being steered by changing the rotation of the drivers on the locomotive.
** Yeah, but its a ''[[AWizardDidIT ''[[AWizardDidIt magic]]'' traintrain.
** Also, while the ''Polar Express'' has five coaches in most scenes, it miraculously grows a whole lot longer in others.



* The train scene in ''Film/{{Torque}}'' is nothing short of ridiculous. In a time when even the once-popular [=F40PH=] is being phased out, there's a single blank vintage E unit on a [[http://www.movie-trains.com/torque.html train]] that would require at least two of them. The space between the coaches is wide enough for a motorcycle to jump through; also, the end doors are open, and there are no diaphragms which means that it'd be pretty windy inside the cars. And the center aisle is wide enough to ride a motorcycle through it at not really low speed. It doesn't really matter anymore that the headlights on the locomotive are off.

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* The train scene in ''Film/{{Torque}}'' is nothing short of ridiculous. In a time when even the once-popular [=F40PH=] is being phased out, there's a single blank vintage EMD E unit on a [[http://www.movie-trains.com/torque.html train]] that would require at least two of them. The space between the coaches is wide enough for a motorcycle to jump through; also, the end doors are open, and there are no diaphragms which means that it'd be pretty windy inside the cars. And the center aisle is wide enough to ride a motorcycle through it at not really low speed. It doesn't really matter anymore that the headlights on the locomotive are off.



** While an overnight train from Geneva to Stockholm isn't unthinkable, routing it via Paris is plain idiotic. Not only that, it travels from Geneva to Basel and then to Paris which is an even longer way than taking the direct route to Paris by entering France a few miles after Geneva. The train is zig-zagging its way through Europe. It's absolutely useless both to start in Geneva (because whoever wants to travel from Geneva to Paris would take a direct train) and to continue beyond Paris with a sleeping-car on the train (because it's not like there aren't any trains that can take you from Geneva to Brussels in ''much'' less time on a ''much'' shorter route). One could think that the American script writers picked some random European cities without informing themselves where exactly in Europe they're located, whether it makes sense to send a train that way, and whether Europe has a much denser network of long-distance railroad lines than the USA.
** Not to mention that it's impossible to let a train have Paris as a mere stopover because the six major stations in Paris are all dead-end, there is no long-distance railroad line ''through'' Paris, and trains from Basel arrive in a different station than where trains to Brussels depart. Trains can only start or terminate in Paris, but not stop. Traveling through Paris via train pretty much always involves changing stations via Métro. Unlike American transcontinental trains, a stopover in a dead-end station does not require turning the entire consist from the locomotive(s) to the last car around, European railroads would simply put another locomotive on the other end of the train and continue with that one, but in Paris' case, it'd require another massive detour to get to the right station or on the right line.
** Of five regular compartment cars, two are first class. Standard for express[=/=]intercity trains between Munich and Zürich in TheEighties, but a European overnight train would never have that much first class in comparison to the second class.

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** While [[http://img64.xooimage.com/views/b/9/9/the-cassandra-cro...---copie-24386f3.jpg/ an overnight train from Geneva to Stockholm Stockholm]] isn't unthinkable, routing it via Paris is plain idiotic. Not only that, it travels from Geneva to Basel and then to Paris which is an even longer way than taking the direct route to Paris by entering France a few miles after Geneva. The train is zig-zagging its way through Europe. It's absolutely useless both to start in Geneva (because whoever wants to travel from Geneva to Paris would take a direct train) and to continue beyond Paris with a sleeping-car on the train (because it's not like there aren't any trains that can take you from Geneva to Brussels in ''much'' less time on a ''much'' shorter route). One could think that the American script writers picked some random European cities without informing themselves where exactly in Europe they're located, whether it makes sense to send a train that way, and whether Europe has a much denser network of long-distance railroad lines than the USA.
** Not to mention that it's impossible to let a train have Paris as a mere stopover because the six major stations in Paris are all dead-end, there is no long-distance railroad line ''through'' Paris, and trains from Basel arrive in a different station than where trains to Brussels depart. Trains can only start or terminate in Paris, but not stop. Traveling through Paris via train pretty much always involves changing stations via Métro. Unlike American transcontinental trains, a stopover in a dead-end station does not require turning the entire consist from the locomotive(s) to the last car around, European railroads would simply put another locomotive on the other end of the train and continue with that one, but in Paris' case, it'd require another massive detour to get to the right station or on the right line.
** Of five regular compartment cars, two are first class. Standard for express[=/=]intercity trains between Munich and Zürich in TheEighties, but a European overnight train would never have that much first class in comparison to the second class.



** In the middle of a train runs a dining-car. This would make it highly difficult to shunt it out of the train, seeing as dining-cars weren't allowed anywhere ''near'' the ferry between Germany and Denmark in those days for fear of too much competition for the on-board restaurants. Also, this particular dining-car model isn't too likely to be allowed to operate in Denmark or Sweden.
** When the train leaves "Geneva" ([[CaliforniaDoubling which is actually Basel]], the train's next stop), two of the three second-car coaches are missing. The second baggage car at the end of the train is there, though.

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** In the middle of a train runs a dining-car. This would make it highly difficult to shunt it out of the train, seeing as dining-cars weren't allowed anywhere ''near'' the ferry between Germany and Denmark in those days for fear of too much competition for the on-board restaurants. Also, this particular dining-car model isn't too likely to be allowed to operate in Denmark or Sweden.
Sweden. So it would have been removed from the middle of the train in Hamburg's busy main station where otherwise only a new locomotive would have been coupled to the other end of the train to reverse it.
** Besides, at the film's time, passenger trains in Denmark were heated with steam since the DSB didn't have diesels with head-end power yet. However, the Swiss RIC cars (the two first-class coaches, the three second-class coaches and the dining-car) didn't have steam heating, so they didn't even have pipes to run heating steam through. The Danish locomotive wouldn't have heated anything beyond the first baggage car running right behind it.
** When the train leaves "Geneva" ([[CaliforniaDoubling which is actually Basel]], Basel SBB]], the train's next stop), two of the three second-car coaches are missing. The second baggage car at the end of the train is there, though.



** In some scenes, a train runs through the scene which doesn't have a single vehicle in common with the Europa-Express, neither the locomotive not any of the cars. One of them even contains German cars whereas the Europa-Express is an entirely Swiss consist. Since almost all passenger cars were green in West and Central Europe in those days, it was believed that the audience wouldn't notice.
** An infected dog is to be taken out of the train in a basket hung from a helicopter. This is impossible on tracks electrified with overhead catenary like almost every bit of Swiss railroad (and any mainline between Switzerland and Paris). However, when the basket comes near the train (and only then), the catenary is missing, as is the second track. In these scenes, the train is pushed by a Bm 4[=/=]4 diesel locomotive which remains unseen while the electric locomotive with its pantographs down remains in plain sight.

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** In some scenes, a train runs through the scene which doesn't have a single vehicle in common with the Europa-Express, neither the locomotive not any of the cars. One of them even contains German cars whereas the Europa-Express is an entirely Swiss consist. Since almost all most passenger cars were green in West and Central Europe in those days, [[ViewersAreMorons it was believed that the audience wouldn't notice.
notice]].
** An infected dog is to be taken out of the train in a basket hung from a helicopter. This is impossible on tracks electrified with overhead catenary like almost every bit of Swiss railroad (and any mainline between Switzerland and Paris). However, when the basket comes near the train (and only then), [[http://www.rotaryaction.com/pages/casncros.html the catenary is missing, as is the second track. suddenly missing]]. In these scenes, the train is pushed by a an off-screen Bm 4[=/=]4 diesel locomotive which remains unseen while the electric locomotive with its pantographs down remains in plain sight.



** "Nuremberg"'s station itself is actually [[CaliforniaDoubling a freight station in Italy]]. Apparently, the American script writers didn't care because it's quite common for American stations to have low-level platforms (i.e. you have to climb stairs to board the train). In Europe, however, passenger stations always have high-level platforms (i.e. the car door and the platform are level).[[note]]American stations with low-level platforms are slowly converting to high-level ones, as new and renovated stations must do so to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.[[/note]] The locomotive on the train is an Italian [=E645=] poorly disguised as a generic Swiss locomotive on one end to remotely resemble the Re 4[=/=]4 II which was on the train all the time up to that point. It's still clearly visible that the Italian locomotive has an articulated carbody. This scene with this locomotive made it onto the movie poster. Both locomotives, by the way, would be unable to operate in Germany, the former because of the wrong current, the latter because the German catenary zig-zag is too wide.

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** "Nuremberg"'s station itself is actually [[CaliforniaDoubling a freight station in Italy]]. Apparently, the American script writers didn't care because it's it used to be quite common for American Amtrak stations especially in FlyoverCountry to have low-level platforms not higher than the rails (i.e. you have to climb stairs steps placed by the crew to board the train). train) or require the passengers to board from the ground next to the tracks. In Europe, however, passenger stations always have high-level platforms (i.e. at least high enough to reach the steps below the car door and the platform are level).[[note]]American stations with low-level platforms are slowly converting to high-level ones, as new and renovated stations must do so to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.[[/note]] door.
**
The locomotive that's on the train upon arrival in "Nuremberg" is [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is408/trainatjc9.1672.jpg an Italian [=E645=] E645 poorly disguised as a generic Swiss locomotive on one end end]] to remotely resemble the [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is408/trainasgd8.424.jpg Re 4[=/=]4 4/4 II 11217 which was on the train all the time up to that point. point]] and numbered Re 4[=/=]4 III 11363 like the similar locomotive that pulls the train in some but not even most Swiss scenes. It's still clearly visible that the Italian locomotive has an articulated carbody. carbody, [[http://img54.xooimage.com/views/e/a/c/the-cassandra-cro...part-7_3-24412bc.jpg/ as are the real front windows behind the larger faux pseudo-Swiss ones]]. [[http://img.xooimage.com/files51/f/3/d/the-cassandra-cro...part-7_9-2441318.jpg The other end remained unchanged except for the green paint]]. [[http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3406863360/tt0074292?ref_=tt_ov_i This scene with this locomotive made it onto the movie poster.poster]]. Both locomotives, by the way, would be unable to operate in Germany, the former because of the wrong current, the latter because the German catenary zig-zag is too wide.



** In "Nuremberg", the locomotive is replaced by a diesel. While in "Nuremberg", it's an Italian [=D143=]. A refurbished American wartime switcher which doesn't even have head-end power for the train is supposed to haul it on the rest of its way. Immediately after leaving "Nuremberg" behind, the train rolls through daylight and what is said to be Poland behind a French first-series BB 66000 repainted green so that the differences in comparison with the previous Italian diesel aren't too obvious, although the BB 66000 looks nothing like a [=D143=]. (Originally, the BB 66000 were blue.)
** Also, both baggage cars suddenly run behind the BB 66000.
** The second class is depicted as saloon cars to make it look clearly inferior to the protagonists' first class. The three Swiss RIC coaches which make up the second class are all compartment cars, though. Also, the interior shot shows a first-class saloon car with only one seat on one side of the aisle and white headrest covers.
** When they were sealed, the two first-class coaches morphed into second-class coaches. This is very clearly visible: The first-class coaches have nine compartments and a yellow line below the roof, the second-class coaches have eleven or twelve compartments.
** According to the movie, there is a central electronic coupling control unit under the dining-car (and only there) from which all couplers on the train can be remote-controlled. In RealLife, however, European railroads still use the same manual couplings as in the mid-[=19th=] century. Blasting one's way to that control box by detonating gas in the restaurant is just as much non-sense, for it'd rather rip the Swiss dining-car's lightweight body to shreds than damage the floor.
** If (not only) a European train is separated while running without properly uncoupling the brake hoses, the rear part will not simply roll out. When the air brake system is opened and the pressure drops, the brakes will apply immediately in both halves of the train. In the movie, none of the two train halves brakes before one of the handbrakes on the separated rear part is used.
** It's clear from the locomotives and catenary already that only the scenes in Geneva are shot on location while most of the rest doesn't even take place in the same country. Most of what should be France or Germany is actually Switzerland, Nuremberg's main station is in Italy and lacks platforms, and Poland is actually France.
** When the train falls off the Cassandra Bridge ([[CaliforniaDoubling which is actually the famous Viaduc de Garabit in France, designed by Gustave Eiffel of Eiffel Tower fame]]), among the falling vehicles are the dining-car, clearly identifiable as the only red car in an otherwise mostly green consist, and two second-class coaches. Just minutes before, the dining-car and everything behind it was explosively uncoupled from the train.

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** In "Nuremberg", the locomotive is replaced by a diesel. While in "Nuremberg", it's an Italian [=D143=]. A refurbished American wartime switcher which doesn't even have head-end power for the train (in fact, as a switcher, it doesn't have any train heating whatsoever) is supposed to haul it on the rest of its way. Immediately after leaving "Nuremberg" behind, the train rolls through daylight and what is said to be Poland behind a French first-series BB 66000 repainted green so that the differences in comparison with the previous Italian diesel aren't too obvious, although the BB 66000 looks nothing like a [=D143=]. (Originally, [=D143=], and maybe so that it looks more like an Eastern Bloc locomotive. (Originally and at that time still, the BB 66000 were blue.)
** [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is179/trainayuy1.7738.jpg In one scene at a level crossing]], BB 66033 has red covers on her headlights, making them tail lights.
** Also, [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is265/trainazpd7.6530.jpg both baggage cars suddenly run behind the BB 66000.
66000]].
** The second class is depicted as saloon cars to make it look clearly inferior to the protagonists' first class. The three Swiss RIC coaches which make up the second class are all compartment cars, though. Also, the interior shot shows a first-class saloon car with only one seat on one side of the aisle and two on the other and white headrest covers.
** When they were sealed, the two first-class coaches morphed into second-class coaches. This is very clearly visible: The first-class RIC coaches have nine compartments and a yellow line below the roof, the second-class RIC coaches have eleven or twelve compartments.
compartments depending on the type.
** After "Nuremberg", there are armed guards on the roofs of the car. It's pretty hard to stand on top of the curved roof of a European passenger car, fluted or not, and even moreso when the car is moving and you're holding an assault rifle.
** According to the movie, there is a central electronic coupling control unit under the dining-car (and only there) from which all couplers on the train can be remote-controlled. In RealLife, however, European railroads still use the same manual chain-like couplings as in the mid-[=19th=] century. [[StuffBlowingUp Blasting one's way to that control box by detonating gas in the restaurant kitchen]] is just as much non-sense, for it'd rather rip the Swiss dining-car's lightweight body aluminum carbody to shreds or at least blow the windows out than damage the floor.
** Besides, Swiss dining-cars have electric stoves. Where'd you get the gas then?
** What's actually blown up is [[http://images-02.delcampe-static.net/img_large/auction/000/022/013/422_001.jpg a not-so-faithful model]] of [[http://ekladata.com/iH8RhbEUk7tQQf1KPrQQStStKz0.jpg a French DEV regular steel dining-car]] that used to be all red back then. [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is179/trainbjjr1.185.jpg The same model is eventually driven off the Cassandra bridge]].
** By the way, the dining-car interior shots (and a group shot of the actors) were taken inside a "light steel" dining-car from the 1930s. Note how [[http://pics.imcdb.org/0is225/trainankf2.7414.jpg the RIC dining-car has one-piece windows]] and [[https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-the-cassandra-crossing-1976-ann-turkel-ray-lovelock-ava-gardner-lionel-29119935.html the one used for inside scenes has windows with sliding upper halves]].
** A more realistic way of uncoupling half the train would have been to undo the coupler underneath the footplates between the cars when there is no pulling force on them. A smarter solution would have been to simply pull the emergency brake which can't be bridged on these coaches (or at all in that time). And even if the emergency brakes had been disabled in any way, lifting one of the footplates and then opening the cock on one of the uncoupled main air line hoses or alternatively uncoupling the respective air hoses without closing the cocks would have stopped the train. But no, too easy and not flashy enough.
** If (not only) a European train is separated while running without properly uncoupling the brake hoses, the rear part will not simply roll out. out, nor will the front part travel on. When the air brake system is opened by ripping the hoses apart, and the pressure drops, the brakes will apply immediately in both halves of the train. In the movie, none of the two train halves brakes before one of the handbrakes on the separated rear part is used.
** It's clear from the locomotives and catenary already that only the scenes in Geneva Basel are shot on location while most of the rest doesn't even take place in the same country. Most of what should be France or Germany is actually Switzerland, Nuremberg's main station is in Italy and lacks platforms, Italy, and Poland is actually France.
** One has to wonder who drives the train to the Cassandra Bridge and finally into the ravine. In RealLife European railroad operation, only a driver who knows that particular line and thus has a permit for it may drive that train on that line. But if he knows it well enough to be aware of the hazardous Cassandra Bridge, he'd know better than to drive an international express train with passengers aboard over that bridge, much less at such a speed. In fact, there must not be a single engineer in Czechoslovakia who doesn't know about the Cassandra Bridge.
** If the Cassandra Bridge is on the verge of collapsing, why isn't the line closed? Why do the Czechoslovak State Railways allow any train, especially an international express train with foreign (Western even) passenger coaches and passengers aboard, to enter that line and try to cross the bridge? How can they force a train driver onto that obvious SuicideMission? And no, they can't be forced by the USA because neither the CIA nor the US military could have any saying in an Eastern Bloc country.
** When the train falls off the Cassandra Bridge ([[CaliforniaDoubling which is actually the famous famous]] [[http://www.garabit.com/viaducgarabit/viaduc.htm Viaduc de Garabit Garabit]] in France, designed by Gustave Eiffel of Eiffel Tower fame]]), fame), among the falling vehicles are the dining-car, clearly identifiable as the only red car in an otherwise mostly green consist, and two second-class coaches. Just minutes before, the dining-car and everything behind it was explosively uncoupled from the train.train.
** [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074292/ The movie poster design used on IMDb]] clearly displays an older American GM-EMD hood unit standing in for the ''Europa-Express''.
** [[http://www.cinemapassion.com/jaquettesdvd/Le-pont-de-Cassandra--Canadienne-.php This DVD cover]] shows both the Italian [=E645=] decorated as a Swiss locomotive and the model train with the French dining-car standing in for the actual Swiss one.
14th Nov '16 10:05:04 PM DanielCase
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkoEE1i0CX8 The teaser trailer]] for the 2016 film adaptation of ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'', which swaps the book's London setting for the more picturesque environs of the Metro-North Railroad's Hudson Line in New York's Westchester County, suggests the filmmakers used both the Hudson Line (along that river; the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardsley-on-Hudson_(Metro-North_station) Ardsley-on-Hudson station]] can be seen in some scenes) and the New Haven Line (along Long Island Sound going into Connecticut, as its name suggests). In real life, the red-trimmed M8s of the latter (seen in one shot from above) would never be used on the Hudson Line, where Emily Blunt is shown on the interiors of what appear to be the M7s that are actually used. Also, there are no pedestrian tunnels under the Hudson Line's tracks; the one shown is on the New Haven Line.

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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkoEE1i0CX8 The teaser trailer]] for the 2016 film adaptation of ''Literature/TheGirlOnTheTrain'', which swaps the book's London setting for the more picturesque environs of the Metro-North Railroad's Hudson Line in New York's Westchester County, suggests the filmmakers used both the Hudson Line (along that river; the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardsley-on-Hudson_(Metro-North_station) Ardsley-on-Hudson station]] can be seen in some scenes) and the New Haven Line (along Long Island Sound going into Connecticut, as its name suggests). In real life, the red-trimmed M8s of the latter (seen in one shot from above) would never be used on the Hudson Line, where Emily Blunt is shown on the interiors of what appear to be the M7s that are actually used. Also, there are no pedestrian tunnels under the Hudson Line's tracks; the one shown is on the Harlem Line in White Plains.
** The finished movie uses no shots of the red cars; averting the trope there. But ... at the end, we see Rachel from the outside of the train, talking in voiceover about how her life is different now, just as she does at the end of the book. An aerial shot of the train shows it is headed towards Bear Mountain and the Hudson Highlands. However, the train car she's sitting in is an M7 ''electric'' multiple-unit passenger car, while the train shown going north is headed by a dual-mode GE Genesis locomotive, which Metro-North operates purely under ''diesel'' power outside of the Park Avenue Tunnel north of Grand Central Station[[note]]since
New Haven Line.York City bans the use of diesel locomotives in rail tunnels[[/note]]. In fact, the tracks at that point have no third rail, so she wouldn't have been sitting in an M7, and the interiors of the passenger cars used with Metro-North's diesel trains look completely different.
23rd Oct '16 5:13:07 AM erforce
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* The second volume of ''TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' has a scene in which a Martian tripod destroys Barnes Bridge along with a train crossing it. However, while the train is spot-on for the period, it's a London and North Western Railway design. Barnes Bridge was on the London and ''South'' Western Railway, and used very different locomotives.

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* The second volume of ''TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' has a scene in which a Martian tripod destroys Barnes Bridge along with a train crossing it. However, while the train is spot-on for the period, it's a London and North Western Railway design. Barnes Bridge was on the London and ''South'' Western Railway, and used very different locomotives.
28th Sep '16 4:46:53 PM Arch9enius
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Added DiffLines:

** One or two teak coaches in a rake of SR stock may be forgivable as through coaches and entire trains did run across the company boundaries, using coaches from whichever company. A train from Penzance (GWR) to Aberdeen (LNER) for example, which took 14 hrs even after the railways were nationalised and singing from the same songbook.
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