History Main / JurisdictionFriction

13th Oct '17 12:26:51 PM Njein
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** Applies to the Washington DC metro area as a whole, with Virginia and Maryland surrounding and only a stone's throw away from the District of Columbia. Not to mention numerous state and federal facility scattered throughout the neighboring counties.

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** Applies to the Washington DC metro area as a whole, with Virginia and Maryland surrounding and only a stone's throw away from the District of Columbia. Not to mention numerous local, state and federal facility facilities scattered throughout the neighboring counties.
23rd Sep '17 12:15:19 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/GoodNewsWeek'': Invoked by Paul [=McDermott=] when [[AustralianPolitics John Howard's]] government was considering sending in the army to deal with a docks dispute:

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* ''Series/GoodNewsWeek'': Invoked by Paul [=McDermott=] when [[AustralianPolitics [[UsefulNotes/AustralianPolitics John Howard's]] government was considering sending in the army to deal with a docks dispute:
10th Sep '17 9:01:37 AM nombretomado
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* In ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the titular ''forensic technicians'' have apparently unlimited authority to interrogate suspects, pursue fugitives, engage in gun battles, make arrests, and cut deals. In the real world, their obviously massive share of departmental funding alone would make the normal cops psychotically jealous -- but the eager and justifiable use of the LawOfConservationOfDetail makes many a FanDumb believe that in the CSIVerse the [[PoliceAreUseless normal cops are useless]]. Also, it seems that CSI also have ridiculous authority to investigate crimes and incidents that clearly would fall under Federal Jurisdiction (The bus accident in ''CSI'', and the plane crash in ''CSI: Miami'' being prime examples which would fall under National Transportation Safety Board, a federal agency). The first season had at least one episode where the [=CSIs=] clashed with the FBI.

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* In ''Series/{{CSI}}'', the titular ''forensic technicians'' have apparently unlimited authority to interrogate suspects, pursue fugitives, engage in gun battles, make arrests, and cut deals. In the real world, their obviously massive share of departmental funding alone would make the normal cops psychotically jealous -- but the eager and justifiable use of the LawOfConservationOfDetail makes many a FanDumb believe that in the CSIVerse Series/CSIVerse the [[PoliceAreUseless normal cops are useless]]. Also, it seems that CSI also have ridiculous authority to investigate crimes and incidents that clearly would fall under Federal Jurisdiction (The bus accident in ''CSI'', and the plane crash in ''CSI: Miami'' being prime examples which would fall under National Transportation Safety Board, a federal agency). The first season had at least one episode where the [=CSIs=] clashed with the FBI.
25th Aug '17 5:03:10 PM GrammarNavi
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* In ''Fanfiction/ChrysalisVisitsTheHague'', there is quite a lot of it going on between the UN (investigating into Queen Chrysalis' crimes on behalf of the International Criminal Court) and the Equestrian crown (who take the matter ''very'' personally and thus take offence to the fact human investigators are roaming around Equestria to begin with).

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* In ''Fanfiction/ChrysalisVisitsTheHague'', ''Fanfic/ChrysalisVisitsTheHague'', there is quite a lot of it going on between the UN (investigating into Queen Chrysalis' crimes on behalf of the International Criminal Court) and the Equestrian crown (who take the matter ''very'' personally and thus take offence to the fact human investigators are roaming around Equestria to begin with).
11th Aug '17 7:10:59 AM v-n-n-n-n
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* In the "Hot Shots" episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Joe Swanson of the Quahog Police Department gets into an argument with a state police officer over jurisdiction in the town, who then argues with an FBI official over the matter. As all three of them are wheelchair-bound and are on the road, a crossing guard tells them that he has jurisdiction over all of them.

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* In the "Hot Shots" episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Joe Swanson of the Quahog Police Department gets into an argument with a state police officer over jurisdiction in the town, town after it's put under quarantine, who then argues with an FBI official over the matter. As all three of them are wheelchair-bound and are on the road, a crossing guard tells them that he has jurisdiction over all of them.
10th Aug '17 11:26:52 PM v-n-n-n-n
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** In the "Hot Shots" episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Joe Swanson of the Quahog Police Department gets into an argument with a state police officer over jurisdiction in the town, who then argues with an FBI official over the matter. As all three of them are wheelchair-bound and are on the road, a crossing guard tells them that he has jurisdiction over all of them.

to:

** * In the "Hot Shots" episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Joe Swanson of the Quahog Police Department gets into an argument with a state police officer over jurisdiction in the town, who then argues with an FBI official over the matter. As all three of them are wheelchair-bound and are on the road, a crossing guard tells them that he has jurisdiction over all of them.
10th Aug '17 9:18:28 PM v-n-n-n-n
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Added DiffLines:

** In the "Hot Shots" episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', Joe Swanson of the Quahog Police Department gets into an argument with a state police officer over jurisdiction in the town, who then argues with an FBI official over the matter. As all three of them are wheelchair-bound and are on the road, a crossing guard tells them that he has jurisdiction over all of them.
4th Aug '17 4:42:35 PM jormis29
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* The movie ''Murder at 1600'' has Wesley Snipes as a Washington D.C. police homicide detective investigating a murder of a secretary at the White House. He has all kinds of Jurisdiction Friction with the Secret Service (which guards the White House). This is also a case of poor research because any murders on Federal property (like the White House) are handled by the FBI.

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* The movie ''Murder at 1600'' ''Film/MurderAt1600'' has Wesley Snipes as a Washington D.C. police homicide detective investigating a murder of a secretary at the White House. He has all kinds of Jurisdiction Friction with the Secret Service (which guards the White House). This is also a case of poor research because any murders on Federal property (like the White House) are handled by the FBI.
27th Jul '17 9:27:09 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/MulhollandFalls'': When the detectives' investigation starts to uncover a high-level conspiracy within the U.S. military, an FBIAgent is sent to Los Angeles in a slimy attempt to intimidate the local cops. This falls flat on its face when Hoover (the main character--an LAPD homicide detective--, not the FBI director of the same name) and the Chief immediately call it out for what it is, and Hoover later ambushes the FBI agent to beat him up. Then he drags the guy out of the federal building they're in and points to a line on the floor to tell him where his jurisdiction ends.

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* ''Film/MulhollandFalls'': ''Film/MulhollandFalls'':
** The LAPD detectives' investigation leads them onto restricted military areas. When they're inevitably arrested by the MPs for trespassing, the Colonel points out that they're out of their jurisdiction.
**
When the detectives' investigation starts to uncover a high-level conspiracy within the U.S. military, an FBIAgent is sent to Los Angeles in a slimy attempt to intimidate the local cops. This falls flat on its face when Hoover (the main character--an LAPD homicide detective--, not the FBI director of the same name) and the Chief immediately call it out for what it is, and Hoover later ambushes the FBI agent to beat him up. Then he drags the guy out of the federal building they're in and points to a line on the floor to tell him where his jurisdiction ends.
25th Jun '17 11:57:06 PM Windrays
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** Friction often occurs not only between the NYPD and feds, but between their Order equivalents, the Manhattan District Attorney and the US Attorney's office. Also, the other boroughs, other towns or counties in the state, the state government, the Port Authority, New Jersey, other US States, the US military, Canada, and other nations. It's one of the writers' favorite ways to disrupt a case that [[YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle could be a slam dunk by the 45 minute mark.]] It helps that New York's unique position in geography and politics means it has a lot of overlapping government spheres of influence, second only perhaps to Washington, D.C.

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** Friction often occurs not only between the NYPD and feds, but between their Order equivalents, the Manhattan District Attorney and the US Attorney's office. Also, the other boroughs, other towns or counties in the state, the state government, the Port Authority, New Jersey, other US States, the US military, Canada, and other nations. It's one of the writers' favorite ways to disrupt a case that [[YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle could be a slam dunk by the 45 minute mark.]] It helps that New York's unique position in geography and politics -- specifically, New York being America's largest city means that Feds are often brought in, while three other states (Connecticut, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania) are very nearby -- means it has a lot of overlapping government spheres of influence, second only perhaps to Washington, D.C.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JurisdictionFriction