History Main / JunglePrincess

28th Mar '18 8:17:45 AM LondonKdS
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** The Marvel Universe has a tropical LostWorld in Antarctica called "the Savage Land", the chief point of which at times seems to be to provide an excuse for heroines to get into skimpy Jungle Princess gear.



* The Marvel Universe has a tropical LostWorld in Antarctica called "the Savage Land", the chief point of which at times seems to be to provide an excuse for heroines to get into skimpy Jungle Princess gear.
7th Mar '18 6:31:05 AM LondonKdS
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** One issue of ''Tom Strong's Terrific Tales'' had Tesla captured by poachers and made into a safari attraction along with several other Jungle Princesses. It turns out they aren't a protected species.

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** One parodic issue of ''Tom Strong's Terrific Tales'' had Tesla going back to nature in a jungle, getting captured by poachers poachers, and made being put into a safari attraction along with several other Jungle Princesses. It turns out they aren't a protected species.


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* The Marvel Universe has a tropical LostWorld in Antarctica called "the Savage Land", the chief point of which at times seems to be to provide an excuse for heroines to get into skimpy Jungle Princess gear.
23rd Feb '18 3:27:58 PM margdean56
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** The whole Marvel game actually got its first female driven series in the 50s with a Comic titled: Lorna, The Jungle Girl. The whole thing was about this father & daughter that goes to South Africa, yet the father passes away because of some thugs and Lorna, having nowhere else to go chooses to stay and train within the forest to the eventually defend her people (animals and humans).

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** The whole Marvel game actually got its first female driven female-driven series in the 50s with a Comic titled: Lorna, comic titled ''Lorna, The Jungle Girl. Girl''. The whole thing was about this father & and daughter that goes go to South Africa, yet Africa; the father passes away because of is killed by some thugs and Lorna, having nowhere else to go go, chooses to stay and train within the forest to the eventually defend her people (animals and humans).



* Deconstructed in ''Gentlemen, the Queen!'' by Wilson Tucker. The titular character, a human girl raised by Martian desert rats and referred to as the Desert Queen, has suffered a lot of realistic consequences from her environement. She has WildHair, is missing one eye and most of her teeth, can barely speak, and has a broken arm that didn't set quite right.
* Jasmine from ''Literature/DeltoraQuest''. A variation is that she only appeared to Lief and Barda to steal their stuff, but eventually came back and save them before they're eaten by the Wen. She also appears in the anime adaptation. Frequently paired with Lief in fanfiction, and the anime has a few hints of it as well, though you have to look for it to see them.

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* Deconstructed in ''Gentlemen, the Queen!'' by Wilson Tucker. The titular character, a human girl raised by Martian desert rats and referred to as the Desert Queen, has suffered a lot of realistic consequences from her environement.environment. She has WildHair, is missing one eye and most of her teeth, can barely speak, and has a broken arm that didn't set quite right.
* Jasmine from ''Literature/DeltoraQuest''. A variation is that she only appeared to Lief and Barda to steal their stuff, but eventually came back and save saved them before they're they could be eaten by the Wen. She also appears in the anime adaptation. Frequently paired with Lief in fanfiction, and the anime has a few hints of it as well, though you have to look for it to see them.
19th Feb '18 2:13:06 PM Storygirl000
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* Candace from ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' became this in the "Where's Perry?" special after [[ItMakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext Jeremy (apparently) breaks up with her]], going to live with the monkeys and learning their language. She also becomes strong enough to [[spoiler: take down several humanoid robots.]] She goes back to normal after her misunderstanding with Jeremy is cleared up.
3rd Jan '18 2:44:35 PM TitoMosquito
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The DistaffCounterpart of {{Tarzan}} of the Apes, this is a young woman of European extraction who has been raised in a [[DarkestAfrica jungle environment]], usually [[RaisedByWolves by animals]]. Despite her upbringing, though, she has managed to grasp the basic rudiments of [[HulkSpeak English]], tools and fashion -- she is frequently seen wearing fetching leather or {{Fur Bikini}}s and wielding a spear. She is far more likely to have RapunzelHair than WildHair, and her legs and armpits will be inexplicably hairless. She's likely to be an EarthyBarefootCharacter.

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The DistaffCounterpart of {{Tarzan}} Franchise/{{Tarzan}} of the Apes, this is a young woman of European extraction who has been raised in a [[DarkestAfrica jungle environment]], usually [[RaisedByWolves by animals]]. Despite her upbringing, though, she has managed to grasp the basic rudiments of [[HulkSpeak English]], tools and fashion -- she is frequently seen wearing fetching leather or {{Fur Bikini}}s and wielding a spear. She is far more likely to have RapunzelHair than WildHair, and her legs and armpits will be inexplicably hairless. She's likely to be an EarthyBarefootCharacter.
14th Nov '17 2:59:51 PM ElSquibbonator
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The trope name ultimately dates to a 1920 silent film serial called ''The Jungle Princess'', but its common usage probably dates from the 1936 film of the same name starring Dorothy Lamour. The trope itself is older than that, though, with possibly the first example being Rima from W. H. Hudson's 1904 book ''Literature/GreenMansions''.

to:

The trope name ultimately dates to a 1920 silent film serial called ''The Jungle Princess'', but its common usage probably dates from the 1936 film of the same name starring Dorothy Lamour. The trope itself is older than that, though, with possibly the first example being Rima from W. H. Hudson's 1904 book ''Literature/GreenMansions''.
''Green Mansions''.



* The 1904 novel ''Literature/GreenMansions'' by W.H. Hudson may be the TropeMaker. She wasn't white or European; she belonged to a lost race that even the local Indians didn't know of. Her skin -- depending on the lighting, it seems -- varied in color, and in bright sunlight seemed "luminous".

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* The 1904 novel ''Literature/GreenMansions'' ''Green Mansions'' by W.H. Hudson may be the TropeMaker. She wasn't white or European; she belonged to a lost race that even the local Indians didn't know of. Her skin -- depending on the lighting, it seems -- varied in color, and in bright sunlight seemed "luminous".
14th Nov '17 2:58:59 PM ElSquibbonator
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The trope name ultimately dates to a 1920 silent film serial called ''The Jungle Princess'', but its common usage probably dates from the 1936 film of the same name starring Dorothy Lamour.

See NubileSavage, which is her default appearance. Not to be confused with TheChiefsDaughter, where the leading lady actually fits the native culture (but is almost always a princess [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses for some reason]]).

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The trope name ultimately dates to a 1920 silent film serial called ''The Jungle Princess'', but its common usage probably dates from the 1936 film of the same name starring Dorothy Lamour.

Lamour. The trope itself is older than that, though, with possibly the first example being Rima from W. H. Hudson's 1904 book ''Literature/GreenMansions''.

See NubileSavage, which is her default appearance. Not to be confused with TheChiefsDaughter, where the leading lady actually fits the native culture (but is almost always called a princess [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses for some reason]]).
14th Nov '17 2:57:01 PM ElSquibbonator
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* Rima the Jungle Girl was the heroine of the 1904 novel ''Literature/GreenMansions'' by W.H. Hudson. She wasn't white or European; she belonged to a lost race that even the local Indians didn't know of. Her skin -- depending on the lighting, it seems -- varied in color, and in bright sunlight seemed "luminous".

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* Rima the Jungle Girl was the heroine of the The 1904 novel ''Literature/GreenMansions'' by W.H. Hudson.Hudson may be the TropeMaker. She wasn't white or European; she belonged to a lost race that even the local Indians didn't know of. Her skin -- depending on the lighting, it seems -- varied in color, and in bright sunlight seemed "luminous".
30th Sep '17 6:55:03 PM WillKeaton
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* Creator/{{Gottlieb}} at one time manufactured a [[http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=1339 "Jungle Princess" pinball game]].

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* Creator/{{Gottlieb}} at one time manufactured a [[http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=1339 "Jungle Princess" pinball game]].game.]]
18th Sep '17 1:41:38 PM JoeMerl
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* {{Downplayed}} in ''Literature/TheLostYearsOfMerlin'' with Rhia(nnon)--she was raised in the woods and wears {{Garden Garment}}s, but she speaks fine and all that, since she was raised by a PlantPerson and her house is a sapient tree. Also, [[spoiler:she's Merlin's twin sister]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JunglePrincess