History Main / JumpPhysics

29th Jul '17 12:18:13 PM nombretomado
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* The {{NES}} [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujZN41GEsb0 pirate hack of]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' is a surprisingly ambitious port of the Super Nintendo classic, and it would actually be playable -- provided they hadn't botched Mario's jumping. Whether Mario is moving slow or running as fast as a bullet, jumping automatically negates any momentum, leaving Mario with a ''very'' limited jumping range. Fortunately, he can still control the direction of his jump in midair.

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* The {{NES}} UsefulNotes/{{NES}} [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujZN41GEsb0 pirate hack of]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' is a surprisingly ambitious port of the Super Nintendo classic, and it would actually be playable -- provided they hadn't botched Mario's jumping. Whether Mario is moving slow or running as fast as a bullet, jumping automatically negates any momentum, leaving Mario with a ''very'' limited jumping range. Fortunately, he can still control the direction of his jump in midair.
21st Jul '17 8:51:36 AM VmKid
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* In ''VideoGame/WhoaDave'', Dave has just as much control in the air as he does on the ground.

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* In ''VideoGame/WhoaDave'', ''VideoGame/WoahDave'', Dave has just as much control in the air as he does on the ground.
12th May '17 5:03:11 AM Cryoclaste
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* The ''{{Metroid}}'' series plays with this trope every way to Sunday. Depending on which game you're playing and which power-ups you've collected, you may be able to jump, high jump, bomb jump (which can almost always be chained at least once, sometimes indefinitely; it is also possible to bomb jump diagonally up and to a side, which can of course be chained, sometimes indefinitely), wall jump, double jump, space (infinite) jump, grab ledges, and/or kill enemies by jumping into them.

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* The ''{{Metroid}}'' ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' series plays with this trope every way to Sunday. Depending on which game you're playing and which power-ups you've collected, you may be able to jump, high jump, bomb jump (which can almost always be chained at least once, sometimes indefinitely; it is also possible to bomb jump diagonally up and to a side, which can of course be chained, sometimes indefinitely), wall jump, double jump, space (infinite) jump, grab ledges, and/or kill enemies by jumping into them.
4th May '17 1:17:49 PM Luigifan
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* For another example in the same franchise, ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' does the hold-for-longer-jump thing, but you don't actually jump until you let go of the button. And since this is Spider-Man we're talking about, your maximum jump height could actually put '''Luigi''' to shame.



** Triple, quadruple or even quintuple jump. Plus whatever flight/teleportation abilities they've got.

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** Triple, quadruple quadruple, or even quintuple jump. Plus whatever flight/teleportation abilities they've got.



*** Specifically damage done causes characters to fly farther and faster when hit before they regain aerial control. So you're trying to damage them enough so that a good hard hit will make them fly so far that they can't make it back to safe ground or just get [=KOed=] instantly.
* The ''VideoGame/KingOfFighters'' series is known for it's many different jumps, which include short hops, normal jumps, hyper hops, and super jumps. The difference between a jump and a hop is based on how long any upwards direction is pressed, meanwhile, hitting down before performing a jump or hop turns it into a super jump or hyper hop.

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*** Specifically Specifically, damage done causes characters to fly farther and faster when hit before they regain aerial control. So you're trying to damage them enough so that a good hard hit will make them fly so far that they can't make it back to safe ground ground, or they just fly out of bounds and get [=KOed=] instantly.
* The ''VideoGame/KingOfFighters'' series is known for it's its many different jumps, which include short hops, normal jumps, hyper hops, and super jumps. The difference between a jump and a hop is based on how long any upwards direction is pressed, pressed; meanwhile, hitting down before performing a jump or hop turns it into a super jump or hyper hop.



* The ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' games have jump physics, though they resemble nothing like regular physics. The number of jumps you can do in a row ranges from two to sixteen, you have free control of your momentum when evading, falling, or dashing. Your dashing can be done without any shown source for such movement, and in directions directly clashing with gravity. Also you and your opponent can ''pause in the air to swordfight''. And this is without getting into how wall running works in this game. So, in short, [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs this is your jump physics on drugs]].

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* The ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' games have jump physics, though they resemble nothing like regular physics. The number of jumps you can do in a row ranges from two to sixteen, you have free control of your momentum when evading, falling, or dashing. Your dashing can be done without any shown source for such movement, and in directions directly clashing with gravity. Also Also, you and your opponent can ''pause in the air to swordfight''. And this is without getting into how wall running {{wall running}} works in this game. So, in short, [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs this is your jump physics on drugs]].



** Some mods, such as ''VideoGame/{{BrutalDoom}}'', add the ability to jump but for only short heights. This can be used to one's advantage to reach certain points and shave off a bit of time.

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** Some mods, such as ''VideoGame/{{BrutalDoom}}'', add the ability to jump jump, but for only short heights. This can be used to one's advantage to reach certain points and shave off a bit of time.



** Inertia was kind of fixed in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', at least when moving on trains. However there's a section where you jump on a speeding train, and inertia no longer applies.
* ''Franchise/StarWars: Dark Forces II: [[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Knight]]'' does the hold-for-longer-jump thing, but you don't actually jump until you let go of the button. Force Jump in the original Jedi Knight is also {{egregious}}: it's possible to a) kill yourself by jumping into a low ceiling with full force jump power, and b) kill yourself by using force jump to jump as high as possible, then take falling damage by landing back on the exact same spot you jumped from.
* The game for ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' does pretty much the same thing as above.

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** Inertia was kind of fixed in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', at least when moving on trains. However However, there's a section where you jump on a speeding train, and inertia no longer applies.
* ''Franchise/StarWars: Dark Forces II: [[VideoGame/DarkForcesSaga Jedi Knight]]'' does the hold-for-longer-jump thing, but you don't actually jump until you let go of the button. button, just like ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' mentioned under "Action Adventure". However, it's especially ridiculous in this game because you can augment your jumps with the Force.
**
Force Jump in the original Jedi Knight is also {{egregious}}: it's possible to a) kill yourself by jumping into a low ceiling with full force jump power, and b) kill yourself by using force jump to jump as high as possible, then take falling damage {{falling damage}} by landing back on the ''the exact same spot you jumped from.
* The game for ''VideoGame/SpiderMan2'' does pretty much the same thing as above.
from''.



* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''; it's sort of justified by you usually being a superhuman, but you still have a pretty floaty jump even in "normal" gravity. Also, in most games you die rather easily from fall damage, but in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo5Guardians 5]]'', fall damage is removed; this is kind of handwaved by your suit being built to withstand the falls, but ''2'' also has you playing as an alien in outdated armor.

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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}''; it's sort of justified by you usually being a superhuman, but you still have a pretty floaty jump even in "normal" gravity. Also, in most games games, you die rather easily from fall damage, but in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Halo 3}} 3]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/Halo5Guardians 5]]'', fall damage is removed; this is kind of handwaved by your suit being built to withstand the falls, but ''2'' also has you playing as an alien in outdated armor.



** ''Quake'''s approach to conservation of momentum was a bit odd, with the end result that you could jump higher when running up a hill, due to the already existing upward momentum. That was fixed eventually.

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** ''Quake'''s ''Quake''[='=]s approach to conservation of momentum was a bit odd, with the end result that you could jump higher when running up a hill, due to the already existing upward momentum. That was fixed eventually.



** Scout can have at maximum ''six jumps'' with the "Soda Popper" at [[LimitBreak maximum Hype]] while soldier can use the Rocket Jumper (a non-damaging rocket launcher) to propel himself to great heights depending on the map or he can use the Gunboats and Beggar's Bazooka's misfires to fly across the map. Demoman's sticky bombs and grenades throw him farther but cost more health to do so but The Sticky Jumper let's Demoman cover tons of ground with little problem at the cost of causing any damage from the weapon.

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** A Scout can have at a maximum of ''six jumps'' with the "Soda Popper" at [[LimitBreak maximum Hype]] Hype]], while soldier a Soldier can use the Rocket Jumper (a non-damaging rocket launcher) to propel himself to great heights depending on the map map, or he can use the Gunboats and Beggar's Bazooka's misfires to fly across the map. A Demoman's sticky bombs and grenades throw him farther than the Soldier's rockets throw the Soldier, but cost more health to do so but The (and the Demoman has less health than the Soldier to begin with). However, the Sticky Jumper let's lets a Demoman cover tons of ground with little problem at the cost of not causing any damage from the weapon.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Painkiller}}'' series allow for bunny-hopping to quickly run around the large levels (even being told as a tip in ''Painkiller: Hell & Damnation''). Seeing how the series is a send-up of older first person shooters, you would have a harder time playing without doing so.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Painkiller}}'' series allow for bunny-hopping to quickly run around the large levels (even being told as a tip in ''Painkiller: Hell & Damnation''). Seeing how the series is a send-up of older first person first-person shooters, you would have a harder time playing without doing so. so.



* ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'' uses a player's Jump skill to determine how high and far they can jump. Unless a player invests a lot of points into it, the distances are realistic. However, the player can change direction and speed in mid-air as well. Besides that, a number of spells effect how players jump and fall, like Feather Fall and Head in the Clouds.

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* ''VideoGame/DungeonsAndDragonsOnline'' uses a player's Jump skill to determine how high and far they can jump. Unless a player invests a lot of points into it, the distances are realistic. However, the player can change direction and speed in mid-air as well. Besides that, a number of spells effect affect how players jump and fall, like Feather Fall and Head in the Clouds.



** Note that originally in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', Mario couldn't change direction in midair and falling beyond his jump height would kill him. ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' would give him and Luigi the ability to survive falls (necessary as jumping between levels was part of the gameplay) and in ''Super Mario Bros'' they had just enough midair control to cut short a forward jump.

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** Note that originally in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', Mario couldn't change direction in midair and falling beyond his jump height would kill him. ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' would give him and Luigi the ability to survive falls (necessary as jumping between levels was part of the gameplay) and in ''Super Mario Bros'' Bros'', they had just enough midair control to cut short a forward jump.



** ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' takes the original Mario jump physics and logically transitions them into the third dimension--Mario can still do his standard jump and hold his momentum as he moves in air or lands on the ground (allowing him to wall jump and do flips, in addition to his triple jump) and you still have some control of his movement as he's in mid-air. Curiously, Mario has a startling amount of control over his Long Jump, allowing him to keep going backwards without losing momentum if he uses it over and over (which in turn allows the famous "Backwards Long Jump" glitch to work).

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** ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' takes the original Mario jump physics and logically transitions them into the third dimension--Mario dimension -- Mario can still do his standard jump and hold his momentum as he moves in air or lands on the ground (allowing him to wall jump and do flips, in addition to his triple jump) and you still have some control of his movement as he's in mid-air. Curiously, Mario has a startling amount of control over his Long Jump, allowing him to keep going backwards without losing momentum if he uses it over and over (which in turn allows the famous "Backwards Long Jump" glitch to work).



** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand'' for the GameBoy superficially looks and plays like the original game, but the jump physics are noticably different; for instance, when Mario jumps diagonally, you can't control how it moves (although you can when it jumps straight up) and he maintains no momentum.

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** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand'' for the GameBoy superficially looks and plays like the original game, but the jump physics are noticably noticeably different; for instance, when Mario jumps diagonally, you can't control how it moves (although you can when it jumps straight up) and he maintains no momentum.



* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4shac02_ks BROS]]'', a [[FollowTheLeader knockoff]] of ''Super Mario Bros'' for Atari 8-Bit computers, has very stiff jump physics ([[DamnYouMuscleMemory not helping you press up on a joystick to jump and move, even if you try to do a diagonal jump]]), and Mario has no weight or momentum when moving (but a bit of mid-air direction control, oddly), resulting in a platformer rife with FakeDifficulty.
* The {{NES}} [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujZN41GEsb0 pirate hack of]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' is a surprisingly ambitious port of the Super Nintendo classic, and it would actually be playable -- provided they hadn't botched Mario's jumping. Whether Mario is moving slow or running as fast as a bullet, jumping automatically negates any momentum, leaving Mario with a ''very'' limited jumping range. Fortunately, he can still control the direction of his jump in mid air.

to:

* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4shac02_ks BROS]]'', a [[FollowTheLeader knockoff]] of ''Super Mario Bros'' for Atari 8-Bit computers, has very stiff jump physics ([[DamnYouMuscleMemory not helping it doesn't help that you have to press up on a joystick to jump and move, even if you try to do a diagonal jump]]), and Mario has no weight or momentum when moving (but a bit of mid-air direction control, oddly), resulting in a platformer rife with FakeDifficulty.
* The {{NES}} [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujZN41GEsb0 pirate hack of]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' is a surprisingly ambitious port of the Super Nintendo classic, and it would actually be playable -- provided they hadn't botched Mario's jumping. Whether Mario is moving slow or running as fast as a bullet, jumping automatically negates any momentum, leaving Mario with a ''very'' limited jumping range. Fortunately, he can still control the direction of his jump in mid air.midair.



* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'' usually plays this trope straight (with a double jump, a WallJump in a few cases, etc.) but in the level where you're on a cart, your inertia ''is'' actually maintained and if you simply jump without trying to go in either direction, you'll land right back on the moving cart.

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* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'' usually plays this trope straight (with a double jump, a WallJump in a few cases, etc.) but in the level where you're on a cart, your inertia ''is'' actually maintained maintained, and if you simply jump without trying to go in either direction, you'll land right back on the moving cart.



* ''VideoGame/{{Tallowmere}}'' is completely ridiculous with this. Your character can jump ''any'' number of times in midair without ever touching the ground. Basically, it's the "pause jump" bug from ''VideoGame/ContraForce'' below, only it's a fundamental aspect of the gameplay (and no pausing is involved (in fact, "pausing" the wrong way may send you right back down to the ground, due to the game's RealTimeWeaponChange mechanics)). The game's RandomlyGeneratedLevels are actually built with a hero who can literally DoubleJump all day in mind; during the course of a game, you'll be crossing dozens of ridiculously wide gaps (don't worry, there are no {{Bottomless Pit}}s in this game (though SpikesOfDoom are plentiful)), ascending through countless tall vertical shafts (again, potentially with SpikesOfDoom a-plenty), and if you make it far enough, eventually navigating through a chamber where ''all surfaces'' save the start and exit are covered in SpikesOfDoom.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Tallowmere}}'' is completely ridiculous with this. Your character can jump ''any'' number of times in midair without ever touching the ground. Basically, [[strike:Basically, it's the "pause jump" bug from ''VideoGame/ContraForce'' below, only it's a fundamental aspect of the gameplay (and no pausing is involved (in fact, "pausing" the wrong way may send you right back down to the ground, due to the game's RealTimeWeaponChange mechanics)). mechanics)).]] The game's RandomlyGeneratedLevels are actually built with a hero who can literally DoubleJump all day in mind; during the course of a game, you'll be crossing dozens of ridiculously wide gaps (don't worry, there are no {{Bottomless Pit}}s in this game (though SpikesOfDoom are plentiful)), ascending through countless tall vertical shafts (again, potentially with SpikesOfDoom a-plenty), and if you make it far enough, eventually navigating through a chamber where ''all surfaces'' save the start and exit are covered in SpikesOfDoom.
[[/folder]]



* ''VideoGame/ContraForce'' has a famous "pause jump" bug: if the game is paused when the character is performing a jump, then, after the game is resumed, he will still fly up the distance of a jump. And then it can be done ''again''. That is, with perfect pause timing, one can literally FLY.

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* ''VideoGame/ContraForce'' has a famous "pause jump" bug: if the game is paused when the character is performing a jump, then, after the game is resumed, he will still fly up the distance of a jump. And then it can be done ''again''. That is, with perfect pause timing, one can literally FLY.
'''FLY'''.



* ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}'''s cybernetic main character can vault several city blocks when his Agility skill rises high enough.
* ''VideoGame/ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' has uncommonly realistic jump physics in its train level. The train sometimes turns, sharply (for a train, at least), and if you jump you're likely to land to the train's side just as you would expect. The trick comes in waiting for straight sections, or jumping lightly and from the inside.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}'''s ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}''[='=]s cybernetic main character can vault several city blocks when his Agility skill rises high enough.
* ''VideoGame/ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' has uncommonly realistic jump physics in its train level. The train sometimes turns, sharply (for a train, at least), and if you jump jump, you're likely to land to the train's side side, just as you would expect. The trick comes in waiting for straight sections, or jumping lightly and from the inside.



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' has fairly realistic physics in this regard. Standing still, Niko can't get more than a few inches of height. A running jump can clear a few feet, but not more than you'd expect. And, of course, inertia takes its toll if you decide to jump on a speeding train or some such. Although the sprinting animation is a lot faster than the jumping animation, so if you jump while at full speed the difference apparently [[NoConservationOfEnergy evaporates into the ether]] and Niko slows right down.
** However, in ''SanAndreas'', the Jump Physics are all over the place. CJ himself can't jump very high (although he can abuse LeParkour), but if you max his Biking stat, stick him on a Mountain Bike, and bunny hop, he can scale ''Mount Chilliad'' in a couple of minutes-and fall off it with no hit point loss.
* ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'': Alex Mercer can do some pretty insane things, starting with jumping thirty feet in the air and working up to airdashing back against his previous momentum; there's an entire upgrade category dedicate to physics-warping stunts like this.
* One of the signature elements of the ''VideoGame/{{Gothic}}'' series (to the point its absence is one of the reasons ''3'' and ''4'' are considered to [[FanonDiscontinuity not exist]]) is the context sensitive jump system, where instead of the default standard barely controllable RealLife/Belmont long jump, the hero will automatically do a standing jump if under a ledge and try to grab it, climb over any low edges in his path or pull himself up if any ledge above him is low enough. The physics get very gamey however, if the player is trained in the acrobatics skill (5 skill points in ''Gothic 1'' or upon reaching a given point in dexterity in ''Gothic 2'' with ''Night of the Raven''), which makes his jumps turn him into a fully controllable missile.

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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' has fairly realistic physics in this regard. Standing still, Niko can't get more than a few inches of height. A running jump can clear a few feet, but not more than you'd expect. And, of course, inertia takes its toll if you decide to jump on a speeding train or some such. Although the sprinting animation is a lot faster than the jumping animation, so if you jump while at full speed speed, the difference apparently [[NoConservationOfEnergy evaporates into the ether]] and Niko slows right down.
** However, in ''SanAndreas'', the Jump Physics are all over the place. CJ himself can't jump very high (although he can abuse LeParkour), but if you max his Biking stat, stick him on a Mountain Bike, and bunny hop, he can scale ''Mount Chilliad'' in a couple of minutes-and minutes -- and fall off it with no hit point loss.
* ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'': Alex Mercer can do some pretty insane things, starting with jumping thirty feet in the air and working up to airdashing back against his previous momentum; there's an entire upgrade category dedicate dedicated to physics-warping stunts like this.
* One of the signature elements of the ''VideoGame/{{Gothic}}'' series (to the point its absence is one of the reasons ''3'' and ''4'' are considered to [[FanonDiscontinuity not exist]]) is the context sensitive jump system, where instead of the default standard barely controllable RealLife/Belmont barely-controllable RealLife[=/=]Belmont long jump, the hero will automatically do a standing jump if under a ledge and try to grab it, climb over any low edges in his path path, or pull himself up if any ledge above him is low enough. The physics get very gamey gamey, however, if the player is trained in the acrobatics skill (5 skill points in ''Gothic 1'' or upon reaching a given point in dexterity in ''Gothic 2'' with ''Night of the Raven''), which makes his jumps turn him into a fully controllable missile.



* In ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'', [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000810c Megaman anticipiates this.]] [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000812c Instead the laws of physics break against him -- he loses all his forward momentum by jumping.]] [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000813c So he cheats instead]].

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* In ''Webcomic/BobAndGeorge'', [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000810c Megaman anticipiates Mega Man anticipates this.]] [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000812c Instead Instead, the laws of physics break against him -- he loses all his forward momentum by jumping.]] [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/000813c So he cheats instead]].instead.]]
4th May '17 12:58:18 PM Luigifan
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* The player character's maximum falling speed is more or less the same as their initial jumping speed, and they will land in the same state whether they fall five inches or five hundred feet. Some games may have a notion of "too far to fall", after which the [[FallingDamage fall becomes damaging]], though there are usually ways of cheating the laws of physics and [[GroundPound stopping your fall without hurting yourself]].
* It is possible for a jumping character to change direction in mid-air (air control), in pretty much all 2D platformers and {{FPS}}es (but not so much in third person -- perhaps because being able to see yourself do this makes it clear how silly it is.) Some first person shooters even let players customize how much air control they have. In real life, most terrestrial species simply can't exert enough force in midair to effect even the slightest change to their momentum, making [[InertiaIsACruelMistress inertia a cruel mistress]] [[TruthInTelevision indeed]]. If the real-life behavior is enforced in a video game[[note]]the early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' titles are a good example of this[[/note]], characters may start feeling as if they're on an InvisibleGrid.

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* The player character's maximum falling speed is more or less the same as their initial jumping speed, and they will land in the same state whether they fall five inches or five hundred feet. Some games may have a notion of "too far to fall", after which the [[FallingDamage fall becomes damaging]], though there are usually ways of cheating the laws of physics and [[GroundPound [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou stopping your fall without hurting yourself]].
yourself]], ranging from the GroundPound to the DoubleJump to some form of VideoGameFlight (among other tricks). (Just keep in mind that what works in one game may not work in another.)
* It is possible for a jumping character to change direction in mid-air (air control), in pretty much all 2D platformers and {{FPS}}es (but not so much in third person -- perhaps because being able to see yourself do this makes it clear how silly it is.) is). Some first person shooters even let players customize how much air control they have. In real life, most terrestrial species simply can't exert enough force in midair to effect even the slightest change to their momentum, making [[InertiaIsACruelMistress inertia a cruel mistress]] [[TruthInTelevision indeed]]. If the real-life behavior is enforced in a video game[[note]]the early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' titles are a good example of this[[/note]], characters may start feeling as if they're on an InvisibleGrid.



* Another common ability is the WallJump, where a character kicks diagonally against a near wall to get a further upward boost. Commonly used to ascend narrow shafts by bouncing off both sides. Though possible in real life, you're unlikely to get higher than you were before without specially designed shoes and a high-friction wall surface, and you can forget about pulling off more than one in a row without the ability to turn in midair.

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* Another common ability is the WallJump, where a character kicks diagonally against a near wall to get a further upward boost. Commonly This is commonly used to ascend narrow shafts by bouncing off both sides. Though possible in real life, you're unlikely to get higher than you were before without specially designed shoes and a high-friction wall surface, and you can forget about pulling off more than one in a row without the ability to turn in midair.



* Similarly, some characters can Crouch or even become Prone whilst in midair, especially common in {{FPS}}es. Which is a point used by players to access areas normally too high for a normal jump. Used perhaps when the RocketJump is not necessary or does not work in the present game mechanics. But can alternatively be coupled together to reach extremely high areas. This might be a way to represent the character's ability to vault over obstacles or grab ledges, which is usually very difficult to implement in a FPS.
* The player should be able to jump different heights, but they should also jump as soon as the jump button is pressed (otherwise avoiding enemies becomes frustrating). Since pressure sensitive buttons were not around for the early platformers, one way of dealing with this is to have the player jump off the ground at a relatively low speed, but for the first fraction of a second continue accelerating upwards (while in the air) if the jump button is pressed. This gives the effect that a quickly tapped button gives a small jump while a held button gives a large jump. Another is to cause the player to continue rising up to their maximum jump height as long as the jump button is pressed, but to begin falling as soon as it is released.

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* Similarly, some characters can Crouch or even become Prone whilst in midair, especially common in {{FPS}}es. Which is a point This can be used by players to access areas normally too high for a normal jump. Used perhaps jump, most often when the RocketJump is not necessary or does not work in the present game mechanics. But these techniques can alternatively be coupled together to reach extremely high areas. This might be a way to represent the character's ability to vault over obstacles or grab ledges, which is usually very difficult to implement in a FPS.
* The player should be able to jump different heights, but they should also jump as soon as the jump button is pressed (otherwise avoiding enemies becomes frustrating). Since pressure sensitive pressure-sensitive buttons were not around for the early platformers, one way of dealing with this is to have the player jump off the ground at a relatively low speed, but for the first fraction of a second continue accelerating upwards (while in the air) if the jump button is pressed. This gives the effect that a quickly tapped button gives a small jump while a held button gives a large jump. Another is to cause the player to continue rising up to their maximum jump height as long as the jump button is pressed, but to begin falling as soon as it is released.



* If the character is lucky enough to possess a DoubleJump, RocketBoots, air dash or any other special abilities for maneuvering in midair, they are almost guaranteed to be strictly limited during a single jump but recharge instantly when you touch the ground--even if you're jumping down a pit several stories deep.

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* If the character is lucky enough to possess a DoubleJump, RocketBoots, air dash dash, or any other special abilities for maneuvering in midair, they are almost guaranteed to be strictly limited during a single jump but recharge instantly when you touch the ground--even ground -- even if you're jumping down a pit several stories deep.



Note that any or all of these points can be changed; these represent the baseline level for the ''SuperMarioBros'' descended platformer.

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Note that any or all of these points can be changed; these represent the baseline level for the ''SuperMarioBros'' descended ''SuperMarioBros''-descended platformer.



* The JumpPhysics in ''Enter The Matrix'' are slightly amazing when leaping in BulletTime. It's very possible to jump around corners, or to attempt a jump, realise you're not going to make it and turn around to land back on the ledge you originally came from. Just shows what a freed mind can do.
* One of the biggest reasons for the original ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'''s legendary NintendoHard difficulty is that Belmont does ''not'' have fine jump control. Rather, his jumps are "committed", like those in real life -- once he jumps, he can change his mind, but not his direction, and he always jumps the same height. This remained true through the NES games and was softened only slightly for the SNES and Turbo Duo games. However, all the 2D games since ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' have allowed the player full jump control and/or DoubleJump capabilities like any other PlatformGame. In addition, the recent games also come with a power-up that enables the player character to jump very high, straight up into the air--and they can do this consecutively without ever touching solid ground. This grants one the amusing ability to crash into the ceiling, complete with (in some games) an appropriate collision sound and bits of falling rubble.

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* The JumpPhysics in ''Enter The Matrix'' are slightly amazing when leaping in BulletTime. It's very possible to jump around corners, or to attempt a jump, realise realize you're not going to make it it, and turn around to land back on the ledge you originally came from. Just shows what a freed mind can do.
* One of the biggest reasons for the original ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'''s legendary NintendoHard difficulty is that Belmont does ''not'' have fine jump control. Rather, his jumps are "committed", like those in real life -- once he jumps, he can change his mind, [[InertiaIsACruelMistress but not his direction, direction]], and he always jumps the same height. This remained true through the NES games and was softened only slightly for the SNES and Turbo Duo games. However, all the 2D games since ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' have allowed the player full jump control and/or DoubleJump capabilities like any other PlatformGame. In addition, the recent games also come with a power-up that enables the player character to jump very high, straight up into the air--and air -- and they can do this consecutively without ever touching solid ground. This grants one the amusing ability to crash into the ceiling, complete with (in some games) an appropriate collision sound and bits of falling rubble.



** 8-bit Simon is the MightyGlacier of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' 's BossRush mode specifically because his jumps are committed, unlike JackOfAllStats Juste and FragileSpeedster Maxim. Which means he's going to take a LOT of hits. Good thing his defense and offense are sky high.

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** 8-bit Simon is the MightyGlacier of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance'' 's ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance''[='=]s BossRush mode specifically because his jumps are committed, unlike JackOfAllStats Juste and FragileSpeedster Maxim. Which means he's going to take a LOT ''lot'' of hits. hits that those two would be able to avoid. Good thing his defense and offense are sky high.sky-high.



* {{Lampshaded}} in the first level of ''VideoGame/UltimateSpiderMan''. When explaining his ability to double jump Spidey admits that it is physically impossible but "so is most of the stuff I do".

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* {{Lampshaded}} in the first level of ''VideoGame/UltimateSpiderMan''. When explaining his ability to double jump DoubleJump, Spidey admits that it is physically impossible impossible, but "so is most of the stuff I do".



* ''VideoGame/TheMatrixPathOfNeo'' has a double jump, a wall jump and an anti-gravity/hover jump.

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* ''VideoGame/TheMatrixPathOfNeo'' has a double jump, a wall jump jump, and an anti-gravity/hover jump.


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[[folder: Rougelike]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Tallowmere}}'' is completely ridiculous with this. Your character can jump ''any'' number of times in midair without ever touching the ground. Basically, it's the "pause jump" bug from ''VideoGame/ContraForce'' below, only it's a fundamental aspect of the gameplay (and no pausing is involved (in fact, "pausing" the wrong way may send you right back down to the ground, due to the game's RealTimeWeaponChange mechanics)). The game's RandomlyGeneratedLevels are actually built with a hero who can literally DoubleJump all day in mind; during the course of a game, you'll be crossing dozens of ridiculously wide gaps (don't worry, there are no {{Bottomless Pit}}s in this game (though SpikesOfDoom are plentiful)), ascending through countless tall vertical shafts (again, potentially with SpikesOfDoom a-plenty), and if you make it far enough, eventually navigating through a chamber where ''all surfaces'' save the start and exit are covered in SpikesOfDoom.
5th Mar '17 4:39:23 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Crackdown}}'''s cybernetic main character can vault several city blocks when his Agility skill rises high enough.
* ''ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' has uncommonly realistic jump physics in its train level. The train sometimes turns, sharply (for a train, at least), and if you jump you're likely to land to the train's side just as you would expect. The trick comes in waiting for straight sections, or jumping lightly and from the inside.

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* ''{{Crackdown}}'''s ''VideoGame/{{Crackdown}}'''s cybernetic main character can vault several city blocks when his Agility skill rises high enough.
* ''ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' ''VideoGame/ShadowsOfTheEmpire'' has uncommonly realistic jump physics in its train level. The train sometimes turns, sharply (for a train, at least), and if you jump you're likely to land to the train's side just as you would expect. The trick comes in waiting for straight sections, or jumping lightly and from the inside.
26th Dec '16 5:30:28 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Action 52}}'' has all of it's platformers share similar or identical jump physics, all of them being stiff, sloppy mechanics that will only let you move in mid-jump while you're descending. The jumps have no momentum or weight, whether you're rising or falling.

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* ''{{Action 52}}'' ''VideoGame/Action52'' has all of it's its platformers share similar or identical jump physics, all of them being stiff, sloppy mechanics that will only let you move in mid-jump while you're descending. The jumps have no momentum or weight, whether you're rising or falling.
19th Dec '16 7:04:21 AM MegaMarioMan
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* The mentioned ''SuperMarioBros'' is the UrExample. Mario's ability to jump is famous worldwide in Mario-based [=RPGs=].

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* The mentioned ''SuperMarioBros'' ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' is the UrExample. Mario's ability to jump is famous worldwide in Mario-based [=RPGs=].



** ''SuperMario64'' takes the original Mario jump physics and logically transitions them into the third dimension--Mario can still do his standard jump and hold his momentum as he moves in air or lands on the ground (allowing him to wall jump and do flips, in addition to his triple jump) and you still have some control of his movement as he's in mid-air. Curiously, Mario has a startling amount of control over his Long Jump, allowing him to keep going backwards without losing momentum if he uses it over and over (which in turn allows the famous "Backwards Long Jump" glitch to work).

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** ''SuperMario64'' ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' takes the original Mario jump physics and logically transitions them into the third dimension--Mario can still do his standard jump and hold his momentum as he moves in air or lands on the ground (allowing him to wall jump and do flips, in addition to his triple jump) and you still have some control of his movement as he's in mid-air. Curiously, Mario has a startling amount of control over his Long Jump, allowing him to keep going backwards without losing momentum if he uses it over and over (which in turn allows the famous "Backwards Long Jump" glitch to work).



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand'' for the GameBoy superficially looks and plays like the original game, but the jump physics are noticably different; for instance, when Mario jumps diagonally, you can't control how it moves (although you can when it jumps straight up) and he maintains no momentum.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand2'' features jumping closer to the original game -- Mario actually has a little momentum, although he still moves in a rather weightless way.
* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4shac02_ks BROS]]'', a [[FollowTheLeader knockoff]] of SuperMarioBros for Atari 8-Bit computers, has very stiff jump physics ([[DamnYouMuscleMemory not helping you press up on a joystick to jump and move, even if you try to do a diagonal jump]]), and Mario has no weight or momentum when moving (but a bit of mid-air direction control, oddly), resulting in a platformer rife with FakeDifficulty.

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* ** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand'' for the GameBoy superficially looks and plays like the original game, but the jump physics are noticably different; for instance, when Mario jumps diagonally, you can't control how it moves (although you can when it jumps straight up) and he maintains no momentum.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand2'' ** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioLand2SixGoldenCoins'' features jumping closer to the original game -- Mario actually has a little momentum, although he still moves in a rather weightless way.
* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4shac02_ks BROS]]'', a [[FollowTheLeader knockoff]] of SuperMarioBros ''Super Mario Bros'' for Atari 8-Bit computers, has very stiff jump physics ([[DamnYouMuscleMemory not helping you press up on a joystick to jump and move, even if you try to do a diagonal jump]]), and Mario has no weight or momentum when moving (but a bit of mid-air direction control, oddly), resulting in a platformer rife with FakeDifficulty.
30th Sep '16 10:25:22 AM Unityd3v
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* The ''VideoGame/KingOfFighters'' series is known for it's many different jumps, which include short hops, normal jumps, hyper hops, and super jumps. The difference between a jump and a hop is based on how long any upwards direction is pressed, meanwhile, hitting down before performing a jump or hop turns it into a super jump or hyper hop.
26th Sep '16 11:10:12 AM Toxicworld
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** Alucard loses jump control after a double jump, becoming committed to that arc for an extra bit of height.

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** Alucard loses jump control after a double high jump, becoming committed to that arc for an extra bit of height.
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