History Main / Jobber

31st Jul '16 6:09:56 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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This occured primarily in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. It rarely happens because the inevitable result would be getting fired. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to "do the job" on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.

to:

This occured occurred primarily in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. It rarely happens because the inevitable result would be getting fired. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to "do the job" on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "carpenters" or "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.
17th May '16 2:10:21 PM JamesAustin
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->-- '''Mottos of Wrestling/{{ECW}}, and later [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]], stable The J.O.B. Squad'''

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->-- '''Mottos -->-- '''Mottos''' of Wrestling/{{ECW}}, and later [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]], stable The J.O.B. Squad'''
Squad
10th Apr '16 5:16:41 AM RobTan
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In any competition, there are winners and losers. In ProfessionalWrestling, the overwhelming majority of them have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.

to:

In any competition, there are winners and losers. In ProfessionalWrestling, the overwhelming majority of them have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.
short. A related term, "jabroni" was used onscreen during the days of {{Kayfabe}} as a slang term for weak or poor wrestler, and as a way of indicating jobbers without admitting matches were scripted, and is still used occasionally today.
30th Dec '15 10:58:11 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."

to:

* One The other thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."
30th Dec '15 10:57:32 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself."

to:

This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character wrestler look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, agreed, because that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself."



Since the revelation of pro wrestling being scripted, jobbing has lost a lot of its stigma in the last few years. In fact, many smarks will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".

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Since the The revelation of pro wrestling being scripted, predetermined caused jobbing has lost to lose a lot of its stigma in the last few years. stigma. In fact, many smarks "{smark}s" will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".



* Wrestling/RonSimmons (with [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield Bradshaw]] as The Acolytes) never received a singles push in the WWE (although he did become the first black WCW World Champion), and would only see action backstage in promos, after the runaway success of Doom (with Butch Reed) and the failed push with the Farooq character. The most individual fame he gained in WWE was [[{{Flanderization}} as the guy who would randomly appear and say "DAMN!" at everything.]]

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* Wrestling/RonSimmons (with [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield Bradshaw]] as The Acolytes) never received a singles push in the WWE (although he did become the first black WCW World Champion), and would only see action backstage in promos, after the runaway success of Doom (with Butch Reed) and the failed push with the Farooq character.gimmick. The most individual fame he gained in WWE was [[{{Flanderization}} as the guy who would randomly appear and say "DAMN!" at everything.]]



* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."

to:

* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."
16th Oct '15 4:55:02 PM SSJMagus
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* Wrestling/BobbyLashley's collegiate and Army wrestling championships.



* [[WildSamoan Polynesian wrestlers]] often suffer this fate, regardless of their actual ability. The main exceptions are Wrestling/{{Yokozuna}}, The Rock (who's Polynesian on his mother's side) and Wrestling/{{TNA}}'s Wrestling/SamoaJoe, who are/were among their respective promotions' top stars. Roman Reigns seems to be going down this road as well, as he is in the middle of a huge push as a member of Wrestling/TheShield, though time will tell if it lasts.
* It's very common for WWE mid-carders such as Wrestling/KofiKingston, Wrestling/CodyRhodes, Wrestling/WadeBarrett, Wrestling/TheMiz, Wrestling/ZackRyder, [[Wrestling/ClaudioCastagnoli Antonio Cesaro]], [[Wrestling/RonKillings R-Truth]], and Wrestling/DamienSandow to be frequently used as jobbers against such big names as Wrestling/JohnCena, Wrestling/CMPunk, Wrestling/RandyOrton, Wrestling/{{Sheamus}}, Wrestling/AlbertoDelRio, and Wrestling/{{Ryback}}, because it seems that the WWE Universe is only interested in seeing the big names and not the mid-card. Thus, the Intercontinental Championship and the United States Championship both have lost their prestige as of late. This is known as being a "jobber to the stars".

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* [[WildSamoan Polynesian wrestlers]] often suffer this fate, regardless of their actual ability. The main exceptions are Wrestling/{{Yokozuna}}, The Rock (who's Polynesian on his mother's side) and Wrestling/{{TNA}}'s Wrestling/SamoaJoe, who are/were among their respective promotions' top stars. Roman Reigns seems to be going down this road as well, as he is in the middle of a huge push as a member of Wrestling/TheShield, though time will tell if it lasts.
lasts. And Samoa Joe seems to be the only Samoan wrestler achieve superstardom ''with his Samoan ancestry as part of his gimmick''.
* It's very common for WWE mid-carders such as Wrestling/KofiKingston, Wrestling/CodyRhodes, Wrestling/WadeBarrett, Wrestling/TheMiz, Wrestling/ZackRyder, [[Wrestling/ClaudioCastagnoli Antonio Cesaro]], [[Wrestling/RonKillings R-Truth]], and Wrestling/DamienSandow to be frequently used as jobbers against such big names as Wrestling/JohnCena, Wrestling/CMPunk, Wrestling/RandyOrton, Wrestling/{{Sheamus}}, Wrestling/AlbertoDelRio, and Wrestling/{{Ryback}}, because it seems that the WWE Universe is only interested in seeing the big names and not the mid-card. Thus, the Intercontinental Championship and the United States Championship both have lost their prestige as of late.late, aside from when Cena holds one of the belts in between his main event runs. This is known as being a "jobber to the stars".
27th Apr '15 2:18:33 PM ChaoticNovelist
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In any competition, there are winners and losers. Of course, the overwhelming majority of them in ProfessionalWrestling have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.

This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because, well, that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself." This almost never happens anymore because the inevitable result would be getting fired; it was mainly seen in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to do the job on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.

to:

In any competition, there are winners and losers. Of course, In ProfessionalWrestling, the overwhelming majority of them in ProfessionalWrestling have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.

This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because, well, because that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself." "

This almost never happens anymore because the inevitable result would be getting fired; it was mainly seen occured primarily in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions.regions. It rarely happens because the inevitable result would be getting fired. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to do "do the job job" on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.



* Some are trainers and/or road agents (the people who actually lay out matches), who take the jobber role in order to work with rookie talents and help them hone their skills. Val Venis worked in this capacity for several years in the WWE. Finlay's return to the ring started out in this capacity, as the initial plans were for him to get a few wins to build credibility, then work as a jobber to put younger talent over, but he actually gained a following and thus broke the mold.
** Sometimes, the road agents will bring their old wrestling personas out when the need presents. Have a foreign heel who resembles the ones from the old days? Here comes WWE Hall of Famer (and road agent) Sgt. Slaughter to give him his comeuppance. Or, many times, not...
* Conversely, rookies can get experience and learn both in and out of {{Kayfabe}} even while jobbing. In Japan a tradition has been for newer wrestlers to be jobbing more often due to inexperience; Japanese pro wrestling legend Wrestling/KentaKobashi lost his first ''63'' matches (in an intentional attempt by Giant Baba to build Wrestling/KentaKobashi as [[{{Determinator}} "never say die"]]) before his first win, and Naomichi Marufuji was mostly a jobber in Wrestling/AllJapanProWrestling before jumping to Wrestling/ProWrestlingNOAH. In general, if there's a tag match, expect the guy with the least experience to be pinned or submit.

to:

* Some are trainers and/or road agents (the people who actually lay out matches), who take the jobber role in order to work with rookie talents and help them hone their skills. Val Venis worked in this capacity for several years in the WWE. Finlay's return to the ring started out in this capacity, as the initial plans were for him to get a few wins to build credibility, then work as a jobber to put younger talent over, but he actually gained a following and thus broke the mold.
** Sometimes, the road agents will bring their old wrestling personas out when the need presents. Have a foreign heel who resembles the ones from the old days? Here comes WWE Hall of Famer (and road agent) Sgt. Slaughter to give him his comeuppance. Or, many times, not...
comeuppance.
* Conversely, rookies Rookies can get experience and learn both in and out of {{Kayfabe}} even while jobbing. In Japan a tradition has been for newer wrestlers to be jobbing more often due to inexperience; Japanese pro wrestling legend Wrestling/KentaKobashi lost his first ''63'' matches (in an intentional attempt by Giant Baba to build Wrestling/KentaKobashi as [[{{Determinator}} "never say die"]]) before his first win, and Naomichi Marufuji was mostly a jobber in Wrestling/AllJapanProWrestling before jumping to Wrestling/ProWrestlingNOAH. In general, if there's a tag match, expect the guy with the least experience to be pinned or submit.



* More recently, wrestlers who are seen as potential stars, such as WWE's Wrestling/MontelVontaviousPorter, have been put through an extended period as a jobber to ensure their loyalty to the company. This happened after WWE lost both Wrestling/BrockLesnar and Wrestling/BobbyLashley to Mixed Martial Arts after sizable pushes in the main event.

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* More recently, wrestlers Wrestlers who are seen as potential stars, such as WWE's Wrestling/MontelVontaviousPorter, have been put through an extended period as a jobber to ensure their loyalty to the company. This happened after WWE lost both Wrestling/BrockLesnar and Wrestling/BobbyLashley to Mixed Martial Arts after sizable pushes in the main event.



* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventer

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* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventereventer.



Some long-running jobbers have gained a cult following. The most famous jobber would probably be the [[Wrestling/SteveLombardi Brooklyn Brawler]], who recently got his own action figure. The second best-known example would be Wrestling/BarryHorowitz, who briefly went from perennial jobber to mid-card in the mid-90's when he pulled an upset victory on Wrestling/ChrisCandido (then wrestling as Skip), and then went on to beat him in at least two more matches. He is now a WWE road agent.

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Some long-running jobbers have gained a cult following. The most famous jobber would probably be the [[Wrestling/SteveLombardi Brooklyn Brawler]], who recently got his own action figure. The second best-known example would be Wrestling/BarryHorowitz, who briefly went from perennial jobber to mid-card in the mid-90's when he pulled an upset victory on Wrestling/ChrisCandido (then wrestling as Skip), and then went on to beat him in at least two more matches. He is now a WWE road agent.



Some other wrestlers avoid "paying their dues" as jobbers because they're actual fighters who have gained prestige in actual athletic contests:

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Some other wrestlers avoid "paying their dues" as jobbers because they're actual real fighters who have gained prestige in actual non-scripted athletic contests:



* Paul Wight (Wrestling/TheBigShow) achieved mega-stardom in his rookie year by not only winning the WCW championship, but by being the only wrestler in history to win Pro Wrestling Illustrated's (the Bible of Professional Wrestling) Rookie of the Year and Wrestler of the Year awards in the same year. Since then, he has rarely held any belt, and is usually either in squashes or jobs. He has jobbed to Wrestling/ChrisBenoit, Kevin Nash (good matches, actually) and much smaller wrestlers. Outside of his occasional main event runs, he's basically the WWE equivalent of a GiantMook. He is, however, the only wrestler to date to have held the WCW, WWE, ''and'' ECW titles in the course of his career.

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* Paul Wight (Wrestling/TheBigShow) achieved mega-stardom in his rookie year by not only winning the WCW championship, but by being the only wrestler in history to win Pro Wrestling Illustrated's (the Bible of Professional Wrestling) Rookie of the Year and Wrestler of the Year awards in the same year. Since then, he has rarely held any belt, and is usually either in squashes or jobs. He has jobbed to Wrestling/ChrisBenoit, Kevin Nash (good matches, actually) and much smaller wrestlers. Outside of his occasional main event runs, he's basically the WWE equivalent of a GiantMook. He is, however, the only wrestler to date to have held the WCW, WWE, ''and'' ECW titles in the course of his career.



An established talent jobbing to a new wrestler is considered a huge favor, and will often boost the new wrestler's popularity almost instantly.

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An established talent jobbing to a new wrestler is considered a huge favor, and will often boost the new wrestler's popularity almost instantly.



* Probably the only thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) is known for (other than injuries, XPacHeat and spending [[BrainBleach "One Night in]] Wrestling/{{Chyna}}") is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."

to:

* Probably the only One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) is known for (other than injuries, XPacHeat and spending [[BrainBleach "One Night in]] Wrestling/{{Chyna}}") is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."



* Tag-team specialist [[Wrestling/TheWorldsGreatestTagTeam Shelton Benjamin]] upsetting Triple H on a 2004 RAW established Benjamin as an upper-card superstar.
** And this was arguably the high point of Shelton's career (aside from being on the receiving end of one of Wrestling/ShawnMichaels' most memorable superkicks).

to:

* Tag-team specialist [[Wrestling/TheWorldsGreatestTagTeam Shelton Benjamin]] upsetting Triple H on a 2004 RAW established Benjamin as an upper-card superstar.
** And this
superstar. This was arguably the high point of Shelton's career (aside from being on the receiving end of one of Wrestling/ShawnMichaels' most memorable superkicks).



The term "jobber" has crept into other genres as well, most particularly anime FightingSeries, in reference to when a character loses a fight against an enemy for seemingly [[TheWorfEffect no reason other than to show off how strong the enemy was]].

to:

The term "jobber" has crept into other genres as well, most particularly anime FightingSeries, in reference to when a character loses a fight against an enemy for seemingly [[TheWorfEffect no reason other than to show off how strong the enemy was]].
was]] and thus a credible threat for TheHero.
29th Mar '15 8:54:55 PM johnnyfog
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This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into a less prominent role. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because, well, that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself." This almost never happens anymore because the inevitable result would be getting fired; it was mainly seen in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

to:

This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role.role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because, well, that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself." This almost never happens anymore because the inevitable result would be getting fired; it was mainly seen in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.
24th Feb '15 12:43:26 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Ivory jobbing to Wrestling/TrishStratus in 2001. This is considered the moment Trish became a legitimate wrestler after spending her first year in the WWF as an eye-candy manager.

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* Ivory Wrestling/{{Ivory}} jobbing to Wrestling/TrishStratus in 2001. This is considered the moment Trish became a legitimate wrestler after spending her first year in the WWF as an eye-candy manager.
23rd Sep '14 5:18:19 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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In any competition, there are winners and losers. Of course, since ProfessionalWrestling is... well, "[[{{Kayfabe}} fake]]"... the winners and losers are pre-determined. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.

to:

In any competition, there are winners and losers. Of course, since the overwhelming majority of them in ProfessionalWrestling is... well, "[[{{Kayfabe}} fake]]"... the winners and losers are pre-determined.have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.
This list shows the last 10 events of 34. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Jobber