History Main / Jobber

13th Mar '17 12:38:37 PM Gimere
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* Some are trainers and/or road agents (the people who lay out matches), who take the jobber role in order to work with rookie talents and help them hone their skills. Val Venis worked in this capacity for several years in the WWE. Finlay's return to the ring started out in this capacity, as the initial plans were for him to get a few wins to build credibility, then work as a jobber to put younger talent over, but he gained a following and thus broke the mold.

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* Some are trainers and/or road agents (the people who lay out matches), who take the jobber role in order to work with rookie talents and help them hone their skills. Val Venis worked in this capacity for several years in the WWE. Finlay's return to the ring started out in this capacity, as the initial plans were for him to get a few wins to build credibility, then work as a jobber to put younger talent over, but he gained a following and thus broke the mold.



* Rookies can get experience and learn both in and out of {{Kayfabe}} even while jobbing. In Japan a tradition has been for newer wrestlers to be jobbing more often due to inexperience; Japanese pro wrestling legend Wrestling/KentaKobashi lost his first ''63'' matches (in an intentional attempt by Giant Baba to build Wrestling/KentaKobashi as [[{{Determinator}} "never say die"]]) before his first win, and Naomichi Marufuji was mostly a jobber in Wrestling/AllJapanProWrestling before jumping to Wrestling/ProWrestlingNOAH. In general, if there's a tag match, expect the guy with the least experience to be pinned or submit.

to:

* Rookies can get experience and learn both in and out of {{Kayfabe}} even while jobbing. In Japan a tradition has been for newer wrestlers to be jobbing more often due to inexperience; Japanese pro wrestling legend Wrestling/KentaKobashi lost his first ''63'' matches (in an intentional attempt by Giant Baba to build Wrestling/KentaKobashi him as [[{{Determinator}} a "never say die"]]) die" {{Determinator}} before his first win, and Naomichi Marufuji was mostly a jobber in Wrestling/AllJapanProWrestling before jumping to Wrestling/ProWrestlingNOAH. In general, if there's a tag match, expect the guy with the least experience to be pinned or submit.



The revelation of pro wrestling being predetermined caused jobbing to lose a lot of stigma. In fact, many "{smark}s" will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".

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The revelation of pro wrestling being predetermined caused jobbing to lose a lot of stigma. In fact, many "{smark}s" "[[SmartMark smarks]]" will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".



* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff[[note]](during Orndorff's 1986-1987 heel run and feud with Hulk Hogan)[[/note]].

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* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s Wrestling/TedDiBiase's whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff[[note]](during Orndorff's 1986-1987 heel run and feud with Hulk Hogan)[[/note]].



Compare CListFodder, RedShirt.

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Compare CListFodder, CListFodder and RedShirt.
7th Feb '17 10:52:35 AM Briguy52748
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* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff. [[note]](during Orndorff's 1986-1987 heel run and feud with Hulk Hogan)[[/note]].

to:

* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff. [[note]](during Orndorff[[note]](during Orndorff's 1986-1987 heel run and feud with Hulk Hogan)[[/note]].
7th Feb '17 10:52:12 AM Briguy52748
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* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against [[Wrestling/PaulOrndorff Mr. Wonderful Paul Orndorff]] [[note]](during Orndorff's heel/bitter-at-Hulk Hogan run)[[/note]].

to:

* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against [[Wrestling/PaulOrndorff Mr. Wonderful "Mr. Wonderful" Paul Orndorff]] Orndorff. [[note]](during Orndorff's heel/bitter-at-Hulk Hogan run)[[/note]].1986-1987 heel run and feud with Hulk Hogan)[[/note]].
7th Feb '17 10:51:12 AM Briguy52748
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* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy.

to:

* Virgil's tour as [[Wrestling/TedDiBiase Ted [=DiBiase=]]]'s whipping boy. At least once before assuming the character of Virgil, Mike Jones was billed as "Luscous Brown"; his only known match under that name, which aired on ''WWF Wrestling Challenge'', was against [[Wrestling/PaulOrndorff Mr. Wonderful Paul Orndorff]] [[note]](during Orndorff's heel/bitter-at-Hulk Hogan run)[[/note]].
7th Feb '17 10:47:16 AM Briguy52748
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** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match. [[note]](One speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down.)[[/note]]

to:

** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously infamous oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match.match for the WWF. [[note]](One speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down.)[[/note]]
17th Oct '16 3:12:23 PM Briguy52748
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* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.

to:

* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.
17th Oct '16 3:11:47 PM Briguy52748
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* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], during his early 1980s WWF run. Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.

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* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], Wrestling/CurtHennig, during his early 1980s WWF run. run, long before he became "Mr. Perfect." Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.
17th Oct '16 3:10:48 PM Briguy52748
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* Wrestling/MickFoley, who wrestled under the name Jack Foley in the 1980s.
* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], during his early 1980s WWF run. Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.



* Nearly all second generation wrestlers, including Brian "Grandmaster Sexay" Lawler (son of [[Wrestling/JerryLawler Jerry "The King" Lawler]]) and Scott Putski (son of "Polish Power" Ivan Putski).

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* Nearly all second generation wrestlers, including Brian "Grandmaster Sexay" Lawler (son of [[Wrestling/JerryLawler Jerry "The King" Lawler]]) Lawler]]), David Sammartino (son of Wrestling/BrunoSammartino) and Scott Putski (son of "Polish Power" Ivan Putski).
17th Oct '16 3:02:54 PM Briguy52748
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* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego.

to:

* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.



** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].

to:

** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one match. [[note]](One speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].down.)[[/note]]
18th Sep '16 2:17:44 PM Briguy52748
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* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventer.

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* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventer. One typical example given by fans is Peter Stilsbury, an Australian native who competed for the WWF from 1987 to 1988 as Outback Jack; Jack, using an exaggerated "friendly Aussie 'mate" gimmick, was given a huge push early in his run (and according to some reports, was also briefly considered for a tag team championship run with HillbillyJim), but when it became evident Stilsbury lacked what it took to be successful, he was jobbed out before being let go from the company in the spring of 1988.
** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].
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