History Main / Jobber

17th Oct '16 3:12:23 PM Briguy52748
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* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.

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* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.
17th Oct '16 3:11:47 PM Briguy52748
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* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], during his early 1980s WWF run. Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.

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* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], Wrestling/CurtHennig, during his early 1980s WWF run. run, long before he became "Mr. Perfect." Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.
17th Oct '16 3:10:48 PM Briguy52748
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* Wrestling/MickFoley, who wrestled under the name Jack Foley in the 1980s.
* [[Wrestling/MrPerfect Curt Hennig]], during his early 1980s WWF run. Wrestling/BretHart also was used as a "jobber to the stars" early in his WWF run in 1984, before being paired with Jim Neidhart and his fortunes changing greatly.



* Nearly all second generation wrestlers, including Brian "Grandmaster Sexay" Lawler (son of [[Wrestling/JerryLawler Jerry "The King" Lawler]]) and Scott Putski (son of "Polish Power" Ivan Putski).

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* Nearly all second generation wrestlers, including Brian "Grandmaster Sexay" Lawler (son of [[Wrestling/JerryLawler Jerry "The King" Lawler]]) Lawler]]), David Sammartino (son of Wrestling/BrunoSammartino) and Scott Putski (son of "Polish Power" Ivan Putski).
17th Oct '16 3:02:54 PM Briguy52748
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* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego.

to:

* Some wrestlers who have had a long and respected career will be happy for the opportunity to "make" a potential star by giving them the rub. Doing so marks them as a loyal company man who puts the good of the business before their own ego. Wrestling/PedroMorales is a prime example -- he was the WWF's first Triple Crown winner but by the mid 1980s, he was generally booked on the losing end of matches to up-and-coming stars such as Wrestling/TheHonkyTonkMan and Wrestling/JakeRoberts, and was reportedly completely squashed by Wrestling/TheOneManGang during a non-televised house show. Other examples included Tony Garea (after a successful run as a tag-team wrestler) and Wrestling/TitoSantana.



** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].

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** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one match. [[note]](One speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].down.)[[/note]]
18th Sep '16 2:17:44 PM Briguy52748
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* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventer.

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* Some are wrestlers who are very good at making their opponents look great, but lack the charisma or presence to make it as a main eventer. One typical example given by fans is Peter Stilsbury, an Australian native who competed for the WWF from 1987 to 1988 as Outback Jack; Jack, using an exaggerated "friendly Aussie 'mate" gimmick, was given a huge push early in his run (and according to some reports, was also briefly considered for a tag team championship run with HillbillyJim), but when it became evident Stilsbury lacked what it took to be successful, he was jobbed out before being let go from the company in the spring of 1988.
** To that end, other jobbers are simply what they are presented to be on television ... not very good. One infamous example is a young man named Steve Reese, who infamously oversold the offense of his opponent, [[Wrestling/AllenCoage Bad News Brown]] during a match that aired on ''WWF Superstars of Wrestling'' in early 1989; for reasons that have never been made clear, this was Reese's only known match [[note]](one speculation was that Brown's intended jobber opponent no-showed and, needing a fill in, turned to Reese; the match is also known for its play-by-play commentary, where commentator VinceMcMahon relentlessly made fun of Reese's physique and lack of ability as Brown mercilessly beat him down)[[/note]].
31st Jul '16 6:09:56 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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This occured primarily in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. It rarely happens because the inevitable result would be getting fired. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to "do the job" on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.

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This occured occurred primarily in the early days of pro wrestling, which was done on a regional basis aside from the champion who'd travel across regions. It rarely happens because the inevitable result would be getting fired. Sometimes a local challenger would "steal" the title by refusing to job to the champion, which for many years meant that the champion would always be somebody who can legitimately fight back against an uncooperative foe.

As strange as it may seem sometimes, there is an entire class of pro wrestlers whose primary purpose in being on TV is to "do the job" on a regular basis. These wrestlers, otherwise known as "carpenters" or "enhancement talent," primarily serve to make the other wrestlers look that much better, by [[TheatricsOfPain selling]] everything the other wrestler does as if they're dying.
17th May '16 2:10:21 PM JamesAustin
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->-- '''Mottos of Wrestling/{{ECW}}, and later [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]], stable The J.O.B. Squad'''

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->-- '''Mottos -->-- '''Mottos''' of Wrestling/{{ECW}}, and later [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]], stable The J.O.B. Squad'''
Squad
10th Apr '16 5:16:41 AM RobTan
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In any competition, there are winners and losers. In ProfessionalWrestling, the overwhelming majority of them have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.

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In any competition, there are winners and losers. In ProfessionalWrestling, the overwhelming majority of them have been pre-determined since at least 1920. Fans and insiders alike refer to being on the losing end of the equation as "doing the job," or "jobbing" in short.
short. A related term, "jabroni" was used onscreen during the days of {{Kayfabe}} as a slang term for weak or poor wrestler, and as a way of indicating jobbers without admitting matches were scripted, and is still used occasionally today.
30th Dec '15 10:58:11 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."

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* One The other thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."
30th Dec '15 10:57:32 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, because that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself."

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This terminology came about because losing the match tends to make the wrestler's character wrestler look worse, and could be a sign that the promotion is transitioning him into [[OutOfFocus a less prominent role]]. This is especially true if he's booked to lose in a championship match or [[SquashMatch get squashed]]. But they finish the match and let the other guy pin them as scripted, agreed, because that's part of the job. There have been times when a wrestler would refuse to "do the job" and would fight for real and defeat the guy who they were scheduled to lose to; this is called "going into business for yourself."



Since the revelation of pro wrestling being scripted, jobbing has lost a lot of its stigma in the last few years. In fact, many smarks will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".

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Since the The revelation of pro wrestling being scripted, predetermined caused jobbing has lost to lose a lot of its stigma in the last few years. stigma. In fact, many smarks "{smark}s" will respect a wrestler who is selfless enough to consistently let put another wrestler over for the good of the company. Some of the best wrestlers in the business (Wrestling/MickFoley, Wrestling/RicFlair, etc.) take immense pride in their ability to "make" another guy through selling and jobbing, though few would label them as "jobbers".



* Wrestling/RonSimmons (with [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield Bradshaw]] as The Acolytes) never received a singles push in the WWE (although he did become the first black WCW World Champion), and would only see action backstage in promos, after the runaway success of Doom (with Butch Reed) and the failed push with the Farooq character. The most individual fame he gained in WWE was [[{{Flanderization}} as the guy who would randomly appear and say "DAMN!" at everything.]]

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* Wrestling/RonSimmons (with [[Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield Bradshaw]] as The Acolytes) never received a singles push in the WWE (although he did become the first black WCW World Champion), and would only see action backstage in promos, after the runaway success of Doom (with Butch Reed) and the failed push with the Farooq character.gimmick. The most individual fame he gained in WWE was [[{{Flanderization}} as the guy who would randomly appear and say "DAMN!" at everything.]]



* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."

to:

* One thing Sean Waltman (123 Kid, X-Pac) Wrestling/XPac) is known for is that he broke through with a (Kayfabe) upset of Razor Ramon. He'd been all over WWF TV as "The X Kid" with X changing on a seemingly weekly basis, at which point BretHart Wrestling/BretHart taunted Ramon and christened Waltman the "1-2-3" kid to mock "The Bad Guy."
This list shows the last 10 events of 39. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Jobber