History Main / ItCantBeHelped

20th Jan '17 11:38:37 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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* The original ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' has Barry say this verbatim while Jill is lamenting the sudden disappearance of their captain, Wesker. The fact that the situation theoretically ''can'' be helped makes it a picture-perfect example of the "gaman" attitude; he's not saying there's nothing they can do, he's just telling Jill not to fret about it.
25th Oct '16 8:14:41 PM nombretomado
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* The concept of gaman is central to the musical [Allegiance] starring GeorgeTakei and loosely based on his own experiences in an internment camp during world War ii. The Japanese inmates initially turn to gaman to help them survive the camps, but the concept is also deconstructed as some younger inmates try to take whatever agency and power they can get and even rebel against the camps guards.

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* The concept of gaman is central to the musical [Allegiance] starring GeorgeTakei Creator/GeorgeTakei and loosely based on his own experiences in an internment camp during world War ii. The Japanese inmates initially turn to gaman to help them survive the camps, but the concept is also deconstructed as some younger inmates try to take whatever agency and power they can get and even rebel against the camps guards.
30th Sep '16 4:13:08 PM DavidDelony
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One attribute highly prized in Japanese society is that of "gaman", or "endurance". Gaman is the quality of enduring what seems unbearable with dignity and grace. The idea basically that is that if there's something unpleasant around you, [[TheStoic it's better to tough it out in an act of self-sacrifice rather than act immediately to change it]]. It's similar to Calvin's Dad's belief in the comic strip ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' that suffering builds character.

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One attribute highly prized in Japanese society is that of "gaman", or "endurance". Gaman is the quality of enduring what seems unbearable with dignity and grace. The idea basically that is that if there's something unpleasant around you, [[TheStoic it's better to tough it out in an act of self-sacrifice rather than act immediately to change it]]. It's similar to Calvin's Dad's belief in the comic strip ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' that suffering builds character.
MiseryBuildsCharacter.
30th Aug '16 1:21:36 PM Morgenthaler
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* A phrase often quoted by Western reporters who visited the afflicted area after the Touhoku Earthquake of 2011. Along with ''gaman'', it was used to describe the lives of the disaster victims after the earthquake and tsunami, mostly on how they coped with the grief, the anxiety, freezing weather, and uncomfortable living circumstances. Was picked up on particularly because of the stark difference of how the victims reacted to the disaster compared to the more unfortunate victims of Haiti and Hurricane Katrina.

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* A phrase often quoted by Western reporters who visited the afflicted area after the Touhoku Earthquake of 2011. Along with ''gaman'', it was used to describe the lives of the disaster victims after the earthquake and tsunami, mostly on how they coped with the grief, the anxiety, freezing weather, and uncomfortable living circumstances. Was picked up on particularly because of the stark difference of how the victims reacted to the disaster compared to the more unfortunate victims of Haiti and Hurricane Katrina.


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30th Aug '16 1:00:37 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''Creator/HarryTurtledove'' has several characters - including non-Japanese - using the phrase in his ''{{Worldwar}}'' series.

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* ''Creator/HarryTurtledove'' has several characters - including non-Japanese - using the phrase in his ''{{Worldwar}}'' ''Literature/{{Worldwar}}'' series.
21st Aug '16 12:18:00 AM MsChibi
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Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win", "It is what it is", "YouCantFightFate"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.

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Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win", "It is what it is", "YouCantFightFate"), "YouCantFightFate," "That's life,"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.
10th Aug '16 7:37:15 PM PaulA
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* ''[[AsianSaga Shogun]]'' by James Clavell uses this phrase as a subtheme, although there it is mispelled as "Shigata ga nai". [[SelfDemonstratingArticle Shikata ga nai]].

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* ''[[AsianSaga Shogun]]'' ''Literature/{{Shogun}}'' by James Clavell uses this phrase as a subtheme, although there it is mispelled as "Shigata ga nai". [[SelfDemonstratingArticle Shikata ga nai]].
5th Aug '16 9:17:29 AM MsChibi
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Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win", "It is what it is"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.

to:

Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win", "It is what it is"), is", "YouCantFightFate"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.
5th Aug '16 9:06:42 AM MsChibi
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One attribute highly prized in Japanese society is that of "gaman", or "endurance". Gaman is the quality of enduring what seems unbearable with dignity and grace. The idea basically that is that if there's something unpleasant around you, it's better to tough it out in an act of self-sacrifice rather than act immediately to change it. It's similar to Calvin's Dad's belief in the comic strip ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' that suffering builds character.

This is the source of many instances of ValuesDissonance in imported/translated Japanese works. Americans, to put it politely, are very familiar with complaining--the nation was founded with free speech in mind, and the ability to speak one's mind is highly valued and constantly taught. A key part of America's self identity is that it is populated with people who acted to make a better life for themselves rather than accept what they had. Britons have the concept of the StiffUpperLip, the idea of dismissing troubles and snarking irreverently about it. The Japanese, however, will have a {{Salaryman}} suffer in silence when his boss demands more hours and his wife screams at him because of a miscarriage, or a mother suffer in silence as she keeps her husband's affair with the neighbor a secret while the child asks where Daddy is.

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One attribute highly prized in Japanese society is that of "gaman", or "endurance". Gaman is the quality of enduring what seems unbearable with dignity and grace. The idea basically that is that if there's something unpleasant around you, [[TheStoic it's better to tough it out in an act of self-sacrifice rather than act immediately to change it.it]]. It's similar to Calvin's Dad's belief in the comic strip ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' that suffering builds character.

This is the source of many instances of ValuesDissonance in imported/translated Japanese works. Americans, to put it politely, are very familiar with complaining--the nation was founded with free speech in mind, and the ability to speak one's mind is highly valued and constantly taught. A key part of [[AmericanDream America's self identity is that it is populated with people who acted to make a better life for themselves rather than accept what they had.had]]. Britons have the concept of the StiffUpperLip, the idea of dismissing troubles and snarking irreverently about it. The Japanese, however, will have a {{Salaryman}} suffer in silence when his boss demands more hours and his wife screams at him because of a miscarriage, or a mother suffer in silence as she keeps her husband's affair with the neighbor a secret while the child asks where Daddy is.
is. It's also a characteristic of the YamatoNadeshiko.



Those interested in linguistics may want to compare this to the Russian word ''nicho'' (ничо), which literally translates to 'nothing' but is more often used as meaning 'there's nothing to be done about it." It has connotations of futility or extreme fatalism (but depending on context, it can also mean nonchalant dismissal as in 'nothing happened, really') and also bears some resemblance to the American English saying "Shit happens", although that has more [[ObligatorySwearing swearing]]. A Mexican version of this is named ''Ni modo'' (roughly translated as ''No way (to do this)''), but it carries more negative connotations than their Japanese and Russian counterparts, due to the severe ValuesDissonance not only between Mexico and the U.S. but also between other regions of the country. The Portuguese saying "Fazer o que?" ("What can I do?") has a pretty similar meaning, even carrying the negative connotations of its japanese counterpart.

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Those interested in linguistics may want to compare this to the Russian word ''nicho'' (ничо), which literally translates to 'nothing' but is more often used as meaning 'there's nothing to be done about it." It has connotations of futility or extreme fatalism (but depending on context, it can also mean nonchalant dismissal as in 'nothing happened, really') and also bears some resemblance to the American English saying "Shit happens", although that has more [[ObligatorySwearing swearing]]. A Mexican version of this is named ''Ni modo'' (roughly translated as ''No way (to do this)''), but it carries more negative connotations than their Japanese and Russian counterparts, due to the severe ValuesDissonance not only between Mexico and the U.S. but also between other regions of the country. The Portuguese saying "Fazer o que?" ("What can I do?") has a pretty similar meaning, even carrying the negative connotations of its japanese counterpart.
Japanese counterpart.

Compare and contrast JapaneseSpirit, TheFatalist, AngstWhatAngst
5th Aug '16 9:01:03 AM MsChibi
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Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.

to:

Phrased as either "shou ga nai" (informal) or "shikata ga nai" (formal). Similar to the French phrase "C'est la vie" ("Such is life") and America's equivalents (e.g. "Shit happens", "You can't win"), win", "It is what it is"), this phrase can be translated as simply weathering troubles and accepting that life can be harsh, but actually has a deeper definition to it.
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