History Main / InvincibleVillain

5th Feb '16 10:00:34 AM Peridonyx
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** On a larger scale, we have ArcVillain Frank Breitkopf from "No Way Out" and "No Way Out II: The Evilution of Frank". He's unbreakably charming, he's CrazyPrepared, he keeps outwitting the BAU, his VillainousBreakdown is downplayed TranquilFury instead of satisfying outrage, [[spoiler:he's never actually punished (instead dying on his own terms), and his lasting influence even sends Gideon (a major protagonist, no less) over the DespairEventHorizon and causes him to leave the BAU forever.]]
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** On a larger scale, we have ArcVillain Frank Breitkopf from "No "''No Way Out" Out''" and "No "''No Way Out II: The Evilution of Frank".Frank''". He's unbreakably charming, he's CrazyPrepared, he keeps outwitting the BAU, his VillainousBreakdown is downplayed TranquilFury instead of satisfying outrage, [[spoiler:he's never actually punished (instead dying on his own terms), and his lasting influence even sends Gideon (a major protagonist, no less) over the DespairEventHorizon and causes him to leave the BAU forever.]]
5th Feb '16 9:58:58 AM Peridonyx
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** On a larger scale, we have ArcVillain Frank Breitkopf from "No Way Out" and "No Way Out II: The Evilution of Frank". He's unbreakably charming, he's CrazyPrepared, he keeps outwitting the BAU, his VillainousBreakdown is downplayed TranquilFury instead of satisfying outrage, [[spoiler:he's never actually punished (instead dying on his own terms), and his lasting influence even sends Gideon (a major protagonist, no less) over the DespairEventHorizon and causes him to leave the BAU forever.]]
4th Feb '16 4:31:38 PM sparkles38
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* Shredder in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' series. Compared to his '89 version (where he constantly suffered defeat) and his 2003 version (where he was tougher, got a few wins in on turtles but wasn't completely unbeatable), this Shredder constantly hands the turtles their butts or succeeds in whatever he does for the sake of his revenge. Most the turtles can do is either inconvenience him or at best tie with him in a fight and run away, but so far he never suffers a complete defeat to the point fans are starting find his end actions of his appearances predictable because the writers can't seem to just let him lose in one of his revenge bids.
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* Shredder in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'' series. Compared to his '89 version (where he constantly suffered defeat) and his 2003 version (where he was tougher, got a few wins in on turtles but wasn't completely unbeatable), this Shredder constantly hands the turtles their butts or succeeds in whatever he does for the sake of his revenge. Most The most the turtles can do is either cause inconvenience for him or at best tie with him in a fight and run away, but so far he never suffers a complete defeat to the point fans are starting find his end actions of his appearances predictable because the writers can't seem to just let him lose in one of his revenge bids.
2nd Feb '16 7:13:41 AM VeryMelon
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** Triple H was actually a {{Face}} from shortly after WrestleMania 22 in 2006 all the way until Summerslam 2013, and was actually a BoringInvincibleHero during that period of time instead.
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** Triple H was actually a {{Face}} from shortly after WrestleMania 22 in 2006 all the way until Summerslam 2013, and was actually a BoringInvincibleHero an InvincibleHero during that period of time instead.

* The only time Mandy, the VillainProtagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' can be said to have "lost" on her own show are the times [[KillEmAll everybody loses]] for some reason; otherwise, she's like a BoringInvincibleHero who's evil. The only time another living being truly won a decisive victory over her was in the {{crossover}} with ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor''.
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* The only time Mandy, the VillainProtagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' can be said to have "lost" on her own show are the times [[KillEmAll everybody loses]] for some reason; otherwise, she's like a BoringInvincibleHero an InvincibleHero who's evil. The only time another living being truly won a decisive victory over her was in the {{crossover}} with ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor''.
1st Feb '16 2:16:56 PM LentilSandEater
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** This is because usually, a heel boss only works if some wrestlers, preferably baby {{face}}s, are able to outsmart them, such as Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin finding a way around Vince's stacking the deck at many points during their feud in 99. Vince seemed to have things work, but Austin found a way around it. This hasn't been the case in some of the more recent heel [=GMs=] that the Wrestling/{{WWE}} has put out there, where it might take months for any heel GM to get their comeuppance due to them either being way too smart, have way too many allies, or just being [[OffScreenInertia on TV way too long during a show]]. However, heel [=GMs=] (Laurinaitis, especially), as well as some other heels, when they finally get beat, might draw some FanDumb from fans who insist that a character has been ruined, or that the WWE did something awful because they lost a battle if they like something about the character to a fault. To be fair, Laurinaitis ''was'' supposed to be {{kayfabe}} fired in the January of that year. The only reason he wasn't was because the man who was about to fire him, COO Wrestling/TripleH, was interrupted by Wrestling/TheUndertaker in order to challenge him for ''Wrestling/WrestleMania'' that year. While Hunter was busy with that, Laurinaitis managed to beg the Board of Directors for a second chance.
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** This is because usually, a heel boss only works if some wrestlers, preferably baby {{face}}s, are able to outsmart them, such as Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin finding a way around Vince's stacking the deck at many points during their feud in 99. Vince seemed to have things work, but Austin found a way around it. This hasn't been the case in some of the more recent heel [=GMs=] that the Wrestling/{{WWE}} has put out there, where it might take months for any heel GM to get their comeuppance due to them either being way too smart, have way too many allies, or just being [[OffScreenInertia on TV way too long during a show]]. However, heel [=GMs=] (Laurinaitis, especially), as well as some other heels, when they finally get beat, might draw some FanDumb from fans who insist that a character has been ruined, or that the WWE did something awful because they lost a battle if they like something about the character to a fault. To be fair, Laurinaitis ''was'' supposed to be {{kayfabe}} fired in the January of that year. The only reason he wasn't was because the man who was about to fire him, COO Wrestling/TripleH, was interrupted by Wrestling/TheUndertaker in order to challenge him for ''Wrestling/WrestleMania'' that year. While Hunter was busy with that, Laurinaitis managed to beg the Board of Directors for a second chance.

** Imperator Librarius, like Relius, mostly provided crippling support in ''Continuum Shift'', and when she acted as if she was in charge of affairs, Rachel refused to buy it. However, ''Chronophantasma'' paints a different picture with this trope front and center: [[spoiler:as Hades of Izanami, an avatar of death, she possesses powers beyond what the protagonists have shown to be able to handle, up to and including drawing Take-Mikzuchi from orbit and firing at Rachel and Amaterasu (the former using Tsukuyomi to protect the latter) with impunity, and later causes Nu to merge with Ragna, driving the latter's Azure Grimoire out of control and having him overwhelm Noel and Jin, the latter beaten to an inch of his life. To drive the point home that she's the power in charge, she leaves Terumi and Relius to their fates, having no further use for them.]] To be fair to Terumi and Relius in retrospect, [[spoiler:both of them had access to Takamagahara's observations and could plot out their moves using them, and their plans went downhill at meteoric speeds when the system's observations could no longer reliably inform them of the protagonists' every move.]]
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** Imperator Librarius, like Relius, mostly provided crippling support in ''Continuum Shift'', and when she acted as if she was in charge of affairs, Rachel refused to buy it. However, ''Chronophantasma'' paints a different picture with this trope front and center: [[spoiler:as Hades of Izanami, an avatar of death, she possesses powers beyond what the protagonists have shown to be able to handle, up to and including drawing Take-Mikzuchi from orbit and firing at Rachel and Amaterasu (the former using Tsukuyomi to protect the latter) with impunity, and later causes Nu to merge with Ragna, driving the latter's Azure Grimoire out of control and having him overwhelm Noel and Jin, the latter beaten to an inch of his life. To drive the point home that she's the power in charge, she leaves Terumi and Relius to their fates, having no further use for them.]] To be fair to Terumi and Relius in retrospect, [[spoiler:both of them had access to Takamagahara's observations and could plot out their moves using them, and their plans went downhill at meteoric speeds when the system's observations could no longer reliably inform them of the protagonists' every move.]]

* Hoo boy, ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'' has a bad problem with this:
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* Hoo boy, ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'' has a bad problem with this:two:

** Lord English, who has all the problems you'd expect when you establish your villain as completely invincible, even retroactively so. Universes, [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch Abominations]], ghosts, [[spoiler:Andrew Hussie]], you name it, he can kill it in a single shot. As for manipulation skill? Try manipulating and entire civilization, another major villain, and three sets of protagonist all to set up circumstances he decided himself, [[ComplexityAddiction for the hell of it]]. Okay, so some of that was due to his omniscient right-hand, who also only gets killed thanks to him ''wanting to die'', but it still counts. He got so bad that the author had to introduce a MacGuffin out of nowhere in order to give the heroes even the slightest chance of success, and [[spoiler:it's one that can break the rules of the setting, at that]] ** To be fair, the final solution to defeating Lord English is being brought into the plot, and is no longer just a MacGuffin, as it is being given relevance in many places. [[spoiler: Even Lord English himself has used the weapon to trap John/Rose/Dave/Jade in it. Hell, the cover of the Sburb music album foreshadowed this years in the past (but not many).]] To say it's a lazy MacGuffin by now isn't doing it justice.
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** Lord English, who has all the problems you'd expect when you establish your villain as completely invincible, even retroactively so. Universes, [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch Abominations]], ghosts, [[spoiler:Andrew Hussie]], you name it, he can kill it in a single shot. As for manipulation skill? Try manipulating and entire civilization, another major villain, and three sets of protagonist all to set up circumstances he decided himself, [[ComplexityAddiction for the hell of it]]. Okay, so some of that was due to his omniscient right-hand, who also only gets killed thanks to him ''wanting to die'', but it still counts. He got so bad that the author had to introduce a MacGuffin out of nowhere in order to give the heroes even the slightest chance of success, and [[spoiler:it's one that can break the rules of the setting, at that]] ** To be fair, the final solution to defeating Lord English is being brought into the plot, and is no longer just a MacGuffin, as it is being given relevance in many places. [[spoiler: Even Lord English himself has used the weapon to trap John/Rose/Dave/Jade in it. Hell, the cover of the Each new revelation about his backstory shows how Sburb music album foreshadowed this years in (and its variations) bent over backwards to make him the past (but not many).]] To say it's a lazy MacGuffin by now isn't doing it justice.villain he is today.
1st Feb '16 12:01:13 PM VeryMelon
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Rewriting the description to be more neutral and read less like an Audience Reaction trope.
However, just because a hero can't win all the time, that doesn't mean [[FailureHero they can't win ever]]. And just because [[TheBadGuysWin villains can win]], that doesn't mean a villain can win all the time (with the exception of CosmicHorrorStory, where the [[YouCantFightFate inevitable loss]] to the [[EldritchAbomination incomprehensible villains]] are enforced). Both of these are problems. And they share an extreme. This is the Invincible Villain. This character is basically a walking personification of VictoryIsBoring, for the audience. [[XanatosGambit Any "losses" that occur either help the villain more than outright victory]] or are ambiguous if he lost or won, or TheCavalry shows the hero can't win on their own. Plus, it's expected in the short term; YouCantThwartStageOne! Doesn't matter [[TrainingFromHell how hard]] TheDeterminator trains, the villain is always [[HardWorkHardlyWorks two steps ahead]]. That head start, of course, is a given when VillainsActHeroesReact. Even if there is a complete defeat, they'll still be subject to JokerImmunity or CardboardPrison. This of course tends to rob a given episode or movie franchise of dramatic punch when the viewer's reaction to a hero's actual ''win'' is "LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt!" The Invincible Villain is the guy who makes the audience react in one of two ways. * "Oh my GOD, would somebody beat this guy already?" ** They want to see the villain get beaten, but not for a "good" reason. Ideally, what a writer wants is for his villain to be a threat and make the audience wonder and anticipate how he's going to be beaten. In this case, the audience are simply bored to see the villains winning without effort. * "OnlyTheAuthorCanSaveThemNow" ** This is a problem for all of the reason it says on that trope page. You've made your villain such a credible threat that now, there doesn't seem to be any plausible way to beat him. Anything that wins against him now will be accused of being all part of the plan, or people will question why did THIS attack work when all the other ones didn't? All of his limits and weaknesses have been so thoroughly discredited that the only discernible reason why he'd lose is because [[ThePlotDemandedThisIndex the author wants him to]] [[DeusExMachina right now]]. A poorly executed OutsideContextVillain can become this, but after a while, the hero may get used to the villain, and without the element of surprise, may be overcome. FailureHero is a possible result of this trope. Deliberate VillainDecay is one way to counteract this by consciously making the villain less menacing, but can easily end up going too far in the other direction and reduce the villain to a joke if not handled carefully.
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However, just because a hero can't win all the time, that doesn't mean [[FailureHero they can't win ever]]. And just because [[TheBadGuysWin villains can win]], that doesn't mean a villain can win all the time (with the exception of CosmicHorrorStory, where the [[YouCantFightFate inevitable loss]] to the [[EldritchAbomination incomprehensible villains]] are enforced). Both of these are problems. And they share an extreme. This is the The Invincible Villain. This character Villain is basically a walking personification of VictoryIsBoring, for chiefly recognized by their disproportional win-lose ratios against the audience. heroes (with the villain winning far more often than losing). [[XanatosGambit Any "losses" that occur either help the villain more than outright victory]] or are ambiguous if he lost or won, or TheCavalry shows the hero can't win on their own. Plus, it's expected in the short term; YouCantThwartStageOne! Doesn't matter [[TrainingFromHell how hard]] TheDeterminator trains, the villain is always [[HardWorkHardlyWorks two steps ahead]]. That head start, of course, is a given when VillainsActHeroesReact. Even if there is a complete defeat, they'll still be subject to JokerImmunity or CardboardPrison. This of course tends to rob a given episode or movie franchise of dramatic punch when the viewer's reaction to a hero's actual ''win'' is "LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt!"\n\nThe Invincible Villain is the guy who makes the audience react in one of two ways.\n* "Oh my GOD, would somebody beat this guy already?"\n** They want to see the villain get beaten, but not for a "good" reason. Ideally, what a writer wants is for his villain to be a threat and make the audience wonder and anticipate how he's going to be beaten. In this case, the audience are simply bored to see the villains winning without effort.\n* "OnlyTheAuthorCanSaveThemNow"\n** This is a problem for all of the reason it says on that trope page. You've made your villain such a credible threat that now, there doesn't seem to be any plausible way to beat him. Anything that wins against him now will be accused of being all part of the plan, or people will question why did THIS attack work when all the other ones didn't? All of his limits and weaknesses have been so thoroughly discredited that the only discernible reason why he'd lose is because [[ThePlotDemandedThisIndex the author wants him to]] [[DeusExMachina right now]].\n\nA poorly executed OutsideContextVillain can become this, but after a while, the hero may get used to the villain, and without the element of surprise, may be overcome. FailureHero is a possible result of this trope. Deliberate VillainDecay is one way to counteract this by consciously making the villain less menacing, but can easily end up going too far in the other direction and reduce the villain to a joke if not handled carefully.

Compare IneffectualSympatheticVillain, the generally interesting, ''vincible'' villain. Contrast InvincibleHero, their GoodCounterpart, and HarmlessVillain, their exact opposite in terms of threat level. See also GenericDoomsdayVillain, which is treated more like an obstacle for the hero to overcome rather than a true character. Remember, TropesAreNotBad. While most examples are likely to be TheScrappy, some are still subject to EvilIsCool.
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Compare IneffectualSympatheticVillain, the generally interesting, ''vincible'' villain. Contrast InvincibleHero, their GoodCounterpart, and HarmlessVillain, their exact opposite in terms of threat level. See also GenericDoomsdayVillain, which is treated more like an obstacle for the hero to overcome rather than a true character. Remember, TropesAreNotBad. TropesAreTools. While most some examples are likely to be can become TheScrappy, some are still subject to EvilIsCool.
1st Feb '16 8:27:32 AM PolarPhantom
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Remember, TropesAreNotBad. While most examples are likely to be TheScrappy, some are still subject to EvilIsCool.
30th Jan '16 12:17:18 AM ManEFaces
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** And now with the release of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_X-Files_%28miniseries%29 the new miniseries]]series set in 2016, the Smoking Man is revealed to have somehow survived the airstrike and the next 15 years and is ''still'' in control of everything while smoking from a tracheotomy hole in his neck.
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** And now with the release of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_X-Files_%28miniseries%29 the new miniseries]]series miniseries]] set in 2016, the Smoking Man is [[spoiler: revealed to have somehow survived the airstrike and the next 15 years and is ''still'' in control of everything while smoking from a tracheotomy hole in his neck.]]
30th Jan '16 12:15:33 AM ManEFaces
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** And now with the release of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_X-Files_%28miniseries%29 the new miniseries]]series set in 2016, the Smoking Man is revealed to have somehow survived the airstrike and the next 15 years and is ''still'' in control of everything while smoking from a tracheotomy hole in his neck.
29th Jan '16 11:52:01 AM FordPrefect
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* The mirror in ''Film/Oculus'' accounts for everything that the main protagonists set up to destroy it, [[spoiler:and uses the anchor fail-safe to kill one to frame the other]].
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* The mirror in ''Film/Oculus'' ''Film/{{Oculus}}'' accounts for everything that the main protagonists set up to destroy it, [[spoiler:and uses the anchor fail-safe to kill one to and frame the other]].
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