History Main / InvincibleHero

22nd May '17 3:55:25 PM SorPepita
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* ''Hjältekväde'' ("Hero's song") is a popular song at swedish {{SCA}} gatherings, about the noble duke Caspian (no relation to the Narnia guy) who leads his army to fight the enemy. Except he dies in the seventh verse from a stray arrow. But since the song is (jokingly intended to be) commissioned by "the duke" (maybe a successor or relative, maybe Caspian himself), the songwriter amends this by having a goose land on his head and take the arrow. As the song continues, the hero gets killed in several un-heroic but fairly realistic ways (he gets stabbed by a spearman from behind, crushed by a panicking horse, and butchered by the more skilled enemy leader) and hastily saved by various contrivances (he's carrying a sack of potatoes on his back for explicitly no reason at all, the horse falls in love with a passing moose, and he wins the duel with no description at all). The song continues to sing about how dull it is to have the hero win all the time and never let him even take a scratch, but assures the listeners that when '''real''' nobles go out to fight, they're just as vulnerable as anyone else...

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* ''Hjältekväde'' ("Hero's song") is a popular song at swedish {{SCA}} Swedish SCA gatherings, about the noble duke Caspian (no relation to the Narnia guy) who leads his army to fight the enemy. Except he dies in the seventh verse from a stray arrow. But since the song is (jokingly intended to be) commissioned by "the duke" (maybe a successor or relative, maybe Caspian himself), the songwriter amends this by having a goose land on his head and take the arrow. As the song continues, the hero gets killed in several un-heroic but fairly realistic ways (he gets stabbed by a spearman from behind, crushed by a panicking horse, and butchered by the more skilled enemy leader) and hastily saved by various contrivances (he's carrying a sack of potatoes on his back for explicitly no reason at all, the horse falls in love with a passing moose, and he wins the duel with no description at all). The song continues to sing about how dull it is to have the hero win all the time and never let him even take a scratch, but assures the listeners that when '''real''' nobles go out to fight, they're just as vulnerable as anyone else...



* No matter what is thrown at him Mario in the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' franchise will never lose against Bowser or whoever is the MonsterOfTheWeek. While Nintendo did subvert it a few times by having Mario be defeated by the main villain in a few games, Mario either gets HeroicSecondWind and continues the fight, he spends time getting stronger for the rematch or he gets a PlotDevice item that lets him can challenge the boss again and win this time.

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* No matter what is thrown at him him, Mario in the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' franchise will never lose against Bowser or whoever is the MonsterOfTheWeek. While Nintendo did subvert it a few times by having Mario be defeated by the main villain in a few games, Mario either gets HeroicSecondWind and continues the fight, he spends time getting stronger for the rematch or he gets a PlotDevice item that lets him can challenge the boss again and win this time.



** Similarly, [[UnscrupulousHero Shadow]], due to being conceptualized to take on Sonic easily, has a massive level of this, especially in [[VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog his game]]. Averted in the franchise's recent years, with him becoming less prominent and, at best, getting to race or fight [[TheRival Sonic,]] and watch in the climax.

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** Similarly, [[UnscrupulousHero Shadow]], due to being conceptualized to take on Sonic easily, has a massive level of this, especially in [[VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog his game]]. Averted in the franchise's recent years, with him becoming less prominent and, at best, getting to race or fight [[TheRival Sonic,]] Sonic]], and watch in the climax.



* Interestingly, for all of a GodModeSue AuthorAvatar that he is, [=Comic!Chris=] of ''Webcomic/{{Sonichu}}'' subverts this greatly, mostly in his earlier stories. Most of his battles seem to have him on the ropes, end up rescued by someone else before he turns the tables on his opponents. He doesn't get into Invincible Hero territory until his last (published) issue, where he systematically destroys his opponents with ease. That being said, Sonichu himself would most often defeat all of his opponents, sometimes with lethal force, without breaking a sweat. It comes from a combination of the author's belief that his characters are real, not wanting to make his characters work hard to achieve their goals, and most of the ''Sonichu'' stories being his way of venting his frustration at some obstacle in his life.

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* Interestingly, for all of a GodModeSue AuthorAvatar that he is, [=Comic!Chris=] of ''Webcomic/{{Sonichu}}'' subverts this greatly, mostly in his earlier stories. Most of his battles seem to have him on the ropes, end ending up rescued by someone else before he turns the tables on his opponents. He doesn't get into Invincible Hero territory until his last (published) issue, where he systematically destroys his opponents with ease. That being said, Sonichu himself would most often defeat all of his opponents, sometimes with lethal force, without breaking a sweat. It comes from a combination of the author's belief that his characters are real, not wanting to make his characters work hard to achieve their goals, and most of the ''Sonichu'' stories being his way of venting his frustration at some obstacle in his life.



* [[DeconstructedCharacterArchetype Deconstructed]] in ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/3-reasons-its-so-hard-to-make-superman-interesting_p2/ 3 Reasons It's So Hard to Make Superman Interesting]] spends a page deconstructing the Invincible Hero and [[DeconReconSwitch then another reconstructing]] a hero faced with the SadisticChoice of whom to save at any given moment.

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* [[DeconstructedCharacterArchetype Deconstructed]] in ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/3-reasons-its-so-hard-to-make-superman-interesting_p2/ 3 Reasons It's So Hard to Make Superman Interesting]] Interesting]], which spends a page deconstructing the Invincible Hero and [[DeconReconSwitch then another reconstructing]] a hero faced with the SadisticChoice of whom to save at any given moment.



* Creator/MaxLandis's video short "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYvMOf3hsGA&oref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DVYvMOf3hsGA&has_verified=1 Wrestling Isn't Wrestling" characterizes John Cena this why, portraying all of his matches as effortless victories in which he instantly dispatches his opponent with a vapid smile and then shrugs.

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* Creator/MaxLandis's video short "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYvMOf3hsGA&oref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DVYvMOf3hsGA&has_verified=1 Wrestling Isn't Wrestling" characterizes John Cena this why, as this, portraying all of his matches as effortless victories in which he instantly dispatches his opponent with a vapid smile and then shrugs.



* Averted in the TV series version of Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}''. After the movie became a hit, the mouse house decided to make a weekday afternoon toon based on it. Except that by the end of the film, Herc is incredibly powerful and has handily defeated nearly every major threat mythological ancient Greece had to offer. The solution was to make the tv show an {{interquel}} taking place during Herc's high school years (a period skipped over entirely in the film) with Hercules always self-identifying as a "hero in training," and looking a tad scrawny compared to his adult self from the latter two-thirds of the movie.

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* Averted in the TV series version of Disney's ''Disney/{{Hercules}}''. After the movie became a hit, the mouse house decided to make a weekday afternoon toon based on it. Except that by the end of the film, Herc is incredibly powerful and has handily defeated nearly every major threat mythological ancient Greece had to offer. The solution was to make the tv TV show an {{interquel}} taking place during Herc's high school years (a period skipped over entirely in the film) with Hercules always self-identifying as a "hero in training," and looking a tad scrawny compared to his adult self from the latter two-thirds of the movie.



* This is the reason Yoda rarely got ADayInTheLimelight on ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The writers had problems coming up with something that would challenge him. He directly fought the Separatists only once, and eventually starred in a Force-themed story.

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* This is the reason Yoda rarely got ADayInTheLimelight on ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The the writers had problems coming up with something that would challenge him. He fought directly fought the Separatists only once, and eventually starred in a Force-themed story.
22nd May '17 2:17:08 PM SorPepita
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** [[HordeOfAlienLocusts Tyranids]] avert this painfully, being the only army whose own rulebook goes into vast description about all the times the Tyranids ''lose''. (Granted, nearly every single one of these cases serve as textbook examples of PyrrhicVictory.) The logic is supposedly [[WrittenByTheWinners "if they won, you wouldn't be hearing about it."]] As the Tyranids measure it their invasion so far has been a reconnaissance mission before the bulk of their forces arrive.
* This is criticism that is very often leveled against ''{{Exalted}}'', as the eponymous Exalted themselves are always portrayed by the system as completely indestructible übermensch that can outplan Batman, outdrink [[IronMan Tony Stark]], outfight Everyone and survive any attack. The cunning player and GM will find many, many weaknesses that can be exploited in order to make their lives miserable, no least the crippling flaw all Exalted must choose.

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** [[HordeOfAlienLocusts Tyranids]] avert this painfully, being the only army whose own rulebook goes into vast description about all the times the Tyranids ''lose''. (Granted, nearly every single one of these cases serve serves as textbook examples of PyrrhicVictory.) The logic is supposedly [[WrittenByTheWinners "if they won, you wouldn't be hearing about it."]] As the Tyranids measure it their invasion so far has been a reconnaissance mission before the bulk of their forces arrive.
* This is criticism that is very often leveled against ''{{Exalted}}'', as the eponymous Exalted themselves are always portrayed by the system as completely indestructible übermensch that can outplan Batman, outdrink [[IronMan Tony Stark]], outfight Everyone everyone and survive any attack. The cunning player and GM will find many, many weaknesses that can be exploited in order to make their lives miserable, no least the crippling flaw all Exalted must choose.
22nd May '17 2:14:53 PM SorPepita
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* In sports, whenever a season gets utterly dominated by [[TheJuggernaut an unstoppable favorite]], particularly if [[http://www.gq.com/story/golden-state-warriors-ruining-nba-basketball even other strong contestants can't keep up with them]]. At time fans can still like it, particularly a FlashyInvincibleHero (the NBA Finals' audience records were when MichaelJordan was trampling everyone). Other times, they'll just get bored (Michael Schumacher winning five straight FormulaOne championships, with barely any competition most years), or outright mixed reception (The modern day New England Patriots with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady).

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* In sports, whenever a season gets utterly dominated by [[TheJuggernaut an unstoppable favorite]], particularly if [[http://www.gq.com/story/golden-state-warriors-ruining-nba-basketball even other strong contestants can't keep up with them]]. At time fans can still like it, particularly a FlashyInvincibleHero Flashy Invincible Hero (the NBA Finals' audience records were when MichaelJordan was trampling everyone). Other times, they'll just get bored (Michael Schumacher winning five straight FormulaOne championships, with barely any competition most years), or outright mixed reception (The modern day New England Patriots with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady).
22nd May '17 12:59:23 PM SorPepita
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** Film/{{Thor}}, except when depowered by Odin or refusing to fight his brother, it's pretty obvious that nothing can threaten him.

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** Film/{{Thor}}, Film/{{Thor}}; except when depowered by Odin or refusing to fight his brother, it's pretty obvious that nothing can threaten him.
22nd May '17 12:57:48 PM SorPepita
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* Neo of ''Franchise/TheMatrix'' grows so strong by the end of [[Film/TheMatrix the first movie]] that when he fights three enhanced Agents alone in ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'', he casually quips "Huh, upgrades" when one of them blocks an attack. The only bad guy who is capable of taking him on equal terms is [[spoiler:smith with a powerful copy of himself that's absorbed the Oracle's powers.]])

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* Neo of ''Franchise/TheMatrix'' grows so strong by the end of [[Film/TheMatrix the first movie]] that when he fights three enhanced Agents alone in ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'', he casually quips "Huh, upgrades" when one of them blocks an attack. The only bad guy who is capable of taking him on equal terms is [[spoiler:smith [[spoiler:Smith with a powerful copy of himself that's absorbed the Oracle's powers.]])
22nd May '17 12:53:37 PM SorPepita
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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' is a big offender. Every single battle between Romans (or, really, anyone) and Gauls have the Gauls [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomp]] their opponents, thanks to their magic potion that grant SuperSpeed, SuperReflexes, SuperStrength, and arguably NighInvulnerability. Plus, even in case of a shortage, they have [[TheJuggernaut Obelix]], who doesn't need to drink any potion since he fell in it during his childhood, and the effect never wore off. As a result, the Romans never, ''ever'', in any comic, manage to gain the smallest durable advantage over the Gauls.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' is a big offender. Every single battle between Romans (or, really, anyone) and Gauls have has the Gauls [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomp]] their opponents, thanks to their magic potion that grant grants SuperSpeed, SuperReflexes, SuperStrength, and arguably NighInvulnerability. Plus, even in case of a shortage, they have [[TheJuggernaut Obelix]], who doesn't need to drink any potion since he fell in it during his childhood, and the effect never wore off. As a result, the Romans never, ''ever'', in any comic, manage to gain the smallest durable advantage over the Gauls.



** On one occasion, a Gaul spy working for Caesar pulls what looks like a perfect XanatosGambit : he tries to prevent Asterix from getting [[MacGuffin the oil necessary to cook the magic potion]] by all means necessary, hoping to trick Getafix into giving him the recipe. Even after Asterix somehow [[DeusExMachina stumble upon an oil well]], he destroys their oil bag and informs Ceasar that the Gauls [[OnlyTheAuthorCanSaveThemNow are now totally deprived of their only mean of defense]]. Except that Getafix turns out to have found a new recipe for the magic potion during their journey.

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** On one occasion, a Gaul spy working for Caesar pulls what looks like a perfect XanatosGambit : XanatosGambit: he tries to prevent Asterix from getting [[MacGuffin the oil necessary to cook the magic potion]] by all means necessary, hoping to trick Getafix into giving him the recipe. Even after Asterix somehow [[DeusExMachina stumble stumbles upon an oil well]], he destroys their oil bag and informs Ceasar that the Gauls [[OnlyTheAuthorCanSaveThemNow are now totally deprived of their only mean of defense]]. Except that Getafix turns out to have found a new recipe for the magic potion during their journey.



--->TheFlash (Wally): This is the man who said he couldn't live up to his legend . . . he's wrestling an angel.

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--->TheFlash (Wally): This is the man who said he couldn't live up to his legend . . .legend... he's wrestling an angel.



** Creator/JossWhedon talked about the difficulties of WB putting together a ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' movie versus his own massive success with ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}''. He pointed out that the Avengers are easier to write and film since they all either have relatable problems or are weak enough to write action scenes for, while comparatively, characters like Superman and Franchise/WonderWoman are seen as "gods" without many flaws [[note]] despite the fact that [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor one of the Avengers is]] [[Main/PhysicalGod literally a god.]][[/note]]. Add in other powerhouse characters like Comicbook/GreenLantern and TheFlash, and it becomes very difficult to write convincing threats for the group in a cinematic setting.

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** Creator/JossWhedon talked about the difficulties of WB putting together a ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' movie versus his own massive success with ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}''. He pointed out that the Avengers are easier to write and film since they all either have relatable problems or are weak enough to write action scenes for, while comparatively, characters like Superman and Franchise/WonderWoman are seen as "gods" without many flaws [[note]] despite [[note]]despite the fact that [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor one of the Avengers is]] [[Main/PhysicalGod literally a god.]][[/note]]. Add in other powerhouse characters like Comicbook/GreenLantern and TheFlash, and it becomes very difficult to write convincing threats for the group in a cinematic setting.



* Similarly, Kirkman's character "ComicBook/{{Invincible}}", from the same-titled comic, has a main character who's the most powerful person on Earth, because he's the son of that comic universe's answer to Superman (well, sorta). And indeed, he ''is'' pretty invincible…[[spoiler:until his dad beats him nearly to death.]] While he remains impossible to hurt for most, there're plenty of critters out there more than powerful enough to kill him. [[spoiler:Chief among these are the fifty-or-so supervillains that comprise the "viltrumite" species from which Invincible's dad hails, who are effectively-ageless {{flying brick}}s with physical powers that increase the longer they exist.]] The existence of such threats requires ComicBook/{{Invincible}} to lend significant focus to things other than straight-up fights, like the ethics of superheroism, the best ways for empowered individuals to improve their civilizations and the [[spoiler:choice between preserving traditions that are killing his people and abandoning culture in order to survive (in Thragg's case).]]

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* Similarly, Kirkman's character "ComicBook/{{Invincible}}", from the same-titled comic, has a main character who's the most powerful person on Earth, because he's the son of that comic universe's answer to Superman (well, sorta). And indeed, he ''is'' pretty invincible…[[spoiler:until invincible… [[spoiler:until his dad beats him nearly to death.]] While he remains impossible to hurt for most, there're plenty of critters out there more than powerful enough to kill him. [[spoiler:Chief among these are the fifty-or-so supervillains that comprise the "viltrumite" species from which Invincible's dad hails, who are effectively-ageless {{flying brick}}s with physical powers that increase the longer they exist.]] The existence of such threats requires ComicBook/{{Invincible}} to lend significant focus to things other than straight-up fights, like the ethics of superheroism, the best ways for empowered individuals to improve their civilizations and the [[spoiler:choice between preserving traditions that are killing his people and abandoning culture in order to survive (in Thragg's case).]]



* This trope is often held to be one of the reasons ''ComicBook/XMan'' got cancelled. Nate Grey, the title character, was powerful to begin with (which is unsurprising considering his background) but frequently lost fights due to his [[HowDoIShootWeb inexperience]] and the genetic flaw which made sure that his powers were killing him, leading to frequent instances of PsychicNosebleed and one of his powers switching off. Even so, he was powerful enough to beat AOA!Apocalypse to a pulp after taking on [[OverlordJr Holocaust]] and ''unconsciously resurrect'' someone (though it is dubious as to how alive Maddie actually was). Most of the tension came through his CharacterDevelopment away from being a LivingWeapon whle trying to figure out his place in this new world and fix his powers. By the end, he'd got his powers fixed and was leaps and bounds ahead of every other telepath and telekinetic in the MarvelUniverse, with only planetary or universal scale threats being capable of giving him pause, and treated the multiverse as his personal stepladder. He was killed off in the final issue ([[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence sort of]]), and when he came back some years later, [[DeathIsCheap as comic characters are wont to do]], after several rounds with the Dark X-Men and Dark Avengers, the writers made note to depower him down to a very limited form of telekinesis and an even more limited form of telepathy.

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* This trope is often held to be one of the reasons ''ComicBook/XMan'' got cancelled. Nate Grey, the title character, was powerful to begin with (which is unsurprising considering his background) but frequently lost fights due to his [[HowDoIShootWeb inexperience]] and the genetic flaw which made sure that his powers were killing him, leading to frequent instances of PsychicNosebleed and one of his powers switching off. Even so, he was powerful enough to beat AOA!Apocalypse to a pulp after taking on [[OverlordJr Holocaust]] and ''unconsciously resurrect'' resurrected'' someone (though it is dubious as to how alive Maddie actually was). Most of the tension came through his CharacterDevelopment away from being a LivingWeapon whle trying to figure out his place in this new world and fix his powers. By the end, he'd got his powers fixed and was leaps and bounds ahead of every other telepath and telekinetic in the MarvelUniverse, with only planetary or universal scale threats being capable of giving him pause, and treated the multiverse as his personal stepladder. He was killed off in the final issue ([[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence sort of]]), and when he came back some years later, [[DeathIsCheap as comic characters are wont to do]], after several rounds with the Dark X-Men and Dark Avengers, the writers made note to depower him down to a very limited form of telekinesis and an even more limited form of telepathy.



* ''ComicBook/{{Fables}}'' spin-off ''Jack of Fables'' plays with this. The eponymous [[DesignatedHero "hero"]] made himself completely indestructible (Fables gain power based on popularity, and having created three mega-successful blockbusters about his own adventures, he's the most famous and beloved fairy tale character in history,) but is virtually a ButtMonkey in terms of how often he suffers humiliating and/or excruciatingly painful injuries (though his personality means you never have any sympathy for him). His interactions with Gary the Pathetic Fallacy (who is the first of the Literals, the {{Anthropomorphic Personification}}s of meta-concepts of story-telling,) lead to him being told that having made himself an Invincible Hero, the universe (driven partly by the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality,) now ''has'' to provide a balance to it in the form of a never-ending series of fatal injuries and spectacularly bad luck to provide something for his powers to be tested against and prove themselves necessary.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Fables}}'' spin-off ''Jack of Fables'' plays with this. The eponymous [[DesignatedHero "hero"]] made himself completely indestructible (Fables gain power based on popularity, and having created three mega-successful blockbusters about his own adventures, he's the most famous and beloved fairy tale character in history,) history), but is virtually a ButtMonkey in terms of how often he suffers humiliating and/or excruciatingly painful injuries (though his personality means you never have any sympathy for him). His interactions with Gary the Pathetic Fallacy (who is the first of the Literals, the {{Anthropomorphic Personification}}s of meta-concepts of story-telling,) story-telling) lead to him being told that having made himself an Invincible Hero, the universe (driven partly by the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality,) now ''has'' to provide a balance to it in the form of a never-ending series of fatal injuries and spectacularly bad luck to provide something for his powers to be tested against and prove themselves necessary.
22nd May '17 12:37:10 PM SorPepita
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*** [[spoiler: However, this was only achieved through Rakan, who was still powerful enough to fight which Negi does note, deciding to let it be a draw and the fact that Kotarou getting beaten to the inch of his life while stalling time for Negi (it was a tag-team tournament) and helping Negi by briefly halting Rakan from moving so Negi can hit him with an extremely powerful spell.]]

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*** [[spoiler: However, this was only achieved through Rakan, who was still powerful enough to fight which Negi does note, deciding to let it be a draw and the fact that Kotarou getting got beaten to the inch of his life while stalling time for Negi (it was a tag-team tournament) and helping helped Negi by briefly halting Rakan from moving so Negi can could hit him with an extremely powerful spell.]]



* Lina, the [[AntiHero anti-heroine]] of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', is less of this trope than it warrants, but it is painfully obvious how fellow mages Zelgadis, Amelia, and Sylphiel are out-classed against her, as she is the only person among them (and probably the entire world) who can both beam-spam the most powerful spell in the verse's BlackMagic, and can also draw power from [[GuardianOfTheMultiverse the Lord of Nightmares.]] She also shows ridiculous insight and intelligence often in random bursts, whereas normally she is fairly smart, but not inquisitive - the reverse happens with [[TheSmartGuy Zelgadis]], normally book-smart, but fails at battle strategies. It is her that takes down every single demonic being that the group encounters, which makes Xellos' comment of all four main characters being "[[TitleDrop Slayers]]" of demons far less credible - Lina defeated Shabranigdo while the others were taken down in one blow each. Filia, a Golden Dragon, Naga, [[GoldfishPoopGang her alleged rival]], and Pokota, a prince, are probably the only people that could rival her, but Filia is a [[HolierThanThou stuck-up, prissy, and naive]] priestess who often refuses to take part in the group's antics, Naga is incredibly flaky, and Pokota is stuck in the body of a [[RidiculouslyCuteCritter stuffed animal]], knocking down his use by a solid margin. This mostly applies to the anime and the novels.

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* Lina, the [[AntiHero anti-heroine]] of ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', is less of this trope than it warrants, but it is painfully obvious how fellow mages Zelgadis, Amelia, and Sylphiel are out-classed against her, as she is the only person among them (and probably the entire world) who can both beam-spam the most powerful spell in the verse's BlackMagic, and can also draw power from [[GuardianOfTheMultiverse the Lord of Nightmares.]] She also shows ridiculous insight and intelligence often in random bursts, whereas normally she is fairly smart, but not inquisitive - the reverse happens with [[TheSmartGuy Zelgadis]], who is normally book-smart, but fails at battle strategies. It is her that takes down every single demonic being that the group encounters, which makes Xellos' comment of all four main characters being "[[TitleDrop Slayers]]" of demons far less credible - Lina defeated Shabranigdo while the others were taken down in one blow each. Filia, a Golden Dragon, Naga, [[GoldfishPoopGang her alleged rival]], and Pokota, a prince, are probably the only people that could rival her, but Filia is a [[HolierThanThou stuck-up, prissy, and naive]] priestess who often refuses to take part in the group's antics, Naga is incredibly flaky, and Pokota is stuck in the body of a [[RidiculouslyCuteCritter stuffed animal]], knocking down his use by a solid margin. This mostly applies to the anime and the novels.
22nd May '17 12:29:22 PM SorPepita
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* Many fans agree that ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'' would be a much better show without its main protagonist, Kirito. He's shown to be ridiculously smart (having built a top-of-the-line custom gaming PC at age 14, knowing how to hack SAO's code, among other things), and is easily considered the best player. He wins every fight with little effort. In fact, one of the only times he's ever lost was when his opponent cheated. There's one scene in particular in which a gang of player-killers rush him. He stands still, completely unfazed while he explains that his health regeneration skill is so high that ''it refills at a faster rate than his enemies can deal out damage.'' Later on, he gains a sword skill that is exclusive to him and him alone. Even when his health is depleted to zero, he somehow wills himself back to life to land the finishing blow on Kayaba. It isn't until the end of SAO2 that he actually loses a fight fair and square, and by that point it hardly matters.

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* Many fans agree that ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'' would be a much better show without its main protagonist, Kirito. He's shown to be ridiculously smart (having built a top-of-the-line custom gaming PC at age 14, knowing how to hack SAO's code, among other things), and is easily considered the best player. He wins every fight with little effort. In fact, one of the only times he's ever lost was when his opponent cheated. There's one scene in particular in which a gang of player-killers rush him. He stands still, completely unfazed while he explains that his health regeneration skill is so high that ''it refills at a faster rate than his enemies can deal out damage.'' Later on, he gains a sword skill that is exclusive to him and him alone. Even when his health is depleted to zero, he somehow wills himself back to life to land the finishing blow on Kayaba. It isn't until the end of SAO2 [=SAO2=] that he actually loses a fight fair and square, and by that point it hardly matters.
18th May '17 10:36:25 AM Spanks
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* In sports, whenever a season gets utterly dominated by [[TheJuggernaut an unstoppable favorite]], particularly if [[http://www.gq.com/story/golden-state-warriors-ruining-nba-basketball even other strong contestants can't keep up with them]]. At time fans can still like it, particularly a FlashyInvincibleHero (the NBA Finals' audience records were when MichaelJordan was trampling everyone). Other times, they'll just get bored (Michael Schumacher winning five straight FormulaOne championships, with barely any competition most years).

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* In sports, whenever a season gets utterly dominated by [[TheJuggernaut an unstoppable favorite]], particularly if [[http://www.gq.com/story/golden-state-warriors-ruining-nba-basketball even other strong contestants can't keep up with them]]. At time fans can still like it, particularly a FlashyInvincibleHero (the NBA Finals' audience records were when MichaelJordan was trampling everyone). Other times, they'll just get bored (Michael Schumacher winning five straight FormulaOne championships, with barely any competition most years).years), or outright mixed reception (The modern day New England Patriots with Bill Belichick and Tom Brady).
14th May '17 10:04:26 AM nombretomado
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* The ''Franchise/{{Starcraft}}'' series gets a bit silly with this, as the usually nameless player controlled commander for each faction invariably leads their forces to victory over and over again no matter how one sided or overwhelmingly unfair the battles they are faced with are. Even if you [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomped]] the faction you're helping in a prior mission.
** In Episode V of Starcraft: Brood War, you help lead the UED to become the most dominant faction in the galaxy, effectively dismantling the Zerg forces and taking over the capital of the Terran Dominion. In Episode VI (you play as the Zerg), you effectively undo all the progress you just made, systematically wiping out all of the UED strongholds and bringing the Zerg swarms back under Kerrigan's rule. Either the player is some sort of strategic demigod or the UED military [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou simply can't function]] without your personal guidance and support.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Starcraft}}'' ''VideoGame/StarCraft'' series gets a bit silly with this, as the usually nameless player controlled commander for each faction invariably leads their forces to victory over and over again no matter how one sided or overwhelmingly unfair the battles they are faced with are. Even if you [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomped]] the faction you're helping in a prior mission.
** In Episode V of Starcraft: ''Starcraft: Brood War, War'', you help lead the UED to become the most dominant faction in the galaxy, effectively dismantling the Zerg forces and taking over the capital of the Terran Dominion. In Episode VI (you play as the Zerg), you effectively undo all the progress you just made, systematically wiping out all of the UED strongholds and bringing the Zerg swarms back under Kerrigan's rule. Either the player is some sort of strategic demigod or the UED military [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou simply can't function]] without your personal guidance and support.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InvincibleHero