History Main / InvincibleHero

25th Apr '16 10:43:48 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Perhaps to balance this, it is often Bugs' most pitiful foes that manage to score a victory over him, both [[TooDumbToLive Elmer Fudd]] (''Rabbit Rampage'', ''Hare Brush'') and [[EnsembleDarkHorse Daffy Duck]] (counting this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RIvO74ZC5c obscure Tang endorsement from ''The Bugs Bunny Show'']], ''LooneyTunesBackInAction'' and Creator/CartoonNetwork's ''The Big Game'' from 2001) have got the upper hand over Bugs a couple occasions in a rather spectacular fashion.

to:

** Perhaps to balance this, it is often Bugs' most pitiful foes that manage to score a victory over him, both [[TooDumbToLive Elmer Fudd]] (''Rabbit Rampage'', ''Hare Brush'') and [[EnsembleDarkHorse Daffy Duck]] (counting this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RIvO74ZC5c obscure Tang endorsement from ''The Bugs Bunny Show'']], ''LooneyTunesBackInAction'' ''Film/LooneyTunesBackInAction'' and Creator/CartoonNetwork's ''The Big Game'' from 2001) have got the upper hand over Bugs a couple occasions in a rather spectacular fashion.
24th Apr '16 3:52:21 PM Awesomekid42
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/YuGiOhArcV'' has Yuya, who has only lost four times in 90+ episodes, and the reason for his first onscreen loss was because of the new and mysterious summoning method he just created out of nowhere and of being WrongGenreSavvy. However, his official victory rate is between 50 and 60% at the beginning of the story, that's why he spends a mini-arc to duel four duelists to gain a 60% victory rate to enter a tournament.

to:

* ''Anime/YuGiOhArcV'' has Yuya, who has only lost four times in 90+ 100+ episodes, and the reason for his first onscreen loss was because of the new and mysterious summoning method he just created out of nowhere and of being WrongGenreSavvy. However, his official victory rate is between 50 and 60% at the beginning of the story, that's why he spends a mini-arc to duel four duelists to gain a 60% victory rate to enter a tournament.
22nd Apr '16 6:18:12 AM jeez
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The [[KaijuDefenceForce Japanese Self-Defence Force]] in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' never lost a single engagement - they won them all with sadistic ease. {{Justified}} most of the time since they are a modern, relatively well-funded [[InsistentTerminology armed force]] that has to face mostly [[MedievalStasis pre-medieval armies of legionnaires armed only with spears, shields, bows and arrows]] and [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the odd dragon]]. However, when they start simultaneously [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomping]] American, Russian ''and'' Chinese [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous Spec-Ops units]], things start to smell exceedingly fishy for a country that has been nominally anti-militaristic since WorldWarTwo. The fact that [[WordOfGod God]] is ex-JSDF himself and has expressed some [[PatrioticFervour rather strong feelings about Japan and the world]] doesn't help.

to:

* The [[KaijuDefenceForce [[UsefulNotes/KaijuDefenseForce Japanese Self-Defence Force]] in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' never lost a single engagement - they won them all with sadistic ease. {{Justified}} most of the time since they are a modern, relatively well-funded [[InsistentTerminology armed force]] that has to face mostly [[MedievalStasis pre-medieval armies of legionnaires armed only with spears, shields, bows and arrows]] and [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the odd dragon]]. However, when they start simultaneously [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomping]] American, Russian ''and'' Chinese [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous Spec-Ops units]], things start to smell exceedingly fishy for a country that has been nominally anti-militaristic since WorldWarTwo. The fact that [[WordOfGod God]] is ex-JSDF himself and has expressed some [[PatrioticFervour rather strong feelings about Japan and the world]] doesn't help.
22nd Apr '16 6:17:38 AM jeez
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The [[UsefulNotes/KaijuDefenceForce Japanese Self-Defence Force]] in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' never lost a single engagement - they won them all with sadistic ease. {{Justified}} most of the time since they are a modern, relatively well-funded [[InsistentTerminology armed force]] that has to face mostly [[MedievalStasis pre-medieval armies of legionnaires armed only with spears, shields, bows and arrows]] and [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the odd dragon]]. However, when they start simultaneously [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomping]] American, Russian ''and'' Chinese [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous Spec-Ops units]], things start to smell exceedingly fishy for a country that has been nominally anti-militaristic since WorldWarTwo. The fact that [[WordOfGod God]] is ex-JSDF himself and has expressed some [[PatrioticFervour rather strong feelings about Japan and the world]] doesn't help.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/KaijuDefenceForce [[KaijuDefenceForce Japanese Self-Defence Force]] in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' never lost a single engagement - they won them all with sadistic ease. {{Justified}} most of the time since they are a modern, relatively well-funded [[InsistentTerminology armed force]] that has to face mostly [[MedievalStasis pre-medieval armies of legionnaires armed only with spears, shields, bows and arrows]] and [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the odd dragon]]. However, when they start simultaneously [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomping]] American, Russian ''and'' Chinese [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous Spec-Ops units]], things start to smell exceedingly fishy for a country that has been nominally anti-militaristic since WorldWarTwo. The fact that [[WordOfGod God]] is ex-JSDF himself and has expressed some [[PatrioticFervour rather strong feelings about Japan and the world]] doesn't help.
22nd Apr '16 6:16:28 AM jeez
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The [[UsefulNotes/KaijuDefenceForce Japanese Self-Defence Force]] in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' never lost a single engagement - they won them all with sadistic ease. {{Justified}} most of the time since they are a modern, relatively well-funded [[InsistentTerminology armed force]] that has to face mostly [[MedievalStasis pre-medieval armies of legionnaires armed only with spears, shields, bows and arrows]] and [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the odd dragon]]. However, when they start simultaneously [[CurbStompBattle curb-stomping]] American, Russian ''and'' Chinese [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous Spec-Ops units]], things start to smell exceedingly fishy for a country that has been nominally anti-militaristic since WorldWarTwo. The fact that [[WordOfGod God]] is ex-JSDF himself and has expressed some [[PatrioticFervour rather strong feelings about Japan and the world]] doesn't help.
7th Apr '16 7:34:59 AM rafi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/MacGyver''. Earlier seasons were still able to portray him as fairly interesting in spite of his contractual invincibility (if often through DiabolusExMachina), but after the writers finished turning him into a full-fledged FixerSue, it got to a point where it was almost subversive to not have an improvised gadget work to full effect (it would still remedy the situation regardless...).



* Eliot Spencer in ''Series/{{Leverage}}''. As the group's muscle, he is unstoppable. The bar for his abilities was set high in the show's pilot, as he enters a room full of armed mobsters and defeats them all in a matter of seconds. From this point on, anyone he faces is doomed. The fact that he works completely unarmed only adds to this trope.
** Then he is forced to use guns in a season finale, at which point he obliterates a roomful of trained mercenaries without a scratch on him. Just because he doesn't like guns doesn't mean he can't use them.
** An episode in the first season has him getting beat up by one of Sterling's men, despite surprising the guy. Then it turns out Spencer was either pretending or just had an off day, when he comes back and pummels the guy.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** After his first season (in which he was a ''very'' flawed and fallible hero doing his best in difficult circumstances), the Third Doctor's era had tendency to fall into this. Creator/JonPertwee liked to play the Doctor as being always in control and one step ahead, and as time wore on in the era the Brigadier devolved from a powerful and pragmatic figure the Doctor struggled to influence to a comedy incompetent the Doctor could easily overrule. Being the Doctor, he was smarter than everyone around him, and being the moral centre of the show, he was always right about everything. When Philip Hinchcliffe took over the producer role and Tom Baker the mantle of the Doctor, both liked the idea of making the Doctor a more distant and fearful figure who would face physical and emotional pain and make the occasional poor decision.
** A common criticism of the Graham Williams era is that the Fourth Doctor ends up as one of these. The preceding era (produced by Philip Hinchcliffe) would often play BreakTheBadass with him by forcing him to struggle through his fear or physical pain, or having him paralysed by indecision and get squeamish about [[ShootTheDog Shooting The Dog]], or even letting him get {{Mind Rape}}d or beaten up, so the powerful character of the Doctor and Creator/TomBaker's [[LargeHam charismatic performance]] would have something to overcome. But, by the Williams era, he's physically strong enough to best people in a straight up fight, has all sorts of amazing Time Lord powers that get him out of scrapes, he can [[TheCharmer charm his way into making anyone love him]] or [[MasterActor act his way into making anyone hate him]], is so clever that he can solve the mysteries in his head and needs no-one else's help, and he does it all with a [[AsideGlance winning smile to the camera]]. His rather odd and difficult personality keeps him entertainingly flawed and he does some great character-based and slapstick comedy in these seasons, but it's almost never used to create in-story tension. The very first story of the JNT era signalled a big backlash from this by making the Doctor both physically and emotionally vulnerable in a [[RapidAging way obvious in promotional pictures]]; later, the same producer oversaw the Doctor's regeneration into a younger and more subtle character defined by his [[BreakTheCutie flaws and vulnerabilities]].
* Subverted by ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' - the heroes are all on the losing side all the time. Even their wins can't be considered as wins, more of a just-barely-managed-to-stay-alive-one-more-day situation. It's so bad that you might actually get pissed at the show for constantly making them lose.
* Subverted with Peter Petrelli and Hiro Nakamura in ''Series/{{Heroes}}''. Peter could gain any other superhero's ability simply by standing near them. Hiro could stop time, teleport, and travel through time, making him nearly impossible to defeat in battle. However, the problem with these heroes was that they were given too many opportunities to solve all the problems of the plot too quickly. This meant that they had to clutch an IdiotBall in order to keep the plot moving, leading to many KillHimAlready moments among fans. Even the writers realized this and had both characters significantly weakened for a time.
* Souji Tendou, the titular ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto''. He effortlessly defeats every single challenge that comes his way, and any exceptions are either PlayedForLaughs (such as his obsession with winning a scratchcard game) or because [[ILetYouWin he let the other person win]]. It got so bad that the show had to introduce an EvilTwin just to give him an adequate challenge, and with ''that'' it only took a few episodes for him to overcome it. Of course, his awareness of his utter invincibility is one of the aspects of Tendou's character. Series/KamenRiderKiva, on the other hand... has no real excuse once he gets Emperor Form.



* Eliot Spencer in ''Series/{{Leverage}}''. As the group's muscle, he is unstoppable. The bar for his abilities was set high in the show's pilot, as he enters a room full of armed mobsters and defeats them all in a matter of seconds. From this point on, anyone he faces is doomed. The fact that he works completely unarmed only adds to this trope.
** Then he is forced to use guns in a season finale, at which point he obliterates a roomful of trained mercenaries without a scratch on him. Just because he doesn't like guns doesn't mean he can't use them.
** An episode in the first season has him getting beat up by one of Sterling's men, despite surprising the guy. Then it turns out Spencer was either pretending or just had an off day, when he comes back and pummels the guy.
* ''Series/MacGyver''. Earlier seasons were still able to portray him as fairly interesting in spite of his contractual invincibility (if often through DiabolusExMachina), but after the writers finished turning him into a full-fledged FixerSue, it got to a point where it was almost subversive to not have an improvised gadget work to full effect (it would still remedy the situation regardless...).
* Patrick Jane from ''Series/TheMentalist'' fits this archetype very well. It doesn't matter what manner of outlandish or dickish moves or claims he pulls, he will ''always'' be justified in doing them, even if if there would be no reason to do so beforehand. He always wins. A fine example of this is the fourth season premiere, where he manages to drum up a million dollars by himself for bail, while in jail, and manages to get away with ''murdering a man'' who had never been investigated prior, by convincing the jury that the man was his arch nemesis, when in reality he wasn't.
* Parodied in a sketch of ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'', in which a hero who can summon an army of angels teams up with a hero who can [[OvershadowedByAwesome ride a BMX bike really well]]. The BMX hero keeps suggesting clever ways to fight the villains with his BMX bike, but the other hero keeps pointing out that simply summoning an army of angels would solve all their problems.
* Shawn Spencer in ''Series/{{Psych}}''; others might one up him once or twice an episode but it's always Shawn (except maybe for ADayInTheLimelight episodes) who makes the final break and solves the case. He's [[SmugSuper so damn smug]] about it, you find yourself wishing he'd lose in his own arena at least ''once''.



* Shawn Spencer in ''Series/{{Psych}}''; others might one up him once or twice an episode but it's always Shawn (except maybe for ADayInTheLimelight episodes) who makes the final break and solves the case. He's [[SmugSuper so damn smug]] about it, you find yourself wishing he'd lose in his own arena at least ''once''.
* Peter Petrelli and Hiro Nakamura in ''Series/{{Heroes}}''. Peter could gain any other superhero's ability simply by standing near them. Hiro could stop time, teleport, and travel through time, making him nearly impossible to defeat in battle. However, the problem with these heroes was that they were given too many opportunities to solve all the problems of the plot too quickly. This meant that they had to clutch an IdiotBall in order to keep the plot moving, leading to many KillHimAlready moments among fans. Even the writers realized this and had both characters significantly weakened for a time.
* Subverted by ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' - the heroes are all on the losing side all the time. Even their wins can't be considered as wins, more of a just-barely-managed-to-stay-alive-one-more-day situation. It's so bad that you might actually get pissed at the show for constantly making them lose.
* Patrick Jane from ''Series/TheMentalist'' fits this archetype very well. It doesn't matter what manner of outlandish or dickish moves or claims he pulls, he will ''always'' be justified in doing them, even if if there would be no reason to do so beforehand. He always wins. A fine example of this is the fourth season premiere, where he manages to drum up a million dollars by himself for bail, while in jail, and manages to get away with ''murdering a man'' who had never been investigated prior, by convincing the jury that the man was his arch nemesis, when in reality he wasn't.
* Souji Tendou, the titular ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto''. He effortlessly defeats every single challenge that comes his way, and any exceptions are either PlayedForLaughs (such as his obsession with winning a scratchcard game) or because [[ILetYouWin he let the other person win]]. It got so bad that the show had to introduce an EvilTwin just to give him an adequate challenge, and with ''that'' it only took a few episodes for him to overcome it. Of course, his awareness of his utter invincibility is one of the aspects of Tendou's character. Series/KamenRiderKiva, on the other hand... has no real excuse once he gets Emperor Form.
* Parodied in a sketch of ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'', in which a hero who can summon an army of angels teams up with a hero who can [[OvershadowedByAwesome ride a BMX bike really well]]. The BMX hero keeps suggesting clever ways to fight the villains with his BMX bike, but the other hero keeps pointing out that simply summoning an army of angels would solve all their problems.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** After his first season (in which he was a ''very'' flawed and fallible hero doing his best in difficult circumstances), the Third Doctor's era had tendency to fall into this. Creator/JonPertwee liked to play the Doctor as being always in control and one step ahead, and as time wore on in the era the Brigadier devolved from a powerful and pragmatic figure the Doctor struggled to influence to a comedy incompetent the Doctor could easily overrule. Being the Doctor, he was smarter than everyone around him, and being the moral centre of the show, he was always right about everything. When Philip Hinchcliffe took over the producer role and Tom Baker the mantle of the Doctor, both liked the idea of making the Doctor a more distant and fearful figure who would face physical and emotional pain and make the occasional poor decision.
** A common criticism of the Graham Williams era is that the Fourth Doctor ends up as one of these. The preceding era (produced by Philip Hinchcliffe) would often play BreakTheBadass with him by forcing him to struggle through his fear or physical pain, or having him paralysed by indecision and get squeamish about [[ShootTheDog Shooting The Dog]], or even letting him get {{Mind Rape}}d or beaten up, so the powerful character of the Doctor and Creator/TomBaker's [[LargeHam charismatic performance]] would have something to overcome. But, by the Williams era, he's physically strong enough to best people in a straight up fight, has all sorts of amazing Time Lord powers that get him out of scrapes, he can [[TheCharmer charm his way into making anyone love him]] or [[MasterActor act his way into making anyone hate him]], is so clever that he can solve the mysteries in his head and needs no-one else's help, and he does it all with a [[AsideGlance winning smile to the camera]]. His rather odd and difficult personality keeps him entertainingly flawed and he does some great character-based and slapstick comedy in these seasons, but it's almost never used to create in-story tension. The very first story of the JNT era signalled a big backlash from this by making the Doctor both physically and emotionally vulnerable in a [[RapidAging way obvious in promotional pictures]]; later, the same producer oversaw the Doctor's regeneration into a younger and more subtle character defined by his [[BreakTheCutie flaws and vulnerabilities]].

to:

* Shawn Spencer in ''Series/{{Psych}}''; others might one up him once or twice an episode but it's always Shawn (except maybe for ADayInTheLimelight episodes) who makes the final break and solves the case. He's [[SmugSuper so damn smug]] ''[[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]]'', while supposedly a regular mortal (questions about it, you find yourself wishing he'd lose in his her true father aside), is pretty much unbeatable. She has defeated entire armies on her own arena at least ''once''.
* Peter Petrelli
along with war gods, archangels, and Hiro Nakamura demons in ''Series/{{Heroes}}''. Peter could gain any other superhero's ability simply by standing near them. Hiro could stop time, teleport, and travel through time, making him nearly impossible to direct battle despite their vastly superior strength. Any time she meets an enemy she cannot directly defeat in battle. However, the problem with these heroes was that they were given too many opportunities to solve all the problems of the plot too quickly. This meant that they had to clutch an IdiotBall in order to keep the plot moving, leading to many KillHimAlready moments among fans. Even the writers realized this and had both characters significantly weakened for a time.
* Subverted by ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' - the heroes are all on the losing side all the time. Even their wins can't be considered as wins, more of a just-barely-managed-to-stay-alive-one-more-day situation. It's so bad that you might actually get pissed at the show for constantly making them lose.
* Patrick Jane from ''Series/TheMentalist'' fits this archetype very well. It doesn't matter what manner of outlandish or dickish moves or claims he pulls, he will ''always'' be justified in doing them, even if if there would be no reason to do so beforehand. He always wins. A fine example of this is the fourth season premiere, where he manages to drum up a million dollars by himself for bail, while in jail, and manages to get away with ''murdering a man'' who had never been investigated prior, by convincing the jury that the man was his arch nemesis, when in reality he wasn't.
* Souji Tendou, the titular ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto''. He effortlessly defeats every single challenge that comes his way, and any exceptions are
she either PlayedForLaughs (such as his obsession with winning a scratchcard game) acquires [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands new powers, skills, or because [[ILetYouWin he let the other person win]]. It got so bad weapons]] that allow her to triumph or her enemies [[ForgotAboutHisPowers conveniently forget about the show had to introduce an EvilTwin just to give him an adequate challenge, and with ''that'' it only took a few episodes for him to overcome it. Of course, his awareness of his utter invincibility is one of the aspects of Tendou's character. Series/KamenRiderKiva, on the other hand... has no real excuse once he gets Emperor Form.
* Parodied in a sketch of ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'', in which a hero who can summon an army of angels teams up with a hero who can [[OvershadowedByAwesome ride a BMX bike really well]]. The BMX hero keeps suggesting clever ways to fight the villains with his BMX bike, but the other hero keeps pointing out
powers]] that simply summoning an army of angels would solve all their problems.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** After his first season (in which he was a ''very'' flawed and fallible hero doing his best in difficult circumstances), the Third Doctor's era had tendency to fall into this. Creator/JonPertwee liked to play the Doctor as being always in control and one step ahead, and as time wore on in the era the Brigadier devolved from a powerful and pragmatic figure the Doctor struggled to influence to a comedy incompetent the Doctor could
let them easily overrule. Being the Doctor, he was smarter than everyone around him, and being the moral centre of the show, he was always right about everything. When Philip Hinchcliffe took over the producer role and Tom Baker the mantle of the Doctor, both liked the idea of making the Doctor defeat a more distant and fearful figure who would face physical and emotional pain and make the occasional poor decision.
** A common criticism of the Graham Williams era is that the Fourth Doctor ends up as one of these. The preceding era (produced by Philip Hinchcliffe) would often play BreakTheBadass with him by forcing him to struggle through his fear or physical pain, or having him paralysed by indecision and get squeamish about [[ShootTheDog Shooting The Dog]], or even letting him get {{Mind Rape}}d or beaten up, so the powerful character of the Doctor and Creator/TomBaker's [[LargeHam charismatic performance]] would have something to overcome. But, by the Williams era, he's physically strong enough to best people in a straight up fight, has all sorts of amazing Time Lord powers that get him out of scrapes, he can [[TheCharmer charm his way into making anyone love him]] or [[MasterActor act his way into making anyone hate him]], is so clever that he can solve the mysteries in his head and needs no-one else's help, and he does it all with a [[AsideGlance winning smile to the camera]]. His rather odd and difficult personality keeps him entertainingly flawed and he does some great character-based and slapstick comedy in these seasons, but it's almost never used to create in-story tension. The very first story of the JNT era signalled a big backlash from this by making the Doctor both physically and emotionally vulnerable in a [[RapidAging way obvious in promotional pictures]]; later, the same producer oversaw the Doctor's regeneration into a younger and more subtle character defined by his [[BreakTheCutie flaws and vulnerabilities]].
mortal.
31st Mar '16 3:09:04 AM IronInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WebAnimation/TurnaboutStorm'', [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Twilight]] remarks how suspicious it is that the murder victim [[TheAce had a flawless winning record]] (it turns out [[spoiler:he blackmailed every competitor who posed a threat]]), and [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix]] agrees. The joke is that Phoenix has canonically won every single major case he's taken, since the games tend to end if he loses.

to:

* In ''WebAnimation/TurnaboutStorm'', [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Twilight]] remarks how suspicious it is that the murder victim [[TheAce had a flawless winning record]] (it turns out [[spoiler:he blackmailed every competitor who posed a threat]]), and [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix]] agrees. The joke is that Phoenix has canonically won every single major case he's taken, since had a perfect record of his own until he took [[spoiler:Matt Engarde's]] case, and that the games tend to end if he loses.make a big deal out of most of the prosecutors having perfect win records (until they come up against Phoenix, of course).
5th Mar '16 12:53:30 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Megaforce'', the titular Megaforce is a private army "whose weapons are the most powerful science can devise": motorcycles that shoot missiles, dune buggies with lasers, and a hologram of a woman in a bikini. In the climax, Megaforce's only possible escape route is being guarded by a company of tanks on flat ground with a clear firing range. Megaforce's brilliant strategy is to just drive straight at the tanks in broad daylight. No one on Megaforce is killed or injured doing this, and even the guy who misses the plane taking off gets away because his motorcycle ''[[AssPull can fly]]''.

to:

* In ''Megaforce'', ''Film/{{Megaforce}}'', the titular Megaforce is a private army "whose weapons are the most powerful science can devise": motorcycles that shoot missiles, dune buggies with lasers, and a hologram of a woman in a bikini. In the climax, Megaforce's only possible escape route is being guarded by a company of tanks on flat ground with a clear firing range. Megaforce's brilliant strategy is to just drive straight at the tanks in broad daylight. No one on Megaforce is killed or injured doing this, and even the guy who misses the plane taking off gets away because his motorcycle ''[[AssPull can fly]]''.



* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' spoofs this as characters are [[GenreSavvy well aware]] that this trope is one of the privileges of the Main Character/[[TheHero Hero]] and will [[HostileShowTakeover try to steal the spot]] when they can. However, in the actual storylines, the main character usually has his ass completely handed to him by a character a thousand levels higher at least once.
* In ''VideoGame/Disgaea3AbsenceOfJustice'', Mao wants to defeat the overlord. He's been studying tropes, so he figures his best bet is to become a hero, since heroes never lose. [[spoiler: Super Hero Aurum from the same game used to be one of these, [[FallenHero but then he went crazy.]]]]

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}''
** The series
spoofs this as characters are [[GenreSavvy well aware]] that this trope is one of the privileges of the Main Character/[[TheHero Hero]] and will [[HostileShowTakeover try to steal the spot]] when they can. However, in the actual storylines, the main character usually has his ass completely handed to him by a character a thousand levels higher at least once.
* ** In ''VideoGame/Disgaea3AbsenceOfJustice'', Mao wants to defeat the overlord. He's been studying tropes, so he figures his best bet is to become a hero, since heroes never lose. [[spoiler: Super Hero Aurum from the same game used to be one of these, [[FallenHero but then he went crazy.]]]]



* Ike in ''VideoGame/FireEmblem: Radiant Dawn''. He even tells the FinalBoss before fighting her that [[BadassBoast in every battle he's been in, he always comes out on top]]. Interestingly enough, Ike is actually the antagonist in several parts of ''Radiant Dawn'' when you're [[AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent playing as Micaiah]]. He even appears as a boss in one chapter, and can be fought normally -And he still never loses! If you defeat him, you'll "win" the chapter automatically (normally it's a defend mission) but GameplayAndStorySegregation kicks in and the following cutscene explains that [[TheBattleDidntCount you're still losing the battle]]. Regardless of what side the player is on, Ike's forces beat Micaiah's every time.

to:

* Ike in ''VideoGame/FireEmblem: Radiant Dawn''.''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn''. He even tells the FinalBoss before fighting her that [[BadassBoast in every battle he's been in, he always comes out on top]]. Interestingly enough, Ike is actually the antagonist in several parts of ''Radiant Dawn'' when you're [[AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent playing as Micaiah]]. He even appears as a boss in one chapter, and can be fought normally -And he still never loses! If you defeat him, you'll "win" the chapter automatically (normally it's a defend mission) but GameplayAndStorySegregation kicks in and the following cutscene explains that [[TheBattleDidntCount you're still losing the battle]]. Regardless of what side the player is on, Ike's forces beat Micaiah's every time.
21st Feb '16 10:01:37 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/JossWhedon talked about the difficulties of WB putting together a ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' movie versus his own massive success with ''Film/TheAvengers''. He pointed out that the Avengers are easier to write and film since they all either have relatable problems or are weak enough to write action scenes for, while comparatively, characters like Superman and Franchise/WonderWoman are seen as "gods" without many flaws [[note]] despite the fact that [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor one of the Avengers is]] [[Main/PhysicalGod literally a god.]][[/note]]. Add in other powerhouse characters like Comicbook/GreenLantern and TheFlash, and it becomes very difficult to write convincing threats for the group in a cinematic setting.

to:

** Creator/JossWhedon talked about the difficulties of WB putting together a ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' movie versus his own massive success with ''Film/TheAvengers''.''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}''. He pointed out that the Avengers are easier to write and film since they all either have relatable problems or are weak enough to write action scenes for, while comparatively, characters like Superman and Franchise/WonderWoman are seen as "gods" without many flaws [[note]] despite the fact that [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor one of the Avengers is]] [[Main/PhysicalGod literally a god.]][[/note]]. Add in other powerhouse characters like Comicbook/GreenLantern and TheFlash, and it becomes very difficult to write convincing threats for the group in a cinematic setting.
20th Feb '16 5:19:45 PM Awesomekid42
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Yugi of ''Anime/YuGiOh'' has "lost" only five times, and only once 'fairly.'

to:

* Yugi of ''Anime/YuGiOh'' has "lost" only five times, and only once twice 'fairly.'
This list shows the last 10 events of 851. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InvincibleHero