History Main / InterfaceScrew

28th Oct '17 5:46:52 AM VicGeorge2011
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* In ''[[VideoGame/StarStrike1981 Star Strike]]'' for the UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}}, a fireball that hits your ship can cause your controls to be temporarily messed up, leaving you at the mercy of your controls.
27th Oct '17 11:09:50 AM REV6Pilot
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* The ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' game ''Piglet's Big Game'' has many examples::

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* The ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' game ''Piglet's Big Game'' has many examples::examplesℹ



* In 'VideoGame/DeathRally'', picking up a mushroom will make the entire track portion of the screen ripple madly until it wears off. Unsurprisingly, this makes driving in the race considerably harder than normal. Unlike most games, the mushrooms ''do'' affect the AI. If you can ram their cars into the pickups, they're actually affected worse than human players.

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* In 'VideoGame/DeathRally'', ''VideoGame/DeathRally'', picking up a mushroom will make the entire track portion of the screen ripple madly until it wears off. Unsurprisingly, this makes driving in the race considerably harder than normal. Unlike most games, the mushrooms ''do'' affect the AI. If you can ram their cars into the pickups, they're actually affected worse than human players.
25th Oct '17 5:27:39 PM nombretomado
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* In the ''ChocobosDungeon'' games, confusion will make Chocobo attack or move in a random direction. Fortunately, the effect is brief, and if you're not in danger, you can remedy it by walking in place.

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* In the ''ChocobosDungeon'' ''VideoGame/ChocobosDungeon'' games, confusion will make Chocobo attack or move in a random direction. Fortunately, the effect is brief, and if you're not in danger, you can remedy it by walking in place.
23rd Oct '17 11:25:21 AM ZombieAladdin
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** This was repeated in its SpiritualSuccessor ''Pinball/HauntedHouse'' but takes it one step further: There is an ''upper'' playfield with flippers that face away from each other. The left flipper button operates the right one and vice versa.
16th Oct '17 9:40:08 AM case
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* ''VideoGame/{{Cuphead}}: Ink droplets dropped by squids summoned by Captain Brineybeard are one of the very few things that don't do damage when they hit Cuphead or Mugman. Instead, they darken the screen for a few seconds, especially around the edges. Getting hit by more of them during this time causes black splotches to appear on the screen.


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* ''VideoGame/{{Cuphead}}: Ink droplets dropped by squids summoned by Captain Brineybeard are one of the very few things that don't do damage when they hit Cuphead or Mugman. Instead, they darken the screen for a few seconds, especially around the edges. Getting hit by more of them during this time causes black splotches to appear on the screen.
16th Oct '17 9:35:12 AM case
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* ''VideoGame/{{Cuphead}}: Ink droplets dropped by squids summoned by Captain Brineybeard are one of the very few things that don't do damage when they hit Cuphead or Mugman. Instead, they darken the screen for a few seconds, especially around the edges. Getting hit by more of them during this time causes black splotches to appear on the screen.
13th Oct '17 9:12:47 AM MyFinalEdits
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* Mr. Dark from the original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' inflicts various effects on you throughout the final level, such as reversed controls and disabled abilities. In an already NintendoHard game, the resultant frustration is arguably relative. Fortunately for the gamer, the keyboard mappings can be flipped in the options menu (right is left and left is right), which the game will then reverse to the correct orientation, allowing normal play.

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* Mr. Dark from the original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' inflicts various effects on you throughout the final level, such as reversed controls and disabled abilities. In an already NintendoHard game, the resultant frustration is arguably relative. Fortunately for the gamer, the keyboard mappings can be flipped in the options menu (right is left and left is right), which the game will then reverse to the correct orientation, allowing normal play.



** Also, the screen will start to bloom excessively from the outside in, making everything blurred. Luckily, this goes away after a few moments, but it repeats until you get yourself fixed up or use a healing item (which you can apply directly to the limb, or heal yourself to heal the limb slightly). The concussion blur is also present when you pull up your Pip-boy, making it rather difficult to find the right item. Arguably rather realistic.

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** Also, the screen will start to bloom excessively from the outside in, making everything blurred. Luckily, this goes away after a few moments, but it repeats until you get yourself fixed up or use a healing item (which you can apply directly to the limb, or heal yourself to heal the limb slightly). The concussion blur is also present when you pull up your Pip-boy, making it rather difficult to find the right item. Arguably rather realistic.



* Two bosses can and will pull this in ''VideoGame/ManaKhemia2FallOfAlchemy''. [[WhenTreesAttack Tetri]], from Ulrika's route, can grow roots over the bottom-right of the screen which completely disable the swap-in mechanics and, by extension, the [[CombinationAttack Intimate Strike/Guard]]. The final fight with Reicher in Raze's story involves a slightly different headache; about halfway through the fight, he'll use a move that buffs him with haste (three actions per turn) and blanks out the game's VisualInitiativeQueue, which makes it pretty much impossible to plan moves ahead. [[spoiler: Fortunately, a Heavenly Juice item will clear up both at once.]]

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* Two bosses can and will pull this in ''VideoGame/ManaKhemia2FallOfAlchemy''. [[WhenTreesAttack Tetri]], from Ulrika's route, can grow roots over the bottom-right of the screen which completely disable the swap-in mechanics and, by extension, the [[CombinationAttack Intimate Strike/Guard]]. The final fight with Reicher in Raze's story involves a slightly different headache; about halfway through the fight, he'll use a move that buffs him with haste (three actions per turn) and blanks out the game's VisualInitiativeQueue, which makes it pretty much almost impossible to plan moves ahead. [[spoiler: Fortunately, a Heavenly Juice item will clear up both at once.]]



** ''Wing Commander IV'' has a few missions where the odds are against you due to a jamming ship that pretty much screws over most of your instruments, including your shields and your missiles, which will not lock. What makes it even more of a kick to the face is that the enemy fighters are not affected at all by the jamming due to [[{{handwave}} frequency-agile avionics and tempesting]] (as per the {{novelization}}), so they have working shields, and missiles that lock. On the upside, though, [[MacrossMissileMassacre salvo-firing off all of your "dumbfire" unguided missiles]] will put a quick end to the jammer ship, once you locate it.

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** ''Wing Commander IV'' has a few missions where the odds are against you due to a jamming ship that pretty much screws over most of your instruments, including your shields and your missiles, which will not lock. What makes it even more of a kick to the face is that the enemy fighters are not affected at all by the jamming due to [[{{handwave}} frequency-agile avionics and tempesting]] (as per the {{novelization}}), so they have working shields, and missiles that lock. On the upside, though, [[MacrossMissileMassacre salvo-firing off all of your "dumbfire" unguided missiles]] will put a quick end to the jammer ship, once you locate it.



* Bally Midway's ''Black Belt'' has a flipper in the upper-right that similarly, flips toward the player and can be used to send a ball up a ramp.. that goes to the other upper flipper on the left which, like most other flippers, flips away from the player. This is pretty much guaranteed to confound players the first few times they play.

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* Bally Midway's ''Black Belt'' has a flipper in the upper-right that similarly, flips toward the player and can be used to send a ball up a ramp.. that goes to the other upper flipper on the left which, like most other flippers, flips away from the player. This is pretty much guaranteed to confound players the first few times they play.
13th Oct '17 9:10:25 AM MyFinalEdits
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* Games with sniper rifles will have the sight move around to simulate breathing or twitchy hands or something like that. For example, the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, which only stops it after you take a relaxant medicine.



** The Panic status in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' randomizes your movement controls when it's applied (Making right become down and left become right, for instance), but you can still move properly once you've figured out which direction is which. However, it lasts much longer the aforementioned status.

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** * The Panic status in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' randomizes your movement controls when it's applied (Making right become down and left become right, for instance), but you can still move properly once you've figured out which direction is which. However, it lasts much longer the aforementioned status.



** Arguably the "Who's The Dummy?" questions in ''2011'', which are delivered through a sarcastic ventriloquist's dummy named Billy O'Brien. Even though Cookie says he's doing pretty good on episode 1, he ends up slightly obscuring the question and answers with his inability to pronounce certain sounds (Specifically his B's P's and M's).
* It could be argued that the ''VideoGame/WarioWare'' series falls under this trope, seeing as the game objectives and controls completely change every five seconds. For good measure, [=WarioWare=] [=DIY=] has a mirror mode.



* Similar to ''[=WarioWare=]'' above, the bulk of the "remix" challenges in ''VideoGame/NESRemix'' feature this: {{Blackout Basement}}s, [[DeliberatelyMonochrome entire levels being played in silhouette]], and others.



** This is actually a common practice that plagues 90% of the apps: Ads can pop up at inconvenient times during the usage of the app and push toolbars down or up, conveniently position themselves where the pause button normally is when you have wi-fi off, and can even appear OUTSIDE the app, in the form of a notification (often dismissable) or covering a portion of the screen. Avast Anti-Virus, for example, loves to remind you that you are not a Pro user and that they have other apps.



* Done brilliantly in ''VideoGame/Code7''. Since the Alex is [[spoiler: a A.I.]], the entire game is played as a text adventure. Being attacked during hacking will cause the screen to shake and lights to go off. When the narrator gets too agitated, the letters will go crazy and sometimes turn into {{Wingdinglish}}. And when [[spoiler: S.O.L.I. hacks Alex]], the entire screen is oddly coloured, shaking and filled with binary.

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* Done brilliantly in ''VideoGame/Code7''. Since the Alex is [[spoiler: a A.I.]], the entire game is played as a text adventure. Being attacked during hacking will cause the screen to shake and lights to go off. When the narrator gets too agitated, the letters will go crazy and sometimes turn into {{Wingdinglish}}. And when [[spoiler: S.O.L.I. hacks Alex]], the entire screen is oddly coloured, shaking and filled with binary.



* ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' contains a level called "Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy," in which Yoshi can collide with cotton-ball enemies that cause the stage to warp and Yoshi to stumble around.
** In the German version, that level is called [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Lustiges Sporen Drama]].
** Also, if a [[http://www.mariowiki.com/Grim_Leecher Grim Leecher]] hits you, you lose Baby Mario and it starts riding you. Until you get Baby Mario back, your controls are reversed. Fortunately, they're a rare enemy, and not terribly hard to defeat.
** In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'', one of the sound effects also comes with a visual effect reminiscent of "Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy". It looks like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Yj2XMZWymA&t=2m24s this]].

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* ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'':
** The game
contains a level called "Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy," in which Yoshi can collide with cotton-ball enemies that cause the stage to warp and Yoshi to stumble around.
**
around. In the German version, that level is called [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Lustiges Sporen Drama]].
** Also, if If a [[http://www.mariowiki.com/Grim_Leecher Grim Leecher]] hits you, you lose Baby Mario and it starts riding you. Until you get Baby Mario back, your controls are reversed. Fortunately, they're a rare enemy, and not terribly hard to defeat.
** * In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'', one of the sound effects also comes with a visual effect reminiscent of "Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy". It looks like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Yj2XMZWymA&t=2m24s this]].



* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' and ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2'' each had a level with a pair of strange potions you could drink to flip the screen upside down and then back up again.

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* ''Franchise/PrinceOfPersia'':
**
''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' and ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2'' each had a level with a pair of strange potions you could drink to flip the screen upside down and then back up again.



* In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'', Kaptain K. Rool has a gun that shoots various status effect "clouds" in addition to cannonballs. The purple clouds reverse left and right, which is problematic because Rool also can suck the player toward him using the gun -- so pressing the wrong direction results in rapidly crashing into him. On the other hand, it's less dangerous than the cannonballs, because at least if these hit you you have a chance of not getting hurt. The red and blue clouds induce "slow-mo" and "frozen in place" effects.

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* ''Franchise/DonkeyKong'':
**
In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'', Kaptain K. Rool has a gun that shoots various status effect "clouds" in addition to cannonballs. The purple clouds reverse left and right, which is problematic because Rool also can suck the player toward him using the gun -- so pressing the wrong direction results in rapidly crashing into him. On the other hand, it's less dangerous than the cannonballs, because at least if these hit you you have a chance of not getting hurt. The red and blue clouds induce "slow-mo" and "frozen in place" effects.



* In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'', one of the objectives on the Gloomy Galleon level is for Chunky Kong to go down under the deck of a ship (the one sailing one) and retrieve his Golden Banana. Once the player reaches the banana and Chunky does his dance, the whole screen constantly distorts itself in different ways, Chunky's walking animation has him leaning backwards with his arms down, and the walking direction controls are reversed, implying seasickness.
** A mini-boss in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' is a giant spider (that only Tiny can fight) who shoots globs of webbing which can reverse the controls or freeze Tiny.

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* ** In ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'', one of the objectives on the Gloomy Galleon level is for Chunky Kong to go down under the deck of a ship (the one sailing one) and retrieve his Golden Banana. Once the player reaches the banana and Chunky does his dance, the whole screen constantly distorts itself in different ways, Chunky's walking animation has him leaning backwards with his arms down, and the walking direction controls are reversed, implying seasickness.
** A mini-boss MiniBoss in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' is a giant spider (that only Tiny can fight) who shoots globs of webbing which can reverse the controls or freeze Tiny.



** Paintra from ''VideoGame/KirbyTripleDeluxe'' paints the fourth wall in the most literal sense, splashing the screen to obscure your vision.

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** * Paintra from ''VideoGame/KirbyTripleDeluxe'' paints the fourth wall in the most literal sense, splashing the screen to obscure your vision.



* In ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie: Nuts & Bolts''' Logbox 720, running into the video or sound card will make the screen or sound staticy respectively. It doesn't actually make the game harder to play, it's just a nice touch.
** It also has a time trial in the Jiggoseum where your rival Trophy Thomas (irritated that you keep besting his times) flips the controls for the custom vehicle.

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* In ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie: Nuts & Bolts''' Logbox 720, running into the video or sound card will make the screen or sound staticy respectively. It doesn't actually make the game harder to play, it's just a nice touch.
**
touch. It also has a time trial in the Jiggoseum where your rival Trophy Thomas (irritated that you keep besting his times) flips the controls for the custom vehicle.



* Mr. Dark from the original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' inflicts various effects on you throughout the final level, such as reversed controls and disabled abilities. In an already NintendoHard game, the resultant frustration is arguably relative.
** Fortunately for the gamer, the keyboard mappings can be flipped in the options menu (right is left and left is right), which the game will then reverse to the correct orientation, allowing normal play.

to:

* Mr. Dark from the original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' inflicts various effects on you throughout the final level, such as reversed controls and disabled abilities. In an already NintendoHard game, the resultant frustration is arguably relative.
**
relative. Fortunately for the gamer, the keyboard mappings can be flipped in the options menu (right is left and left is right), which the game will then reverse to the correct orientation, allowing normal play.



* In ''TheSimpsons: Bart's Nightmare'', if you touch the music notes coming from a flying sax, you'll moonwalk for what feels like a minute.

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* In ''TheSimpsons: ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons: Bart's Nightmare'', if you touch the music notes coming from a flying sax, you'll moonwalk for what feels like a minute.



* ''[[VideoGame/{{Tetris}} Heboris]] Unofficial Expansion'''s Versus Mode has a number of items that fall under this trope. "X-Ray" turns the field invisible, with a scanner running through it to give you a brief glimpse of the screen. "Hide Next" turns off your preview pieces. "Grandmother Block" turns your blocks into black-and-white (or green-and-white, depending on your rotation system) "[ ]" blocks a la the original ''Tetris'' and ''Tetris: The Grand Master 3'' Shirase Mode's last 300 levels.

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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Tetris}} Heboris]] ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'':
** ''Heboris
Unofficial Expansion'''s Versus Mode has a number of items that fall under this trope. "X-Ray" turns the field invisible, with a scanner running through it to give you a brief glimpse of the screen. "Hide Next" turns off your preview pieces. "Grandmother Block" turns your blocks into black-and-white (or green-and-white, depending on your rotation system) "[ ]" blocks a la the original ''Tetris'' and ''Tetris: The Grand Master 3'' Shirase Mode's last 300 levels.



** Several of Konami's ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' and ''Pop'n Music'' titles have had Battle Modes with the same gimmick (albeit with different interface screws.)
** ''DDR Max'' also has the Trick course in Oni / Challenge Mode. The first stage is on Boost, which makes arrows start slower and accelerate as they move up the screen. The second stage adds Reverse, which makes the arrows move top-to-bottom instead of bottom-to-top. So far, fairly reasonable, and both modifiers are selectable normally as a SelfImposedChallenge. But the third stage swaps out Boost for Brake, which makes the arrows slow down. To almost a halt. Which makes it hard to tell exactly when you're supposed to hit them. Then the fourth stage ditches the previous modifiers for "Fuwa-Fuwa", which pulsates between 0.25x and 1x scroll speed, making the arrows squish together and then move back apart in an accordion-like manner. Then the final stage is [[ThatOneBoss MAX 300]] on 0.25x scroll speed, which results in runs of 10 arrows per second being smushed together so that the 10 arrows span about 1/4th the height of the screen.
*** This shows up again later in the DDR series, and in the fan-tribute/spiritual successor to DDR, ''VideoGame/InTheGroove''.

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** Several of Konami's ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' and ''Pop'n Music'' titles have had Battle Modes with the same gimmick (albeit with different interface screws.)
** ''DDR Max'' also
* ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution Mix'' has the Trick course in Oni / Challenge Mode. The first stage is on Boost, which makes arrows start slower and accelerate as they move up the screen. The second stage adds Reverse, which makes the arrows move top-to-bottom instead of bottom-to-top. So far, fairly reasonable, and both modifiers are selectable normally as a SelfImposedChallenge. But the third stage swaps out Boost for Brake, which makes the arrows slow down. To almost a halt. Which makes it hard to tell exactly when you're supposed to hit them. Then the fourth stage ditches the previous modifiers for "Fuwa-Fuwa", which pulsates between 0.25x and 1x scroll speed, making the arrows squish together and then move back apart in an accordion-like manner. Then the final stage is [[ThatOneBoss MAX 300]] on 0.25x scroll speed, which results in runs of 10 arrows per second being smushed together so that the 10 arrows span about 1/4th the height of the screen.
***
screen. This shows up again later in the DDR series, and in the fan-tribute/spiritual successor to DDR, ''VideoGame/InTheGroove''.



* The second installments of ''Taiko no Tatsujin'' feature boss battles, in which the bosses use different kinds of methods to block your view. Most annoying is Botan's, which pretty much covers the screen in black.

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* The second installments of ''Taiko no Tatsujin'' feature boss battles, in which the bosses use different kinds of methods to block your view. Most annoying is Botan's, which pretty much covers the screen in black.



* A [[AscendedGlitch restored]] bug in the ''DDR'' simulator ''VideoGame/{{Stepmania}}'' handled negative-tempo designations oddly, causing the arrow sequence to skip forward immediately. Several stepchart writers have had [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLVWQuKo_8U some]] [[http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=tsubrothersgamush&emb=0&aq=0&oq=tsubrother# fun]] with this. (The second video shows both negative-tempo tricks [see 4:50, when the circular "mines" turn back into arrows] and what is essentially the the game itself throwing predetermined Battle Mode attacks at the player.)
** The course in the second video was actually made by a 3rd party (specifically, Zeta) and included in the final release of Hopscotchmix Encore. The only modifier put in on the video was the "blind" modifier, which was intentionally done to prevent two things: accusations of cheating (slightly widened timing windows were used to compensate for recording lag) and counting the notes in the then-unreleased [=TsusurvivorgamusH=].
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7XykqvVS2I Said bug taken to its logical extreme.]] And the best part? It actually works on modded ITG cabinets, which use a a fork of ''Stepmania 4'', which supposedly fixed this "bug"!

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* ''VideoGame/{{Stepmania}}'':
**
A [[AscendedGlitch restored]] bug in the ''DDR'' simulator ''VideoGame/{{Stepmania}}'' handled negative-tempo designations oddly, causing the arrow sequence to skip forward immediately. Several stepchart writers have had [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLVWQuKo_8U some]] [[http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=tsubrothersgamush&emb=0&aq=0&oq=tsubrother# fun]] with this. (The second video shows both negative-tempo tricks [see 4:50, when the circular "mines" turn back into arrows] and what is essentially the the game itself throwing predetermined Battle Mode attacks at the player.)
** The course in the second video was actually made by a 3rd party (specifically, Zeta) and included in the final release of Hopscotchmix Encore. The only modifier put in on the video was the "blind" modifier, which was intentionally done to prevent two things: accusations of cheating (slightly widened timing windows were used to compensate for recording lag) and counting the notes in the then-unreleased [=TsusurvivorgamusH=].
**
) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7XykqvVS2I Said Here's said bug taken to its logical extreme.]] And the best part? It actually works on modded ITG cabinets, which use a a fork of ''Stepmania 4'', which supposedly fixed this "bug"!



* In ''{{Baroque}}'', the Confusion status effect makes directions to change wildly, making it all but impossible to move.
** Also, being affected with the Lust status effect turns everything into the same floating kimono-wearing figure : items, enemies, traps and the main character all look the same.

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* In ''{{Baroque}}'', the ''{{Baroque}}'':
** The
Confusion status effect makes directions to change wildly, making it all but impossible to move.
** Also, being Being affected with the Lust status effect turns everything into the same floating kimono-wearing figure : items, enemies, traps and the main character all look the same.



* ''VideoGame/NetHack'' has a ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' level, a ShoutOut to the game that started the {{Roguelike}} genre. For the duration of the level, all the graphics are changed to be as close to the original ''Rogue'' as possible. Even if you're playing with graphics mode, everything is in ''Rogue'''s ASCII. It counts as an InterfaceScrew because it suddenly becomes very confusing unless you've played ''Rogue'', as ''Nethack'' and ''Rogue'' use different symbols for a lot of things.
** It also contains some more standardized screws, such as the Hallucinating effect. Monsters and items swap graphics/characters every turn, and [[http://nethackwiki.com/wiki/Hallucinatory_messages a large amount the descriptive text]] is changed to sound sillier. Some of the things one can see while hallucinating [[http://nethackwiki.com/wiki/Hallucinatory_monster don't even exist during normal play]], and attempting to name a monster only yields the message "You would never recognize it anyway."

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* ''VideoGame/NetHack'' has a ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' level, a ShoutOut to the game that started the {{Roguelike}} genre. For the duration of the level, all the graphics are changed to be as close to the original ''Rogue'' as possible. Even if you're playing with graphics mode, everything is in ''Rogue'''s ASCII. It counts as an InterfaceScrew because it suddenly becomes very confusing unless you've played ''Rogue'', as ''Nethack'' and ''Rogue'' use different symbols for a lot of things.
**
things. It also contains some more standardized screws, such as the Hallucinating effect. Monsters and items swap graphics/characters every turn, and [[http://nethackwiki.com/wiki/Hallucinatory_messages a large amount the descriptive text]] is changed to sound sillier. Some of the things one can see while hallucinating [[http://nethackwiki.com/wiki/Hallucinatory_monster don't even exist during normal play]], and attempting to name a monster only yields the message "You would never recognize it anyway."



* ''VideoGame/CryptOfTheNecrodancer'' has some effects like this. They are worse than usual since this game, unlike other Roguelikes, does not leave you with much time to think (unless you are playing as Bard).

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* ''VideoGame/CryptOfTheNecrodancer'' ''VideoGame/CryptOfTheNecrodancer'':
** The game
has some effects like this. They are worse than usual since this game, unlike other Roguelikes, does not leave you with much time to think (unless you are playing as Bard).



* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' features one of the Status Effects -- [[GoodBadTranslation Mashroomization]] -- that, once outside of battle, will randomly change Left, Right, Up, and Down on the D-pad to other directions, always in relation to each other. This will change every 20 seconds until the mushroom is removed.

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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' ''VideoGame/EarthBound'':
** The game
features one of the Status Effects -- [[GoodBadTranslation Mashroomization]] -- that, once outside of battle, will randomly change Left, Right, Up, and Down on the D-pad to other directions, always in relation to each other. This will change every 20 seconds until the mushroom is removed.



*** ''Survival Kids'' for the Game Boy Color used a similar effect (referred to as "Confusion" in-game) which rotated the primary directions clockwise (left -> up, up -> right, and so forth) that kicked in if the player ate the right (wrong?) type of -- you guessed it -- mushrooms.

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*** * ''Survival Kids'' for the Game Boy Color used a similar has an effect (referred to as "Confusion" in-game) which rotated rotates the primary directions clockwise (left -> up, up -> right, and so forth) that kicked kick in if the player ate eats the right (wrong?) type of -- you guessed it -- mushrooms.



* The underground areas of ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' have a "Confuse Trap" item, which scrambles your movements so you go in a random direction. For example, up goes up, left goes down, right goes up also, and down goes left. Which is a crippling disadvantage as it's used in Capture the Flag.

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
The underground areas of ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' have a "Confuse Trap" item, which scrambles your movements so you go in a random direction. For example, up goes up, left goes down, right goes up also, and down goes left. Which is a crippling disadvantage as it's used in Capture the Flag.



* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' has a Confuse effect that reverses your controls (up is down, left is right, etc) until the end of the effect, which wears off with time. (Confuse can be remedied by going to the controls section and pressing L or R to reverse the D pad. Or holding the controller upside-down...)
** Likewise, its West-Coast cousin ''Secret of Evermore'' has the identical Confound.

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* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' has a Confuse effect that reverses your controls (up is down, left is right, etc) until the end of the effect, which wears off with time. (Confuse can be remedied by going to the controls section and pressing L or R to reverse the D pad. Or holding the controller upside-down...)
** Likewise, its
) Its West-Coast cousin ''Secret of Evermore'' has the identical Confound.



** Although if you're playing on a Game boy Player, you can just turn the Gamecube Controller accordingly.



* ''VideoGame/TalesOfHearts'' adds the Reverse status to the series list. It inverts the up/down and left/right directions on the D-pad, and for some reason is the characteristic status of the Light element.
** Its version of Blind also makes everything black and invisible except the affected character.

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* ''VideoGame/TalesOfHearts'' adds the Reverse status to the series list. It inverts the up/down and left/right directions on the D-pad, and for some reason is the characteristic status of the Light element.
**
element. Its version of Blind also makes everything black and invisible except the affected character.



* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' uses tricks similar to ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'''s when your character is too close to an explosion. Additionally, when your health starts to decrease in ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', blood vessels appear on the edges of the screen and sounds become distant and distorted, and getting drunk causes blurring and random swaying of the screen.

to:

* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' uses tricks similar to ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'''s ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** This happens
when your character is too close to an explosion. Additionally, when your health starts to decrease in ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', blood vessels appear on the edges of the screen and sounds become distant and distorted, and getting drunk causes blurring and random swaying of the screen.



* ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'' has two. Flip-foot, which reverses the D-pad controls, and Radar Zap, which temporarily disables the map on the touch screen. Thankfully, they only last for a short while.

to:

* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'':
**
''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'' has two. Flip-foot, which reverses the D-pad controls, and Radar Zap, which temporarily disables the map on the touch screen. Thankfully, they only last for a short while.



* In the [=VideoMan=] arc of ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork 4'', the D-pad configuration is completely inverted. You also have to carefully navigate the field, because stepping on certain tiles resets you to the beginning of the area.
** The Confused status has also done this to Mega Man since the third game, where it totally scrambled D-pad assignments. It's since been downgraded to a straight inversion.
** Similarly, the [=NaviCust=] program, when improperly used, can result in MegaMan.EXE acquiring random bugs, good or bad. This can make him confused, invert the controls, cause him to move two whole spaces on the field instead of one, cause HP drain, a sudden infliction of damage with the start of every turn until the HP meter drops to the bare minimum of 1 point, make Poison Panels generate, give Mega Man a protective Barrier, or even tamper with the amount of Battle Chips Mega Man can use. In MMBN3, there is the Bug Style that harnesses a luck-of-the-draw deliberate set of bugs, and in MMBN4 and MMBN5, using Dark Chips can trigger bugs as well. There is a [=NaviCust=] program called [=BugStop=] which can effectively remove the presence of negative bugs and allow the player to break the rules of the [=NaviCust=] system or take full control of Bug Style.

to:

* ''Franchise/MegaMan'':
**
In the [=VideoMan=] arc of ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork 4'', the D-pad configuration is completely inverted. You also have to carefully navigate the field, because stepping on certain tiles resets you to the beginning of the area.
** The Confused status has also done this to Mega Man since the third game, where it totally scrambled D-pad assignments. It's since been downgraded to a straight inversion.
** Similarly, the
[=NaviCust=] program, when improperly used, can result in MegaMan.EXE acquiring random bugs, good or bad. This can make him confused, invert the controls, cause him to move two whole spaces on the field instead of one, cause HP drain, a sudden infliction of damage with the start of every turn until the HP meter drops to the bare minimum of 1 point, make Poison Panels generate, give Mega Man a protective Barrier, or even tamper with the amount of Battle Chips Mega Man can use. In MMBN3, there is the Bug Style that harnesses a luck-of-the-draw deliberate set of bugs, and in MMBN4 and MMBN5, using Dark Chips can trigger bugs as well. There is a [=NaviCust=] program called [=BugStop=] which can effectively remove the presence of negative bugs and allow the player to break the rules of the [=NaviCust=] system or take full control of Bug Style.



* ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' has the Judgement Ring - a QuickTimeEvent-esque mechanic requiring you to press X in time to a spinner rolling over specific segments of a ring. A number of enemies can inflict [[StandardStatusEffect status effects]] upon you which can either add fake segments to the ring, remove the segments altogether, make the ring spin either faster, slower, in the opposite direction or erratically, or simply shrink the ring so small that you can barely see it (made easier if you have a mahoosive television, incidentally).
** There are also some accessories that do the same, but with good tradeoffs. One removes the visual indicator of where you're supposed to hit, but doubles the amount of damage you do. It's not too hard to learn where to press X, so it's a fairly good accessory to use. Another (not present in the first game) triples your damage, but you not only can't see the hit segments but also can't see the needle showing where you're even hitting. Needless to say, this is much harder to use properly.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' has the Judgement Ring - a QuickTimeEvent-esque mechanic requiring you to press X in time to a spinner rolling over specific segments of a ring. A number of enemies can inflict [[StandardStatusEffect status effects]] upon you which can either add fake segments to the ring, remove the segments altogether, make the ring spin either faster, slower, in the opposite direction or erratically, or simply shrink the ring so small that you can barely see it (made easier if you have a mahoosive television, incidentally).
**
incidentally). There are also some accessories that do the same, but with good tradeoffs. One removes the visual indicator of where you're supposed to hit, but doubles the amount of damage you do. It's not too hard to learn where to press X, so it's a fairly good accessory to use. Another (not present in the first game) triples your damage, but you not only can't see the hit segments but also can't see the needle showing where you're even hitting. Needless to say, this is much harder to use properly.



* A recurring enemy named Mote from the first ''VideoGame/BreathOfFire'' game is a fan of this. He transports the party to the Dream World practically every time he meets them, in which many rooms and areas tend to look like [[{{MinusLevel}} minus levels]]. Not too bad, until you reach the Dream Tower, which has several maze-like floors. There are certain hidden switches, which are very easy to accidentally step on, which ''turn all the walls invisible''. Not a fun level.
** Then there's the Spyre, a tower that's twice as long as it should be, thanks to the fact that Mote is waiting for you inside where he will trap you in the Dream World again and screw with you for a while. There's one room that's notoriously bad: glass bridge suspended above a black abyss. There are multiple branching pathways, dead ends, no landmarks, and many switches you are ''forced'' to step on which spin the maze around and make it frustratingly difficult to keep track of where you are. Easily the ''worst'' puzzle in the entire game. Solid candidate for ''worst puzzle in any RPG, ever.''

to:

* ''VideoGame/BreathOfFire'':
**
A recurring enemy named Mote from the first ''VideoGame/BreathOfFire'' game is a fan of this. He transports the party to the Dream World practically every time he meets them, in which many rooms and areas tend to look like [[{{MinusLevel}} minus levels]]. Not too bad, until you reach the Dream Tower, which has several maze-like floors. There are certain hidden switches, which are very easy to accidentally step on, which ''turn all the walls invisible''. Not a fun level.
** Then there's the The Spyre, a tower that's twice as long as it should be, thanks to the fact that Mote is waiting for you inside where he will trap you in the Dream World again and screw with you for a while. There's one room that's notoriously bad: glass bridge suspended above a black abyss. There are multiple branching pathways, dead ends, no landmarks, and many switches you are ''forced'' to step on which spin the maze around and make it frustratingly difficult to keep track of where you are. Easily the ''worst'' puzzle in the entire game. Solid candidate for ''worst puzzle in any RPG, ever.''



** And then there's [[spoiler:Photoshop Flowey, the FinalBoss of the Neutral path. If you used SaveScumming to kill Toriel and then go back and spare her, you'll know that Flowey possesses the same powers of "Saving" as you do, and ''boy'' does he make liberal use of it throughout the fight, constantly saving across multiple files and reloading in order to connect with an attack you had previously dodged, among other such shenanigans.]]
** Perhaps the most noticeable example, however, is the gauntlet that lies in wait for those pursuing Genocide runs. [[spoiler:The final boss of this route, Sans, not only attacks first and dodges your attacks (unlike every ''other'' encounter in the game, in an attempt to catch you off-guard), but also resorts to ''attacking you through your HUD'' by rolling his attack bones over the various options (preventing you from getting your bearings between attacks), using attacks [[{{Combo}} that interrupt]] his ''other'' attacks (pausing the background music as he does so), and ultimately ends the fight with an empty attack that ''never ends'', preventing you from getting your next turn. You have to screw with the interface ''yourself'' and move the "bullet box" (the field in which BulletHell patterns take place; the player is stuck in this box while it's Sans' turn) over to your "FIGHT" button to ultimately take him out]].

to:

** And then Then there's [[spoiler:Photoshop Flowey, the FinalBoss of the Neutral path. If you used SaveScumming to kill Toriel and then go back and spare her, you'll know that Flowey possesses the same powers of "Saving" as you do, and ''boy'' does he make liberal use of it throughout the fight, constantly saving across multiple files and reloading in order to connect with an attack you had previously dodged, among other such shenanigans.]]
** Perhaps the most noticeable example, however, is the The gauntlet that lies in wait for those pursuing Genocide runs. [[spoiler:The final boss of this route, Sans, not only attacks first and dodges your attacks (unlike every ''other'' encounter in the game, in an attempt to catch you off-guard), but also resorts to ''attacking you through your HUD'' by rolling his attack bones over the various options (preventing you from getting your bearings between attacks), using attacks [[{{Combo}} that interrupt]] his ''other'' attacks (pausing the background music as he does so), and ultimately ends the fight with an empty attack that ''never ends'', preventing you from getting your next turn. You have to screw with the interface ''yourself'' and move the "bullet box" (the field in which BulletHell patterns take place; the player is stuck in this box while it's Sans' turn) over to your "FIGHT" button to ultimately take him out]].



* When you get hit by a missile in ''[[VideoGame/{{HAWX}} H.A.W.X.]]'' the screen goes fuzzy for a bit, which can compound matters if the attacker who landed the hit isn't the only one going after you.
** There's also a few missions where your ERS system is jammed by the enemy, which results in static all over everything on-screen. Even worse, sometimes this jamming affects your ability to target or even launch missiles.

to:

* When you get hit by a missile in ''[[VideoGame/{{HAWX}} H.A.W.X.]]'' the screen goes fuzzy for a bit, which can compound matters if the attacker who landed the hit isn't the only one going after you.
**
you. There's also a few missions where your ERS system is jammed by the enemy, which results in static all over everything on-screen. Even worse, sometimes this jamming affects your ability to target or even launch missiles.



* In the ''Videgame/MechWarrior'' series, InterfaceScrew is somewhat of a gameplay element. Damaged sensors can end up having your radar, targeting or vision impaired. PPC hits temporarily scramble the HUD, and excessive heat buildup can interfere with it as well.
** In ''Mechwarrior Living Legends'', interface screw is one of the easiest ways for [[PoweredArmor BattleArmor]] players to tell how close to death they are - PPC hits scramble the HUD and cause snow to appear over the suit's visor. [[DiegeticInterface Armor breaches cause the visor to permanently crack]], and causes suit sealant to splash onto the visor, temporarily distorting one's vision. Taking health damage causes blood to get splattered onto the visor, along with diagnostics and warnings popping up on the sides of the visor, usually telling you '''USER DEATH IMMINENT'''.

to:

* In the ''Videgame/MechWarrior'' series, InterfaceScrew is somewhat of a gameplay element. Damaged sensors can end up having your radar, targeting or vision impaired. PPC hits temporarily scramble the HUD, and excessive heat buildup can interfere with it as well. \n** In ''Mechwarrior Living Legends'', interface screw is one of the easiest ways for [[PoweredArmor BattleArmor]] players to tell how close to death they are - PPC hits scramble the HUD and cause snow to appear over the suit's visor. [[DiegeticInterface Armor breaches cause the visor to permanently crack]], and causes suit sealant to splash onto the visor, temporarily distorting one's vision. Taking health damage causes blood to get splattered onto the visor, along with diagnostics and warnings popping up on the sides of the visor, usually telling you '''USER DEATH IMMINENT'''.



* In ''NCAA Football 2005'' and ''2006'', the "Homefield Advantage" feature would kick in when you played on the road in the more notoriously loud stadiums. Before big plays, the defense could tap a button to rile up the crowd, which would blur the screen and shake your controller furiously.
** It would also affect [=QBs=] and [=WRs=], who if rattled (determined by their skill, or lack thereof), would have the route pattern outlines wriggly and messed-up if you looked at the line-of-scrimmage play art, or [=WRs=] could also run the wrong route should the QB call an audible.

to:

* In ''NCAA Football 2005'' and ''2006'', the "Homefield Advantage" feature would kick in when you played on the road in the more notoriously loud stadiums. Before big plays, the defense could tap a button to rile up the crowd, which would blur the screen and shake your controller furiously.
**
furiously. It would also affect [=QBs=] and [=WRs=], who if rattled (determined by their skill, or lack thereof), would have the route pattern outlines wriggly and messed-up if you looked at the line-of-scrimmage play art, or [=WRs=] could also run the wrong route should the QB call an audible.



* The normal game over screen in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' is a "Mission Failed" screen with a small window showing your character's death in the top-left. Once the game's GainaxEnding is in full swing, you start getting "FissionMailed" screens that look like game-over screens with bad spelling, while the game is still going on inside the "death window".
** Similarly, during the fight with Psycho Mantis in the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', he will occasionally make the screen turn black except for the word "[[HideoKojima Hideo]]" in the top right corner of the screen, in an apparent attempt to make you turn off the game. In addition, he is extremely difficult to damage unless your controller is plugged into controller port 2. Otherwise he just "reads your mind" (your controller input). These particular effects actually return in ''[=MGS4=]''. Kojima loves that joke, apparently.

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':
**
The normal game over screen in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' is a "Mission Failed" screen with a small window showing your character's death in the top-left. Once the game's GainaxEnding is in full swing, you start getting "FissionMailed" screens that look like game-over screens with bad spelling, while the game is still going on inside the "death window".
** Similarly, during During the fight with Psycho Mantis in the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', he will occasionally make the screen turn black except for the word "[[HideoKojima Hideo]]" in the top right corner of the screen, in an apparent attempt to make you turn off the game. In addition, he is extremely difficult to damage unless your controller is plugged into controller port 2. Otherwise he just "reads your mind" (your controller input). These particular effects actually return in ''[=MGS4=]''. Kojima loves that joke, apparently.



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto: [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity Vice City]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' use a slight version of this to simulate substance abuse, whether alcohol or marijuana. Watch the screen move...
** ''Vice City'' actually features a rather memorable mission where your friend exposes you to some extremely potent moonshine and then manages to blow himself up. You have to drive him to the hospital whilst your vision and motor control are still severely affected by the booze fumes.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto: [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'':
** ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity
Vice City]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' use a slight version of this to simulate substance abuse, whether alcohol or marijuana. Watch the screen move...
**
''Vice City'' actually features a rather memorable mission where your friend exposes you to some extremely potent moonshine and then manages to blow himself up. You have to drive him to the hospital whilst your vision and motor control are still severely affected by the booze fumes.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}'', if you stay up really late, like 1:00 am, then the screen goes all blurry, the music is now freakishly sluggish and your character's response is decreased. If you don't get to your bed in your dorm before 2:00 am, you faint. When you wake, you may have lost some of your possessions (usually your shoes).
** Needless to say, if you actually ''are'' playing late at night and you start to notice Jimmy's head dropping and the creepily distorted soundtrack very subtly start to creep in, it's pretty unnerving.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}'', if you stay up really late, like 1:00 am, then the screen goes all blurry, the music is now freakishly sluggish and your character's response is decreased. If you don't get to your bed in your dorm before 2:00 am, you faint. When you wake, you may have lost some of your possessions (usually your shoes).
**
shoes). Needless to say, if you actually ''are'' playing late at night and you start to notice Jimmy's head dropping and the creepily distorted soundtrack very subtly start to creep in, it's pretty unnerving.



* ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' uses IdiosyncraticWipes of cameras from the Machine's network (the Machine is, in essence, the show's ViewpointCharacter). After a virus is uploaded into it, glitches begin to appear during the wipes, which become increasingly frequent and severe over time.

to:

* ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' ''Series/PersonOfInterest'':
** The series
uses IdiosyncraticWipes of cameras from the Machine's network (the Machine is, in essence, the show's ViewpointCharacter). After a virus is uploaded into it, glitches begin to appear during the wipes, which become increasingly frequent and severe over time.
13th Oct '17 8:50:17 AM MyFinalEdits
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** When fighting [[spoiler:Ganon]] at the end of the storyline of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons]]'', halfway through the fight he will magically change the room you are fighting into a nauseating pulsing-blue theme. The side effect is that all of Link's directional buttons are reversed.
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker Wind Waker]]'', one of the things a Poe can do, including Jalhalla, is to reverse the direction your Control Stick makes you go.
* The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'' includes various ways to impair your vision. In all three games, static fills the screen if Samus is too close to electrical enemies or is hit with some static-inducing attack; during one boss fight in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'', destroying the enemy's weak spot causes it to explode with such brilliant lighting that Samus's visor overloads, requiring her to switch visors until it recovers. ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'' has an [[DemonicSpiders enemy]] that actually uploads some sort of virus effect directly into Samus' suit, causing the game to lag like hell, turn off all displays, and fill the screen with snow static. Luckily, you can "reboot" with a button combination input.
** In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeHunters'', Kanden's charged Volt Driver scrambles your visor for a bit when hit. In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', one of the Visor modes turns into static if an enemy goes into hypermode ... which happens a lot in higher difficult settings. Which makes for some rather annoying encounters when the visor is required if you don't want to shoot blindly.

to:

** When fighting [[spoiler:Ganon]] at the end of the storyline of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons]]'', halfway through the fight he will magically change the room you are fighting into a nauseating pulsing-blue theme. The side effect is that all of Link's directional buttons are reversed.
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker Wind Waker]]'', one of the things a Poe can do, including KingMook Jalhalla, is to reverse the direction your Control Stick makes you go.
* The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'' includes various ways to impair your vision. vision.
**
In all three games, static fills the screen if Samus is too close to electrical enemies or is hit with some static-inducing attack; during one boss fight in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'', destroying the enemy's weak spot causes it to explode with such brilliant lighting that Samus's visor overloads, requiring her to switch visors until it recovers. ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'' recovers.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'':
*** The game
has an [[DemonicSpiders enemy]] that actually uploads some sort of virus effect directly into Samus' suit, causing the game to lag like hell, turn off all displays, and fill the screen with snow static. Luckily, you can "reboot" with a button combination input.
*** The Rezbit hacks Samus's visor and completely crashes it. The color goes black and white and half-static-filled, the framerate goes completely bonkers, the visor computer spews a wall of gibberish text up on-screen, and nothing works. Handily, the game tells you the buttons to press to reboot the visor, which still takes a moment before it's operational again... [[CycleOfHurting by which time the Rezbit may just hack your visor again]].
** In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeHunters'', Kanden's charged Volt Driver scrambles your visor for a bit when hit. hit.
**
In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', one of the Visor modes turns into static if an enemy goes into hypermode ... which happens a lot in higher difficult settings. Which makes for some rather annoying encounters when the visor is required if you don't want to shoot blindly.



** The worst interface screw comes from the enemy know as the Rezbit in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes''. It hacks Samus's visor and completely crashes it. The color goes black and white and half-static-filled, the framerate goes completely bonkers, the visor computer spews a wall of gibberish text up on-screen, and nothing works. Handily, the game tells you the buttons to press to reboot the visor, which still takes a moment before it's operational again... [[CycleOfHurting by which time the Rezbit may just hack your visor again]].



* The fairly forgotten game ''[[Franchise/WinnieThePooh Piglet's Big Game]]'' involved getting rid of Heffalumps and Woozles using disturbing "Brave Faces" at them, which is apparently scary to them. In order to do said "Brave Faces", you have to press a certain button combination. Some of the Heffalumps and Woozles are able to mess with you so that they can get to you before you get the combination right. For example:

to:

* The fairly forgotten ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' game ''[[Franchise/WinnieThePooh Piglet's ''Piglet's Big Game]]'' involved Game'' has many examples::
** The game nvolves
getting rid of Heffalumps and Woozles using disturbing "Brave Faces" at them, which is apparently scary to them. In order to do said "Brave Faces", you have to press a certain button combination. Some of the Heffalumps and Woozles are able to mess with you so that they can get to you before you get the combination right. For example:



** The Scarecrow's final MindScrew, [[spoiler: where your game crashes and restarts with ''Batman'' being captured by the ''Joker'' - whom ''you control'' just like you controlled Batman at the very beginning of the game]].
*** "Use the middle stick to dodge Joker's shots!" Or "Tilt your mouse!" in the PC version.

to:

** The Scarecrow's final MindScrew, [[spoiler: where your game crashes and restarts with ''Batman'' being captured by the ''Joker'' - whom ''you control'' just like you controlled Batman at the very beginning of the game]].
***
game]]. The message "Use the middle stick to dodge Joker's shots!" Or (or "Tilt your mouse!" in the PC version.version) appears in the loading screen.



* The Codemasters Game ''Fantasy World Dizzy'' featured a sequence where VideoGame/{{Dizzy}} falls down a well and comes out on the other side of the world, where the game continues, only upside down.

to:

* The Codemasters Game ''Fantasy ''[[VideoGame/{{Dizzy}} Fantasy World Dizzy'' featured Dizzy]]'':
** The game features
a sequence where VideoGame/{{Dizzy}} Dizzy falls down a well and comes out on the other side of the world, where the game continues, only upside down.



** And in ''Magicland Dizzy'' he walks into a [[Literature/AliceInWonderland magic mirror]], where he moves backwards and the controls are reversed.
** In ''[[VideoGame/{{Dizzy}} The Fantastic Adventures of Dizzy]]'', the controls are temporarily reversed whenever you touch a butterfly. The same happens with touching the red bee in [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] of ''Treasure Island Dizzy''. This trope seems to be kind of a favorite for the series.

to:

** And in In ''Magicland Dizzy'' he walks into a [[Literature/AliceInWonderland magic mirror]], where he moves backwards and the controls are reversed.
** In ''[[VideoGame/{{Dizzy}} The ''The Fantastic Adventures of Dizzy]]'', Dizzy'', the controls are temporarily reversed whenever you touch a butterfly. The same happens with touching the red bee in [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] of ''Treasure Island Dizzy''. This trope seems to be kind of a favorite for the series.



** Same for ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest''.

to:

** %%* Same for ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest''.



* In ''VideoGame/MarioKart DS'', ''Wii'', ''7'', and ''8'' the Blooper will dump ink in the face of your driver... and on your screen, partially blocking your view of the road until it drips away. Thankfully this also affects computer players, more so than human players -- CPU racers blinded will weave about the track like a drunken clown.
** Partially pointless on the DS version because you can simply look at the bottom screen.
** Using a mushroom or speed boost ramp will also clear this effect.
** On the Wii it's almost entirely pointless if your TV is widescreen because the ink spots are quite small.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MarioKart DS'', ''Wii'', ''7'', ''[[VideoGame/MarioKartDS DS]]'', ''[[VideoGame/MarioKartWii Wii]]'', ''[[VideoGame/MarioKart7 7]]'', and ''8'' ''[[VideoGame/MarioKart8 8]]'' the Blooper will dump ink in the face of your driver... and on your screen, partially blocking your view of the road until it drips away. Thankfully this also affects computer players, more so than human players -- CPU racers blinded will weave about the track like a drunken clown.
** Partially pointless on
clown. The DS and 3DS games allow you to use the DS version because you can simply look at the bottom screen.
**
touching screen's map to keep track of your driver's current position during this situation. Using a mushroom or speed boost ramp will also clear this effect.
** On the Wii it's almost entirely pointless if your TV is widescreen because the ink spots are quite small.
effect.



* In ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing]]'' the Pocket Rainbow item obscures the victim's view with rainbow-colored slime. Presumably for fairness, CPU Racers will spin out upon being hit by this and the Confusing Star. Beat's All-Star has a similar effect, where he skates up to the other races and covers them in graffiti.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SegaSuperstars'':
**
In ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic ''Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing]]'' Racing'' the Pocket Rainbow item obscures the victim's view with rainbow-colored slime. Presumably for fairness, CPU Racers will spin out upon being hit by this and the Confusing Star. Beat's All-Star has a similar effect, where he skates up to the other races and covers them in graffiti.



** In ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'', MODOK's [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Jamming Bomb]] will also reverse the opponent's controls.

to:

** * In ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'', MODOK's [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Jamming Bomb]] will also reverse the opponent's controls.



* In ''DigimonRumbleArena 2'', one character's special attack mixes what every button does, including movement. The effects are not consistent from time to time, however. And in the same game, there is an item that mixes who is controlling which character. Damage done will be given to the original characters when the effect ends.
** Said character with the special attack is [=MaloMyotsimon/BelialVamdemon=], and is probably the only thing that makes him difficult to fight, despite being on the hardest end of the final boss scale in one player mode (Even though middle-scale bosses like Diablomon and Duskmon are several magnitudes harder). Probably heralds back to him being such an AntiClimaxBoss in the show...

to:

* In ''DigimonRumbleArena ''VideoGame/DigimonRumbleArena 2'', one character's special attack mixes what every button does, including movement. The effects are not consistent from time to time, however. And in the same game, there is an item that mixes who is controlling which character. Damage done will be given to the original characters when the effect ends.
**
ends. Said character with the special attack is [=MaloMyotsimon/BelialVamdemon=], and is probably the only thing that makes him difficult to fight, despite being on the hardest end of the final boss scale in one player mode (Even though middle-scale bosses like Diablomon and Duskmon are several magnitudes harder). Probably heralds back to him being such an AntiClimaxBoss in the show...



* ''VideoGame/MortalKombatArmageddon'' features auto aim for your fireball attack, usually useful. One level features enemies that fire at you from above, only give you a small opportunity to attack them without being attacked yourself, and frequently have enemies appear on the ground next to you to grab the target of your fireball.
** ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' loves this trope. Of particular note are Rain and Noob Saibot in ''Mortal Kombat Trilogy''. Rain can actually psychokinetically control his opponent for a few seconds, and as for Noob, he can make it so all attacking or blocking is disabled.

to:

* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'':
**
''VideoGame/MortalKombatArmageddon'' features auto aim for your fireball attack, usually useful. One level features enemies that fire at you from above, only give you a small opportunity to attack them without being attacked yourself, and frequently have enemies appear on the ground next to you to grab the target of your fireball.
** ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' loves this trope. Of particular note are Rain and Noob Saibot in ''Mortal Kombat Trilogy''. Rain can actually psychokinetically control his opponent for a few seconds, and as for Noob, he can make it so all attacking or blocking is disabled.



** Similar mushrooms make an appearance in another game published by Apogee, namely ''VideoGame/DeathRally''. Picking one up will make the entire track portion of the screen ripple madly until it wears off. Unsurprisingly, this makes driving in the race considerably harder than normal. Unlike most games, the mushrooms ''do'' affect the AI. If you can ram their cars into the pickups, they're actually affected worse than human players.

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** Similar mushrooms make an appearance in another game published by Apogee, namely ''VideoGame/DeathRally''. Picking one * In 'VideoGame/DeathRally'', picking up a mushroom will make the entire track portion of the screen ripple madly until it wears off. Unsurprisingly, this makes driving in the race considerably harder than normal. Unlike most games, the mushrooms ''do'' affect the AI. If you can ram their cars into the pickups, they're actually affected worse than human players.



* In ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'', the screen will get really blurry (and green) if you get vomited by the Boomer or stay near it when someone kills it. In both the cases, the Horde will become frantic to kill that person.
** Also, after being incapacitated for the second time, the screen goes black-and-white, hazy around the edges, and you can hear your amplified heartbeat.
** Also, the textures glow a little bit when you take painkillers.

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* In ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'', the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'':
** The
screen will get really blurry (and green) if you get vomited by the Boomer or stay near it when someone kills it. In both the cases, the Horde will become frantic to kill that person.
** Also, after After being incapacitated for the second time, the screen goes black-and-white, hazy around the edges, and you can hear your amplified heartbeat.
** Also, the The textures glow a little bit when you take painkillers.



* In ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'' and its episodes, if you get repeatedly shot with an automatic gun, prepare to see nothing but white. And if there are two people shooting you? Forget about hoping to see. Standing too close to an exploding grenade will also cause a brief ringing sound to play, mimicking the effects of tinnitus.

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* In ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'' and its episodes, if ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'':
** If
you get repeatedly shot with an automatic gun, prepare to see nothing but white. And if there are two people shooting you? Forget about hoping to see. Standing too close to an exploding grenade will also cause a brief ringing sound to play, mimicking the effects of tinnitus.



* The Spy in ''VideoGame/TeamFortressClassic'' carries gas grenades that make enemies exposed to the gas see and hear imaginary explosions, gunfire etc.

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* ''VideoGame/TeamFortressClassic'':
**
The Spy in ''VideoGame/TeamFortressClassic'' carries gas grenades that make enemies exposed to the gas see and hear imaginary explosions, gunfire etc.



* The Tranquilizer in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' hopelessly blurs your screen, rendering you more or less completely helpless, for a good 30 seconds and ''doesn't wear off even when you die,'' often resulting in five or six quick deaths before the effect finally wears off.
** Even worse than the Tranquilizer were the Crossbow (which has bolts laced with tranquilizers) and Throwing Knives (which are laced with poison), which not only induced the blurry effect, but also kept damaging you until you died. The fact that the Crossbow could also kill you instantly in its secondary mode didn't help matters.

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* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'':
**
The Tranquilizer in ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' hopelessly blurs your screen, rendering you more or less completely helpless, for a good 30 seconds and ''doesn't wear off even when you die,'' often resulting in five or six quick deaths before the effect finally wears off.
** Even worse than the Tranquilizer were the The Crossbow (which has bolts laced with tranquilizers) and Throwing Knives (which are laced with poison), which not only induced the blurry effect, but also kept damaging you until you died. The fact that the Crossbow could also kill you instantly in its secondary mode didn't help matters.



** A case of TruthInTelevision in that flashbangs stimulate all photosensitive cells at once, completely disabling them so they can only transmit the last image before the flash. This basically creates the single persistent afterimage that most games have.
* In ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'', the Flashbang Grenade blinds the enemy for a few seconds, allowing you to shoot it at will. Of course, if you forget to turn away from the blast, you have a hard time targeting a pure white enemy on a pure white screen...

to:

** A case of TruthInTelevision in that flashbangs stimulate all photosensitive cells at once, completely disabling them so they can only transmit the last image before the flash. This basically creates the single persistent afterimage that most games have.
* In ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'', the ''VideoGame/StarWarsRepublicCommando'':
** The
Flashbang Grenade blinds the enemy for a few seconds, allowing you to shoot it at will. Of course, if you forget to turn away from the blast, you have a hard time targeting a pure white enemy on a pure white screen...



* Similar to the water example above, in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', getting hit with the Sniper's Jarate causes the screen to go yellowish and warped until the effect wears off.

to:

* Similar to the water example above, in ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', getting In ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** Getting
hit with the Sniper's Jarate causes the screen to go yellowish and warped until the effect wears off.



* The last battle against SHODAN in ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' involves trying to shoot her in virtual reality while she [[GrandTheftMe tries to take over your mind]]. This is represented as the screen slowly being replaced with a picture of SHODAN and your crosshairs continuously veering away from SHODAN herself, with the effect getting stronger over time.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SystemShock'':
**
The last battle against SHODAN in ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' involves trying to shoot her in virtual reality while she [[GrandTheftMe tries to take over your mind]]. This is represented as the screen slowly being replaced with a picture of SHODAN and your crosshairs continuously veering away from SHODAN herself, with the effect getting stronger over time.



* Many, ''many'' games with sniper rifles will have the sight move around to simulate breathing or twitchy hands or something like that. For example, the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, which only stops it after you take a relaxant medicine.
** Recent ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games actually do this with ''every'' weapon when looking down the sights; every gun has an "accuracy" rating that doesn't affect where the bullet lands, which is always where the sights are, but rather, ''how much'' the sights wobble around. Adding an ACOG to any gun severely reduces this rating. Adding an ACOG to the AK-47 makes it wobble around as much as a sniper rifle. It has the added downside that at least a proper sniper rifle comes with the option to hold your breath, reducing the sway for a bit. While the ACOG is close to a sniper scope, it doesn't let you hold your breath, so if the sights swing around a lot, good luck being accurate!
** ''VideoGame/{{MAG}}'' has scope sway for every single weapon. There are various skills to reduce the sway, but even at maximized sway reduction while shooting prone, you'll still have scope sway. The only way to eliminate it entirely is with a bipod, which introduces a new problem when you can't move while the bipod is extended. Red dot scopes don't seem to have scope sway, but bullets don't always go to the exact center of the red dot to make up for that.
* After destroying the reactor at the end of each level in the DOS game ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'', you had to navigate to the exit. The whole time your pathfinding is hampered by large random movements of the controls.
** Also, the sequel has flash missiles which blind the victim by causing a massive whiteout. The battle against the boss which uses homing flash missiles is supremely annoying because of this. And they blind you for longer than regular flash missiles.

to:

* Many, ''many'' games Games with sniper rifles will have the sight move around to simulate breathing or twitchy hands or something like that. For example, the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, which only stops it after you take a relaxant medicine.
** Recent * In later ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games actually do this with games, ''every'' weapon weapon's aiming is affected when looking down the sights; every gun has an "accuracy" rating that doesn't affect where the bullet lands, which is always where the sights are, but rather, ''how much'' the sights wobble around. Adding an ACOG to any gun severely reduces this rating. Adding an ACOG to the AK-47 makes it wobble around as much as a sniper rifle. It has the added downside that at least a proper sniper rifle comes with the option to hold your breath, reducing the sway for a bit. While the ACOG is close to a sniper scope, it doesn't let you hold your breath, so if the sights swing around a lot, good luck being accurate!
** * ''VideoGame/{{MAG}}'' has scope sway for every single weapon. There are various skills to reduce the sway, but even at maximized sway reduction while shooting prone, you'll still have scope sway. The only way to eliminate it entirely is with a bipod, which introduces a new problem when you can't move while the bipod is extended. Red dot scopes don't seem to have scope sway, but bullets don't always go to the exact center of the red dot to make up for that.
* ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'':
**
After destroying the reactor at the end of each level in the DOS game ''VideoGame/{{Descent}}'', game, you had have to navigate to the exit. The whole time your pathfinding is hampered by large random movements of the controls.
** Also, the The sequel has flash missiles which blind the victim by causing a massive whiteout. The battle against the boss which uses homing flash missiles is supremely annoying because of this. And they blind you for longer than regular flash missiles.



* In the ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon'' games, being near Alma will have this effect, causing static to sound in your radio earpiece and hallucinations to appear. It gets worse in ''Project Origin'', as certain sequences will cause Becket's vision to turn blurry and monochrome, and feedback to sound, indicating that Alma is close.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon'':
**
In the ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon'' games, being near Alma will have this effect, causing static to sound in your radio earpiece and hallucinations to appear. It gets worse in ''Project Origin'', as certain sequences will cause Becket's vision to turn blurry and monochrome, and feedback to sound, indicating that Alma is close.



* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' makes use of this in several ways. Status effects, the UI being loaded or having a function enabled, taking damage to shield or health, shield breaking, being covered in web, you name it. The second game, however, has a sidequest that requires you to crash a wake while being drunk.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' and ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' makes ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'':
** The games make
use of this in several ways. Status effects, the UI being loaded or having a function enabled, taking damage to shield or health, shield breaking, being covered in web, you name it. The second game, however, has a sidequest that requires you to crash a wake while being drunk.



** To top it off, Gaige can have a 1050% damage bonus but obtain -1050% accuracy due to 600 stacks of Anarchy, which means a Gaige player can [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy miss a target at point-blank]]. But her victims should pray to God they don't get hit by her. And all those stacks causes her view to jerk so hard she may end up facing the opposite direction after a shot.

to:

** To top it off, Gaige can have a 1050% damage bonus but obtain -1050% accuracy due to 600 stacks of Anarchy, which means a Gaige player can [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy miss a target at point-blank]]. But her victims should pray to God they don't get hit by her. And all those stacks causes her view to jerk so hard she may end up facing the opposite direction after a shot.



** ''Everquest 2'' has a few. If you are drunk or hit with an effect, your screen can blur and if you get drunk enough/hit enough, you will eventually be seeing quadruple. Some mobs also have abilities that give you Sonic Vision, also known as Piss Vision. Finally, in the Estate of Unrest there is an interface screw towards the end as the boss of the zone tries to come out the screen at you.

to:

** * ''Everquest 2'' has a few. If you are drunk or hit with an effect, your screen can blur and if you get drunk enough/hit enough, you will eventually be seeing quadruple. Some mobs also have abilities that give you Sonic Vision, also known as Piss Vision. Finally, in the Estate of Unrest there is an interface screw towards the end as the boss of the zone tries to come out the screen at you.



* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', drinking enough alcohol will get you into various stages of inebriation, affecting your motor skills and making your character veer off slightly in different directions as they walk, as well as blurring your screen (lower graphical settings excluded). If you get "completely smashed," enemy {{NPC}}s will be displayed to your character as having much lower levels than they actually do.
** And most amusingly, the game will mangle your text chat to others by slurring and misspelling your words. Not that it stands out, however.
*** You shtart talking like thish when you get drunk...hic. Fortunately this does not affect Real ID chat or whispers to other players.
** This effect led to a very amusing change in one of the earlier patches to the game: "Your character will no longer spout profanity when talking about sitting while drunk."
** This effect actually comes into play during the Brewfest event where getting smashed allows you to see the [[http://www.wowwiki.com/Wolpertinger Wild Wolpertingers]] scattered about. In the 2007 version of this event, being drunk was required to catch them for a quest.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', drinking ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
** Drinking
enough alcohol will get you into various stages of inebriation, affecting your motor skills and making your character veer off slightly in different directions as they walk, as well as blurring your screen (lower graphical settings excluded). If you get "completely smashed," enemy {{NPC}}s will be displayed to your character as having much lower levels than they actually do.
**
do. And most amusingly, the game will mangle your text chat to others by slurring and misspelling your words. Not that it stands out, however.
***
however. You shtart talking like thish when you get drunk...hic. Fortunately this does not affect Real ID chat or whispers to other players.
**
players. This effect led to a very amusing change in one of the earlier patches to the game: "Your character will no longer spout profanity when talking about sitting while drunk."
** This effect actually
" It comes into play during the Brewfest event where getting smashed allows you to see the [[http://www.wowwiki.com/Wolpertinger Wild Wolpertingers]] scattered about. In the 2007 version of this event, being drunk was required to catch them for a quest.



* Like the above, getting drunk in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' also has similar (but much more severe at higher states of drunkenness) graphical effects, with the added bonus of the drunk player character shouting typical drunk phrases ("I love you, man!"). Not only is there a special title for those who spend a certain amount of time drunk, but there's also a particularly infamous quest that has you performing various acts while ascending up the drunkenness ladder, culminating with having to herd several pigs into a pen while barely able to stand.
* Similarly, ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsOnline'' has the Inn League reputation quests. They consist of going to every bar in the Shire and getting progressively more drunk, and other drinking-related debauchery. Eventually, you can black out and wake up in places that one should not be - including on top of a massive stone spire in the middle of the Misty Mountains, with no obvious way up and no pain-free way down.
** In snowy areas you can encounter white-outs which make everything onscreen nearly invisible, and at least one monster type can create much the same effect by raising a cloud of dust.

to:

* Like the above, getting Getting drunk in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' also has similar (but much more severe at higher states of drunkenness) graphical effects, with the added bonus of the drunk player character shouting typical drunk phrases ("I love you, man!"). Not only is there a special title for those who spend a certain amount of time drunk, but there's also a particularly infamous quest that has you performing various acts while ascending up the drunkenness ladder, culminating with having to herd several pigs into a pen while barely able to stand.
* Similarly, ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsOnline'' has the Inn League reputation quests. They consist of going to every bar in the Shire and getting progressively more drunk, and other drinking-related debauchery. Eventually, you can black out and wake up in places that one should not be - including on top of a massive stone spire in the middle of the Misty Mountains, with no obvious way up and no pain-free way down.
** In
down. And in snowy areas you can encounter white-outs which make everything onscreen nearly invisible, and at least one monster type can create much the same effect by raising a cloud of dust.
9th Oct '17 5:59:48 PM nombretomado
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* The Android ''TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}'' app will sometimes have the controls go beneath the advertisement at the bottom of the screen making them impossible to use. Of course ElectronicArts doesn't seem keen on fixing this as it means if you're not paying attention you'll be tapping the advertisement.

to:

* The Android ''TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}'' app will sometimes have the controls go beneath the advertisement at the bottom of the screen making them impossible to use. Of course ElectronicArts Creator/ElectronicArts doesn't seem keen on fixing this as it means if you're not paying attention you'll be tapping the advertisement.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InterfaceScrew