History Main / InterchangeableAntimatterKeys

9th Jun '16 5:53:40 PM Prfnoff
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* The hybrid FPS/Driving game ''Redline'' didn't even bother with keys at all. In one mission, after coming across a locked door, your MissionControl flat out tells you not to waste your time searching the level for a key and to just blast the door down with a rocket launcher.

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* The hybrid FPS/Driving game ''Redline'' ''VideoGame/{{Redline}}'' didn't even bother with keys at all. In one mission, after coming across a locked door, your MissionControl flat out tells you not to waste your time searching the level for a key and to just blast the door down with a rocket launcher.


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* ''Rolo to the Rescue'' averts this. Having one key allows Rolo to unlock every cage in its level.
12th Apr '16 6:22:45 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Keys and locked doors appear in several [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] games, including ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'', ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' and ''MarioVsDonkeyKong''.

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* Keys and locked doors appear in several [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games, including ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'', ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' and ''MarioVsDonkeyKong''.''VideoGame/MarioVsDonkeyKong''; and in all of them the keys can only be used once each. A post-release update for ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' allows the player to introduce keys and locked doors in their levels, where the trope is present as well.
12th Apr '16 4:20:26 AM Hylarn
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* ''VideoGame/BlakeStone'' averts this and combines it with BagOfSpilling. On each level, various keycards will unlock doors. As you advance through the game, you find that the keycards from one level don't work on the others; as an AntiFrustrationFeature, the game does save which keycards you have on each level in case you decide to backtrack and chase OneHundredPercentCompletion.



* ''VideoGame/BlakeStone'' averts this and combines it with BagOfSpilling. On each level, various keycards will unlock doors. As you advance through the game, you find that the keycards from one level don't work on the others; as an AntiFrustrationFeature, the game does save which keycards you have on each level in case you decide to backtrack and chase OneHundredPercentCompletion.
23rd Mar '16 9:49:47 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series is a prime user of this trope. In fact, the first two games had a magic key whose only power is that it ''doesn't'' disappear when you use it to unlock a door.
** The first few games also had keys that worked in any dungeon (the equivalent of the key for your front door unlocking Fort Knox). This created problems, where you would become trapped if you used some keys from one dungeon that you didn't fully complete, in another dungeon. The first game had purchasable keys as a workaround, but the second did not. Eventually, they simply made keys only usable in the dungeon in which you acquire them.
** Instead of buying replacement keys, ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' had a spell which transformed Link into a fairy, enabling him to bypass locked doors by ''flying through the keyholes''.
** However, in games where there is a key ''to the dungeon entrance itself'', it is usually unique.
** Also, there are some keys that are required to enter the Boss's chamber (usually simply called the 'boss key'), and in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', there was the Big Key. The Big Key was reusable multiple times (within the same dungeon) to open any door with a very big keyhole.
* ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'' had identical keys scattered throughout every level. Players could open doors or locked chests just by touching them if they had at least one key. The doors were particularly strange in that they could be extremely long and would completely disappear the instant they were touched ''anywhere'' by a player who had a key. Who needs keyholes?
* In the ''FireEmblem'' series, there are 2 kinds of keys: door keys and chest keys. Any door key can open any door, and any chest key can open any chest. If a particular game has lockpicks, they open both.
** ''Shadow Dragon'' has two others: bridge keys (guess) and master keys (open anything, and have five uses each).

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series is a prime user of this trope. In fact, the first two games had have a magic key whose only power is that it ''doesn't'' disappear when you use it to unlock a door.
** The first few games also had have keys that worked work in any dungeon (the equivalent of the key for your front door unlocking Fort Knox). This created creates problems, where you would can become trapped if you used use some keys from one dungeon that you didn't fully complete, in another dungeon. The first game had has purchasable keys as a workaround, but the second did not.doesn't and thus will require the use of the Fairy spell to get through the keyholes. Eventually, they simply made keys only usable in the dungeon in which you acquire them.
** Instead of buying replacement keys, ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' had a spell which transformed Link into a fairy, enabling him to bypass locked doors by ''flying through the keyholes''.
** However, in games where there is a key ''to the dungeon entrance itself'', it is usually unique.
** Also, there
There are some keys that are required to enter the Boss's chamber (usually simply called the 'boss key'), and in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'', there was there's the Big Key. The Big Key was Key, which is reusable multiple times (within the same dungeon) to open any door with a very big keyhole.
* ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'' had has identical keys scattered throughout every level. Players could can open doors or locked chests just by touching them if they had have at least one key. The doors were are particularly strange in that they could can be extremely long and would completely disappear the instant they were are touched ''anywhere'' by a player who had has a key. Who needs keyholes?
key.
* In the ''FireEmblem'' ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' series, there are 2 kinds of keys: door keys and chest keys. Any door key can open any door, and any chest key can open any chest. If a particular game has lockpicks, they open both.
**
both. ''Shadow Dragon'' has two others: bridge keys (guess) and master keys (open anything, and have five uses each).



** Except, annoyingly, this fact was only explained in the first game, although the entire series used them. If you started with, say, the fourth game, you'd have no idea why something called a duplicator opens magic boxes.
* In ''VideoGame/DiabloII'', all keys in the game are identical and can be used to open any locked chest in the game. Yes, they disappear afterwards. The only exceptions are the special keys that are sometimes dropped by the Countess, the Summoner and Nihlathak on Hell difficulty. They don't open anything, at least not in the conventional way.

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** Except, annoyingly, this fact was only explained in the first game, although the entire series used them. If you started with, say, the fourth game, you'd have no idea why something called a duplicator opens magic boxes.
* In ''VideoGame/DiabloII'', all ''VideoGame/DiabloII'':
** All
keys in the game are identical and can be used to open any locked chest in the game. Yes, they disappear afterwards. The only exceptions are the special keys that are sometimes dropped by the Countess, the Summoner and Nihlathak on Hell difficulty. They don't open anything, at least not in the conventional way.



* While ''VideoGame/DeusEx'''s actual keys are completely normal, its reconfigurable nanolockpicks and electromagnetic multitools fit this trope like a glove, as they both have ludicrous [[HandWave Handwavium-based]] excuses for making them non-reusable. And not even an excuse for why it can take four to six lockpicks/multitools to unlock a door, while the lock weakens with each try.

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* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'':
**
While ''VideoGame/DeusEx'''s the actual keys are completely normal, its reconfigurable nanolockpicks and electromagnetic multitools fit this trope like a glove, as they both have ludicrous [[HandWave Handwavium-based]] excuses for making them non-reusable. And not even an excuse for why it can take four to six lockpicks/multitools to unlock a door, while the lock weakens with each try.



* The first ''VideoGame/{{DragonQuest|I}}'' game had one-use keys, though later games in the series allowed single keys to open multiple doors (and [[AWizardDidIt they were magic]], which explains one key fitting every door in the world).
** Then you run into FridgeLogic in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'', the prequel to the first game. You take ''your'' magic key, which can be used infinitely but ''doesn't'' open every door in the game (you need the Final Key for that), and show it to the guy who, by ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'', is selling magic keys. Presumably, he copies it, but makes them one-time use ''and'' capable of opening any door in the world. In other words, his copy attempt ''failed completely''.
** That, or he's a savvy/shady businessman.

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* The first ''VideoGame/{{DragonQuest|I}}'' game had has one-use keys, though later games in the series allowed allow single keys to open multiple doors (and [[AWizardDidIt they were are magic]], which explains one key fitting every door in the world).
**
world). Then you run into FridgeLogic in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'', the prequel to the first game. You take ''your'' magic key, which can be used infinitely but ''doesn't'' open every door in the game (you need the Final Key for that), and show it to the guy who, by ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'', is selling magic keys. Presumably, he copies it, but makes them one-time use ''and'' capable of opening any door in the world. In other words, his copy attempt ''failed completely''.
** That, or he's a savvy/shady businessman.
completely''.



* Weights from ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' qualify. They are found everywhere and can only be used once. They can be placed on pedestals throughout the ruins to activate things. Things like doors, [[RagnarokProofing ancient mechanisms]], and when you [[NintendoHard least]] expect it, {{Death Trap}}s.
** The Ankh Jewels also qualify; you don't need to use the jewel from the same area to activate that area's boss.

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* Weights from ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' qualify. They are found everywhere and can only be used once. They can be placed on pedestals throughout the ruins to activate things. Things like doors, [[RagnarokProofing ancient mechanisms]], and when you [[NintendoHard least]] expect it, {{Death Trap}}s.
**
Trap}}s. The Ankh Jewels also qualify; qualify, as you don't need to use the jewel from the same area to activate that area's boss.



* ''VideoGame/{{ZZT}}'' had a variant of this: Keys and doors came in seven colors, and any key of a given color would unlock any door of that color (and then disappear forever). You also could only carry one key of each color at a time, which led to situations where your way might be [[InsurmountableWaistHeightFence blocked by a key]] (which was the same size as the player, the doors, and everything else) that you could not pick up until you found a door to use the key you already had on.
* The Subspace Emissary mode from ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{ZZT}}'' had has a variant of this: Keys and doors came come in seven colors, and any key of a given color would unlock unlocks any door of that color (and then disappear forever). You also could can only carry one key of each color at a time, which led leads to situations where your way might be [[InsurmountableWaistHeightFence blocked by a key]] (which was is the same size as the player, the doors, and everything else) that you could not cannot pick up until you found find a door to use the key you already had on.
* The Subspace Emissary mode from ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''.''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'' has one-time keys that open doors this way. They respawn in their original locations if the key is lost or abandoned in the way, but they're gone forever after they're used.



* ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''.
** The module editor let you make each door work however you wanted, with the keys being interchangeable or not as you desire. You could also set the "relockable", "requires key to unlock" (as opposed to being vulnerable to the Open Lock skill), and "consumes key when used" flags, although [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything not all three at once]].

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* ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''.
**
''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''. The module editor let lets you make each door work however you wanted, want, with the keys being interchangeable or not as you desire. You could can also set the "relockable", "requires key to unlock" (as opposed to being vulnerable to the Open Lock skill), and "consumes key when used" flags, although [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything not all three at once]].once.



* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' now has this in the form of Mann Co. Supply Crate Keys. You can get locked crates from the [[RandomlyDrops Random Drop System]], which in turn can be opened by these one-use keys. The problem? You have to buy the keys. [[RevenueEnhancingDevices With real money]], or if you are cheap or have little money you can get them also by trading [[ItemCrafting metal]], [[NiceHat hats]], event items (Halloween, etc.), or strange weapons. ''Webcomic/VGCats'' [[http://www.vgcats.com/comics/?strip_id=300 explains]].
** There are also special keys for Seasonal items/Promotional events which only open special crates, those keys turn into normal ones after the event ends.

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* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' now has this in the form of Mann Co. Supply Crate Keys. You can get locked crates from the [[RandomlyDrops Random Drop System]], which in turn can be opened by these one-use keys. The problem? You have to buy the keys. [[RevenueEnhancingDevices With real money]], or if you are cheap or have little money you can get them also by trading [[ItemCrafting metal]], [[NiceHat hats]], event items (Halloween, etc.), or strange weapons. ''Webcomic/VGCats'' [[http://www.vgcats.com/comics/?strip_id=300 explains]].
**
explains]]. There are also special keys for Seasonal items/Promotional events which only open special crates, those keys turn into normal ones after the event ends.



* ''[[VideoGame/KikiKaiKai Pocky & Rocky]] 2'' had locked chests and occasionally locked doors that could all be opened with identical keys. Keys could be found in baskets, dropped by enemies, or bought in stores, but if you had Little Ninja as your partner, you could use her magic to pick the locks and bypass the need for keys.

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* ''[[VideoGame/KikiKaiKai Pocky & Rocky]] 2'' had has locked chests and occasionally locked doors that could can all be opened with identical keys. Keys could can be found in baskets, dropped by enemies, or bought in stores, but if you had have Little Ninja as your partner, you could can use her magic to pick the locks and bypass the need for keys.



* In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', a key can open any locked door or golden chest. After using, it disappears.'

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* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'':
**
In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', the first game, a key can open any locked door or golden chest. After using, it disappears.'



* Played absolutely straight in ''VideoGame/AnotherPerspective'', where any key will open any locked door, and the key will promptly disappear afterwards.

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* Played absolutely straight Done in ''VideoGame/AnotherPerspective'', where any key will open any locked door, and the key will promptly disappear afterwards.



* ''VideoGame/UltimaOnline''. Since a key allows accessing a specific player house, it is useless for anything but one specific door. More keys can be made for the same door by copying the pattern from an existing key to a "blank key".

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* ''VideoGame/UltimaOnline''. ''VideoGame/UltimaOnline''.
**
Since a key allows accessing a specific player house, it is useless for anything but one specific door. More keys can be made for the same door by copying the pattern from an existing key to a "blank key".



*** Which was a ''massive'' pain in the hind-end, because the game had a deliberately difficult inventory system and the character ended up with dozens of keys taking up space in it, each of which had to be hunted down and clicked on in the inventory before opening its target. As a result, the greatest treasure in the sequel's expansion pack was a magic keyring, which simply automagically gathered the keys and gave the character a "use whichever key fits" function.
** ''UltimaVIIPartII: Serpent Isle'' had even more keys. Thankfully its add-in pack ''Silver Seed'' introduced a keyring where all keys could go. The keyring could then be used directly on a lock and if would open if the key was on the ring. ''Ultima Underworld II: Labyrinth of Worlds'' had already introduced a keyring but in that game the keys still had to be tested individually.
*** That related trope about the locked door always getting opened? UltimaVIII avoided that one. in the later part of the game there's this HUGE set of double doors that just scream "I am big and important! Open me!" There's no key. If you cheated in the game and moved the doors there was nothing behind them. It was apparently supposed to be how you'd get into the expansion. Which never came out...

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*** Which was a ''massive'' pain in the hind-end, because the game had a deliberately difficult inventory system and the character ended up with dozens of keys taking up space in it, each of which had to be hunted down and clicked on in the inventory before opening its target. As a result, the greatest treasure in the sequel's expansion pack was a magic keyring, which simply automagically gathered the keys and gave the character a "use whichever key fits" function.
** ''UltimaVIIPartII: ''VideoGame/UltimaVIIPartII: Serpent Isle'' had even more keys. Thankfully its add-in pack ''Silver Seed'' introduced a keyring where all keys could go. The keyring could then be used directly on a lock and if would open if the key was on the ring. ''Ultima Underworld II: Labyrinth of Worlds'' had already introduced a keyring but in that game the keys still had to be tested individually.
*** That related trope about the locked door always getting opened? UltimaVIII avoided that one. in the later part of the game there's this HUGE set of double doors that just scream "I am big and important! Open me!" There's no key. If you cheated in the game and moved the doors there was nothing behind them. It was apparently supposed to be how you'd get into the expansion. Which never came out...
individually.



** This would actually be plausible if the chests have ''multiple identical locks'' that all have to be opened at the same time, and you are be unable to remove the key while a lock is open. So you'd need one identical key for each lock. But no such multiple locks are visible on the chests.



** ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' had a similar door in the final area of the game which could not be opened.

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** * ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' had a similar door in the final area of the game which could not be opened.opened.
* ''Franchise/{{Lufia}}'':



* ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' has the ever-obnoxious red chests that can only be unlocked by a specific item much later in the game...and it's not always worth it.
* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', each key is can only be used on specific locks, and continue to exist once they have been used. Due to this, an accomplished thief (or brutal murderer) can collect upwards of 30-40 keys by the end of the game. (They take up a bit of room until you get a key ring, though...)
* Played straight with the lockpicks in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''; in Morrowind, they break after a certain number of uses, and in Oblivion, they break if you fail at the [[HackingMinigame minigame]]. There are also Open Lock spells with varying magnitudes, but some (usually plot-important) doors require keys to open.

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* ** ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' has the ever-obnoxious red chests that can only be unlocked by a specific item much later in the game...and it's not always worth it.
* ** In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', each key is can only be used on specific locks, and continue to exist once they have been used. Due to this, an accomplished thief (or brutal murderer) can collect upwards of 30-40 keys by the end of the game. (They take up a bit of room until you get a key ring, though...)
* Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
**
Played straight with the lockpicks in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''; in Morrowind, they break after a certain number of uses, and in Oblivion, they break if you fail at the [[HackingMinigame minigame]]. There are also Open Lock spells with varying magnitudes, but some (usually plot-important) doors require keys to open.



* The NintendoHard, nigh-{{Unwinnable}} NES game ''Castlequest'' had their keys and doors color-coded. Figuring out how best to spend your keys was part of the challenge.

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* The NintendoHard, nigh-{{Unwinnable}} NES game ''Castlequest'' had their keys and doors color-coded. Figuring out how best to spend your keys was part of the challenge.



** And yet you are still asked what key to use out of the keys that fit. Every single time.
** The second game actually has a lock on the front door to someone's house...because he's lost his key. Finding it for him is one of the game's many sidequests.



* In ''VideoGame/ChipsChallenge'' there are four key colours. Red, yellow and blue keys vanish when used, but green ones don't.
** This has the effect of making certain puzzles UnWinnable if the player opens certain locks at the wrong time (for example, opening the doors to the chip door or the goal in Elementary before getting all the chips behind the other doors).

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* In ''VideoGame/ChipsChallenge'' there are four key colours. Red, yellow and blue keys vanish when used, but green ones don't.
**
don't. This has the effect of making certain puzzles UnWinnable UnwinnableByDesign if the player opens certain locks at the wrong time (for example, opening the doors to the chip door or the goal in Elementary before getting all the chips behind the other doors).



* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series is probably the best example of realistic key use in games. A key or keycard will only work with specific doors, and you can keep the keys afterwards. You can even find keycards which have no use in game, or find keys well before (or after) you find the door they're used on. Oddly, you can sell some keycards afterwards.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series is probably the best example of portrays a more realistic key use in games. use:
**
A key or keycard will only work with specific doors, and you can keep the keys afterwards. You can even find keycards which have no use in game, or find keys well before (or after) you find the door they're used on. Oddly, you can sell some keycards afterwards.



* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryIV: Shadows of Darkness'' sees TheHero, [[TheNameless Prince of Shapeir]] hold on to every key he finds because they only open specific doors and locks.
** Not all that bad, though, as there are only four keys you can get anyway (your inn room key, the key to Dr. Cranium's lab, [[spoiler: the crypt key]], and the key to the adventurer's guild).

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* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryIV: Shadows of Darkness'' sees TheHero, [[TheNameless Prince of Shapeir]] hold on to every key he finds because they only open specific doors and locks.
** Not all that bad, though, as there
locks. There are only four keys you can get anyway (your inn room key, the key to Dr. Cranium's lab, [[spoiler: the crypt key]], and the key to the adventurer's guild).



* ''Videogame/JaggedAlliance'' games have plenty of keys to be found. The original ''Jagged Alliance 2'' campaign has over 100 different sets of keys to be found, and each unlocks one or more doors, so they never disappear and it can get confusing. Some keys have duplicates, and some are useless (?). However, it is impossible to lock a door once it's been unlocked, and enemies are able to pass through locked (or trapped) doors without any key, effort, or lock-picking equipment. Another interesting aspect is that the character opening the door needs to be carrying the key (no [[BagOfSharing shared inventory]]), which can be very frustrating during combat.
* ''Videogame/RuneScape'' is an aversion, in that nearly every door has a unique key associated, and most of them are infinitely reusable. Fortunately, there's also a keyring item which lets you store certain important keys so you don't have to waste nearly as much bank space as you might think.
** But at the same time, it is present and accounted for in a lot of cases in the game as well. Crystal Keys break off in the lock, as do H.A.M. keys, but Shade Keys go one step further by '''dissolving''' when used.

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* ''Videogame/JaggedAlliance'' games have plenty of keys to be found. The original ''Jagged Alliance 2'' campaign has over 100 different sets of keys to be found, and each unlocks one or more doors, so they never disappear and it can get confusing. Some keys have duplicates, and some are useless (?).useless. However, it is impossible to lock a door once it's been unlocked, and enemies are able to pass through locked (or trapped) doors without any key, effort, or lock-picking equipment. Another interesting aspect is that the character opening the door needs to be carrying the key (no [[BagOfSharing shared inventory]]), which can be very frustrating during combat.
* ''Videogame/RuneScape'' is an aversion, in that nearly every door has a unique key associated, and most of them are infinitely reusable. Fortunately, there's also a keyring item which lets you store certain important keys so you don't have to waste nearly as much bank space as you might think.
** But at
think. At the same time, it is present and accounted for in a lot of cases in the game as well. Crystal Keys break off in the lock, as do H.A.M. keys, but Shade Keys go one step further by '''dissolving''' when used.
23rd Mar '16 2:59:16 PM Ripsaw
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/BlakeStone'' averts this and combines it with BagOfSpilling. On each level, various keycards will unlock doors. As you advance through the game, you find that the keycards from one level don't work on the others; as an AntiFrustrationFeature, the game does save which keycards you have on each level in case you decide to backtrack and chase OneHundredPercentCompletion.
21st Mar '16 5:08:00 PM StFan
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** The keys in ''VideoGame/LandsOfLore'' aren't interchangeable, but they are anti-matter. Also worth noting is one particular dungeon, the White Tower; while most keys in the game are noticeably unique in appearance, this area uses special "Mystic Keys". These keys are all shaped exactly alike and are only differentiated by their color, but since nothing in the Tower is color-coded, figuring out which key goes into which lock is a matter of trial and error.

to:

** * The keys in ''VideoGame/LandsOfLore'' aren't interchangeable, but they are anti-matter. Also worth noting is one particular dungeon, the White Tower; while most keys in the game are noticeably unique in appearance, this area uses special "Mystic Keys". These keys are all shaped exactly alike and are only differentiated by their color, but since nothing in the Tower is color-coded, figuring out which key goes into which lock is a matter of trial and error.
12th Mar '16 11:56:41 AM Swicket
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* In ''Frannchise/SpyroTheDragon'', Spyro only ever needs one key at a time, located a sufficient distance away from the locked box to make things..."fun". ''VideoGame/SpyroAHerosTail'' had things called "Lock-Picks," which you had to buy so that your little dragonfly friend could fly into locks and pick them, but they looked more like keys than like actual lock-picks.

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* In ''Frannchise/SpyroTheDragon'', ''Franchise/SpyroTheDragon'', Spyro only ever needs one key at a time, located a sufficient distance away from the locked box to make things..."fun". ''VideoGame/SpyroAHerosTail'' had things called "Lock-Picks," which you had to buy so that your little dragonfly friend could fly into locks and pick them, but they looked more like keys than like actual lock-picks.
5th Mar '16 7:59:38 AM BillyMT
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** Then there's the Keyrings, [[NonIndicativeName pistol-shaped tools]] that construct a key for the matching lock on the go. To do so a keyring need a Key, [[NonIndicativeName a bluish small cylinder]] containing the lock parameters. [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], with both in hands, locks can open and close at your leisure... [[BeggingTheQuestion Which make us wonder why make technological, overly-complicated versions of the old stuff if they work, and are violated, through the exactly same means]].

to:

** Then there's the Keyrings, [[NonIndicativeName pistol-shaped tools]] that construct a key for the matching lock on the go. To do so a keyring need a Key, [[NonIndicativeName a bluish small cylinder]] containing the lock said lock's parameters. [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], with both in hands, locks the door can open and close or be locked again at your leisure... [[BeggingTheQuestion Which make us wonder why make technological, overly-complicated versions of the old stuff if they work, and are violated, through the exactly same means]].
5th Mar '16 7:57:54 AM BillyMT
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** Then there's the Keyrings, [[NonIndicativeName pistol-shaped tools]] that construct a key for the matching lock on the go. [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], to do so a keyring need a Key, [[NonIndicativeName a bluish small cylinder]] containing the lock parameters. But once acquired, locks can open and close at your leisure... [[BeggingTheQuestion Which make us wonder why make technological versions of the old stuff if they work, and are violated, through the exactly same means]].

to:

** Then there's the Keyrings, [[NonIndicativeName pistol-shaped tools]] that construct a key for the matching lock on the go. [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], to To do so a keyring need a Key, [[NonIndicativeName a bluish small cylinder]] containing the lock parameters. But once acquired, [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], with both in hands, locks can open and close at your leisure... [[BeggingTheQuestion Which make us wonder why make technological technological, overly-complicated versions of the old stuff if they work, and are violated, through the exactly same means]].
5th Mar '16 7:55:49 AM BillyMT
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** Then there's the Keyrings, [[NonIndicativeName pistol-shaped tools]] that construct a key for the matching lock on the go. [[SubvertedTrope Unlike the trope however]], to do so a keyring need a Key, [[NonIndicativeName a bluish small cylinder]] containing the lock parameters. But once acquired, locks can open and close at your leisure... [[BeggingTheQuestion Which make us wonder why make technological versions of the old stuff if they work, and are violated, through the exactly same means]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InterchangeableAntimatterKeys