History Main / InteractiveFiction

17th Oct '17 4:06:03 PM Twiddler
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** ''VideoGame/AffairsOfTheCourt''


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** ''VideoGame/HeroesRise''
12th Oct '17 10:34:08 AM cwickham
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* Website/AdventureGamesLive
** ''VideoGame/AssaultOnVampireIsland''
** ''VideoGame/TheEarlyYears''
** ''VideoGame/EscapeFromStMarys''
** ''VideoGame/FantasyQuest''
** ''VideoGame/TheGameOfTheAges''
** ''VideoGame/TheMysteryOfBracklyHall''
** ''VideoGame/OutlawsOfTheSierraNevadas''
** ''VideoGame/ThePerilsOfAkumos''
** ''VideoGame/TrailOfAnguish''



* ''VideoGame/AssaultOnVampireIsland''



* ''VideoGame/TheEarlyYears''



* ''VideoGame/EscapeFromStMarys''



* ''VideoGame/FantasyQuest''



* ''VideoGame/TheGameOfTheAges''



* ''VideoGame/TheMysteryOfBracklyHall''



* ''VideoGame/OutlawsOfTheSierraNevadas''
* ''VideoGame/ThePerilsOfAkumos''



* ''VideoGame/TrailOfAnguish''
3rd Oct '17 12:13:04 PM ABE.Crudele
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Videogame/CommunityCollegeHero''
22nd Sep '17 5:52:41 PM Nouct
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* ''Literature/RomeoAndOrJuliet''
19th Sep '17 5:31:07 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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19th Sep '17 5:25:02 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/DontGetSpooked''
22nd Aug '17 9:53:48 PM Twiddler
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Interactive fiction games are adventure games in which the interaction is almost entirely text-based. Early games, and games from purist companies like Creator/Infocom, were nothing more than bare text, but some later offerings added pictures, sound and limited mouse input (one game, ''VideoGame/LeatherGoddessesOfPhobos'', even included plot-relevant scratch-and-sniff cards as {{Feelies}}) -- but the primary form of interaction was still through descriptive text and typed commands. The genre began with the original adventure game, ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'', and really took off in the early 1980s, with offerings such as the ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'' trilogy and later, more literary works, such as ''VideoGame/{{Trinity}}'' and ''VideoGame/AMindForeverVoyaging''. During this period such games were almost universally known as "text adventures". Interactive Fiction is a term originally introduced by the seminal AdventureGame company Creator/{{Infocom}} to describe its line of more "serious" long-form text adventures back in the Golden Era, and has become the dominant term in the 21st century as the genre became an increasingly specialised market aimed at an increasingly "literary" audience.

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Interactive fiction games are adventure games in which the interaction is almost entirely text-based. Early games, and games from purist companies like Creator/Infocom, Creator/{{Infocom}}, were nothing more than bare text, but some later offerings added pictures, sound and limited mouse input (one game, ''VideoGame/LeatherGoddessesOfPhobos'', even included plot-relevant scratch-and-sniff cards as {{Feelies}}) -- but the primary form of interaction was still through descriptive text and typed commands. The genre began with the original adventure game, ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'', and really took off in the early 1980s, with offerings such as the ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'' trilogy and later, more literary works, such as ''VideoGame/{{Trinity}}'' and ''VideoGame/AMindForeverVoyaging''. During this period such games were almost universally known as "text adventures". Interactive Fiction is a term originally introduced by the seminal AdventureGame company Creator/{{Infocom}} to describe its line of more "serious" long-form text adventures back in the Golden Era, and has become the dominant term in the 21st century as the genre became an increasingly specialised market aimed at an increasingly "literary" audience.
22nd Aug '17 9:53:34 PM Twiddler
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Interactive fiction games are adventure games in which the interaction is almost entirely text-based. Early games, and games from purist companies like Infocom, were nothing more than bare text, but some later offerings added pictures, sound and limited mouse input (one game, ''VideoGame/LeatherGoddessesOfPhobos'', even included plot-relevant scratch-and-sniff cards as {{Feelies}}) -- but the primary form of interaction was still through descriptive text and typed commands. The genre began with the original adventure game, ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'', and really took off in the early 1980s, with offerings such as the ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'' trilogy and later, more literary works, such as ''VideoGame/{{Trinity}}'' and ''VideoGame/AMindForeverVoyaging''. During this period such games were almost universally known as "text adventures". Interactive Fiction is a term originally introduced by the seminal AdventureGame company Creator/{{Infocom}} to describe its line of more "serious" long-form text adventures back in the Golden Era, and has become the dominant term in the 21st century as the genre became an increasingly specialised market aimed at an increasingly "literary" audience.

to:

Interactive fiction games are adventure games in which the interaction is almost entirely text-based. Early games, and games from purist companies like Infocom, Creator/Infocom, were nothing more than bare text, but some later offerings added pictures, sound and limited mouse input (one game, ''VideoGame/LeatherGoddessesOfPhobos'', even included plot-relevant scratch-and-sniff cards as {{Feelies}}) -- but the primary form of interaction was still through descriptive text and typed commands. The genre began with the original adventure game, ''VideoGame/ColossalCave'', and really took off in the early 1980s, with offerings such as the ''VideoGame/{{Zork}}'' trilogy and later, more literary works, such as ''VideoGame/{{Trinity}}'' and ''VideoGame/AMindForeverVoyaging''. During this period such games were almost universally known as "text adventures". Interactive Fiction is a term originally introduced by the seminal AdventureGame company Creator/{{Infocom}} to describe its line of more "serious" long-form text adventures back in the Golden Era, and has become the dominant term in the 21st century as the genre became an increasingly specialised market aimed at an increasingly "literary" audience.
22nd Aug '17 9:52:56 PM Twiddler
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The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.) Many text adventures were promoted with the concept that the player's imagination was capable of producing far more extravagant and realistic images than were possible on computers of the day. And even when graphical adventure games and [[RPGs RolePlayingGame]] began to appear, text adventures were allowed to be more complex and wide-ranging than the graphical versions due to text taking up far less limited disk space and memory than graphics and sound.

to:

The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.) Many text adventures were promoted with the concept that the player's imagination was capable of producing far more extravagant and realistic images than were possible on computers of the day. And even when graphical adventure games and [[RPGs RolePlayingGame]] [[RolePlayingGame RPGs]] began to appear, text adventures were allowed to be more complex and wide-ranging than the graphical versions due to text taking up far less limited disk space and memory than graphics and sound.
22nd Aug '17 9:52:42 PM Twiddler
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The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.) Many text adventures were promoted with the concept that the player's imagination was capable of producing far more extravagant and realistic images than were possible on computers of the day. And even when graphical adventure games and RPGs began to appear, text adventures were allowed to be more complex and wide-ranging than the graphical versions due to text taking up far less limited disk space and memory than graphics and sound.

to:

The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.) Many text adventures were promoted with the concept that the player's imagination was capable of producing far more extravagant and realistic images than were possible on computers of the day. And even when graphical adventure games and RPGs [[RPGs RolePlayingGame]] began to appear, text adventures were allowed to be more complex and wide-ranging than the graphical versions due to text taking up far less limited disk space and memory than graphics and sound.
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