History Main / InteractiveFiction

21st May '16 10:49:03 PM Renicula
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** ''VideoGame/Guenevere''

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** ''VideoGame/Guenevere''''VideoGame/{{Guenevere}}''
21st May '16 10:48:35 PM Renicula
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** ''VideoGame/Guenevere''
16th May '16 6:38:28 AM skidoo23
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* NintendoHard: Part of the genre's charm for many players, though games do range in difficulty and some of them can't be gotten into an {{Unwinnable}} state. Many games are notorious for being this at the very beginning of the game, where either through intent or poor writing, there is little information given as to how to get out of the very first area. The text adventure adaptation of ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}'' is one notorious example as it begins in the middle of an action sequence with little clue given to the player as to how to get out of it.

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* NintendoHard: Part of the genre's charm for many players, though games do range in difficulty and some of them can't be gotten into an {{Unwinnable}} state. Many games are notorious for being this at the very beginning of the game, where either through intent or poor writing, there is little information given as to how to get out of the very first area. The text adventure adaptation of ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}'' is one notorious example as it begins in the middle of an action sequence with little clue given to the player as to [[RoomEscapeGame how to get out of it.it]].


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** Actually, per NintendoHard, above, there are many IF games both vintage and recent that begin with this scenario, even if the game as a whole isn't part of the genre.
16th May '16 6:36:51 AM skidoo23
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* NintendoHard: Part of the genre's charm for many players, though games do range in difficulty and some of them can't be gotten into an {{Unwinnable}} state.

to:

* NintendoHard: Part of the genre's charm for many players, though games do range in difficulty and some of them can't be gotten into an {{Unwinnable}} state. Many games are notorious for being this at the very beginning of the game, where either through intent or poor writing, there is little information given as to how to get out of the very first area. The text adventure adaptation of ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}'' is one notorious example as it begins in the middle of an action sequence with little clue given to the player as to how to get out of it.
16th May '16 6:35:03 AM skidoo23
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* TimedMission: A number of games, including the original ''Colossal Cave'', have some element of this, usually by way of a torch or lamp that has only a finite amount of fuel or battery power. Once it gives out and you're left in the dark, you're done. For seasoned players, "LAMP OFF" (or equivalent) became a default command the moment they entered an area where illumination wasn't required, to preserve the resource as much as possible. Made rather cruel in some versions of ''Colossal Cave'' (such as the version made for Apple II) where the only way to extend the lamp's life was to spend one of the game's treasures on new batteries, rendering the game unwinnable as a result.

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* TimedMission: A number of games, including the original ''Colossal Cave'', have some element of this, usually by way of a torch or lamp that has only a finite amount of fuel or battery power. Once it gives out and you're left in the dark, you're done. For seasoned players, "LAMP OFF" (or equivalent) became a default command the moment they entered an area where illumination wasn't required, to preserve the resource as much as possible. Made rather cruel in some versions of ''Colossal Cave'' (such as the version made for Apple II) II which was titled ''Microsoft Adventure'') where the only way to extend the lamp's life was to spend one of the game's treasures on new batteries, rendering batteries at a vending machine hidden in the game unwinnable as game's maze area, making it impossible to get a result.perfect treasure-collection score on the game.
16th May '16 6:33:01 AM skidoo23
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The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.)

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The obvious reason why they were in text form is that was the only means of output available. Original Adventure was written in the programming language FORTRAN and was designed to run on the UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graphics output wasn't possible because most places had no systems available for on-screen graphics. It was only when computers that could display color graphics became affordable in the early 1980s that the text adventure started to be replaced by various programs that used graphics capability; a few text adventures were remade in graphical form at this time. (In non-English-speaking countries, graphical adventures had far more success in the 1980s than text-only adventures, which were rarely translated and thus posed a formidable language barrier.)
) Many text adventures were promoted with the concept that the player's imagination was capable of producing far more extravagant and realistic images than were possible on computers of the day. And even when graphical adventure games and RPGs began to appear, text adventures were allowed to be more complex and wide-ranging than the graphical versions due to text taking up far less limited disk space and memory than graphics and sound.



* TimedMission: A number of games, including the original ''Colossal Cave'', have some element of this, usually by way of a torch or lamp that has only a finite amount of fuel or battery power. Once it gives out and you're left in the dark, you're done. For seasoned players, "LAMP OFF" (or equivalent) became a default command the moment they entered an area where illumination wasn't required, to preserve the resource as much as possible. Made rather cruel in some versions of ''Colossal Cave'' (such as the version made for Apple II) where the only way to extend the lamp's life was to spend one of the game's treasures on new batteries, rendering the game unwinnable as a result.



* {{Walkthrough}}: Optional. Some games come with, some don't. Lack of walkthroughs contributes to some of the mystery in old {{Vaporware}} games.

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* {{Walkthrough}}: Optional. Some games come with, some don't. Lack of walkthroughs contributes to some of the mystery in old {{Vaporware}} games. Some of the earliest "game guide" books to be published were walkthroughs of text adventures.
10th May '16 1:58:51 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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-->-- ''ColossalCaveAdventure''

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-->-- ''ColossalCaveAdventure''
''VideoGame/ColossalCave''
1st May '16 10:57:38 AM Veanne
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1st May '16 10:46:27 AM Veanne
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* ''VideoGame/TheAxolotlProject''
23rd Feb '16 2:53:43 PM Bakazuki
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** ''VideoGame/AStudyInSteampunk''
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