History Main / InstantMarksmanJustSqueezeTrigger

8th Sep '15 8:16:32 AM Prfnoff
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* Somewhat averted in ''DeadWinter''. After Liz [[AccidentalAimingSkills headshots the wrong zombie]], Alice [[http://deadwinter.cc/page/360 gives her]] the usual "squeeze the trigger" advice. She fires again...and hits a vending machine.

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* Somewhat averted in ''DeadWinter''.''Webcomic/DeadWinter''. After Liz [[AccidentalAimingSkills headshots the wrong zombie]], Alice [[http://deadwinter.cc/page/360 gives her]] the usual "squeeze the trigger" advice. She fires again...and hits a vending machine.
9th May '15 2:32:34 PM Quanyails
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This is, of course, partially TruthInTelevision: many novice shooters *do* yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.

to:

This is, of course, partially TruthInTelevision: many novice shooters *do* ''do'' yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.
20th Apr '15 10:11:51 AM jmackaerospace
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This is, of course, TruthInTelevision: many novice shooters yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.

to:

This is, of course, partially TruthInTelevision: many novice shooters *do* yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.
20th Apr '15 10:06:39 AM jmackaerospace
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Real expertise in this field, of course, can take years of training and practice. Plus, it may not be clear to an amateur gun user what, specifically, the distinction between "pulling" and "squeezing" a trigger may be. These are issues that are generally not addressed when these scenes take place, but this is somewhat justified in that a [[TheLawOfConservationOfDetail lengthy scene featuring detailed instructions on how to fire a gun might be boring.]] This is, of course, TruthInTelevision: many first-time shooters yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.

It is rather difficult to become a proper "marksman" or even just an good shot. Guns and ammunition are fairly expensive (In the United States, even the cheap stuff gives you overhead easily into the hundreds of dollars before you even fire your first shot, and are even more expensive and highly regulated much of the world), range time in most places is bought by the hour and is not exactly cheap, instruction is even more expensive and eats up both lots of fairly expensive ammo and significant amount of the student's time (often much of a day, if not two or even more), and then there is the matter of getting to visit facilities which are more than short static ranges or simple trap clubs. And then there comes the commitments of time and money involved. To be frank, it takes a lot of time and even more money to become a solid shooter. And then there's the matter of marksmanship being one of the most perishable and temperamental skills in the world. To maintain high grade marksmanship, practice has to be not only frequent but also of sufficient volume. Just sending a box or two of ammo down a static indoor range every week isn't going to cut it. Nor is saving up all year for a weekend class by a top tier instructor at some elite school going to make up for the 363 other days that year you didn't so much as dry fire your gun while waiting for your breakfast to toast. But don't worry, even most cops and soldiers don't get all that much practice either, thanks to live fire training budgets being notoriously tight things as well as not particularly popular with health and safety conscious forces.

Pretty much, unless you are living a lifestyle in a place where developing guncraft is a central pursuit, you'll likely never become a marksman.

Luckily, it's not too difficult or demanding to become an okay shot and then protect your skills by doing dryfire and airsoft / pellet gun/ airgun practice in your home frequently while making somewhat regular trips to the shooting range with occasional competitions and instruction. And luckily, you don't need to have anything approaching ImprobableAimingSkills, since most shots, apart from sniper shots or long range competition events, fall within 400M, with the vast majority taking place well within 200M. If you can consistently shoot within a human torso at 100M/Yds, you're fine.

to:

Real expertise in this field, of course, can take years of training and practice. Plus, it may not be clear to an amateur gun user what, specifically, the distinction between "pulling" and "squeezing" a trigger may be. These are issues that are generally not addressed when these scenes take place, but this is somewhat justified in that a [[TheLawOfConservationOfDetail lengthy scene featuring detailed instructions on how to fire a gun might be boring.]] This is, of course, TruthInTelevision: many first-time novice shooters yank on the trigger and thus pull their gun way off.

It is rather difficult to become a proper "marksman" or even just an good shot. Guns and ammunition are fairly expensive (In the United States, even the cheap stuff gives you overhead easily into the hundreds of dollars before you even fire your first shot, and are even more expensive and highly regulated much of the world), range time in most places is bought by the hour and is not exactly cheap, instruction is even more expensive and eats up both lots of fairly expensive ammo and significant amount of the student's time (often much of a day, if not two or even more), and then there is the matter of getting to visit facilities which are more than short static ranges or simple trap clubs. And then there comes the commitments of time and money involved. To be frank, it takes a lot of time and even more money to become a solid shooter. And then there's the matter of marksmanship being one of the most perishable and temperamental skills in the world. To maintain high grade marksmanship, practice has to be not only frequent but also of sufficient volume. Just sending a box or two of ammo down a static indoor range every week isn't going to cut it. Nor is saving up all year for a weekend class by a top tier instructor at some elite school going to make up for the 363 other days that year you didn't so much as dry fire your gun while waiting for your breakfast to toast. But don't worry, even most cops and soldiers don't get all that much practice either, thanks to live fire training budgets being notoriously tight things as well as not particularly popular with health and safety conscious forces.

Pretty much, unless you are living a lifestyle in a place where developing guncraft is a central pursuit, you'll likely never become a marksman.

Luckily,
it's not too difficult or demanding to become an okay shot the sole barrier between a novice and then protect your skills by doing dryfire and airsoft / pellet gun/ airgun practice in your home frequently while making somewhat regular trips to the an elite sniper.

Fortunately, much like real life, most movie
shooting range happens at ranges of 50m or less, where the main barrier to hitting something is simply [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy remembering to aim at all]]. With that particular low barrier to entry, movie style coaching is probably sufficient, at least to ensure you don't shoot yourself.

(It is worth noting, without *some* form of coaching, most people will copy their shooting style from what they see in film and TV. The problem
with occasional competitions and instruction. And luckily, you that is that ACTORS certainly don't need to have anything approaching ImprobableAimingSkills, since most shots, apart from sniper shots or long range competition events, fall within 400M, with be carefully aiming when they pull the vast majority taking place well within 200M. If you can consistently shoot within a human torso at 100M/Yds, you're fine.
trigger, and may in fact be hamming up things like recoil for [[RuleOfCool dramatic effect]])
9th Apr '15 8:24:15 PM jormis29
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* Inverted in the video game ''{{Uncharted}}'', right in the beginning when Drake hands Elena [[IntrepidReporter (a journalist)]] a pistol. His advice is "Just point...and shoot," which is something one would only expect to hear from somebody who's never, ever held a gun in their life.

to:

* Inverted in the video game ''{{Uncharted}}'', ''VideoGame/UnchartedDrakesFortune'', right in the beginning when Drake hands Elena [[IntrepidReporter (a journalist)]] a pistol. His advice is "Just point...and shoot," which is something one would only expect to hear from somebody who's never, ever held a gun in their life.
16th Mar '15 11:02:45 AM molotov
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It is rather difficult to become a proper "marksman" or even just an good shot. Guns and ammunition are fairly expensive (even the cheap stuff gives you overhead easily into the hundreds of dollars before you even fire your first shot, and are even more expensive and highly regulated much of the world), range time in most places is bought by the hour and is not exactly cheap, instruction is even more expensive and eats up both lots of fairly expensive ammo and significant amount of the student's time (often much of a day, if not two or even more), and then there is the matter of getting to visit facilities which are more than short static ranges or simple trap clubs. And then there comes the commitments of time and money involved. To be frank, it takes a lot of time and even more money to become a solid shooter. And then there's the matter of marksmanship being one of the most perishable and temperamental skills in the world. To maintain high grade marksmanship, practice has to be not only frequent but also of sufficient volume. Just sending a box or two of ammo down a static indoor range every week isn't going to cut it. Nor is saving up all year for a weekend class by a top tier instructor at some elite school going to make up for the 363 other days that year you didn't so much as dry fire your gun while waiting for your breakfast to toast. But don't worry, even most cops and soldiers don't get all that much practice either, thanks to live fire training budgets being notoriously tight things as well as not particularly popular with health and safety conscious forces.

to:

It is rather difficult to become a proper "marksman" or even just an good shot. Guns and ammunition are fairly expensive (even (In the United States, even the cheap stuff gives you overhead easily into the hundreds of dollars before you even fire your first shot, and are even more expensive and highly regulated much of the world), range time in most places is bought by the hour and is not exactly cheap, instruction is even more expensive and eats up both lots of fairly expensive ammo and significant amount of the student's time (often much of a day, if not two or even more), and then there is the matter of getting to visit facilities which are more than short static ranges or simple trap clubs. And then there comes the commitments of time and money involved. To be frank, it takes a lot of time and even more money to become a solid shooter. And then there's the matter of marksmanship being one of the most perishable and temperamental skills in the world. To maintain high grade marksmanship, practice has to be not only frequent but also of sufficient volume. Just sending a box or two of ammo down a static indoor range every week isn't going to cut it. Nor is saving up all year for a weekend class by a top tier instructor at some elite school going to make up for the 363 other days that year you didn't so much as dry fire your gun while waiting for your breakfast to toast. But don't worry, even most cops and soldiers don't get all that much practice either, thanks to live fire training budgets being notoriously tight things as well as not particularly popular with health and safety conscious forces.
16th Mar '15 11:01:30 AM molotov
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Added DiffLines:

It is rather difficult to become a proper "marksman" or even just an good shot. Guns and ammunition are fairly expensive (even the cheap stuff gives you overhead easily into the hundreds of dollars before you even fire your first shot, and are even more expensive and highly regulated much of the world), range time in most places is bought by the hour and is not exactly cheap, instruction is even more expensive and eats up both lots of fairly expensive ammo and significant amount of the student's time (often much of a day, if not two or even more), and then there is the matter of getting to visit facilities which are more than short static ranges or simple trap clubs. And then there comes the commitments of time and money involved. To be frank, it takes a lot of time and even more money to become a solid shooter. And then there's the matter of marksmanship being one of the most perishable and temperamental skills in the world. To maintain high grade marksmanship, practice has to be not only frequent but also of sufficient volume. Just sending a box or two of ammo down a static indoor range every week isn't going to cut it. Nor is saving up all year for a weekend class by a top tier instructor at some elite school going to make up for the 363 other days that year you didn't so much as dry fire your gun while waiting for your breakfast to toast. But don't worry, even most cops and soldiers don't get all that much practice either, thanks to live fire training budgets being notoriously tight things as well as not particularly popular with health and safety conscious forces.

Pretty much, unless you are living a lifestyle in a place where developing guncraft is a central pursuit, you'll likely never become a marksman.

Luckily, it's not too difficult or demanding to become an okay shot and then protect your skills by doing dryfire and airsoft / pellet gun/ airgun practice in your home frequently while making somewhat regular trips to the shooting range with occasional competitions and instruction. And luckily, you don't need to have anything approaching ImprobableAimingSkills, since most shots, apart from sniper shots or long range competition events, fall within 400M, with the vast majority taking place well within 200M. If you can consistently shoot within a human torso at 100M/Yds, you're fine.
23rd Jan '15 6:22:20 AM chc232323
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* Averted in the first ''[[VideoGame/SilentHill1 Silent Hill]]'' game. Harry, who's never handled a gun before, is given one by policewoman Cybil Bennett. Her instructions are pretty terrible and do not include this advice. She even says, "Before you pull the trigger..." which of course is the wrong way to manipulate a trigger. Calling Harry a mediocre shot is being charitable. The scene can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAGZx9M4Iro here]], where Cybil dives pretty deep into RecklessGunUsage.

to:

* Averted in the first ''[[VideoGame/SilentHill1 Silent Hill]]'' game. Harry, who's never handled a gun before, is given one by policewoman Cybil Bennett. Her instructions are pretty terrible and do not include this advice. She even says, "Before you pull the trigger..." which of course is the wrong way to manipulate a trigger. Calling Harry a mediocre shot is being charitable. The scene can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAGZx9M4Iro here]], where Cybil dives pretty deep into RecklessGunUsage.
ArtisticLicenseGunSafety.
23rd Jan '15 6:21:27 AM chc232323
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* In the first ''[[VideoGame/SilentHill1 Silent Hill]]'' game, Harry, who's never handled a gun before, is given one by policewoman Cybil Bennett. Her instructions boil down to know who he's shooting at.

to:

* In Averted in the first ''[[VideoGame/SilentHill1 Silent Hill]]'' game, game. Harry, who's never handled a gun before, is given one by policewoman Cybil Bennett. Her instructions boil down are pretty terrible and do not include this advice. She even says, "Before you pull the trigger..." which of course is the wrong way to know who he's shooting at.
manipulate a trigger. Calling Harry a mediocre shot is being charitable. The scene can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAGZx9M4Iro here]], where Cybil dives pretty deep into RecklessGunUsage.
3rd Jun '14 2:53:09 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Only Related: Used in the video game ''{{Uncharted}}'', right in the beginning when Drake hands Elena [[IntrepidReporter (a journalist)]] a pistol. "Just point...and shoot."

to:

* Only Related: Used Inverted in the video game ''{{Uncharted}}'', right in the beginning when Drake hands Elena [[IntrepidReporter (a journalist)]] a pistol. His advice is "Just point...and shoot."shoot," which is something one would only expect to hear from somebody who's never, ever held a gun in their life.
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