History Main / InspirationNod

26th Oct '16 8:43:48 PM PaulA
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* Writer PeterDavid called these his PinkBunnySlippers after an example of one of his ''IncredibleHulk'' comic book storylines. He realised that there are parallels between between his ''Incredible Hulk'' story line and this other movie, ''Film/RealGenius''. There are similar plot points, so he makes a reference to it that doesn't involve using any more of the pre-existing connection but just throws in this shot of pink bunny slippers (as worn by both the University President and Val Kilmer in the movie) to lampshade it to anyone else who might have also spotted the similarities.

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* Writer PeterDavid Creator/PeterDavid called these his PinkBunnySlippers Pink Bunny Slippers after an example of one of his ''IncredibleHulk'' ''ComicBook/IncredibleHulk'' comic book storylines. He realised that there are parallels between between his ''Incredible Hulk'' story line and this other movie, ''Film/RealGenius''. There are similar plot points, so he makes a reference to it that doesn't involve using any more of the pre-existing connection but just throws in this shot of pink bunny slippers (as worn by both the University President and Val Kilmer in the movie) to lampshade it to anyone else who might have also spotted the similarities.



* PeterDavid again: ''Comicbook/XFactor'' #240 is called "Run, Layla, Run" and features Layla Miller running to save someone, while her alterations to history mean that instead of seeing a single, immutable future, she sees multiple possible futures. Halfway through, she collides with [[Film/RunLolaRun Lola]], who is running in the opposite direction.

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* PeterDavid Creator/PeterDavid again: ''Comicbook/XFactor'' #240 is called "Run, Layla, Run" and features Layla Miller running to save someone, while her alterations to history mean that instead of seeing a single, immutable future, she sees multiple possible futures. Halfway through, she collides with [[Film/RunLolaRun Lola]], who is running in the opposite direction.
25th Oct '16 3:58:03 PM nombretomado
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** GeorgeLucas likes ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars''. A lot. Burroughs' Mars has ''Jed''s (princes) and ''padwar''s (lieutenants), martian lions are called ''banthas'' and one species of evil insects is called ''Sith''.

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** GeorgeLucas Creator/GeorgeLucas likes ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars''. A lot. Burroughs' Mars has ''Jed''s (princes) and ''padwar''s (lieutenants), martian lions are called ''banthas'' and one species of evil insects is called ''Sith''.
19th Oct '16 2:57:36 AM Morgenthaler
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* It's fairly obvious that the New Republic in ''[[Literature/TheEschatonSeries Singularity Sky]]'' by Creator/CharlesStross is basically 19th century Prussia IN SPACE! Less obvious is that the Republic's military leader's delusion that he is pregnant with an elephant was shared by a real Prussian field marshal (Gebhard von Blucher) during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.

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* It's fairly obvious that the New Republic in ''[[Literature/TheEschatonSeries Singularity Sky]]'' ''Literature/SingularitySky'' by Creator/CharlesStross is basically 19th century Prussia IN SPACE! Less obvious is that the Republic's military leader's delusion that he is pregnant with an elephant was shared by a real Prussian field marshal (Gebhard von Blucher) during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.
19th Oct '16 2:56:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* Creator/StephenFry's novel ''TheStarsTennisBalls'' (aka ''Revenge'') owes a lot to ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo''. In acknowledgement of this, the major characters have names that are anagrams of or puns on the names of their equivalents in the earlier novel.
* It's fairly obvious that the New Republic in ''[[TheEschatonSeries Singularity Sky]]'' by Creator/CharlesStross is basically 19th century Prussia IN SPACE! Less obvious is that the Republic's military leader's delusion that he is pregnant with an elephant was shared by a real Prussian field marshal (Gebhard von Blucher) during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.

to:

* Creator/StephenFry's novel ''TheStarsTennisBalls'' ''Literature/TheStarsTennisBalls'' (aka ''Revenge'') owes a lot to ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo''. In acknowledgement of this, the major characters have names that are anagrams of or puns on the names of their equivalents in the earlier novel.
* It's fairly obvious that the New Republic in ''[[TheEschatonSeries ''[[Literature/TheEschatonSeries Singularity Sky]]'' by Creator/CharlesStross is basically 19th century Prussia IN SPACE! Less obvious is that the Republic's military leader's delusion that he is pregnant with an elephant was shared by a real Prussian field marshal (Gebhard von Blucher) during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.



* Brutha, the protagonist of ''Discworld/SmallGods'' is a beefy guy who has a PhotographicMemory and becomes the prophet of a CrystalDragonJesus religion. These are traits shared with Severian, the protagonist of ''BookOfTheNewSun'', and to this end, one character that Brutha encounters is named Severian. Incidentally, ''Discworld/SmallGods'' is sort of an unofficial sequel or prequel to Discworld/{{Pyramids}}, and in that book, one of the sections is titled "The Book of the New Son".

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* Brutha, the protagonist of ''Discworld/SmallGods'' is a beefy guy who has a PhotographicMemory and becomes the prophet of a CrystalDragonJesus religion. These are traits shared with Severian, the protagonist of ''BookOfTheNewSun'', ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'', and to this end, one character that Brutha encounters is named Severian. Incidentally, ''Discworld/SmallGods'' is sort of an unofficial sequel or prequel to Discworld/{{Pyramids}}, and in that book, one of the sections is titled "The Book of the New Son".
6th Aug '16 2:45:46 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/NeilGaiman's ''ComicBook/TheSandman'': The concept of taking a relatively obscure DCUniverse figure and re-interpreting it with a deeper mythology was ground well-trod by Alan Moore, in his run on the ''Comicbook/SwampThing'' series. In his first couple of arcs, Gaiman throws in a ton of nods to Moore: the inclusion of the Moore-created [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]], the clues that Morpheus' pet Matthew is the reincarnation of the ''Comicbook/SwampThing'' character Matthew Cable, the similar plot of a formerly goofy DC universe villain taking hold of his powers to become a major threat that the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}} can't handle, so the eponymous character must talk down (The Floronic Man/Doctor Destiny), and so forth.

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* Creator/NeilGaiman's ''ComicBook/TheSandman'': The concept of taking a relatively obscure DCUniverse Franchise/DCUniverse figure and re-interpreting it with a deeper mythology was ground well-trod by Alan Moore, in his run on the ''Comicbook/SwampThing'' series. In his first couple of arcs, Gaiman throws in a ton of nods to Moore: the inclusion of the Moore-created [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]], the clues that Morpheus' pet Matthew is the reincarnation of the ''Comicbook/SwampThing'' character Matthew Cable, the similar plot of a formerly goofy DC universe villain taking hold of his powers to become a major threat that the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}} can't handle, so the eponymous character must talk down (The Floronic Man/Doctor Destiny), and so forth.
2nd Aug '16 2:05:57 PM margdean56
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* The Creator/RoaldDahl story "Pig" is clearly written as an homage to Literature/{{Candide}}, including a [[ThePollyanna ridiculously idealistic]] protagonist and a bitingly satirical tone. As a reference to this, the hero's aunt, who raised him, is named Glosspan- a SignificantAnagram for Voltaire's Pangloss.

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* The Creator/RoaldDahl story "Pig" is clearly written as an homage to Literature/{{Candide}}, including a [[ThePollyanna ridiculously idealistic]] protagonist and a bitingly satirical tone. As a reference to this, the hero's aunt, who raised him, is named Glosspan- a Glosspan--a SignificantAnagram for Voltaire's Pangloss.
2nd Aug '16 2:02:38 PM margdean56
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* Writer PeterDavid called these his PinkBunnySlippers after an example of one of his ''IncredibleHulk'' comic book storylines. He realised that there are parallels between between his ''Incredible Hulk'' story line and this other movie, ''Film/RealGenius''. There are similar plot points, so he makes a reference to it that doesn't involve using any more of the pre-existing connection but just throws in this shot of pink bunny slippers (as worn by both the University President and Val Kilmer in the movie) to lampshade it to anyone else who might have also spotted the similarites.

to:

* Writer PeterDavid called these his PinkBunnySlippers after an example of one of his ''IncredibleHulk'' comic book storylines. He realised that there are parallels between between his ''Incredible Hulk'' story line and this other movie, ''Film/RealGenius''. There are similar plot points, so he makes a reference to it that doesn't involve using any more of the pre-existing connection but just throws in this shot of pink bunny slippers (as worn by both the University President and Val Kilmer in the movie) to lampshade it to anyone else who might have also spotted the similarites.similarities.
13th Jun '16 6:59:53 PM PaulA
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* In a few ''SherlockHolmes'' stories, EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin (on whom Holmes is based) is mentioned; in one story Holmes explicitly does a trick that Dupin did in one of his stories: as they're walking along one evening, Holmes/Dupin [[InnerMonologueConversation responds to some unsaid thought that their walking companion had at the time]].

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* In a few ''SherlockHolmes'' ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' stories, EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's Literature/CAugusteDupin (on whom Holmes is based) is mentioned; in mentioned. In one story Holmes explicitly does a trick that Dupin did in one of his stories: as they're walking along one evening, Holmes/Dupin [[InnerMonologueConversation responds to some unsaid thought that their walking companion had at the time]].
19th May '16 5:04:34 PM nombretomado
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* Jessica Fletcher of ''MurderSheWrote'' seems to have been more than slightly [[LittleOldLadyInvestigates inspired by]] Agatha Christie's Miss Marple, especially since series star Creator/AngelaLansbury had previously ''played'' Marple in the movie version of ''The Mirror Crack'd''. The pilot of ''Murder She Wrote'' opens with a scene of the star little old lady ''solving'' the end of a movie mystery interrupted halfway, which is a direct lift from the opening of ''The Mirror Crack'd''. Said scene is not in the book.

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* Jessica Fletcher of ''MurderSheWrote'' ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' seems to have been more than slightly [[LittleOldLadyInvestigates inspired by]] Agatha Christie's Miss Marple, especially since series star Creator/AngelaLansbury had previously ''played'' Marple in the movie version of ''The Mirror Crack'd''. The pilot of ''Murder She Wrote'' opens with a scene of the star little old lady ''solving'' the end of a movie mystery interrupted halfway, which is a direct lift from the opening of ''The Mirror Crack'd''. Said scene is not in the book.



* Season 5 Episode 17 of ''{{Numb3rs}}'' contains a a number of references to the Robot series of Isaac Asimov, from which it borrows the plot device "an A.I. that kills a human." The episode's title is "First Law" after the Asimov's First Law of Robotics. The company in which the death takes place is called "Steel Cave Industries" after one novel in the series, ''Literature/TheCavesOfSteel''. The name of the A.I. accused of murder is "Bailey" after the protagonist of that novel, Detective Lije Bailey. The scientist who is killed is named Daniel and gives his admin password as "Daniel Olivaw" after Lije Bailey's robot sidekick R. Daneel Olivaw. Presumably this scientist was the one responsible for naming the A.I. and the company created to fund its development, so his familiarity with these books gives an in-story explanation for all these references.

to:

* Season 5 Episode 17 of ''{{Numb3rs}}'' ''Series/{{Numb3rs}}'' contains a a number of references to the Robot series of Isaac Asimov, from which it borrows the plot device "an A.I. that kills a human." The episode's title is "First Law" after the Asimov's First Law of Robotics. The company in which the death takes place is called "Steel Cave Industries" after one novel in the series, ''Literature/TheCavesOfSteel''. The name of the A.I. accused of murder is "Bailey" after the protagonist of that novel, Detective Lije Bailey. The scientist who is killed is named Daniel and gives his admin password as "Daniel Olivaw" after Lije Bailey's robot sidekick R. Daneel Olivaw. Presumably this scientist was the one responsible for naming the A.I. and the company created to fund its development, so his familiarity with these books gives an in-story explanation for all these references.
22nd Jan '16 4:24:14 PM nombretomado
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* StephenFry's novel ''TheStarsTennisBalls'' (aka ''Revenge'') owes a lot to ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo''. In acknowledgement of this, the major characters have names that are anagrams of or puns on the names of their equivalents in the earlier novel.

to:

* StephenFry's Creator/StephenFry's novel ''TheStarsTennisBalls'' (aka ''Revenge'') owes a lot to ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo''. In acknowledgement of this, the major characters have names that are anagrams of or puns on the names of their equivalents in the earlier novel.
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