History Main / InadequateInheritor

17th May '16 4:38:24 AM WillBGood
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* One episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', "The Masks," is about a group of greedy, selfish in-laws who visit a dying man only because they want a part of his large inheritance. The man gives them the condition that they can only inherit his fortune if they wear a set of hideous-looking masks until midnight. They succeed in fulfilling this condition (and as it turns out, the old man dies at the very stroke of midnight), but the man gets the last laugh on them as it turns out that the masks have permanently disfigured their faces to make them more suitable for their personalities.

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* One episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', "The Masks," ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS5E145TheMasks The Masks]]," is about a group of greedy, selfish in-laws who visit a dying man only because they want a part of his large inheritance. The man gives them the condition that they can only inherit his fortune if they wear a set of hideous-looking masks until midnight. They succeed in fulfilling this condition (and as it turns out, the old man dies at the very stroke of midnight), but the man gets the last laugh on them as it turns out that the masks have permanently disfigured their faces to make them more suitable for their personalities.



* In ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Cartmanland", Eric Cartman inherited his grandmother's money. She mentioned in her will that she left her money to him because she feared her other relatives would have spent it on crack. While he bought a failing amusement park so he could have it to himself, only to sell it back after unintentionally making it profitable again (he hated letting other kids in to pay for everything) then lost the rest of the money to back taxes and lawsuits. So yeah, the Cartman's aren't exactly the best gene pool.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Cartmanland", Eric Cartman inherited his grandmother's money. She mentioned in her will that she left her money to him because she feared her other relatives would have spent it on crack. While he bought a failing amusement park so he could have it to himself, only to sell it back after unintentionally making it profitable again (he hated letting other kids in to pay for everything) then lost the rest of the money to back taxes and lawsuits. So yeah, the Cartman's Cartmans aren't exactly the best gene pool.
17th May '16 4:30:59 AM WillBGood
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** This is the reason Samwell Tarly ends up joining the Night's Watch. His dad wants a warrior and a lord for a heir, and Sam is soft-hearted boy of some obesity. When, after a long series of miscarriages and daughters, a second male heir is produced, his dad offers him a choice: join the Night's Watch, thereby forsaking all claims to land and heirs, or experience a HuntingAccident.

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** This is the reason Samwell Tarly ends up joining the Night's Watch. His dad wants a warrior and a lord for a heir, and Sam is soft-hearted a soft-hearted, bookish boy of some obesity. When, after a long series of miscarriages and daughters, a second male heir is produced, his dad offers him a choice: join the Night's Watch, thereby forsaking all claims to land and heirs, or experience a HuntingAccident.
9th May '16 1:53:40 PM WanderingBrowser
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* [[ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse Scrooge McDuck]] eventually named Huey, Dewey and Louie as his heirs because (in part) the miser feared Donald would squander his fortune given the opportunity and considered Gladstone too lazy to deserve the inheritance. Not to mention Donald's (lack of) business skills.
** The decision has been made in CarlBarks story "Some Heir over the Rainbow". Taking advantage of the legend of a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow, Scrooge made a SecretTestOfCharacter. In order to test his potential heirs' skills, he wanted to give one thousand dollars to each one of them without them knowing the money came from him. Using three rainbows and three pots, he managed to give one thousand dollars to Huey, Dewey and Louie; another thousand to Gladstone and the last one to Donald. Donald spent the money on a down payment for a new car; Gladstone saw no immediate need for the money so he decided to hide it somewhere; and Huey, Dewey and Louie used their money to help a man search for a treasure. Before Donald's nephews had a return from their investment, Scrooge would, despite considering an "awful injustice" to allow Gladstone to inherit his fortune, choose the LuckyBastard over Donald for being the least likely to squander it.

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* Whether or not [[ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse Scrooge McDuck]] eventually named considers Donald Duck and Gladstone Gander to be this, thusly leaving his fortune to the triplets Huey, Dewey and Louie as his heirs because (in part) instead, is a case of DependingOnTheWriter. Although the miser feared usual paradigm is that this is the case, as Donald would is typically set up as too likely to squander his fortune given it and Gladstone's luck-dependant laziness offends Scrooge, some stories instead present Donald as the opportunity and considered Gladstone too lazy to deserve the inheritance. Not to mention Donald's (lack of) business skills.
heir, but one who desperately needs some training (at least in Scrooge's eyes).
** The decision has been to have the triplets be Scrooge's heir was made most prominently in the 1953 CarlBarks story "Some Heir over the Rainbow". Taking advantage of the legend of a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow, Scrooge made a SecretTestOfCharacter. In order to test his potential heirs' skills, he wanted to give one thousand dollars to each one of them without them knowing the money came from him. Using three rainbows and three pots, he managed to give one thousand dollars to Huey, Dewey and Louie; another thousand to Gladstone and the last one to Donald. Donald spent the money on a down payment for a new car; Gladstone saw no immediate need for the money so he decided to hide it somewhere; and Huey, Dewey and Louie used their money to help a man search for a treasure. Before Donald's nephews had a return from their investment, Scrooge would, despite considering an "awful injustice" to allow Gladstone to inherit his fortune, choose the LuckyBastard over Donald for being the least likely to squander it.it.
** However, Donald was earlier declared Scrooge's heir in the 1949 story, "Race to the South Seas". And three years after "Some Heir Over The Rainbow", in 1956's "Two is Company", Donald and Gladstone were again competing for the position of Scrooge's heir. And in the 1961 story, "Bongo on the Congo", the whole plot is Scrooge considering Donald his heir and trying to make him better fitted for the role.
** Also, Donald's inadequacy is as writer-dependent thing; in several stories, such as "City of Golden Roofs" and "Crocodile Collector", whilst Scrooge still "wins out" at the end, Donald still displays considerable business savvy. For example, in "City of Golden Roofs", although Scrooge wins by receiving a huge golden nugget, the sizable amount of worked golden goods and sculpted jewels Donald earned would probably have a greater value than Scrooge's huge nugget. And in "Crocodile Collector", Donald allows Scrooge to swindle him out of the $10 thousand he was promised so that he can secretly claim the far larger treasure he discovered whilst searching for Scrooge's special crocodile.
27th Mar '16 5:34:23 PM nombretomado
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* Drives most of the plot of ''DowntonAbbey''. On the death of his heir, on the ''Titanic'', the Earl of Grantham's estate is all set to pass to...a solicitor. Gasp. Of course, the real issue is that Grantham would much rather leave his estate to one of his actual children (but can't, because they're all girls) than to a distant relative he's never met, who could potentially throw his daughters out onto the streets with nothing when the time comes.

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* Drives most of the plot of ''DowntonAbbey''.''Series/DowntonAbbey''. On the death of his heir, on the ''Titanic'', the Earl of Grantham's estate is all set to pass to...a solicitor. Gasp. Of course, the real issue is that Grantham would much rather leave his estate to one of his actual children (but can't, because they're all girls) than to a distant relative he's never met, who could potentially throw his daughters out onto the streets with nothing when the time comes.
19th Mar '16 1:47:28 AM Hossmeister
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22nd Feb '16 10:50:38 AM PixelKnight
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* In the backstory of ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', Zepheniah Mann, seeing his sons [[MeaningfulName Blutarch and Redmond]] as idiotic and incompetent, gives them both half of his empire to squabble over (minus his company, Mann Co, which he gave to [[TestosteronePoisoning Saxton Hale]]'s (grand?)father). The two proceed to go to war with each other via an army of mercenaries, a war that lasted from 1850 to 1970.

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* In the backstory of ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'', Zepheniah Mann, seeing his sons [[MeaningfulName Blutarch and Redmond]] as idiotic and incompetent, gives them both half of his (worthless) empire to squabble over (minus his company, Mann Co, which he gave to [[TestosteronePoisoning Saxton Hale]]'s (grand?)father). The two proceed to go to war with each other via an army of mercenaries, a war that lasted from 1850 to 1970.
18th Jan '16 4:12:21 PM Willbyr
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* Shiki in ''{{Tsukihime}}'' is disinherited because he is extremely sick after an almost deadly accident, and even after recovering is still too bad as a result. [[spoiler:Also, he is not a real Tohno, only was fooled - and thus fooled the others - in believing to be. The real Tohno SHIKI was killed, and even after coming back to life he was too mentally unstable.]]
* In ''UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'', wealthy head of the Ushiromiya family Kinzo is dying. His heir, Krauss has made several bad investments and lost a lot of money. The second oldest, Eva, is intelligent and ambitious, but not very personable and is border line crazy. The third oldest, Rudolf, is just a womanizer. The youngest, Rosa has an illegitimate daughter. So what does he do to remedy the situation? Teach them to be better heirs? [[AbusiveParents No]]. [[spoiler:Because he's been dead for over a year before the series begins anyway. In [=EP7=], an AlternateTimeline shows who Kinzo ''would'' have considered his ideal inheritor: [[AmbiguousGender Lion]], the child of his [[ParentalIncest unholy union]] with his illegitimate daughter, who he gave to Krauss and Natsuhi to raise as their own.]]

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* Shiki in ''{{Tsukihime}}'' ''VisualNovel/{{Tsukihime}}'' is disinherited because he is extremely sick after an almost deadly accident, and even after recovering is still too bad as a result. [[spoiler:Also, he is not a real Tohno, only was fooled - and thus fooled the others - in believing to be. The real Tohno SHIKI was killed, and even after coming back to life he was too mentally unstable.]]
* In ''UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'', ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', wealthy head of the Ushiromiya family Kinzo is dying. His heir, Krauss has made several bad investments and lost a lot of money. The second oldest, Eva, is intelligent and ambitious, but not very personable and is border line crazy. The third oldest, Rudolf, is just a womanizer. The youngest, Rosa has an illegitimate daughter. So what does he do to remedy the situation? Teach them to be better heirs? [[AbusiveParents No]]. [[spoiler:Because he's been dead for over a year before the series begins anyway. In [=EP7=], an AlternateTimeline shows who Kinzo ''would'' have considered his ideal inheritor: [[AmbiguousGender Lion]], the child of his [[ParentalIncest unholy union]] with his illegitimate daughter, who he gave to Krauss and Natsuhi to raise as their own.]]
15th Jan '16 9:45:15 AM 0nyx
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** The Freakonomics podcast went into several cases of this trope in the business world, such as Busch Beer's financial troubles until it was eventually sold. Investors and companies seem to overvalue the "family line." Japanese culture has a strong tendency for the father to be succeeded by his son in the family business, with some families having run a particular business for dozens of generations. The Japanese would often adopt individuals (in the past, almost always men) into their family just to avert this trope if the son didn't seem worthy.

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** The Freakonomics podcast went into [[http://freakonomics.com/2011/08/03/new-freakonomics-radio-podcast-the-church-of-scionology/ several cases of this trope in the business world, world,]] such as Busch Beer's financial troubles until it was eventually sold. Investors and companies seem to overvalue the "family line." Japanese culture has a strong tendency for the father to be succeeded by his son in the family business, with some families having run a particular business for dozens of generations. The Japanese would often adopt individuals (in the past, almost always men) into their family just to avert this trope if the son didn't seem worthy.
19th Dec '15 10:24:48 PM nombretomado
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* Kate Blackwell struggles with finding a proper heir in SidneySheldon's ''Master of the Game''.

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* Kate Blackwell struggles with finding a proper heir in SidneySheldon's Creator/SidneySheldon's ''Master of the Game''.
8th Dec '15 1:09:22 PM Morgenthaler
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* King Henry in Shakespeare's ''HenryIV'' parts one and two believes his son Hal to be this, since instead of being a proper, honorable prince, Hal spends his time drinking, stealing and chasing skirts with the commonest of lowlifes. Henry eventually confronts his son about his behavior, and in the 2012 BBC production, Hal's rather flippant response [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51KWNvbDVA4 earns him a slap in the face]].

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* King Henry in Shakespeare's ''HenryIV'' ''Theatre/HenryIV'' parts one and two believes his son Hal to be this, since instead of being a proper, honorable prince, Hal spends his time drinking, stealing and chasing skirts with the commonest of lowlifes. Henry eventually confronts his son about his behavior, and in the 2012 BBC production, Hal's rather flippant response [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51KWNvbDVA4 earns him a slap in the face]].



* ''SaintsRow2'': Shogo Akuji leads the Ronin in Stilwater. He proves so inept at his job, though, that not only does his father has to fly in from Japan to take the reigns, but he ends up favoring Shogo's [[TheDragon lieutenant]] over him.

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* ''SaintsRow2'': ''VideoGame/SaintsRow2'': Shogo Akuji leads the Ronin in Stilwater. He proves so inept at his job, though, that not only does his father has to fly in from Japan to take the reigns, but he ends up favoring Shogo's [[TheDragon lieutenant]] over him.



* This is the backstory to TheElderScrollsTwoDaggerfall, and through it, most of the setting -- the intro narration even begins by reciting how "The unworthy heirs of the Septim Dynasty have allowed the bonds of the Empire to weaken and crack..."

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* This is the backstory to TheElderScrollsTwoDaggerfall, ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsTwoDaggerfall'', and through it, most of the setting -- the intro narration even begins by reciting how "The unworthy heirs of the Septim Dynasty have allowed the bonds of the Empire to weaken and crack..."
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