History Main / InUniverseGameClock

21st Feb '18 4:20:13 PM treehugger0369
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* ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' will always start in the daytime or nighttime, respectively, regardless of the time of your system clock. The next plot event will always take place at sundown. Story-wise, it's not until the third day that the in-game time correlates to that of your system clock. This extends to ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'' as well. In addition, in the former games, when you [[spoiler: go to summon the cover legendary]], if it's nighttime in ''Sun'' or daytime in ''Moon'', the game will skip to day or night, respectively, and will return to normal once that plot event is over.
21st Feb '18 4:14:02 PM treehugger0369
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* ''VideoGame/PlagueInc'' uses a variant of this, as it goes by dates, rather than time of day. Most runs start the date your system calendar says it is and advances at a rate of one in-game day per real life second(at the slowest speed). This is also the default for custom scenarios, but creators can change this as they wish if they're doing a scenario with a plot that takes place in a specific time period.
13th Feb '18 2:56:17 AM Cryoclaste
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* In the first two ''WayOfTheSamurai'' games, time ''does'' pass whether you're following the plot or not. However, time passes only while traveling, so it's possible to TakeYourTime if you don't leave the current area you're in. In the second game, you have an entire month to spend exploring Amahara, and can ''still'' spend the whole time collecting swords and staying out of the plot. However, the third game appears to follow this trope more traditionally, letting you TakeYourTime a bit more.

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* In the first two ''WayOfTheSamurai'' ''VideoGame/WayOfTheSamurai'' games, time ''does'' pass whether you're following the plot or not. However, time passes only while traveling, so it's possible to TakeYourTime if you don't leave the current area you're in. In the second game, you have an entire month to spend exploring Amahara, and can ''still'' spend the whole time collecting swords and staying out of the plot. However, the third game appears to follow this trope more traditionally, letting you TakeYourTime a bit more.
30th Jan '18 3:46:57 PM Nyansu
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An in-universe game clock is a feature found in some video games, where the time of day actually changes in the game's world rather than remain static. As the player loiters around the sun may set and it becomes nighttime within the area they are visiting. Depending on the game, this can either be an attempt at realism or a way to introduce other gameplay features (including {{Non Player Character}}s being located in [[NPCScheduling different locations]] depending on the time of day, abilities or items that work better in sunlight or the dark, and even creatures or monsters that only appear at certain times of the day. The result is one or more of the following:

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An in-universe game clock is a feature found in some video games, where the time of day actually changes in the game's world rather than remain static. As the player loiters around the sun may set and it becomes nighttime within the area they are visiting. Depending on the game, this can either be an attempt at realism or a way to introduce other gameplay features (including {{Non Player Character}}s being located in [[NPCScheduling different locations]] depending on the time of day, day), abilities or items that work better in sunlight or the dark, and even creatures or monsters that only appear at certain times of the day. The result is one or more of the following:
11th Jan '18 11:03:33 AM BeerBaron
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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' has 1 minute in-game equal to 2 real-world seconds. As time passes, it gets dark, eventually shops close, and so on. There ''are'' cheat codes built into the game, interestingly, that allow you to change this ratio. Ever wanted to recreate the scene in ''Film/{{The Time Machine|2002}}'' (or, for you younger players, ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'') where the days and nights move so swiftly that everything becomes a blur? Set the ratio to ''Decade''-Per-Real-World-Seconds. All the main ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games since at least ''Daggerfall'', and especially ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' where most quests were timed to some extent, have been heavily reliant on in-universe calendars and clocks to determine night/day cycles.
* The ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series uses six seconds of real time to equal one minute (which, conveniently enough, is the length of a combat round in ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Advanced Dungeons and Dragons]]''), and extrapolates outward from there. Many locations and people would remain available 24/7, but there were definite exceptions; also, certain RandomEncounters were exclusive to day or night. In contrast to this, many scripted events in the second game would appear a specific amount of ''real'' playtime after the previous in the sequence. One could cheat the system a little by pausing the game and leaving it alone for an hour, then unpausing it to see if the next event had triggered.

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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'': The series has 1 minute in-game equal to 2 real-world seconds. As time passes, it gets dark, eventually shops close, and so on. There ''are'' cheat codes built into the game, interestingly, that allow you to change this ratio. Ever wanted to recreate the scene in ''Film/{{The Time Machine|2002}}'' (or, for you younger players, ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'') where the days and nights move so swiftly that everything becomes a blur? Set the ratio to ''Decade''-Per-Real-World-Seconds. All the main ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games had an internal clock since at least ''Daggerfall'', and especially ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' where Daggerfall]]'', which is also the game with the most quests were that are timed to some extent, extent (including one of the first missions of the ''main quest'', though you at least get several warnings before the time runs out). ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' both have been heavily reliant on in-universe calendars and clocks to determine night/day cycles.
* The ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series uses six seconds of
default time scales where 1 in-game hour equals 2 real-world minutes. (Essentially, an in-game day lasts 48 real time to equal one minute (which, conveniently enough, is life minutes.) ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' changes it so that 1 in-game hour equals 3 real-world minutes (meaning an in-game day lasts 72 real life minutes). In each case, the length of a combat round in ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Advanced Dungeons games have [[FastForwardMechanic Wait and Dragons]]''), and extrapolates outward from there. Many locations and people would remain available 24/7, but there were definite exceptions; also, certain RandomEncounters were exclusive Rest mechanics]] which allow you to day or night. In contrast to this, many scripted events in the second game would appear a specific amount of ''real'' playtime after the previous in the sequence. One could cheat the system a little by pausing fast forward the game and leaving it alone for an hour, then unpausing it to see if the next event had triggered.time. ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsOnline'' bumps this up even further, making 1 in-game hour equal 3.5 real-world minutes.
11th Jan '18 12:47:34 AM KBABZ
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* As noted in the folder below, ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' got this variant after a patch, in addition to the options for having the day/night cycle move on its own over user-defined periods of time.



* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' uses a clock system that is normally compressed. However, there is a menu option to lock it to day, lock it to night, or sync it to real-world time. This has the added use of giving the player the choice of when he wants to do specific day/night events. The player can also alter the time it takes for 24 in-game hours to pass, ranging from 24 minutes to 2 hours.

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* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' averted this at launch and was in a perpetual afternoon. After a patch however, it uses this Day/Night cycle by default, using a clock system that is normally compressed. However, there compresses 24 hours to 24 minutes (although it can also be altered to take up to two hours to pass). There is also a menu option to lock it to specific times of the day, lock it to night, or sync it to real-world time. This which has the added use of giving the player the choice of when he wants to do specific day/night events. The player can or sync it to real-world time. There's also alter the time option synch it takes for 24 in-game hours to pass, ranging from 24 minutes to 2 hours.the system's internal clock, meaning it fits the previous version of the trope as well!


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** The 24-minute day/night cycle gets a [[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] ''[[JakIIRenegade Jak II]]''. After completing a specific Mission, Krew says it's time for his beauty nap, to which Daxter replies that there aren't enough hours in the day.


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* All of the ''{{VideoGame/Infamous}}'' games utilize this version of the trope combined with pre-defined weather, both of which advance after certain story events, such as waiting for Bertrand to show up to a rally in the second game. The effect is that the time of day and weather will almost always suit the nature of the plot and tone of the Missions. For example, the beginning of ''VideoGame/InfamousSecondSon'' will be sunny and optimistic, while the end will be either very cloudy or at night to suit the dramatic finale.
9th Jan '18 10:35:14 PM Sabrewing
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-->-- '''One of the first messages''' you receive in the graphic adventure game ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transylvania_(series) Transylvania]]''. [[NonStandardGameOver They are NOT kidding.]]

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-->-- '''One of the first messages''' you receive in the graphic adventure game ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transylvania_(series) Transylvania]]''.''VideoGame/{{Transylvania}}''. [[NonStandardGameOver They are NOT kidding.]]
25th Dec '17 8:20:44 PM superkeijikun
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* Many games in the ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series use an in-game clock based on phases of the moon. The phase changes as players move through the game world and dungeons, and the current phase has an effect on demons; in general, monsters are more docile during a new moon and are more amenable to negotiations, while a full moon makes monsters more aggressive and deaf to reason. The phase of the moon can also have an effect on the results of fusing demons together.
8th Dec '17 2:32:23 AM TheKaizerreich
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* ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' - Kevin, being a werewolf, transforms and becomes much stronger at night; magic may also vary in effectiveness depending on the day of the week, but it's not too obvious; most stores are closed at night, and the inn offers free stays on Holy Mana Day.

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* ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' - Kevin, being a werewolf, transforms and becomes much stronger at night; magic may also vary in effectiveness depending on the day of the week, but it's not too obvious; most stores are closed at night, night (except the Black Market, which is ''only'' open at night), and the inn offers free stays on Holy Mana Day.



* ''VideoGame/{{Earth 2150}}''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Earth 2150}}''.2150}}'' has a day-night cycle with realistic lighting sequences, in addition to several weather effects and all this implies: ambient temperature is different depending on time of day (very slighty affects laser weapons, which heat units until they explode due to ammo/fuel catching fire), fog appears when it's cold, it snows when it's even colder, units and buildings have lights that can be permanently on (grants vision at night, but makes targeting them much easier as well; stealth devices of units with lights on also don't work because light itself simply can't be stealthed), permanently off (the opposite) or automatic (on during night, off during day), and various missions will consequently be easier during day or night, depending on the set-up.
7th Dec '17 1:38:43 PM xenol
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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' also has an in-game clock with one day being 70 minutes. The only thing this affects are what kinds of fish you can get and some side quests. Any time the plot requires it to be day or night, the change is only visible for that quest/instance.
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