History Main / InThePastEveryoneWillBeFamous

27th Nov '17 10:55:04 PM DustSnitch
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* Everyone in the afterlife of ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' is either a well-known historical figure or someone who would be familiar to Dante's readers. It gets a {{justifi|edTrope}}cation as Dante's guides point out these exemplary figures, or Dante himself recognizes them. They also usually have more important places in Heaven or more picturesque punishments in Hell. There are some exceptions, though; the hoarders and spenders, for instance, are so featureless that they can barely be distinguished from each other, and Dante does pause to talk with a nameless Florentine suicide.
29th Oct '17 12:41:48 PM nombretomado
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** The ancestor variant shows up when Sam leaps into his own great-grandfather, a Union general near the end of the Civil War. At the end of the episode, he talks with a newly freed slave who declares that, since being emancipated has made him feel like royalty, he will be taking the surname King. [[CivilRightsMovement You can probably guess where this one's headed...]]

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** The ancestor variant shows up when Sam leaps into his own great-grandfather, a Union general near the end of the Civil War. At the end of the episode, he talks with a newly freed slave who declares that, since being emancipated has made him feel like royalty, he will be taking the surname King. [[CivilRightsMovement [[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement You can probably guess where this one's headed...]]
5th Oct '17 6:58:38 AM Lloigor
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Note that this only counts if you're not specifically aiming for the famous person. For example, ''Film/BillAndTed'' don't count because A: they were actually ''trying'' to find UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan and Sigmund "Frood," and B: they had the help of a magic phone directory to find them. Though, even then, other well-known personages from the same period may crop up unexpectedly (UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte ended up piggybacking with them by mistake, for instance).

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Note that this only counts if you're not specifically aiming for the famous person. For example, ''Film/BillAndTed'' don't count because A: they were actually ''trying'' to find UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan and Sigmund "Frood," "Frood", and B: they had the help of a magic phone directory to find them. Though, even then, other well-known personages from the same period may crop up unexpectedly (UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte ended up piggybacking with them by mistake, for instance).
3rd Oct '17 8:39:47 AM RallyBot2
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* One ''ComicBook/XMen'' miniseries had Kitty Pryde and Rachel Summers thrown back in time to 1936, where Kitty befriends a little girl named Lilibet, who turns out to be the future [[spoiler:Queen Elizabeth]].

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* One ''ComicBook/XMen'' ''ComicBook/XMen: True Friends'', a miniseries in 1999, had Kitty Pryde and Rachel Summers thrown back in time to 1936, where Kitty befriends a little girl named Lilibet, who turns out to be the future [[spoiler:Queen Elizabeth]].
2nd Oct '17 1:24:42 PM Epicazeroth
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* In January 1913, Vienna's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caf%C3%A9_Central Café Central]] was patronized by UsefulNotes/JosipBrozTito, UsefulNotes/SigmundFreud, UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler, UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin and UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky (the last two as regulars). Of these, only Freud had done by then [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian the thing]] for which he is famous today.

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* In January 1913, Vienna's [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caf%C3%A9_Central Café Central]] was patronized by UsefulNotes/JosipBrozTito, UsefulNotes/SigmundFreud, UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler, UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin and UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky (the last two as regulars). Of these, only Freud had done by then [[AllPsychologyIsFreudian the thing]] for which he is famous today. The list of other famous (but not as famous) patrons is too long to reasonably fit here.
16th Sep '17 3:47:50 PM nombretomado
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** The [[VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII sequel]], set in [[TheRenaissance Renaissance Italy]], features Creator/LeonardoDaVinci as a frequent ally, repairing your assassin tech and decoding messages from your ancestor. Ezio rubs shoulders with the likes of Lorenzo de Medici, Caterina Sforza and Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli! [[spoiler:And the final boss is Pope Alexander VI.]]

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** The [[VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII sequel]], set in [[TheRenaissance [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance Renaissance Italy]], features Creator/LeonardoDaVinci as a frequent ally, repairing your assassin tech and decoding messages from your ancestor. Ezio rubs shoulders with the likes of Lorenzo de Medici, Caterina Sforza and Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli! [[spoiler:And the final boss is Pope Alexander VI.]]
1st Jul '17 4:45:33 PM nombretomado
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* The ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' series features a degree of the historical fiction version, with the heroes bumping into such famous historical personages as Kawashima Yoshiko (As a note, the little girl in the second game is supposed to be the historical one -- the one in the first game is a wholly fictional character, who, according to the series, is the namesake of the real one), UsefulNotes/AlCapone, Creator/HPLovecraft, and the Great Gama (yes, he was a real person - ask TheOtherWiki). Party members over the series include UsefulNotes/MataHari (under her actual name, Margarete) and Princess Anastasia Romanov.

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* The ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' series features a degree of the historical fiction version, with the heroes bumping into such famous historical personages as Kawashima Yoshiko (As a note, the little girl in the second game is supposed to be the historical one -- the one in the first game is a wholly fictional character, who, according to the series, is the namesake of the real one), UsefulNotes/AlCapone, Creator/HPLovecraft, and the Great Gama (yes, he was a real person - ask TheOtherWiki).Wiki/TheOtherWiki). Party members over the series include UsefulNotes/MataHari (under her actual name, Margarete) and Princess Anastasia Romanov.
23rd Jun '17 3:00:49 PM jormis29
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* M.J. Trow's ''Lestrade'' novels are full of historic characters. Given the premise (a {{Deconstruction}} of Literature/SherlockHolmes using the LiteraryAgentHypothesis but telling the "true story" behind Watson's accounts) Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle is justified. Having Lestrade point at a baby and tell Watson he'd make a better Holmes than William Gillette, before revealing this is the infant Basil Rathbone, somewhat less so. Then there's Creator/OscarWilde, Creator/GilbertAndSullivan, UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper, Florence Nightingale...

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* M.J. Trow's ''Lestrade'' novels are full of historic characters. Given the premise (a {{Deconstruction}} of Literature/SherlockHolmes using the LiteraryAgentHypothesis but telling the "true story" behind Watson's accounts) Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle is justified. Having Lestrade point at a baby and tell Watson he'd make a better Holmes than William Gillette, before revealing this is the infant Basil Rathbone, Creator/BasilRathbone, somewhat less so. Then there's Creator/OscarWilde, Creator/GilbertAndSullivan, UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper, Florence Nightingale...
13th Mar '17 12:50:16 AM AthenaBlue
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** In the classic series: The Doctor [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E8TheGunfighters standing in for Doc Holliday in the OK Corral]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E4TheRomans meeting Nero and giving him the idea of burning down Rome]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E4MarcoPolo riding with]] Creator/MarcoPolo, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E6TheCrusades meeting]] King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart... We don't see him, but Creator/LeonardoDaVinci was a good friend of the Doctor, and H.G. Wells got his idea for the term "Science Fiction" from the Doctor - all in the classic series.

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** In the classic series: The Doctor [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E8TheGunfighters standing in for Doc Holliday in the OK Corral]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E4TheRomans meeting Nero and giving him the idea of burning down Rome]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E4MarcoPolo riding with]] Creator/MarcoPolo, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E6TheCrusades [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E6TheCrusade meeting]] King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart... We don't see him, but Creator/LeonardoDaVinci was a good friend of the Doctor, and H.G. Wells got his idea for the term "Science Fiction" from the Doctor - all in the classic series.
13th Mar '17 12:49:16 AM AthenaBlue
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* The new series of ''Series/DoctorWho'' has done this quite a bit, with Charles Dickens fighting off an alien invasion in "The Unquiet Dead", werewolves trying [[TheVirus to infect]] Queen Victoria in "Tooth and Claw", Madame de Pompadour falling in love with the Doctor in "The Girl in the Fireplace", Creator/WilliamShakespeare battling alien witches "The Shakespeare Code" and Creator/AgathaChristie solving a murder mystery with the Doctor along with a giant alien wasp, in "The Unicorn and the Wasp".
** Also, earlier Doctors have done the same thing. The Doctor standing in for Doc Holliday in the OK Corral, meeting Nero and giving him the idea of burning down Rome, riding with Creator/MarcoPolo, meeting King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart... We don't see him, but Creator/LeonardoDaVinci was a good friend of the Doctor, and H.G. Wells got his idea for the term "Science Fiction" from the Doctor - all in the classic series.

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* Played with in an episode of ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'', where Endora threatens Samantha that she'll tell Darrin about her relationship with Sir Walter Raleigh if she doesn't comply. Samantha protests that she never even ''met'' Sir Walter Raleigh, but Endora reminds her that Darrin wouldn't know that.
* This is the driving premise behind the ''Series/{{Blackadder}}: Back and Forth'' special.
The new series time machine used by the characters (which had been invented by accident thanks to Baldrick having a GeniusDitz moment) was somehow "attuned" to the frequencies of Lord Blackadder's ancestors -- who just so happened to be big historical players in the eras they visited.
** As the show creators themselves have noticed, Blackadder's intelligence seems to rise as his fortunes fall. The Blackadder in Rome is scarcely above a grunt. However, the trope is affirmed and indeed parodied when you take into account the amount of times those same people are hanging around Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie....
*
''Series/DoctorWho'' has done does this quite a bit, with Charles Dickens fighting off an alien invasion in "The Unquiet Dead", werewolves trying [[TheVirus to infect]] Queen Victoria in "Tooth and Claw", Madame de Pompadour falling in love with fairly frequently.
** In
the Doctor in "The Girl in the Fireplace", Creator/WilliamShakespeare battling alien witches "The Shakespeare Code" and Creator/AgathaChristie solving a murder mystery with the Doctor along with a giant alien wasp, in "The Unicorn and the Wasp".
** Also, earlier Doctors have done the same thing.
classic series: The Doctor [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E8TheGunfighters standing in for Doc Holliday in the OK Corral, Corral]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E4TheRomans meeting Nero and giving him the idea of burning down Rome, Rome]], [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E4MarcoPolo riding with with]] Creator/MarcoPolo, meeting [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E6TheCrusades meeting]] King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart... We don't see him, but Creator/LeonardoDaVinci was a good friend of the Doctor, and H.G. Wells got his idea for the term "Science Fiction" from the Doctor - all in the classic series.series.
** In the new series: Charles Dickens fighting off an alien invasion in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead "The Unquiet Dead"]], a werewolf trying [[TheVirus to infect]] Queen Victoria in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw "Tooth and Claw"]], Madame de Pompadour falling in love with the Doctor in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]], Creator/WilliamShakespeare battling alien witches in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] and Creator/AgathaChristie solving a murder mystery with the Doctor involving a giant alien wasp in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E7TheUnicornAndTheWasp "The Unicorn and the Wasp"]].



** This works not just with people who are famous in our time, but also people who will be famous in the future. When the Doctor decides to go to Mars, he arrives just in time to meet the first humans to establish a colony on the planet.

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** Creator/RobertHolmes, the legendary scriptwriter on the classic series, hated historical episodes for this reason. When he was forced to write a story set in medieval Europe, he agreed on the condition that no historical personages appear. What resulted was [[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E1TheTimeWarrior "The Time Warrior"]], a notable aversion of this trope.
** This works not just with people who are famous in our time, but also people who will be famous in the future. When the Doctor decides to go to Mars, he [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E16TheWatersOfMars arrives just in time to meet the first humans to establish a colony base on the planet.planet]].
* Happens fairly frequently in ''Series/ForeverKnight'', mainly because the characters have been around for so long. In one episode, Nick encounters UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc; in another, Lacroix contemplates turning a young German soldier into a vampire, but decides the man has too much darkness in his soul (you can probably guess who he [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler turns out to be]]).
* In ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', Hiro Nakamura, through an accidental use of his powers, winds up several centuries in the past -- and immediately runs smack dab into the legendary warrior Takezo Kensei. [[spoiler:Also known as Adam Monroe, who became one of the biggest villains in the series [[StableTimeLoop due to Hiro's actions.]] ]]
* The "Soldier's Heart" episode of ''Series/NewAmsterdam'' contains a particularly glaring example of this. Throughout the episode, the 400-year-old main character John Amsterdam flashes back to an incident that happened when he was an army surgeon in the American Civil War, and a patient whose leg he had to amputate took drastic and violent action. The understanding Amsterdam gained of the "soldier's heart", which he discusses with his orderly Walt, helps him understand the current-day mystery he faces concerning psychologically troubled veterans. None of this has anything to do with what happens in the episode's last flashback, where Walt out of nowhere tells John "I want to give you a copy of this book I wrote" and hands him a book whose title page reads ''Literature/LeavesOfGrass'', revealing "Walt" to be famous poet Creator/WaltWhitman.
* ''Mostly'' averted in ''Series/QuantumLeap'', where the majority of the characters Sam becomes are ordinary people -- but he ''does'' run into Music/BuddyHolly, a young Music/MichaelJackson, Creator/SylvesterStallone, UsefulNotes/BillClinton, and a teenage Creator/StephenKing, who decides to become a horror writer thanks to him. He also became Lee Harvey Oswald, Music/ElvisPresley and Dr. Ruth in other episodes.
** And Creator/MarilynMonroe. Most of the celebrity encounters happened in the last season when they were doing everything they could to boost ratings.
** The ancestor variant shows up when Sam leaps into his own great-grandfather, a Union general near the end of the Civil War. At the end of the episode, he talks with a newly freed slave who declares that, since being emancipated has made him feel like royalty, he will be taking the surname King. [[CivilRightsMovement You can probably guess where this one's headed...]]



* This is the driving premise behind the ''Series/{{Blackadder}}: Back and Forth'' special. The time machine used by the characters (which had been invented by accident thanks to Baldrick having a GeniusDitz moment) was somehow "attuned" to the frequencies of Lord Blackadder's ancestors -- who just so happened to be big historical players in the eras they visited.
** As the show creators themselves have noticed, Blackadder's intelligence seems to rise as his fortunes fall. The Blackadder in Rome is scarcely above a grunt. However, the trope is affirmed and indeed parodied when you take into account the amount of times those same people are hanging around Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie....
* The "Soldier's Heart" episode of ''Series/NewAmsterdam'' contains a particularly glaring example of this. Throughout the episode, the 400-year-old main character John Amsterdam flashes back to an incident that happened when he was an army surgeon in the American Civil War, and a patient whose leg he had to amputate took drastic and violent action. The understanding Amsterdam gained of the "soldier's heart", which he discusses with his orderly Walt, helps him understand the current-day mystery he faces concerning psychologically troubled veterans. None of this has anything to do with what happens in the episode's last flashback, where Walt out of nowhere tells John "I want to give you a copy of this book I wrote" and hands him a book whose title page reads ''Literature/LeavesOfGrass'', revealing "Walt" to be famous poet Creator/WaltWhitman.

to:

* This is Also the driving entire premise behind of ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''.
* Pretty much
the ''Series/{{Blackadder}}: Back and Forth'' special. The time machine used by the characters (which had been invented by accident thanks to Baldrick having a GeniusDitz moment) was somehow "attuned" to the frequencies entire premise of Lord Blackadder's ancestors -- who just so happened to be big historical players in the eras they visited.
** As the show creators themselves have noticed, Blackadder's intelligence seems to rise as his fortunes fall. The Blackadder in Rome is scarcely above a grunt. However, the trope is affirmed and indeed parodied when you take into account the amount of times those same people are hanging around Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie....
* The "Soldier's Heart" episode of ''Series/NewAmsterdam'' contains a particularly glaring example of this. Throughout the episode, the 400-year-old main character John Amsterdam flashes back to an incident that happened when he was an army surgeon in the American Civil War, and a patient whose leg he had to amputate took drastic and violent action. The understanding Amsterdam gained of the "soldier's heart", which he discusses with his orderly Walt, helps him understand the current-day mystery he faces concerning psychologically troubled veterans. None of this has anything to do with what happens in the episode's last flashback, where Walt out of nowhere tells John "I want to give you a copy of this book I wrote" and hands him a book whose title page reads ''Literature/LeavesOfGrass'', revealing "Walt" to be famous poet Creator/WaltWhitman.
''Series/{{Voyagers}}''.



* ''Mostly'' averted in ''Series/QuantumLeap'', where the majority of the characters Sam becomes are ordinary people -- but he ''does'' run into Music/BuddyHolly, a young Music/MichaelJackson, Creator/SylvesterStallone, UsefulNotes/BillClinton, and a teenage Creator/StephenKing, who decides to become a horror writer thanks to him. He also became Lee Harvey Oswald, Music/ElvisPresley and Dr. Ruth in other episodes.
** And Creator/MarilynMonroe. Most of the celebrity encounters happened in the last season when they were doing everything they could to boost ratings.
** The ancestor variant shows up when Sam leaps into his own great-grandfather, a Union general near the end of the Civil War. At the end of the episode, he talks with a newly freed slave who declares that, since being emancipated has made him feel like royalty, he will be taking the surname King. [[CivilRightsMovement You can probably guess where this one's headed...]]
* Played with in an episode of ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'', where Endora threatens Samantha that she'll tell Darrin about her relationship with Sir Walter Raleigh if she doesn't comply. Samantha protests that she never even ''met'' Sir Walter Raleigh, but Endora reminds her that Darrin wouldn't know that.
* Pretty much the entire premise of ''Series/{{Voyagers}}''.
* Also the entire premise of ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''.
* Happens fairly frequently in ''Series/ForeverKnight'', mainly because the characters have been around for so long. In one episode, Nick encounters UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc; in another, Lacroix contemplates turning a young German soldier into a vampire, but decides the man has too much darkness in his soul (you can probably guess who he [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler turns out to be]]).
* Creator/RobertHolmes, the legendary scriptwriter on the original Series/DoctorWho hated historical episodes for this reason. When he was forced to write a story set in medieval Europe, he agreed on the condition that no historical personages appear. What resulted was [[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E1TheTimeWarrior The Time Warrior]], a notable aversion of this trope.
* In ''Series/{{Heroes}}'', Hiro Nakamura, through an accidental use of his powers, winds up several centuries in the past -- and immediately runs smack dab into the legendary warrior Takezo Kensei. [[spoiler:Also known as Adam Monroe, who became one of the biggest villains in the series [[StableTimeLoop due to Hiro's actions.]] ]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InThePastEveryoneWillBeFamous