History Main / InTheOriginalKlingon

30th Jul '16 9:38:07 AM JackG
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* In a US government [[PublicServiceAnnouncement informational]] film [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum after the DayOfTheJackboot and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.

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* In a US government [[PublicServiceAnnouncement informational]] film InstructionalFilm [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum after the DayOfTheJackboot and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.
30th Jul '16 9:37:22 AM JackG
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* In a US government [[PublicServiceAnnouncement informational]] film [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum after the DayOfTheJackboot and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.



* In a US government informational film [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.

to:

* In a US government informational film [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.
30th Jul '16 9:34:58 AM JackG
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Added DiffLines:

* In a US government informational film [[RedScare warning of the dangers of communism]], a man takes his son to the museum and is shocked to find that all the American inventions are now credited to the Russians.
31st May '16 8:35:31 AM Doug86
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* "Shakespeare in the original German" goes back at least to 1941, when it was used in Leslie Howard's ''Film/PimpernelSmith'' ("But you must at least admit that the English translation is marvellous!") It was, of course, a parody of the idea, dating back at least to WWI, that Shakespeare was racially "Aryan," even if not an actual German himself. Similar claims were made for Michelangelo and Leonardo. (No, not the turtles.[[note]]They're Russian[[/note]]) [[note]]It should be noted, many German speakers who know ''perfectly well'' that Shakespeare is quintessentially English and have no truck with Nazi racial theory ''still'' think German translation improves Shakespeare. The dubious theory has it that German is simply the better-suited language in which to express his ideas. It also had to do with the fact that for a time in the 19th century German appreciation of Shakespeare was at least as great if not greater than the one in Britain. As G. B. Shaw recalls, before WorldWarOne there was an effort in Britain to found a national theatre in honour of the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth, for the financing of which he himself wrote a play, ''The Dark Lady of the Sonnets'': "After some years of effort the result was a single handsome contribution from a German gentleman."[[/note]]

to:

* "Shakespeare in the original German" goes back at least to 1941, when it was used in Leslie Howard's ''Film/PimpernelSmith'' ("But you must at least admit that the English translation is marvellous!") It was, of course, a parody of the idea, dating back at least to WWI, that Shakespeare was racially "Aryan," even if not an actual German himself. Similar claims were made for Michelangelo and Leonardo. (No, not the turtles.[[note]]They're Russian[[/note]]) [[note]]It should be noted, many German speakers who know ''perfectly well'' that Shakespeare is quintessentially English and have no truck with Nazi racial theory ''still'' think German translation improves Shakespeare. The dubious theory has it that German is simply the better-suited language in which to express his ideas. It also had to do with the fact that for a time in the 19th century German appreciation of Shakespeare was at least as great if not greater than the one in Britain. As G. B. Shaw recalls, before WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI there was an effort in Britain to found a national theatre in honour of the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth, for the financing of which he himself wrote a play, ''The Dark Lady of the Sonnets'': "After some years of effort the result was a single handsome contribution from a German gentleman."[[/note]]



** Not that America has always had a monopoly on this. A bit before WorldWarI, a Hungarian woman in the Austrian-law part of Austria-Hungary was on trial for [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotHeinous teaching her kids Hungarian]] (German was the official in the Austrian-law parts and Hungarian in the Hungarian-law parts, with other languages being frowned-upon in both). [[CriticalResearchFailure The German judges at one point asked her what language she thought Jesus spoke in, clearly expecting 'German' as the answer. The woman naturally said Hungarian.]]

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** Not that America has always had a monopoly on this. A bit before WorldWarI, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, a Hungarian woman in the Austrian-law part of Austria-Hungary was on trial for [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotHeinous teaching her kids Hungarian]] (German was the official in the Austrian-law parts and Hungarian in the Hungarian-law parts, with other languages being frowned-upon in both). [[CriticalResearchFailure The German judges at one point asked her what language she thought Jesus spoke in, clearly expecting 'German' as the answer. The woman naturally said Hungarian.]]
19th Mar '16 12:25:27 PM nombretomado
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** In ''TheBigBangTheory'', Raj Koothrapali echoes this character when he maintains Sherlock Holmes is really Indian and Arthur Conan-Doyle merely copied an Indian literary character, a polymath intellectual who solved crimes for a hobby.

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** In ''TheBigBangTheory'', ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', Raj Koothrapali echoes this character when he maintains Sherlock Holmes is really Indian and Arthur Conan-Doyle merely copied an Indian literary character, a polymath intellectual who solved crimes for a hobby.
2nd Dec '15 2:23:44 PM Totema
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** Another ''DS9'' example: In the episode "Tacking into the Wind", Worf quotes, "Great men do not seek power; they have power thrust upon them." - which sounds like a reference to ''Theatre/TwelfthNight'', but is actually attributed to the Klingon mytho-historical emperor Kahless, predating the Bard by some 700 years.

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** Another ''DS9'' ''[=DS9=]'' example: In the episode "Tacking into the Wind", Worf quotes, "Great men do not seek power; they have power thrust upon them." - which sounds like a reference to ''Theatre/TwelfthNight'', but is actually attributed to the Klingon mytho-historical emperor Kahless, predating the Bard by some 700 years.
2nd Dec '15 2:23:19 PM Totema
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Added DiffLines:

** Another ''DS9'' example: In the episode "Tacking into the Wind", Worf quotes, "Great men do not seek power; they have power thrust upon them." - which sounds like a reference to ''Theatre/TwelfthNight'', but is actually attributed to the Klingon mytho-historical emperor Kahless, predating the Bard by some 700 years.
1st Dec '15 4:13:08 PM nombretomado
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** Similarly, in a few episodes of ''GarfieldandFriends'' Garfield reveals that a cat was responsible for the world's greatest discoveries like the movie camera, the airplane, and of course [[TradeMarkFavoriteFood lasagna]].

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** Similarly, in a few episodes of ''GarfieldandFriends'' ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldandFriends'' Garfield reveals that a cat was responsible for the world's greatest discoveries like the movie camera, the airplane, and of course [[TradeMarkFavoriteFood lasagna]].
4th Nov '15 10:16:21 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* Many Japanese believe that "Auld Lang Syne" is an ancient Japanese folk tune with no connection to Robert Burns, Scotland, etc.



* Many Japanese believe that "Auld Lang Syne" is an ancient Japanese folk tune with no connection to Robert Burns, Scotland, etc.

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* Many Japanese believe that "Auld Lang Syne" is an ancient Japanese folk tune with no connection to Robert Burns, Scotland, etc.
1st Nov '15 8:07:46 PM JRDelta
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to:

* Many Japanese believe that "Auld Lang Syne" is an ancient Japanese folk tune with no connection to Robert Burns, Scotland, etc.
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