History Main / InSpiteOfANail

19th Mar '17 11:42:57 AM WeirdBeard
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**Played straight in that all the characters still have the same cutie marks anyways. Also, each time back to the present, only one villain is shown to be in power, with no VillainTeamUp.
14th Mar '17 10:52:07 PM klom99
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** Speaking of Power Rangers, the finale to season 2 of ''Power Rangers Dino Charge'' involved the Rangers travelling back to the pre-historic era to defeat Sledge and his shipmates. The result of this involved next to no change in the future Earth aside from the teeny-tiny tidbit of ''Dinosaurs never having gone extinct and co-existing with Humans''. Unless ''Ninja Steel'' addresses it somehow, this turns the entire PR continuity ([[AlternateUniverse sans RPM]]) into one big ContinuitySnarl.
13th Mar '17 9:53:16 AM AthenaBlue
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* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "The Parallel", an astronaut returns to an alternate Earth where his family and superiors are identical, but he himself has a higher military rank and the ''President'' is different.
* Numerous episodes of ''{{Series/Sliders}}'', especially the one where everything was exactly the same except that women had moustaches, and the one where the sky was purple but things were much the same until the RobotWar.
* In ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'''s "Mirror, Mirror", Kirk visits an AlternateUniverse where the Federation of Planets is a repressive interstellar empire -- but there's still a starship Enterprise, and it has mostly the same crew (although not all of them perform the same functions). Specifically for ''Mirror, Mirror'' there is a partial explanation in that the mechanism of transfer could only happen between realities in which the same (parallel) people were doing the same thing at the same time.
** Likewise for the sequels in the various spin-off series. This is despite the characters from the "original" universe causing changes that kill off or radically change various of their counterparts; the AlternateUniverse is still directly alternate.
** The ''TNG'' ExpandedUniverse novel ''Dark Mirror'' treads similar ground; there's still an ''Enterprise''-D, with most of the same crew in most of the same roles, except that Worf is a galley slave and Wesley Crusher is a ''total badass'' who attempts to [[KlingonPromotion kill Picard, as revenge for killing his father and taking over the Stargazer, and to move himself up]].
** Similarly, in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Yesterday's Enterprise", history changing so that the Federation has been at war with the Klingons for the past twenty years has no apparent effect on the Enterprise's command roster except for the absence of Worf and Troi and the survival of Tasha Yar. It does affect the rest of the ship's complement, though, as instead of nominally carrying 1,014 in Starfleet personnel, civilian crews, families, and passengers, it was a militarized ship capable of carrying 6,000 troops, and the only observed civilian on board was Guinan. ([[CreatorsPet Wesley]] was still there, but as a fully-commissioned officer, when his "main" counterpart was still an acting ensign.)
** Lampshaded in the ''TNG'' episode "Tapestry". Picard [[spoiler:becoming a paper-pusher assistant astrophysics officer instead of a legendary starship captain]] had no apparent effect on the rest of the crew roster, yet that was because of Q's promise to Picard that anything he does in the past will not affect anyone else in the present.
** The episode, "Parallels," has Worf going through several dimensions, and while Enterprise remains mostly the same, the changes keep mounting to the point where Wesley was the tactical officer, Picard died during the events of a "Best of Both Worlds" (leaving Riker as Captain), and Troi had married Worf. They also ran into a Riker from a universe where the Borg had conquered the galaxy.
** In ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', the Mirror Universe has the station inhabited with largely the same characters, even if some of them are there for vastly different reasons; such as O'Brien, who is (strangely) virtually the same as ''normal'' O'Brien (and not, like almost everyone else, evil), and is only on Deep Space Nine as a ''slave''.
*** And yet a later episode explicitly stated that Jake Sisko was never born there. So any future descendants of Jake will not have counterparts there either.
*** The most baffling thing is that Vic is still on the station -- but ''isn't a hologram''.
*** The trope is shortly averted: over the course of three or four Mirror Universe episodes, several major and minor alternates die onscreen or off, including [[spoiler: Ben Sisko, Jennifer Sisko, Odo, Quark, Rom, Nog, and Vic Fontaine]].
** [[Literature/StarTrekMirrorUniverse Spin-off fiction]] takes it further; there are Terran Resistance cells equivalent to the ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' crew (including Neelix and Kes!), the ''[[Literature/StarTrekStargazer Stargazer]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier Excalibur]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekTitan Titan]]'' crew, etc. And they fight Alliance members who are counterparts of the aliens in the same crews.
** Some of the universes in the ''Literature/StarTrekMyriadUniverses'' spin-offs are even worse than the MirrorUniverse. If Khan Noonien Singh won the Eugenics War, and humanity spent the next four hundred years being genetically engineered and only breeding according to strict eugenic principles, it beggars belief that the ''Deep Space Nine'' cast even ''exist'', let alone are patrolling Bajoran space in a ship called the ''Defiance''.
*** Christopher L. Bennett's ''Myriad Universes'' novella ''Place of Exile'' proposes that the characters are linked to their alternate universe counterparts though subspace. In his [[http://home.fuse.net/ChristopherLBennett/PlacesExileAnnot.html annotations]] he says "the physical connection across different timelines means that there can be a sort of quantum resonance: the shared 'inertia' of different quantum facets of the same being causes their lives -- and their genetics -- to develop along similar lines."
** Then there's a less extreme example in ''[[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries The Animated Series]]'' episode "Yesteryear", in which Spock died at the age of seven because he failed to go back in time to save his own life. Nothing changes on the ''Enterprise'' except that the first officer is an Andorian we've never met before. Everyone we know but Spock is still alive, in the same positions, and they are still on the same assignment.
*** A ''Myriad Universes'' story explores the alternate universe in more detail and follows the life of said Andorian. There's no major difference in the timelines until the events of ''Film/{{Star Trek II|The Wrath Of Khan}}'', at which point divergences begin to happen almost exponentially.
* This trope is explicit in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. First mentioned in "Different Destinations...", when Harvey tells Crichton that "If nudged closely enough to course, events have a way of restructuring themselves. If the participants are the same, the venue's the same, the motivation's the same, then, well, the outcome is likely to be the same." It's confirmed by the Ancient "Einstein", and soon put to use again when the crew has to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong fix Crichton's past]].

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* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode "The Parallel", an astronaut returns to an alternate Earth where his family and superiors are identical, but he himself has a higher military rank and ''Series/TwelveMonkeys'': At the ''President'' is different.
* Numerous episodes of ''{{Series/Sliders}}'', especially the one where everything was exactly the same except that women had moustaches, and the one where the sky was purple but things were much the same until the RobotWar.
* In ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'''s "Mirror, Mirror", Kirk visits an AlternateUniverse where the Federation of Planets is a repressive interstellar empire -- but there's still a starship Enterprise, and it has mostly the same crew (although not all of them perform the same functions). Specifically for ''Mirror, Mirror'' there is a partial explanation in that the mechanism of transfer could only happen between realities in which the same (parallel) people were doing the same thing at the same time.
** Likewise for the sequels in the various spin-off series. This is despite the characters from the "original" universe causing changes that kill off or radically change various of their counterparts; the AlternateUniverse is still directly alternate.
** The ''TNG'' ExpandedUniverse novel ''Dark Mirror'' treads similar ground; there's still an ''Enterprise''-D, with most
end of the same crew pilot [[spoiler: Cole successfully kills Jeffrey Goines in most of the same roles, except that Worf is a galley slave and Wesley Crusher is a ''total badass'' who attempts to [[KlingonPromotion kill Picard, as revenge for killing his father and taking over the Stargazer, and to move himself up]].
** Similarly, in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Yesterday's Enterprise", history changing so that the Federation has been at war with the Klingons for the past twenty years
2015]], but this has no apparent effect on the Enterprise's command roster except for future, as his work is continued by others - [[spoiler: most likely, the absence of Worf titular '12 Monkeys']]. Of course [[spoiler: it's also possible that Jeffrey Goines was ''never'' the one directly involved in the creation and Troi and the survival of Tasha Yar. It does affect the rest release of the ship's complement, though, as virus, which would void this trope]].
* At the end of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' season 4, Angel makes a DealWithTheDevil to ensure that
instead of nominally carrying 1,014 in Starfleet personnel, civilian crews, families, being his son, Connor was raised by a normal human family. Except that Connor was an essential element to a StoryArc that lasted ''three seasons'', involving Darla, Sahjahn, Holtz, Wesley, Lilah, and passengers, it was a militarized ship capable of carrying 6,000 troops, ultimately Jasmine, and the only observed civilian on board idea that his absence didn't affect any of this is absurd.
** It is not entirely clear to what extent Angel's deal actually changed the past, or if it simply changed their memories. The demon who did it refers to it as shaping reality, but Angel does retain his original memories, and Connor his original genetics (or at least appearance) so if he did alter reality, the alteration
was Guinan. ([[CreatorsPet Wesley]] was still there, but as a fully-commissioned officer, when his "main" counterpart was still an acting ensign.)
** Lampshaded
incomplete. Later in the ''TNG'' episode "Tapestry". Picard [[spoiler:becoming a paper-pusher assistant astrophysics officer instead season when Wesley undoes the spell for those within close proximity to himself, which included Connor, it is implied that they end up with memories from both timelines.
*** It would be very interesting to know exactly how the alternate timeline explained Wesley's estrangement from the group (implied in that his relationship with Lilah still happened) without involving Connor.
*** It's made very clear that the past was not changed at all, only people's memories. In season 5 [[spoiler:they get them back]].
* ''Series/BabylonFive'': In "War Without End", we see the Ivanova
of a legendary starship captain]] timeline where Sinclair and Babylon 4 never went back in time recording a message before Babylon 5 blows up. She's wearing the uniform that Delenn had no apparent made for her. But in this timeline, because Sinclair didn't go to the past, [[spoiler:Delenn wouldn't have been born, because she's Sinclair's descendant]].
* FridgeLogic gives this from ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 5, when you realize for Franchise/{{Buffyverse}} canon to make sense, before season 5 Dawn must have had very little, if any, actual
effect on the rest of the crew roster, yet that was world.
** Which makes sense,
because only memories and records of Q's promise her were inserted "retroactively" -- she herself ''wasn't''. Her history was created to Picard dovetail into what had already happened, so of course she did nothing to change things. It may also be the case that anything he does the Scoobies' memories were altered such that they remember Dawn playing an occasional role in making things turn out the way they did. It would be interesting, for example, to find out just what they remember of Dawn's involvement in That Certain Halloween.
** This is covered in the comic collection ''False Memories'' (June 2002), where we see some events of
the past seasons from Dawn's perspective. She also appears in comics from 2003-2004 set before "Welcome to the Hellmouth".
** Considering that Dawn would have been a quite young child during the early series, and that Buffy was trying to keep her separate from any Slayer-related activity even when she was 14 and beyond, it's no surprise that she had no influence to much of the plot.
** In the alternate Wishverse, Giles somehow got to Sunnydale despite Buffy's not being there and Giles not knowing that Buffy was supposed to be there, even though his sole reason for coming to the town in the normal timeline was to find Buffy and become her mentor. Cordelia questions this, but is killed before we can get an explanation.
*** Less bothersome with the other characters, because they all lived in Sunnydale independently of Buffy, and the divergence point was only about three years earlier. Which brings up an interesting general rule: The further back in time the divergence point is, the weirder InSpiteOfANail becomes.
* On ''Series/{{Continuum}}'', the time-space continuum is described as being extremely self-correcting and that most of the time even a GrandfatherParadox
will not affect anyone else in the present.
** The episode, "Parallels," has Worf going through several dimensions, and while Enterprise remains mostly the same, the changes keep mounting to the point where Wesley was the tactical officer, Picard died during the
major events of a "Best of Both Worlds" (leaving Riker as Captain), and Troi had married Worf. They also ran into a Riker from a universe where the Borg had conquered the galaxy.
**
timeline. In ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', the Mirror Universe has the station inhabited with largely the same characters, even if some addition, a group of them are there for vastly different reasons; such as O'Brien, who is (strangely) virtually the same as ''normal'' O'Brien (and not, like almost everyone else, evil), and is only on Deep Space Nine as a ''slave''.
*** And yet a later episode explicitly stated
fanatical TimePolice make sure that Jake Sisko was never born there. So time travelers are stopped before they can do any future descendants of Jake will not have counterparts there either.
*** The most baffling thing is
real damage and that Vic is still on the station -- but ''isn't a hologram''.
*** The trope is shortly averted: over the course
any significant changes are corrected. All of three or four Mirror Universe episodes, several this ends up being subverted when a major and minor alternates die onscreen or off, including [[spoiler: Ben Sisko, Jennifer Sisko, Odo, Quark, Rom, Nog, and Vic Fontaine]].
** [[Literature/StarTrekMirrorUniverse Spin-off fiction]] takes it further; there are Terran Resistance cells equivalent to the ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' crew (including Neelix and Kes!), the ''[[Literature/StarTrekStargazer Stargazer]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier Excalibur]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekTitan Titan]]'' crew, etc. And they fight Alliance members who are counterparts of the aliens in the same crews.
** Some of the universes in the ''Literature/StarTrekMyriadUniverses'' spin-offs are even worse than the MirrorUniverse. If Khan Noonien Singh won the Eugenics War, and humanity spent the next four hundred years being genetically engineered and only breeding according to strict eugenic principles, it beggars belief that the ''Deep Space Nine'' cast even ''exist'', let alone are patrolling Bajoran space in a ship called the ''Defiance''.
*** Christopher L. Bennett's ''Myriad Universes'' novella ''Place of Exile'' proposes that the characters are linked to their alternate universe counterparts though subspace. In his [[http://home.fuse.net/ChristopherLBennett/PlacesExileAnnot.html annotations]] he says "the physical connection across different timelines means that there can be a sort of quantum resonance: the shared 'inertia' of different quantum facets of the same being causes their lives -- and their genetics -- to develop along similar lines."
** Then there's a less extreme example in ''[[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries The Animated Series]]'' episode "Yesteryear", in which Spock died at the age of seven because he failed to go
historical figure travels back in time a week to save change a major event in his own life. Nothing changes on life and then sticks around to interact with the ''Enterprise'' except other time travelers already present in that the first officer is an Andorian we've never met before. Everyone we know but Spock is still alive, in the same positions, and they are still on the same assignment.
*** A ''Myriad Universes'' story explores the alternate universe in more detail and follows the life of said Andorian. There's no major difference in the timelines until the events of ''Film/{{Star Trek II|The Wrath Of Khan}}'', at which point divergences begin to happen almost exponentially.
*
time period. This trope is explicit in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. First mentioned in "Different Destinations...", when Harvey tells Crichton that "If nudged closely enough to course, events have a way too much of restructuring themselves. If a paradox and a TimeCrash occurs where the participants are entire future timeline is wiped out and a brand new timeline is created to account for all the same, the venue's the same, the motivation's the same, then, well, the outcome is likely to be the same." It's confirmed by the Ancient "Einstein", and soon put to use again when the crew has to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong fix Crichton's past]].changes.



** In ''Inferno'', the Doctor borrows power from the Inferno Project to jump-start the TARDIS and winds up in an AlternateHistory where Britain has been a fascist dictatorship for decades -- but there's still an Inferno Project (though the alternate versions are closer to completing their project), run for the same purpose by the same people (although, again, not always in the same roles). Which is convenient, since he needs to borrow power from them again to get back home.
** In "Father's Day", Rose remembers her father, who died alone in a hit-and-run accident when she was a baby. She goes back in time and saves his life instead. This creates a TemporalParadox and prompts the ClockRoaches to start eating people. Her father ends up setting things right by throwing himself in front of the car that was supposed to have killed him, but this time Rose is there and comforts him while his life slips away, thus altering her own past in a trivial way that doesn't affect the greater march of time. This also affects the driver, as the accident is no longer a hit-and-run.
** In "Rise of the Cybermen", the Doctor, Rose, and Mickey visit an AlternateUniverse where history is different enough that Britain has a black President (yes, president) and a thriving [[ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld zeppelin industry]] -- but Mickey was still born and lives at the same address (though he's named "Ricky" and implied to be gay, and his grandmother is still alive). Both of Rose's parents also exist in this universe under the same names, and were still married, although Rose herself was explicitly never born and Pete never died in the eighties. There doesn't appear to be a Doctor, though, or he's seriously shirking his world-saving duties. [[spoiler: Until the [[ReplacementGoldfish series 4 finale,]] that is.]]
** In "The Shakespeare Code", Martha is afraid of altering history after landing in Elizabethan London. When bringing up the [[ButterflyOfDoom butterfly paradox]], the Doctor says, "Tell you what: Don't step on any butterflies. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint What have butterflies ever done to you?]]"
** In "The Waters of Mars", this takes a darker turn as the Doctor attempts to [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem break the laws of Time]] in order to save someone that history says should have died. Despite his efforts, or rather ''because'' of them, she commits suicide, and history is altered but still preserves the key elements that cause the future to occur as it should. Among the altered events is the survival of two other people who should've died, and the revelation of what happened on Mars to the world (it was previously a mystery).

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** In ''Inferno'', [[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E4Inferno "Inferno"]], the Doctor borrows power from the Inferno Project to jump-start the TARDIS and winds up in an AlternateHistory where Britain has been a fascist dictatorship for decades -- but there's still an Inferno Project (though the alternate versions are closer to completing their project), run for the same purpose by the same people (although, again, not always in the same roles). Which is convenient, since he needs to borrow power from them again to get back home.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay "Father's Day", Rose remembers her father, who Day"]], Rose's father died alone in a hit-and-run accident when she was a baby. She goes back in time and saves his life instead. This creates a TemporalParadox and prompts the ClockRoaches to start eating people. Her father ends up setting things right by throwing himself in front of the car that was supposed to have killed him, but this time Rose is there and comforts him while his life slips away, thus altering her own past in a trivial way that doesn't affect the greater march of time. This also affects the driver, as the accident is no longer a hit-and-run.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E5RiseOfTheCybermen "Rise of the Cybermen", Cybermen"]], the Doctor, Rose, and Mickey visit an AlternateUniverse where history is different enough that Britain has a black President (yes, president) and a thriving [[ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld zeppelin industry]] -- but Mickey was still born and lives at the same address (though he's named "Ricky" and implied to be gay, and his grandmother is still alive). Both of Rose's parents also exist in this universe under the same names, and were still married, although Rose herself was explicitly never born and Pete never died in the eighties. There doesn't appear to be a Doctor, though, or he's seriously shirking his world-saving duties. [[spoiler: Until the [[ReplacementGoldfish series 4 finale,]] that is.]]
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code", Code"]], Martha is afraid of altering history after landing in Elizabethan London. When bringing up the [[ButterflyOfDoom butterfly paradox]], the Doctor says, "Tell you what: Don't step on any butterflies. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint What have butterflies ever done to you?]]"
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E16TheWatersOfMars "The Waters of Mars", Mars"]], this takes a darker turn as the Doctor attempts to [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem break the laws of Time]] in order to save someone that history says should have died. Despite his efforts, or rather ''because'' of them, she commits suicide, and history is altered but still preserves the key elements that cause the future to occur as it should. Among the altered events is the survival of two other people who should've died, and the revelation of what happened on Mars to the world (it was previously a mystery).mystery).
* The 4th season of ''{{Series/Eureka}}'' plays havoc with this trope. Five of the main characters accidentally travel to 1947 (the founding of Eureka) and bring the guy responsible for the city back with them to 2010. Specific things have changes while others are completely the same:
** Allison still had a son, Kevin, by the same father, who looks exactly the same -- but is no longer autistic. This one gets lampshaded, with Henry noting that no one knows what causes it in the first place, so it would be impossible to figure out how it changed. Jack hypothesizes that Kevin may have engineered the time travel incident in order to undo his autism, but as he didn't travel back with them he has no memory of ever doing so.
** Allison is no longer head of GD (Fargo is) -- yet she still lives and works in Eureka (as chief medical officer). It's mentioned that Fargo got to this point thanks to the influence of his grandfather. It can be assumed that, in this timeline, Grand-Fargo did not become a HumanPopsicle early in his career and rose high in GD.
** Henry is married to a woman he previously barely knew -- yet still has the same garage and equipment and is still mayor of Eureka. Except [[spoiler:both of them are members of the Consortium, although Henry doesn't know it, since his alternate self was erased the moment he returned to the present]]. And Alt!Henry is supposed to have asthma, and he continues taking the medicine while maintaining the ruse for his wife, despite the fact that it could be harmful to someone who isn't an asthmatic.
** GD is much more of a [=DoD=] puppet with Fargo in charge -- yet all the same scientists work on all the same projects as before.
** Jo is no longer deputy is now chief of GD security with her replacement being Andy the robot. And due to him never having gone through ''CharacterDevelopment'', Zane never dated her.
** Tess never left for Australia so assumed that her relationship with Carter was perfect and was even moving in with him.
** Fargo's girlfriend Jennifer is now rich and married to an astronaut.
** All of the highly improbable events that occurred in previous seasons are assumed to still have happened, like Nathan being vaporized by a rogue experiment on his wedding day.
** Henry uses the term "ripple effect" to explain why little if any history has changed on a global scale: the time travel hit Eureka profoundly like a wave, causing major changes which would have caused other changes - ripples - which would have caused other changes and so on, and affected areas besides Eureka, but the further away from Eureka, the less significant the changes would be, and the ripples would eventually stop.
* This trope is explicit in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. First mentioned in "Different Destinations...", when Harvey tells Crichton that "If nudged closely enough to course, events have a way of restructuring themselves. If the participants are the same, the venue's the same, the motivation's the same, then, well, the outcome is likely to be the same." It's confirmed by the Ancient "Einstein", and soon put to use again when the crew has to [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong fix Crichton's past]].
* Played with in the episode "The One That Could Have Been" from Series/{{Friends}}. It takes a look at the lives of the main six characters had each one had one significant change in their life: Ross never got divorced, Monica never lost weight, Chandler quit his job, Rachel got married, Phoebe became a stockbroker. In the end, by the time it's over most of their lives resemble their ones from the "real" world: Ross realizes is marriage is over while Carol gets together with Susan, Monica and Chandler have fallen in love and got together, Rachel's left her husband, Phoebe's lost her job as a stockbroker and is now performing her usual bizarre songs at Central Perk, etc. The directors commentary lampshades this:
--> Kevin Bright: "It would have been different, but ultimately it would have been the same."
** Joey's case is an inversion, as his main "what if?" scenario is he was never fired from "Days of Our Lives" back during the events of the second season, and he's still happily employed as one of the regular cast members by the end of the episode. In the following season after "The One That Could Have Been" after learning some humility he's able to successfully appeal to the creator of the soap and is brought back. Notably, one episode that features a very brief clip from a "Days of Our Lives" episode is actually reused from the one shown in "The One That Could Have Been".
* While the exact point of divergence of the two universes from ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is not yet known, it's hard to imagine it could be later than about 1900 and revelations from Season 3 suggest it could possibly predate the dinosaurs. Despite this the majority of characters exist on both sides.
** Barack Obama is president of the United States during the 2009-2013 term in both universes. In one of them, no one has heard of Andrew Jackson, who (in our universe) basically founded the U.S. Democratic Party that Obama belongs to.
*** Although it's possible this isn't an actual change, it's simply a 'historical focus' change. Andrew Jackson was fairly pro-slavery, and removed Native American, and it seems the civil right's movement in the alternate universe was different. (Eldridge Cleaver, founder of the Black Panthers here, and MLK apparently gave a 'We have a dream' speech together, and MLK is on the twenty dollar bill instead of Andrew Jackson.) So it's possible Andrew Jackson has been 'demoted' in the history books from 'important president everyone knows' to a president no one's really heard of like John Tyler, because the alternate universe has decided to skim over that part of history.
** Oh, the characters don't just exist; we learn that the Bishops in both universe [[spoiler:live in the same house and Peter sleeps in the same bedroom.]]
** Examined in the season 4 episode "Everything In Its Right Place", where two versions of Lincoln Lee compare their lives to find out where they diverged into Captain Lee being a hyper-confident badass and Agent Lee being a cautious ByTheBookCop, and find that their lives were identical, down to every last detail, through high school. The confident version rejects the idea that his personality has to be dictated by his past circumstances, and proposes that he's the way he is because it's what he chose to become.



* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' had an episode where the Nazis won World War II. The characters looked exactly the same, and despite never knowing each other before the events of the series, they had met each other.
* In ''{{Journeyman}},'' the lead character of Dan Vassar, while traveling through time, meets and interacts with his friends and family in the past. This never has any impact on the present day and it seems no ever asks the Dan in their time about something the time-traveling Dan mentioned to them.

to:

* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' had an episode where the Nazis won World War II. The characters looked exactly the same, and despite never knowing each other before the events of the series, they had met each other.
* In ''{{Journeyman}},'' ''Series/{{Journeyman}}'' the lead character of Dan Vassar, while traveling through time, meets and interacts with his friends and family in the past. This never has any impact on the present day and it seems no ever asks the Dan in their time about something the time-traveling Dan mentioned to them.



** RubberbandHistory. It's stated pretty explicitly that there is some sort of intelligence guiding the "Journeys," and that is what keeps everything nearly identical. Likewise, Dan's son becoming a daughter was used because otherwise, what reason would he have to undo the massive technology jump he caused?
* In the ''Series/StargateSG1'' two-part episode "Moebius", the team muddles around with Egypt 5,000 years ago. Their admittedly small changes result in a world where the Stargate hasn't been discovered and the main characters aren't quite as cool. Those characters go back and fix things, which results in everything being the way it was before, with the exception of a pond that was but now is no longer devoid of fish ([[WMG/StargateSG1 and the sudden existence of a certain lieutenant colonel]])...
** Which should suggest at least some differences with O'Neill's personality as he doesn't like fish getting in the way of his fishing and therefore probably wouldn't have bought a house with a pond with fish in it, but this is ignored.
** And they have a ZPM, which was actually the whole reason they went back in the first place if I recall.

to:

** RubberbandHistory. It's stated pretty explicitly that there is some sort of intelligence guiding the "Journeys," "Journeys", and that is what keeps everything nearly identical. Likewise, Dan's son becoming a daughter was used because otherwise, what reason would he have to undo the massive technology jump he caused?
* In the ''Series/StargateSG1'' two-part episode "Moebius", the team muddles around with Egypt 5,000 years ago. Their admittedly small changes result in a world where the Stargate hasn't been discovered and the main characters aren't quite as cool. Those characters go back and fix things, which results in everything being the way it was before, with the exception of a pond that was but now is no longer devoid of fish ([[WMG/StargateSG1 and the sudden existence of a certain lieutenant colonel]])...
** Which should suggest at least some differences with O'Neill's personality as he doesn't like fish getting in the way of his fishing and therefore probably wouldn't have bought a house with a pond with fish in it, but this is ignored.
** And they have a ZPM, which was actually the whole reason they went back in the first place if I recall.
caused?



* ''Series/RedDwarf'' {{hand wave}}d this in one episode by specifically erasing two characters from history, yet having the two characters still running around trying to not be killed by the guy who erased them. They run into the main characters and find that their "twins" are slightly off and played by completely different people, like the "fraternal brothers" thing only even more distinct than that. Yet the ship still exists and the accident still happened and Dave Lister still managed to be frozen in stasis for three million years, etc.
** ''Series/RedDwarf'' was a repeat offender. The 3rd season episode "Timeslides" had Dave Lister changing history so that he became a millionaire and never left Earth, prompting the Cat and Kryten to vanish from existence ... yet, bizarrely, Rimmer (who was only revived as a companion for Lister) is still stuck on the ship, 3 million years into deep space. Likewise, 7th season episode "Tikka to Ride" has the crew accidentally avert the assassination of John F Kennedy, which results in a CrapsackWorld future where the US space program, and hence Red Dwarf, never existed ... yet, bizarrely, the crew and their time machine aren't similarly erased from existence. Then there's ... you know what? [[MST3KMantra It's probably best not to think about it.]]
*** Especially when you realize that Lister's children from his one-night stand with his own alternate universe female version were written out even though future echoes implied they'd be on Red Dwarf for decades, not to mention the fact that Lister effectively creates an ontological paradox where he becomes his own father (or, more accurately, has always been his own father). [[TimeyWimeyBall Time travel in the Red Dwarf universe is insane]] ''at best''.
* ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0482643/ Mud]]'', a BBC live action children's series from the 1990s, ended with the characters returning from a trip back in time and accidentally bringing Christopher Columbus home with them. They go home and everything seems normal, until they try to watch ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' -- which their mother has never heard of, because the discovery of the Americas must have played out somewhat differently due to his absence. If this was supposed to be a SequelHook it fell rather flat, and the viewer is LeftHanging as to whether or not they manage to sort it all out.

to:

* ''Series/RedDwarf'' {{hand wave}}d this MarvelCinematicUniverse: The Netflix shows take place in one episode a New York City affected by specifically erasing two characters [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "The Incident"]], however, evidence suggests that aside from history, yet having the two characters still running around trying to not be killed by insertion of the guy who erased them. They run into invasion, the main characters and find that their "twins" are slightly off and played by completely different people, like the "fraternal brothers" thing only even more distinct than that. Yet the ship still exists and the accident still happened and Dave Lister still managed to be frozen in stasis for three million years, etc.
** ''Series/RedDwarf'' was a repeat offender. The 3rd season episode "Timeslides" had Dave Lister changing
city's history so that he became a millionaire and never left Earth, prompting has been unaltered. For instance, the Cat and Kryten to vanish from existence ... yet, bizarrely, Rimmer (who was only revived as a companion for Lister) Black Lives Matter movement is still stuck on the ship, 3 million years into deep space. referenced in ''Series/LukeCage2016''. Likewise, 7th ''Series/Daredevil2015'' shows that the Fall Experimental Football League[[note]]a failed minor league football franchise intent on being a professional feeder system for the NFL; it lasted from 2014 to 2016[[/note]] still happened, as Karen Page wears a Brooklyn Bolts T-shirt in one scene in season episode "Tikka to Ride" has the crew accidentally avert the assassination of John F Kennedy, which results in a CrapsackWorld future where the US space program, and hence Red Dwarf, never existed ... yet, bizarrely, the crew and their time machine aren't similarly erased from existence. Then there's ... you know what? [[MST3KMantra It's probably best not to think about it.]]
*** Especially when you realize that Lister's children from his one-night stand with his own alternate universe female version were written out even though future echoes implied they'd be on Red Dwarf for decades, not to mention the fact that Lister effectively creates an ontological paradox where he becomes his own father (or, more accurately, has always been his own father). [[TimeyWimeyBall Time travel in the Red Dwarf universe is insane]] ''at best''.
* ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0482643/ Mud]]'', a BBC live action children's series from the 1990s, ended with the characters returning from a trip back in time and accidentally bringing Christopher Columbus home with them. They go home and everything seems normal, until they try to watch ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' -- which their mother has never heard of, because the discovery of the Americas must have played out somewhat differently due to his absence. If this was supposed to be a SequelHook it fell rather flat, and the viewer is LeftHanging as to whether or not they manage to sort it all out.
1.



* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' episode "The Temptation of Sarah Jane" claims that when history gets "diverted", it ''tries'' to correct itself, explaining why, in a world enslaved by the Trickster since 1951, Rani's mum still exists and they "happen" to run into her.

to:

* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' had an episode "The Temptation of Sarah Jane" claims that when history gets "diverted", it ''tries'' to correct itself, explaining why, in a world enslaved by where the Trickster since 1951, Rani's mum still exists Nazis won World War II. The characters looked exactly the same, and despite never knowing each other before the events of the series, they "happen" had met each other.
* ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0482643/ Mud]]'', a BBC live action children's series from the 1990s, ended with the characters returning from a trip back in time and accidentally bringing Christopher Columbus home with them. They go home and everything seems normal, until they try
to run into her.watch ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' -- which their mother has never heard of, because the discovery of the Americas must have played out somewhat differently due to his absence. If this was supposed to be a SequelHook it fell rather flat, and the viewer is LeftHanging as to whether or not they manage to sort it all out.



* FridgeLogic gives this from ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 5, when you realize for Franchise/{{Buffyverse}} canon to make sense, before season 5 Dawn must have had very little, if any, actual effect on the world.
** Which makes sense, because only memories and records of her were inserted "retroactively" -- she herself ''wasn't''. Her history was created to dovetail into what had already happened, so of course she did nothing to change things. It may also be the case that the Scoobies' memories were altered such that they remember Dawn playing an occasional role in making things turn out the way they did. It would be interesting, for example, to find out just what they remember of Dawn's involvement in That Certain Halloween.
** This is covered in the comic collection ''False Memories'' (June 2002), where we see some events of the past seasons from Dawn's perspective. She also appears in comics from 2003-2004 set before "Welcome to the Hellmouth".
** Considering that Dawn would have been a quite young child during the early series, and that Buffy was trying to keep her separate from any Slayer-related activity even when she was 14 and beyond, it's no surprise that she had no influence to much of the plot.
** In the alternate Wishverse, Giles somehow got to Sunnydale despite Buffy's not being there and Giles not knowing that Buffy was supposed to be there, even though his sole reason for coming to the town in the normal timeline was to find Buffy and become her mentor. Cordelia questions this, but is killed before we can get an explanation.
*** Less bothersome with the other characters, because they all lived in Sunnydale independently of Buffy, and the divergence point was only about three years earlier. Which brings up an interesting general rule: The further back in time the divergence point is, the weirder InSpiteOfANail becomes.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'': In "War Without End", we see the Ivanova of a timeline where Sinclair and Babylon 4 never went back in time recording a message before Babylon 5 blows up. She's wearing the uniform that Delenn had made for her. But in this timeline, because Sinclair didn't go to the past, [[spoiler:Delenn wouldn't have been born, because she's Sinclair's descendant]].
* The 4th season of ''{{Series/Eureka}}'' plays havoc with this trope. Five of the main characters accidentally travel to 1947 (the founding of Eureka) and bring the guy responsible for the city back with them to 2010. Specific things have changes while others are completely the same:
** Allison still had a son, Kevin, by the same father, who looks exactly the same -- but is no longer autistic. This one gets lampshaded, with Henry noting that no one knows what causes it in the first place, so it would be impossible to figure out how it changed. Jack hypothesizes that Kevin may have engineered the time travel incident in order to undo his autism, but as he didn't travel back with them he has no memory of ever doing so.
** Allison is no longer head of GD (Fargo is) -- yet she still lives and works in Eureka (as chief medical officer). It's mentioned that Fargo got to this point thanks to the influence of his grandfather. It can be assumed that, in this timeline, Grand-Fargo did not become a HumanPopsicle early in his career and rose high in GD.
** Henry is married to a woman he previously barely knew -- yet still has the same garage and equipment and is still mayor of Eureka. Except [[spoiler:both of them are members of the Consortium, although Henry doesn't know it, since his alternate self was erased the moment he returned to the present]]. And Alt!Henry is supposed to have asthma, and he continues taking the medicine while maintaining the ruse for his wife, despite the fact that it could be harmful to someone who isn't an asthmatic.
** GD is much more of a [=DoD=] puppet with Fargo in charge -- yet all the same scientists work on all the same projects as before.
** Jo is no longer deputy is now chief of GD security with her replacement being Andy the robot. And due to him never having gone through ''CharacterDevelopment'', Zane never dated her.
** Tess never left for Australia so assumed that her relationship with Carter was perfect and was even moving in with him.
** Fargo's girlfriend Jennifer is now rich and married to an astronaut.
** All of the highly improbable events that occurred in previous seasons are assumed to still have happened, like Nathan being vaporized by a rogue experiment on his wedding day.
** Henry uses the term "ripple effect" to explain why little if any history has changed on a global scale: the time travel hit Eureka profoundly like a wave, causing major changes which would have caused other changes - ripples - which would have caused other changes and so on, and affected areas besides Eureka, but the further away from Eureka, the less significant the changes would be, and the ripples would eventually stop.
* At the end of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' season 4, Angel makes a DealWithTheDevil to ensure that instead of being his son, Connor was raised by a normal human family. Except that Connor was an essential element to a StoryArc that lasted ''three seasons'', involving Darla, Sahjahn, Holtz, Wesley, Lilah, and ultimately Jasmine, and the idea that his absence didn't affect any of this is absurd.
** It is not entirely clear to what extent Angel's deal actually changed the past, or if it simply changed their memories. The demon who did it refers to it as shaping reality, but Angel does retain his original memories, and Connor his original genetics (or at least appearance) so if he did alter reality, the alteration was incomplete. Later in the season when Wesley undoes the spell for those within close proximity to himself, which included Connor, it is implied that they end up with memories from both timelines.
*** It would be very interesting to know exactly how the alternate timeline explained Wesley's estrangement from the group (implied in that his relationship with Lilah still happened) without involving Connor.
*** It's made very clear that the past was not changed at all, only people's memories. In season 5 [[spoiler:they get them back]].
* While the exact point of divergence of the two universes from ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is not yet known, it's hard to imagine it could be later than about 1900 and revelations from Season 3 suggest it could possibly predate the dinosaurs. Despite this the majority of characters exist on both sides.
** Barack Obama is president of the United States during the 2009-2013 term in both universes. In one of them, no one has heard of Andrew Jackson, who (in our universe) basically founded the U.S. Democratic Party that Obama belongs to.
*** Although it's possible this isn't an actual change, it's simply a 'historical focus' change. Andrew Jackson was fairly pro-slavery, and removed Native American, and it seems the civil right's movement in the alternate universe was different. (Eldridge Cleaver, founder of the Black Panthers here, and MLK apparently gave a 'We have a dream' speech together, and MLK is on the twenty dollar bill instead of Andrew Jackson.) So it's possible Andrew Jackson has been 'demoted' in the history books from 'important president everyone knows' to a president no one's really heard of like John Tyler, because the alternate universe has decided to skim over that part of history.
** Oh, the characters don't just exist; we learn that the Bishops in both universe [[spoiler:live in the same house and Peter sleeps in the same bedroom.]]
** Examined in the season 4 episode "Everything In Its Right Place", where two versions of Lincoln Lee compare their lives to find out where they diverged into Captain Lee being a hyper-confident badass and Agent Lee being a cautious ByTheBookCop, and find that their lives were identical, down to every last detail, through high school. The confident version rejects the idea that his personality has to be dictated by his past circumstances, and proposes that he's the way he is because it's what he chose to become.
* In Smallville, Clark visits a MirrorUniverse where the major difference is that he was raised by the Luthors instead of the Kents. His other self was raised to be completely ruthless and evil, but for some reason was still given the first name of Clark.

to:

* FridgeLogic gives ''Series/RedDwarf'' {{hand wave}}d this in one episode by specifically erasing two characters from ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' season 5, when you realize for Franchise/{{Buffyverse}} canon to make sense, before season 5 Dawn must have had very little, if any, actual effect on history, yet having the world.
** Which makes sense, because only memories and records of her were inserted "retroactively" -- she herself ''wasn't''. Her history was created to dovetail into what had already happened, so of course she did nothing to change things. It may also be the case that the Scoobies' memories were altered such that they remember Dawn playing an occasional role in making things turn out the way they did. It would be interesting, for example, to find out just what they remember of Dawn's involvement in That Certain Halloween.
** This is covered in the comic collection ''False Memories'' (June 2002), where we see some events of the past seasons from Dawn's perspective. She also appears in comics from 2003-2004 set before "Welcome to the Hellmouth".
** Considering that Dawn would have been a quite young child during the early series, and that Buffy was
two characters still running around trying to keep her separate from any Slayer-related activity even when she was 14 and beyond, it's no surprise that she had no influence to much of the plot.
** In the alternate Wishverse, Giles somehow got to Sunnydale despite Buffy's
not being there and Giles not knowing that Buffy was supposed to be there, even though his sole reason for coming to the town in the normal timeline was to find Buffy and become her mentor. Cordelia questions this, but is killed before we can get an explanation.
*** Less bothersome with
by the other characters, because they all lived in Sunnydale independently of Buffy, and the divergence point was only about three years earlier. Which brings up an interesting general rule: The further back in time the divergence point is, the weirder InSpiteOfANail becomes.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'': In "War Without End", we see the Ivanova of a timeline where Sinclair and Babylon 4 never went back in time recording a message before Babylon 5 blows up. She's wearing the uniform that Delenn had made for her. But in this timeline, because Sinclair didn't go to the past, [[spoiler:Delenn wouldn't have been born, because she's Sinclair's descendant]].
* The 4th season of ''{{Series/Eureka}}'' plays havoc with this trope. Five of
guy who erased them. They run into the main characters and find that their "twins" are slightly off and played by completely different people, like the "fraternal brothers" thing only even more distinct than that. Yet the ship still exists and the accident still happened and Dave Lister still managed to be frozen in stasis for three million years, etc.
** ''Series/RedDwarf'' was a repeat offender. The 3rd season episode "Timeslides" had Dave Lister changing history so that he became a millionaire and never left Earth, prompting the Cat and Kryten to vanish from existence ... yet, bizarrely, Rimmer (who was only revived as a companion for Lister) is still stuck on the ship, 3 million years into deep space. Likewise, 7th season episode "Tikka to Ride" has the crew
accidentally travel to 1947 (the founding avert the assassination of Eureka) John F Kennedy, which results in a CrapsackWorld future where the US space program, and bring hence Red Dwarf, never existed ... yet, bizarrely, the guy responsible for the city back with them to 2010. Specific things have changes while others are completely the same:
** Allison still had a son, Kevin, by the same father, who looks exactly the same -- but is no longer autistic. This one gets lampshaded, with Henry noting that no one knows what causes it in the first place, so it would be impossible to figure out how it changed. Jack hypothesizes that Kevin may have engineered the
crew and their time travel incident in order to undo his autism, but as he didn't travel back with them he has no memory of ever doing so.
** Allison is no longer head of GD (Fargo is) -- yet she still lives and works in Eureka (as chief medical officer).
machine aren't similarly erased from existence. Then there's ... you know what? [[MST3KMantra It's mentioned that Fargo got to this point thanks to the influence of his grandfather. It can be assumed that, in this timeline, Grand-Fargo did probably best not become a HumanPopsicle early in his career and rose high in GD.
** Henry is married
to a woman he previously barely knew -- yet still has the same garage and equipment and is still mayor of Eureka. Except [[spoiler:both of them are members of the Consortium, although Henry doesn't know it, since his alternate self was erased the moment he returned to the present]]. And Alt!Henry is supposed to have asthma, and he continues taking the medicine while maintaining the ruse for his wife, despite the fact that it could be harmful to someone who isn't an asthmatic.
** GD is much more of a [=DoD=] puppet with Fargo in charge -- yet all the same scientists work on all the same projects as before.
** Jo is no longer deputy is now chief of GD security with her replacement being Andy the robot. And due to him never having gone through ''CharacterDevelopment'', Zane never dated her.
** Tess never left for Australia so assumed that her relationship with Carter was perfect and was even moving in with him.
** Fargo's girlfriend Jennifer is now rich and married to an astronaut.
** All of the highly improbable events that occurred in previous seasons are assumed to still have happened, like Nathan being vaporized by a rogue experiment on his wedding day.
** Henry uses the term "ripple effect" to explain why little if any history has changed on a global scale: the time travel hit Eureka profoundly like a wave, causing major changes which would have caused other changes - ripples - which would have caused other changes and so on, and affected areas besides Eureka, but the further away from Eureka, the less significant the changes would be, and the ripples would eventually stop.
* At the end of ''Series/{{Angel}}'' season 4, Angel makes a DealWithTheDevil to ensure that instead of being his son, Connor was raised by a normal human family. Except that Connor was an essential element to a StoryArc that lasted ''three seasons'', involving Darla, Sahjahn, Holtz, Wesley, Lilah, and ultimately Jasmine, and the idea that his absence didn't affect any of this is absurd.
** It is not entirely clear to what extent Angel's deal actually changed the past, or if it simply changed their memories. The demon who did it refers to it as shaping reality, but Angel does retain his original memories, and Connor his original genetics (or at least appearance) so if he did alter reality, the alteration was incomplete. Later in the season when Wesley undoes the spell for those within close proximity to himself, which included Connor, it is implied that they end up with memories from both timelines.
*** It would be very interesting to know exactly how the alternate timeline explained Wesley's estrangement from the group (implied in that his relationship with Lilah still happened) without involving Connor.
*** It's made very clear that the past was not changed at all, only people's memories. In season 5 [[spoiler:they get them back]].
* While the exact point of divergence of the two universes from ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is not yet known, it's hard to imagine it could be later than
think about 1900 and revelations from Season 3 suggest it could possibly predate the dinosaurs. Despite this the majority of characters exist on both sides.
** Barack Obama is president of the United States during the 2009-2013 term in both universes. In one of them, no one has heard of Andrew Jackson, who (in our universe) basically founded the U.S. Democratic Party that Obama belongs to.
*** Although it's possible this isn't an actual change, it's simply a 'historical focus' change. Andrew Jackson was fairly pro-slavery, and removed Native American, and it seems the civil right's movement in the alternate universe was different. (Eldridge Cleaver, founder of the Black Panthers here, and MLK apparently gave a 'We have a dream' speech together, and MLK is on the twenty dollar bill instead of Andrew Jackson.) So it's possible Andrew Jackson has been 'demoted' in the history books from 'important president everyone knows' to a president no one's really heard of like John Tyler, because the alternate universe has decided to skim over that part of history.
** Oh, the characters don't just exist; we learn that the Bishops in both universe [[spoiler:live in the same house and Peter sleeps in the same bedroom.
it.]]
** Examined *** Especially when you realize that Lister's children from his one-night stand with his own alternate universe female version were written out even though future echoes implied they'd be on Red Dwarf for decades, not to mention the fact that Lister effectively creates an ontological paradox where he becomes his own father (or, more accurately, has always been his own father). [[TimeyWimeyBall Time travel in the season 4 Red Dwarf universe is insane]] ''at best''.
* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures''
episode "Everything In Its Right Place", "The Temptation of Sarah Jane" claims that when history gets "diverted", it ''tries'' to correct itself, explaining why, in a world enslaved by the Trickster since 1951, Rani's mum still exists and they "happen" to run into her.
* Numerous episodes of ''{{Series/Sliders}}'', especially the one
where two versions of Lincoln Lee compare their lives to find out everything was exactly the same except that women had moustaches, and the one where they diverged into Captain Lee being a hyper-confident badass and Agent Lee being a cautious ByTheBookCop, and find that their lives the sky was purple but things were identical, down to every last detail, through high school. The confident version rejects much the idea that his personality has to be dictated by his past circumstances, and proposes that he's same until the way he is because it's what he chose to become.
RobotWar.
* In Smallville, ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', Clark visits a MirrorUniverse where the major difference is that he was raised by the Luthors instead of the Kents. His other self was raised to be completely ruthless and evil, but for some reason was still given the first name of Clark.Clark.
* In the ''Series/StargateSG1'' two-part episode "Moebius", the team muddles around with Egypt 5,000 years ago. Their admittedly small changes result in a world where the Stargate hasn't been discovered and the main characters aren't quite as cool. Those characters go back and fix things, which results in everything being the way it was before, with the exception of a pond that was but now is no longer devoid of fish ([[WMG/StargateSG1 and the sudden existence of a certain lieutenant colonel]])...
** Which should suggest at least some differences with O'Neill's personality as he doesn't like fish getting in the way of his fishing and therefore probably wouldn't have bought a house with a pond with fish in it, but this is ignored.
** And they have a ZPM, which was actually the whole reason they went back in the first place if I recall.
* In ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'''s "Mirror, Mirror", Kirk visits an AlternateUniverse where the Federation of Planets is a repressive interstellar empire -- but there's still a starship Enterprise, and it has mostly the same crew (although not all of them perform the same functions). Specifically for ''Mirror, Mirror'' there is a partial explanation in that the mechanism of transfer could only happen between realities in which the same (parallel) people were doing the same thing at the same time.
** Likewise for the sequels in the various spin-off series. This is despite the characters from the "original" universe causing changes that kill off or radically change various of their counterparts; the AlternateUniverse is still directly alternate.
** The ''TNG'' ExpandedUniverse novel ''Dark Mirror'' treads similar ground; there's still an ''Enterprise''-D, with most of the same crew in most of the same roles, except that Worf is a galley slave and Wesley Crusher is a ''total badass'' who attempts to [[KlingonPromotion kill Picard, as revenge for killing his father and taking over the Stargazer, and to move himself up]].
** Similarly, in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Yesterday's Enterprise", history changing so that the Federation has been at war with the Klingons for the past twenty years has no apparent effect on the Enterprise's command roster except for the absence of Worf and Troi and the survival of Tasha Yar. It does affect the rest of the ship's complement, though, as instead of nominally carrying 1,014 in Starfleet personnel, civilian crews, families, and passengers, it was a militarized ship capable of carrying 6,000 troops, and the only observed civilian on board was Guinan. ([[CreatorsPet Wesley]] was still there, but as a fully-commissioned officer, when his "main" counterpart was still an acting ensign.)
** Lampshaded in the ''TNG'' episode "Tapestry". Picard [[spoiler:becoming a paper-pusher assistant astrophysics officer instead of a legendary starship captain]] had no apparent effect on the rest of the crew roster, yet that was because of Q's promise to Picard that anything he does in the past will not affect anyone else in the present.
** The episode, "Parallels," has Worf going through several dimensions, and while Enterprise remains mostly the same, the changes keep mounting to the point where Wesley was the tactical officer, Picard died during the events of a "Best of Both Worlds" (leaving Riker as Captain), and Troi had married Worf. They also ran into a Riker from a universe where the Borg had conquered the galaxy.
** In ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', the Mirror Universe has the station inhabited with largely the same characters, even if some of them are there for vastly different reasons; such as O'Brien, who is (strangely) virtually the same as ''normal'' O'Brien (and not, like almost everyone else, evil), and is only on Deep Space Nine as a ''slave''.
*** And yet a later episode explicitly stated that Jake Sisko was never born there. So any future descendants of Jake will not have counterparts there either.
*** The most baffling thing is that Vic is still on the station -- but ''isn't a hologram''.
*** The trope is shortly averted: over the course of three or four Mirror Universe episodes, several major and minor alternates die onscreen or off, including [[spoiler: Ben Sisko, Jennifer Sisko, Odo, Quark, Rom, Nog, and Vic Fontaine]].
** [[Literature/StarTrekMirrorUniverse Spin-off fiction]] takes it further; there are Terran Resistance cells equivalent to the ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' crew (including Neelix and Kes!), the ''[[Literature/StarTrekStargazer Stargazer]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier Excalibur]]'' crew, the ''[[Literature/StarTrekTitan Titan]]'' crew, etc. And they fight Alliance members who are counterparts of the aliens in the same crews.
** Some of the universes in the ''Literature/StarTrekMyriadUniverses'' spin-offs are even worse than the MirrorUniverse. If Khan Noonien Singh won the Eugenics War, and humanity spent the next four hundred years being genetically engineered and only breeding according to strict eugenic principles, it beggars belief that the ''Deep Space Nine'' cast even ''exist'', let alone are patrolling Bajoran space in a ship called the ''Defiance''.
*** Christopher L. Bennett's ''Myriad Universes'' novella ''Place of Exile'' proposes that the characters are linked to their alternate universe counterparts though subspace. In his [[http://home.fuse.net/ChristopherLBennett/PlacesExileAnnot.html annotations]] he says "the physical connection across different timelines means that there can be a sort of quantum resonance: the shared 'inertia' of different quantum facets of the same being causes their lives -- and their genetics -- to develop along similar lines."
** Then there's a less extreme example in ''[[WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries The Animated Series]]'' episode "Yesteryear", in which Spock died at the age of seven because he failed to go back in time to save his own life. Nothing changes on the ''Enterprise'' except that the first officer is an Andorian we've never met before. Everyone we know but Spock is still alive, in the same positions, and they are still on the same assignment.
*** A ''Myriad Universes'' story explores the alternate universe in more detail and follows the life of said Andorian. There's no major difference in the timelines until the events of ''Film/{{Star Trek II|The Wrath Of Khan}}'', at which point divergences begin to happen almost exponentially.



** The timeline appears to be trying to repair itself in that episode however, since the plot is kicked off when descendants of the people who should have died on the ''Titanic'' start dropping off like flies. [[spoiler: This is the work of the angry Fate, who knows Castiel organized it all to get more souls for his side of an angelic civil war.]]]
* Played with in the episode "The One That Could Have Been" from Series/{{Friends}}. It takes a look at the lives of the main six characters had each one had one significant change in their life: Ross never got divorced, Monica never lost weight, Chandler quit his job, Rachel got married, Phoebe became a stockbroker. In the end, by the time it's over most of their lives resemble their ones from the "real" world: Ross realizes is marriage is over while Carol gets together with Susan, Monica and Chandler have fallen in love and got together, Rachel's left her husband, Phoebe's lost her job as a stockbroker and is now performing her usual bizarre songs at Central Perk, etc. The directors commentary lampshades this:
--> Kevin Bright: "It would have been different, but ultimately it would have been the same."
** Joey's case is an inversion, as his main "what if?" scenario is he was never fired from "Days of Our Lives" back during the events of the second season, and he's still happily employed as one of the regular cast members by the end of the episode. In the following season after "The One That Could Have Been" after learning some humility he's able to successfully appeal to the creator of the soap and is brought back. Notably, one episode that features a very brief clip from a "Days of Our Lives" episode is actually reused from the one shown in "The One That Could Have Been."
* On ''Series/{{Continuum}}'', the time-space continuum is described as being extremely self-correcting and that most of the time even a GrandfatherParadox will not affect the major events of the timeline. In addition, a group of fanatical TimePolice make sure that time travelers are stopped before they can do any real damage and that any significant changes are corrected. All of this ends up being subverted when a major historical figure travels back in time a week to change a major event in his own life and then sticks around to interact with the other time travelers already present in that time period. This is too much of a paradox and a TimeCrash occurs where the entire future timeline is wiped out and a brand new timeline is created to account for all the changes.

to:

** The timeline appears to be trying to repair itself in that episode however, since the plot is kicked off when descendants of the people who should have died on the ''Titanic'' start dropping off like flies. [[spoiler: This is the work of the angry Fate, who knows Castiel organized it all to get more souls for his side of an angelic civil war.]]]
]]
* Played with in ''Series/{{Travelers}}'' has possibly the most resilient timeline in all of fiction. In the second episode they save 11,000 people and there is absolutely no effect to the timeline. Half way through first season they manage to [[spoiler:prevent an asteroid impact that kills '''''91 million people''''']] and the change to the future is so subtle that operations continue for weeks without them realizing that anything was altered at all.
* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone''
episode "The One That Could Have Been" from Series/{{Friends}}. It takes a look at the lives of the main six characters had each one had one significant change in their life: Ross never got divorced, Monica never lost weight, Chandler quit his job, Rachel got married, Phoebe became a stockbroker. In the end, by the time it's over most of their lives resemble their ones from the "real" world: Ross realizes is marriage is over while Carol gets together with Susan, Monica and Chandler have fallen in love and got together, Rachel's left her husband, Phoebe's lost her job as a stockbroker and is now performing her usual bizarre songs at Central Perk, etc. The directors commentary lampshades this:
--> Kevin Bright: "It would have been different, but ultimately it would have been the same."
** Joey's case is
Parallel", an inversion, as his main "what if?" scenario is he was never fired from "Days of Our Lives" back during the events of the second season, and he's still happily employed as one of the regular cast members by the end of the episode. In the following season after "The One That Could Have Been" after learning some humility he's able astronaut returns to successfully appeal to the creator of the soap and is brought back. Notably, one episode that features a very brief clip from a "Days of Our Lives" episode is actually reused from the one shown in "The One That Could Have Been."
* On ''Series/{{Continuum}}'', the time-space continuum is described as being extremely self-correcting and that most of the time even a GrandfatherParadox will not affect the major events of the timeline. In addition, a group of fanatical TimePolice make sure that time travelers are stopped before they can do any real damage and that any significant changes are corrected. All of this ends up being subverted when a major historical figure travels back in time a week to change a major event in his own life and then sticks around to interact with the other time travelers already present in that time period. This is too much of a paradox and a TimeCrash occurs
an alternate Earth where his family and superiors are identical, but he himself has a higher military rank and the entire future timeline ''President'' is wiped out and a brand new timeline is created to account for all the changes.different.



* ''Series/TwelveMonkeys'': At the end of the pilot [[spoiler: Cole successfully kills Jeffrey Goines in 2015]], but this has no effect on the future, as his work is continued by others - [[spoiler: most likely, the titular '12 Monkeys']]. Of course [[spoiler: it's also possible that Jeffrey Goines was ''never'' the one directly involved in the creation and release of the virus, which would void this trope]].
* MarvelCinematicUniverse: The Netflix shows take place in a New York City affected by [[Film/TheAvengers2012 "The Incident"]], however, evidence suggests that aside from the insertion of the invasion, the city's history has been unaltered. For instance, the Black Lives Matter movement is referenced in ''Series/LukeCage2016''. Likewise, ''Series/Daredevil2015'' shows that the Fall Experimental Football League[[note]]a failed minor league football franchise intent on being a professional feeder system for the NFL; it lasted from 2014 to 2016[[/note]] still happened, as Karen Page wears a Brooklyn Bolts T-shirt in one scene in season 1.
* ''{{Travelers}}'' has possibly those most resilient timeline in all of fiction. In the second episode they save 11,000 people and there is absolutely no effect to the timeline. Half way through first season they manage to [[spoiler:prevent an asteroid impact that kills '''''91 million people''''']] and the change to the future is so subtle that operations continue for weeks without them realizing that anything was altered at all.
4th Mar '17 2:26:27 PM nombretomado
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* Most ComicBook {{Elseworld}}s suggest that, whatever else happens, the superheroes still exist (unless the absence of a given hero is The Difference). Particularly obvious in many of MarvelComics's ''ComicBook/{{Exiles}}'' storylines; in one the entire world has been under the control of Skrulls for the last century, humans have no access to technology, but apparently Peter Parker was still bitten by a radioactive spider.

to:

* Most ComicBook {{Elseworld}}s suggest that, whatever else happens, the superheroes still exist (unless the absence of a given hero is The Difference). Particularly obvious in many of MarvelComics's Creator/MarvelComics's ''ComicBook/{{Exiles}}'' storylines; in one the entire world has been under the control of Skrulls for the last century, humans have no access to technology, but apparently Peter Parker was still bitten by a radioactive spider.



** This one is probably best handled in Creator/MarvelComics's ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}''. In this case, a foreign element (namely, [[spoiler:Captain America being sent backwards in time]]) has messed up history; the universe reacts, and "a season has dawned over three hundred years early: a season of heroes and marvels." Or more accurately, "heroes and Marvels."

to:

** This one is probably best handled in Creator/MarvelComics's Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}''. In this case, a foreign element (namely, [[spoiler:Captain America being sent backwards in time]]) has messed up history; the universe reacts, and "a season has dawned over three hundred years early: a season of heroes and marvels." Or more accurately, "heroes and Marvels."



** A quick study of Marvel's ''What If...'' series will confirm that, in the multiverse of MarvelComics, there's only two universes in which Peter Parker doesn't ever become Spider-Man. One of them has no superhumans at all, and the other has no Peter Parker at all. In every other MarvelUniverse variant, Peter Parker exists, and he '''''will''''' become Spider-Man at some point.

to:

** A quick study of Marvel's ''What If...'' series will confirm that, in the multiverse of MarvelComics, Creator/MarvelComics, there's only two universes in which Peter Parker doesn't ever become Spider-Man. One of them has no superhumans at all, and the other has no Peter Parker at all. In every other MarvelUniverse variant, Peter Parker exists, and he '''''will''''' become Spider-Man at some point.
25th Feb '17 1:25:40 PM nombretomado
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* Though UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush's presidency and his policies never occurred in DaleBrown's books, the US of 2012 is somehow still recovering from a major recession.

to:

* Though UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush's presidency and his policies never occurred in DaleBrown's Creator/DaleBrown's books, the US of 2012 is somehow still recovering from a major recession.
24th Feb '17 7:22:51 AM fruitstripegum
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*** In another Treehouse of Horror segment, Bart acquires the keys of a Time machine and travels back to 1974 (so he can get a comic book cheap). While there, he finds out that if his pareents never met, he would be rich. So he splits his parents up and travels back to 2012 (the present when the episode aired). Even though Marge married a rich man, he, Lisa, and Maggie are still born. The mansion they live in is in the same place as his old home as well.

to:

*** In another Treehouse of Horror segment, Bart acquires the keys of a Time machine and travels back to 1974 (so he can get a comic book cheap). While there, he finds out that if his pareents parents never met, he would be rich. So he splits his parents up and travels back to 2012 (the present when the episode aired). Even though Marge married a rich man, he, Lisa, and Maggie are still born. The mansion they live in is in the same place as his old home as well.
18th Feb '17 5:49:10 PM rva98014
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* In ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'', the basic premise of the movie's setting is that even though human beings never existed, [[ArtMajorBiology some highly improbable convergent evolution came along]] and [[FunnyAnimal anthropomorphized]] ''every single mammal species in existence'', and civilization all the way up to modern society emerged in almost exactly the same way as it would have with humans.

to:

* In ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'', the basic premise of the movie's setting is that even though human beings never existed, [[ArtMajorBiology some highly improbable convergent evolution came along]] existed and [[FunnyAnimal anthropomorphized]] ''every single mammal species in existence'', and sapient anthropomorphic mammals evolved instead, civilization all the way up to and modern society emerged in almost exactly the same way as it would have with humans.
13th Feb '17 3:12:27 AM Abdiel
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* In one dimension of [[Roleplay/WeAreOurAvatars WAOA]], Aurora was a Dragonborn. Her habits haven't changed at all. In fact, she sent a cake with moon sugar inside it. [[IntoxicationEnsues The end result was predictable]].

to:

* In one dimension of [[Roleplay/WeAreOurAvatars WAOA]], ''[[Roleplay/WeAreOurAvatars WAOA]]'', Aurora was a Dragonborn. Her habits haven't changed at all. In fact, she sent a cake with moon sugar inside it. [[IntoxicationEnsues The end result was predictable]].
13th Feb '17 3:01:45 AM Abdiel
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* In ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' Church gets the opportunity to save himself and his friends, but despite every butterfly he tried to stomp on, some other event kicks in and the only thing he changed is that he is the one who cause him team's eventual demises. Except [[spoiler: It all turns out to be a ruse by Gary, who traps him in a simulation of a time loop.]]
* In Literature/GreenAntarctica, something happened so that Antarctica didn't have the glaciers and ice sheets that they did in OTL. Yet World History still went on the same until the Tsalal got into the picture.
* In RedDawnPlus20, the Chernobyl disaster still happened as scheduled, but this time, instead of Soviet engineering incompetence, it was American military intel incompetence that destroyed the reactor. Intel said the reactors weren't online when they were set to be targeted. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero Oops]].
* In one dimension of [[Roleplay/WeAreOurAvatars WAOA]], Aurora was a Dragonborn. Her habits haven't changed at all. In fact, she sent a cake with moon sugar inside it. [[IntoxicationEnsues The end result was predictable]].



** In addition, the setting's "multi-verse" is based on the idea of the multiple-world hypothesis, in which every time any person makes a choice, a new alternate timeline is branched off that reflects those choices. However, timelines that are based on irrelevant choices (for example, having toast and eggs for breakfast instead of cereal) tend to re-merge further down the time stream with all of its similarly irrelevant alternaties.
* In the WhateleyUniverse, despite the fact that the world has a Lovecraft Lite mythos, ancient Sidhe, mutants with superpowers, and supernatural monsters, the world is pretty much the same as what we're used to. Apparently, all the great scientific and medical advancements thanks to super-inventors have been cancelled out by bad stuff due to supervillains and mad scientists.
* On Website/WrestleCrap, Rewriting the Book has some stories that end up like this in some way.

to:

** In addition, the setting's "multi-verse" is based on the idea of the multiple-world hypothesis, in which every time any person makes a choice, a new alternate timeline is branched off that reflects those choices. However, timelines that are based on irrelevant choices (for example, having toast and eggs for breakfast instead of cereal) tend to re-merge further down the time stream with all of its similarly irrelevant alternaties.
alternatives.
* In ''Literature/GreenAntarctica'', something happened so that Antarctica didn't have the glaciers and ice sheets that they did in OTL. Yet World History still went on the same until the Tsalal got into the picture.
* In ''[[WebOriginal/{{KeitAi}} Keit-Ai]]'', this is necessary for the plot to work. Otherwise, the [[AlternateUniverse alternate universe]] [[AlternateSelf versions]] of the boy and the girl would end up too different from them, resulting in a different story altogether.
* In ''RedDawnPlus20'', the Chernobyl disaster still happened as scheduled, but this time, instead of Soviet engineering incompetence, it was American military intel incompetence that destroyed the reactor. Intel said the reactors weren't online when they were set to be targeted. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero Oops]].
* In ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' Church gets the opportunity to save himself and his friends, but despite every butterfly he tried to stomp on, some other event kicks in and the only thing he changed is that he is the one who cause him team's eventual demises. Except [[spoiler: It all turns out to be a ruse by Gary, who traps him in a simulation of a time loop.]]
* In one dimension of [[Roleplay/WeAreOurAvatars WAOA]], Aurora was a Dragonborn. Her habits haven't changed at all. In fact, she sent a cake with moon sugar inside it. [[IntoxicationEnsues The end result was predictable]].
* In the WhateleyUniverse, ''WhateleyUniverse'', despite the fact that the world has a Lovecraft Lite mythos, ancient Sidhe, mutants with superpowers, and supernatural monsters, the world is pretty much the same as what we're used to. Apparently, all the great scientific and medical advancements thanks to super-inventors have been cancelled out by bad stuff due to supervillains and mad scientists.
* On Website/WrestleCrap, ''Website/WrestleCrap'', Rewriting the Book has some stories that end up like this in some way.
7th Feb '17 10:25:12 AM Game_Fan
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* ''{{Travelers}}'' has possibly those most resilient timeline in all of fiction. In the second episode that save 11,000 people and there is absolutely no effect to the timeline. Half way through first season they manage to [[spoiler:prevent an asteroid impact that kills '''''91 million people''''']] and the change to the future is so subtle that operations continue for weeks without them realizing that anything was altered at all.

to:

* ''{{Travelers}}'' has possibly those most resilient timeline in all of fiction. In the second episode that they save 11,000 people and there is absolutely no effect to the timeline. Half way through first season they manage to [[spoiler:prevent an asteroid impact that kills '''''91 million people''''']] and the change to the future is so subtle that operations continue for weeks without them realizing that anything was altered at all.
This list shows the last 10 events of 306. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InSpiteOfANail