History Main / ImproperlyPlacedFirearms

25th Apr '16 2:22:53 PM Kadorhal
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* The ECOAS spec ops troops in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' use FN P90s, despite the series taking place at least a century or two into the future. Earlier in the timeline (such as in ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamThe08thMSTeam The 08th MS Team]]''), Federation troops are often shown using rifles that are very nearly carbon copies of the Enfield [=SA80=], while Zeon troops are described (but not shown) as using old AK-47s.

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* The ECOAS spec ops troops in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' use FN P90s, despite the series taking place at least a century or two into the future. Earlier in the timeline (such as in ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamThe08thMSTeam The 08th MS Team]]''), Federation troops are often shown using rifles that are very nearly carbon copies of the Enfield [=SA80=], while Zeon troops are described (but not shown) as using old AK-47s. The [[HumongousMecha mobile suits']] non-beam-firing weapons are also often based off of real-world weapons, such as the updated Zaku machine gun from ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam0083StardustMemory Gundam 0083]]'' being a dressed-up AR-15.
25th Apr '16 1:55:49 PM Kadorhal
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** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry thanks to these games: the FN [=P90TR=], F2000, and in the third game the Five-seveN are all used exclusively by the Russians and Makarov's Inner Circle, while the FN FAL appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the Five-seveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service (there's a reason the version of the weapon in-game is the Five-seveN '''USG''). To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the Five-seveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real Five-seveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonWealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.

to:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry thanks to these games: the FN [=P90TR=], F2000, [=P90TR=] and in the third game the Five-seveN F2000 are all used exclusively by the Russians and Makarov's Inner Circle, while the FN FAL appears exclusively in the hands of other enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the Five-seveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service (there's a reason the version of the weapon in-game is the Five-seveN '''USG''). To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the Five-seveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real Five-seveN carries 20 rounds supplier in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta).reality. The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India... neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; ''[=MW2=]''; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonWealth Commonwealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.



* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian belt-fed machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces, but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the Five-Seven, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian belt-fed machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces, but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the Five-Seven, FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971.1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.



** The Russian army in ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' uses two Russian assault rifles and a handgun alongside ''Chinese'' machine guns and sniper rifles and a ''Swedish'' RPG. What's even weirder is that the game features a wide assortment of much more sensible modern Russian firearms[[note]]though still preferring rare guns over actual standard-issue hardware - there is no AK-74 in the game, instead settling for the prototype AEK-971 and the special forces-only AN-94[[/note]], but the majority of them are only usable in multiplayer.

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** The Russian army in ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' uses two Russian assault rifles and a handgun alongside ''Chinese'' machine guns and sniper rifles and a ''Swedish'' RPG. What's even weirder is that the game features a wide assortment of much more sensible modern Russian firearms[[note]]though still preferring rare guns over actual standard-issue hardware - there is no AK-74 in the game, instead settling for the prototype AEK-971 and AEK-971, the special forces-only AN-94[[/note]], AN-94, and the [[SmallReferencePools far more well-known]] AKS-74U carbine[[/note]], but the majority of them are only usable in multiplayer.



* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid-26th century, still fluffs most of the UNSC's weapons as using cartridges from the 20th century. Apparantly humanity has made no advancements whatsoever in ammunition in 600 years, other than making a caseless weapon (the SMG from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and on) that's actually viable in sustained combat. There's also the sniper rifle, which at first glance appears to be a barely-modified Denel NTW-14.5. To be fair, Africa does seem to have become a major world power in ''Halo'' [[spoiler:(at least until the Elites glass the continent to stop the Flood in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'')]].

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid-26th century, still fluffs most of the UNSC's weapons as using cartridges from the 20th century. Apparantly humanity has made no advancements whatsoever in ammunition in 600 years, other than making a caseless weapon (the SMG from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and on) that's actually viable in sustained combat. The series also [[BiggerIsBetter tends to favor larger calibers]] than real-world militaries would use for the same purposes no matter how overpowered such a round would be, which already reaches the apex of silliness in [[VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved the first game]] - the pistol is firing what is essentially [[HandCannon .50 Action Express]], yet ''none'' of your allies seen using it have any issues [[FiringOneHanded one-handing the thing]] without the gun smacking into their faces after every shot. There's also the sniper rifle, which at first glance appears to be a barely-modified Denel NTW-14.5. To be fair, Africa does seem to have become a major world power in ''Halo'' [[spoiler:(at least until the Elites glass the continent to stop the Flood in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'')]].
16th Apr '16 3:22:38 PM Kadorhal
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** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN [=P90TR=] and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN [=FiveseveN=]) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN [=FAL=] appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the [=FiveseveN=] actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the [=FiveseveN=]...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real [=FiveseveN=] carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonWealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.

to:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: industry thanks to these games: the FN [=P90TR=] [=P90TR=], F2000, and FN 2000 (and in the third game, game the FN [=FiveseveN=]) Five-seveN are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, Makarov's Inner Circle, while the FN [=FAL=] FAL appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the [=FiveseveN=] Five-seveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. Service (there's a reason the version of the weapon in-game is the Five-seveN '''USG''). To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the [=FiveseveN=]...Five-seveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real [=FiveseveN=] Five-seveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonWealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.



** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with.

to:

** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with.with, and which are called with a "Fox" brevity code (used only for air-to-air munitions).



* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELINE Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELINE FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.
22nd Mar '16 7:17:24 PM Bat178
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** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN [=P90TR=] and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN [=FiveseveN=]) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN [=FAL=] appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the [=FiveseveN=] actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the [=FiveseveN=]...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real [=FiveseveN=] carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonFwealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.

to:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN [=P90TR=] and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN [=FiveseveN=]) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN [=FAL=] appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the [=FiveseveN=] actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the [=FiveseveN=]...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real [=FiveseveN=] carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British CommonFwealth CommonWealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.
20th Mar '16 3:20:54 AM Wuz
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** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN P90TR and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN FiveseveN) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN FAL appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the FiveseveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the FiveseveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real FiveseveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British Commonwealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.

to:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN P90TR [=P90TR=] and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN FiveseveN) [=FiveseveN=]) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN FAL [=FAL=] appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the FiveseveN [=FiveseveN=] actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the FiveseveN...[=FiveseveN=]...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real FiveseveN [=FiveseveN=] carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British Commonwealth CommonFwealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Infinity Ward apparently thought they looked cool, so here they are.



* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the L1A1 Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELINE Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the L1A1 [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELINE Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.
16th Mar '16 4:08:58 PM Godzillafan93
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** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN P90TR and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN FiveseveN) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the FiveseveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the FiveseveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real FiveseveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III. But Treyarch apparently though they looked cool, so here they are.

to:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN P90TR and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN FiveseveN) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, while the FN FAL appears exclusively in the hands of enemies, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the FiveseveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the FiveseveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real FiveseveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III. III; as for the FAL, it was the primary firearm of the British Commonwealth during the Cold War, and is roughly analogous to the American M14; at one time it was meant to be ''the'' standard NATO rifle, so finding it in the hands of Russian soldiers is somewhat bizarre. But Treyarch Infinity Ward apparently though thought they looked cool, so here they are.



* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them). Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

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* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by the ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them). them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the L1A1 Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELINE Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971. Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.
15th Mar '16 2:50:32 PM Godzillafan93
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Added DiffLines:

** You might be excused for thinking Fabrique Nationale is a subsidiary of the Russian arms industry: the FN P90TR and FN 2000 (and in the third game, the FN FiveseveN) are all used exclusively by the Russians and INNER CIRCLE, despite FN being a NATO supplier, and the FiveseveN actually being standard issue for the US Secret Service. To be fair, by the third game, Delta Force also uses the FiveseveN...except it has very blatantly replaced the Beretta 92SB from the previous games, down to having the same capacity (a real FiveseveN carries 20 rounds in the magazine; the one in-game carries 15, like the Beretta). The P90 is a beloved PDW for NATO forces, and the F2000 is in service with Pakistan and India...neither of whom are belligerents in World War III. But Treyarch apparently though they looked cool, so here they are.
6th Mar '16 2:44:26 PM dracogeorge
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* During the UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, America's main service weapon, the M16 rifle, had serious reliability problems and was prone to jamming in the middle of shootouts. Because of this, many American units preferred to ditch their M16s in favor of [=AK47=] rifles (A rifle highly prized for reliability) they captured from enemy troops. This created significant problems, not only because the [=AK47=] used a different kind of ammo then the type issued to Americans, but also because the [=AK47=] made a distinctly different sound then the M16 when it was fired. Thus Americans firing [=AK47=] rifles risked being mistaken for Vietnamese troops by other American units in the area who had not come into visual range.
14th Feb '16 5:02:31 PM Kadorhal
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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid 26th century, stil fluffs most of the weapons as using carridges from the 20th century. Apparantly humanity has made no advancements whatsoever in ammunition in 600 years.
** To be fair, Africa does seem to have become a major world power in ''Halo'' [[spoiler:(at least until the Elites glass the continent to stop the Flood in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'')]].

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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid 26th mid-26th century, stil still fluffs most of the UNSC's weapons as using carridges cartridges from the 20th century. Apparantly humanity has made no advancements whatsoever in ammunition in 600 years.
**
years, other than making a caseless weapon (the SMG from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and on) that's actually viable in sustained combat. There's also the sniper rifle, which at first glance appears to be a barely-modified Denel NTW-14.5. To be fair, Africa does seem to have become a major world power in ''Halo'' [[spoiler:(at least until the Elites glass the continent to stop the Flood in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'')]].



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' introduces Tommy Guns (using 50-round drum magazines) and Grease Guns as the only .45 caliber weapons. It also has town guards carrying as standard issue the rare G11 caseless weapons, Pancor Jackhammer shotguns, and CAWS shotguns.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' introduces Tommy Guns (using 50-round drum magazines) and Grease Guns as the only .45 caliber weapons. It also has town guards carrying as standard issue the rare G11 caseless weapons, weapons and the never-produced Pancor Jackhammer shotguns, and H&K CAWS shotguns.



* Enemies early in ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' are armed with the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Individual_Combat_Weapon AICW]], a prototype weapon system that was essentially to the Australian version of the AUG as the [[RareGuns XM29 OICW]] was to the American M16. Unlike most other occurrences of this trope, however, this is actually a plot point, as after Sam overhears a guard test-firing his weapon (noting that he [[GoodGunsBadGuns thinks Kalashnikov when he thinks of guerrillas]], and has had enough of them fired at him over his life to know that what he heard was not one) he is given optional objectives for this and the second mission to find and tag weapon crates to find out where exactly small-time Colombian guerrillas are getting such advanced hardware from.

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* Enemies early in ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory'' are armed with the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Individual_Combat_Weapon AICW]], a prototype weapon system that was essentially to the Australian version of the AUG as the [[RareGuns XM29 OICW]] was to the American M16. Unlike most other occurrences of this trope, however, this is actually a plot point, as after Sam overhears a guard test-firing his weapon (noting that he [[GoodGunsBadGuns thinks Kalashnikov when he thinks of guerrillas]], and has had enough of them fired at him over his life to know that what he heard was not one) he is given optional objectives for this and the second mission to find and tag weapon crates to find out where exactly small-time Colombian guerrillas are getting such advanced hardware from.
14th Feb '16 4:40:33 PM Kadorhal
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* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941. The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other (though it's never explained how Spike got a plasma cannon on his Swordfish when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the main cast's weapons are out of date ''now''. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.

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* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941. 941, Jet a Walther P99 and Faye a Glock 30. The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained how Spike got a plasma cannon on his Swordfish when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the main cast's weapons are out of date ''now''. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.



** [=AKMs=], [=AKMSUs=], or Chinese AK replicas modified (such as adding the muzzle brake) to look like AK-74's and AKS-74's since Hollywood did not have access to those weapons at those times.
** [[TheDragon Sgt. Kourov]] uses an AKM mounted with a US-made M203 grenade launcher, instead of a Russian made grenade launcher for the same reasons above. Because the two weapons weren't made for each other, the actors were forced to to sort of grip the magazine in an incredibly awkward fashion to fire the launcher.

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** [=AKMs=], [=AKMSUs=], or Chinese AK replicas modified (such as adding the muzzle brake) to look like AK-74's AK-74s and AKS-74's AKS-74s since Hollywood did not have access to those weapons at those times.
** [[TheDragon Sgt. Kourov]] uses an AKM mounted with a US-made M203 grenade launcher, instead of a Russian made grenade launcher for the same reasons above. Because the two weapons weren't made for each other, the actors were forced to to sort of [[http://www.imfdb.org/images/8/84/Rambo3-AKM2034A.jpg sort-of grip the magazine in an incredibly awkward fashion fashion]] to fire the launcher.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ImproperlyPlacedFirearms