History Main / ImproperlyPlacedFirearms

17th Nov '16 3:50:53 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Mal's signature pistol in ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' is based off a US Civil War-era Volcanic repeater for the Western feel. From it's on-screen performance it's much more accurate and powerful and its use is accompanied by a hissing/whirring noise showing there's evidently something more high tech in there. The prop itself is a shell built over a contemporary Taurus Model 85. Jayne's handgun is a modified replica Civil War era LeMat, an American designed, French built revolver that included a shotgun barrel. A Lemat was reportedly the favored sidearm of Confederate Cavalry Gen. J.E.B. Stuart.

to:

* Mal's signature pistol in ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' is based off a US Civil War-era Volcanic repeater for the Western feel. From it's on-screen performance it's much more accurate and powerful and its use is accompanied by a hissing/whirring noise showing there's evidently something more high tech in there. The prop itself is a shell built over a contemporary Taurus Model 85. Jayne's handgun is a modified replica Civil War era LeMat, an American designed, French built Civil War-era [=LeMat=], an American-designed, French-built revolver that included a shotgun barrel. A Lemat was reportedly the favored sidearm of Confederate Cavalry Gen. J.E.B. Stuart. barrel.



* The box art for ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' depicts Nazis using M16s, that [[ShurFineGuns fire while falling through air]], no less. The box art for its ''Spear of Destiny'' expansion features the hero smashing open the glass case of said spear with a Kalashnikov.
* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm, which being a militia force meant as a desperate attempt to hold off the Soviets was about as far from "elite" as possible.

to:

* The box art for ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' depicts Nazis using M16s, that [[ShurFineGuns fire while falling through air]], no less.less, while the [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SNES]] port's box has an undefined character (presumably the hero) carrying not only another M16, but also what appears to be a Beretta 92. The box art for its ''Spear of Destiny'' expansion features the hero smashing open the glass case of said spear with a Kalashnikov.
* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm, which being a militia force made up of people who hadn't already been in the regular army and meant as a desperate attempt to hold off the Soviets Soviets, was about as far from "elite" as possible.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, RPK-74 used in the first game, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the KRISS KARD pistol (not (still not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".PSR".
** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3'' deliberately invokes this in the "Demon Within" level, most of which takes place in a weird sort-of flashback to the Battle of the Bulge from World War II - period-accurate soldiers, wearing period-accurate uniforms, getting support from period-accurate armor, but other than the rare appearance of a mounted [=MG42=], all using the same array of fictional futuristic weapons the player gets, all of which are from at least a hundred and twenty years in the future from when the actual battle took place.
7th Nov '16 5:43:48 AM REV6Pilot
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Grease Gun shows up in the non-WWII game ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune II'', in which it serves as the main [[YouKeepUsingThatWord "assault rifle"]]... of the ''Czechoslovakian army''.

to:

* The Grease Gun shows up in the non-WWII game ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune II'', in which it II''
** The Grease Gun
serves as the main [[YouKeepUsingThatWord "assault rifle"]]... of the ''Czechoslovakian army''.army in 1989''.
** In the same game, literally ''everyone'' uses the Colt 1911 as sidearm. Forget Beretta, Makarov, Norinco, or any other brand or caliber that would be more plausible for non-American folks to carry.
** To a very slightly less absurd extent, all AK-74 assault rifles you find have been modified to chamber 5.56mm NATO. While it makes sense for the Shop's armory to have theirs modded as such for logistics's sake, it's not nearly as plausible for terrorist cells to do the same considering how much easier the 74's original 5.45mm ammo is to come by.
2nd Nov '16 12:42:41 AM flaktrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Odd example in ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', this is one of the movies where real AK-74s are shown alongside fake ones (Both modified AKM or Type 56 like the Rambo examples as well as rubber props). Bond himself did get a hold of a real AKS-74U. Oddly, Xenia and Trevelyan is seen with fake ones in some scenes. Probably because they don't have enough of the real AK-74 as the movie demands.
20th Oct '16 10:39:51 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A very common one is use of the wrong AK variant. Sometimes you see Soviet/ex-Soviet soldiers in a reasonably modern setting wielding the original AK or the AKM. In reality, they'd been mostly replaced in Soviet service by the AK-74 (which can be identified by a smaller, less-curved, orange-coloured magazine, as well as a large muzzle brake on the end of the barrel). ''Film/LordOfWar'' is an example. Recently, however, 7.62mm [=AKs=], either former mainstays of the AKM line, or more modern AK-10x series, made a resurgence, after combat experience in Afghanistan and Chechnya demonstrated that the lighter bullet of the AK-74 tends to ricochet at the slightest prodding, and is thus unsuitable in forested areas. Thus there can be some unexpected aversion, when a bumbling producer [[TheyJustDidntCare who just doesn't care]] [[AccidentallyAccurate accidentally gets things straight.]]

to:

* A very common one is use of the wrong AK variant. Sometimes you see Soviet/ex-Soviet soldiers in a reasonably modern setting wielding the original AK or the AKM. In reality, they'd been mostly replaced in Soviet service by the AK-74 (which can be identified by a smaller, less-curved, orange-coloured magazine, as well as a large muzzle brake on the end of the barrel). ''Film/LordOfWar'' is an example. Recently, however, 7.62mm [=AKs=], either former mainstays of the AKM line, or more modern AK-10x series, made a resurgence, after combat experience in Afghanistan and Chechnya demonstrated that the lighter bullet of the AK-74 tends to ricochet at the slightest prodding, and is thus unsuitable in forested areas. Thus there can be some unexpected aversion, when a bumbling producer [[TheyJustDidntCare who just doesn't care]] [[AccidentallyAccurate accidentally gets things straight.]]



* [[TheyJustDidntCare Hilariously]] in the film version of ''Film/BulletProofMonk'', the Nazi villain's {{Mooks}} use Uzis. The Uzi was created by an Israeli.

to:

* [[TheyJustDidntCare Hilariously]] Hilariously in the film version of ''Film/BulletProofMonk'', the Nazi villain's {{Mooks}} use Uzis. The Uzi was created by an Israeli.
17th Oct '16 2:32:52 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** UNIT, an elite military formation, is armed with bolt-action Lee-Enfield rifles which had been declared obselete in British service nearly twenty years beforehand; they also had WW2-era Vickers and Bren machine-guns[[note]]Brens are still in service, just about. But the Vickers dates back to before WW1[[/note]]

to:

** UNIT, an elite military formation, is armed with bolt-action Lee-Enfield rifles which had been declared obselete in British service nearly twenty years beforehand; they also had WW2-era Vickers and Bren machine-guns[[note]]Brens are still in service, just about. But the Vickers dates back to before WW1[[/note]]UsefulNotes/WW1[[/note]]
13th Oct '16 12:37:22 AM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm.Volkssturm, which being a militia force meant as a desperate attempt to hold off the Soviets was about as far from "elite" as possible.



** What's funny to note about ''Modern Warfare 2'' is that ''only one of the weapons the Russians use makes sense''. This is the Dragunov SVD - and even then, it's still in its original, older wooden-furniture version, rather than the synthetic SVD-M that modern Russian forces actually use. The RPG-7 makes some sense, but even that is not the favored rocket launcher anymore, nor has it been for quite a while. Most of the other guns used by the game's Russian forces ''aren't even Russian'' - for example, the Israeli TAR-21, the French FAMAS, or the Austrian Steyr AUG. The other ones that are Russian, such as the RPD and AK-47, have long since been replaced in military use. Still others, like the Amsel Striker, AA-12, and KRISS Vector, had ''not even been put into production'' at the time of release.

to:

** What's funny to note about ''Modern Warfare 2'' is that ''only one of the weapons the Russians use makes sense''. This is the Dragunov SVD - and even then, it's still in its original, older wooden-furniture version, rather than the synthetic SVD-M that modern Russian forces actually use. The RPG-7 makes some sense, but even that is not the favored rocket launcher anymore, nor has it been for quite a while. Most of the other guns used by the game's Russian forces ''aren't even Russian'' - for example, the Israeli TAR-21, the French FAMAS, or the Austrian Steyr AUG. The other ones that are Russian, such as the RPD and AK-47, have long since been replaced in military use. Still others, like the Amsel Armsel Striker, AA-12, and KRISS Vector, had ''not even been put into production'' at the time of release.



** The Russian army in ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' uses two Russian assault rifles and a handgun alongside ''Chinese'' machine guns and sniper rifles and a ''Swedish'' RPG. What's even weirder is that the game features a wide assortment of much more sensible modern Russian firearms[[note]]though still preferring rare guns over actual standard-issue hardware - the AK-74 isn't in the game, instead, there's the prototype AEK-971, the special forces-only AN-94, and the [[SmallReferencePools far more well-known]] AKS-74U carbine[[/note]], but the majority of them are only usable in multiplayer.
** In general, starting with ''VideoGame/Battlefield3'', players can choose from a wide assortment of weapons... Such as weapons that were never used by the playable factions, weapons that were only designed for civilian use, and even weapons that ''never even left the prototype stage.''

to:

** The Russian army in ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' uses two Russian assault rifles and a handgun alongside ''Chinese'' machine guns and sniper rifles and a ''Swedish'' RPG. What's even weirder is that the game features a wide assortment of much more sensible modern Russian firearms[[note]]though still preferring rare guns over actual standard-issue hardware - the standard AK-74 isn't or AK-74M is completely ignored in the game, instead, there's favor of the prototype AEK-971, the special forces-only AN-94, and the less-issued but [[SmallReferencePools far more well-known]] AKS-74U carbine[[/note]], but the majority of them are only usable in multiplayer.
** In general, starting with ''VideoGame/Battlefield3'', players can choose from a wide assortment of weapons... Such such as weapons that were never used by the playable factions, factions (such as the F2000, the [=KH2002=], and the FAMAS Surbaissé), weapons that were only designed for civilian use, use (like the Cobray Street Sweeper and Barrett Model 98B), and even weapons that ''never even left the prototype stage.''stage'' (the MP-412 REX, Magpul PDR, and Pancor Jackhammer).



* While all the other guns in the original ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' (set around 2293) are futuristic enough, the game's sniper rifle is merely a long-barreled, early model M16 with a scope attached to the carry handle, a rather out-of-place ShoutOut to ''Manga/{{Golgo 13}}''. Lampshaded in the official site's timeline of the series, where the in-universe explanation for replacing it with the Lightning Gun in ''[[VideoGame/UnrealTournament2004 UT2003]]'' was that it was "a relic of centuries past".
* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid-26th century, still fluffs most of the UNSC's weapons as using cartridges originating from the 20th century. Though canon has occasionally implied that these aren't ''quite'' the same as the 20th century originals, the only apparent advancement in ammunition we see in the original trilogy is a caseless weapon (the SMG from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and on) that's actually viable in sustained combat. The series also [[BiggerIsBetter tends to favor larger calibers]] than real-world militaries would use for the same purposes no matter how overpowered such a round would be, which already reaches the apex of silliness in [[VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved the first game]] - the pistol is firing what is essentially [[HandCannon .50 Action Express]], yet ''none'' of your allies seen using it have any issues [[FiringOneHanded one-handing the thing]] without the gun smacking into their faces after every shot. There's also the sniper rifle, which at first glance appears to be a barely-modified Denel NTW-14.5.

to:

* While all the other guns in the original ''VideoGame/UnrealTournament'' (set around 2293) are futuristic enough, the game's sniper rifle is merely a long-barreled, early model M16 with a scope attached to the carry handle, a rather out-of-place ShoutOut to ''Manga/{{Golgo 13}}''. Lampshaded in the old official site's timeline of the series, where the in-universe explanation for replacing it with the Lightning Gun in ''[[VideoGame/UnrealTournament2004 UT2003]]'' was that it was "a relic of centuries past".
* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', set in the mid-26th century, still fluffs most of the UNSC's weapons as using cartridges originating from the 20th century. Though canon has occasionally implied that these aren't ''quite'' the same as the 20th century originals, the only apparent advancement in ammunition we see in the original trilogy is a caseless weapon (the SMG from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' and on) that's actually viable in sustained combat. The series also [[BiggerIsBetter tends to favor larger calibers]] than real-world militaries would use for the same purposes no matter how overpowered such a round would be, which already reaches the apex of silliness in [[VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved the first game]] - the pistol is firing what is essentially [[HandCannon .50 Action Express]], yet while the SuperSoldier Master Chief properly uses both hands to fire it, ''none'' of your allies seen using it (and none of whom are augmented in any way, mind) have any issues [[FiringOneHanded one-handing the thing]] without the gun smacking into their faces after every shot. There's also the sniper rifle, which at first glance appears to be a barely-modified Denel NTW-14.5.



* The armored vehicle variant shows up in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'', with its TwentyMinutesInTheFuture setting. Many of the vehicles such as the [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Light_tank_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 M2 Bradley]] (here called a "light tank" [[TanksButNoTanks which it isn't]]), the [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Artillery_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 M110 Howitzer]], and [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Apache_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 AH-64 Apache]] are featured, all more-or-less contemporaneous U.S. equipment. The only problem is that many of them (including the above three) were ''Nod'' units. Sure, the United States hasn't been above supplying -- [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters let's call them "partisans"]] -- in the past, but it doesn't usually ship them current-model military vehicles at the same time as it funds the UN force opposing them. This gets even worse in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRenegade'', where Nod now has the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing-Sikorsky_RAH-66_Comanche RAH-66 Comanche]] stealth helicopter'', a design that was hyped for a number of years but ultimately was not adopted and [[RareVehicles only had two prototypes]]. On the other hand, intentionally or not it could be a demonstration of how technology ended up going in different ways thanks to the arrival of Tiberium - cutscenes, for instance, indicate that the YF-23, another aircraft that only had two prototypes in reality, is GDI's standard jet fighter before they introduce the completely fictional Orca.
* Enemies early in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory'' are armed with the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Individual_Combat_Weapon AICW]], a prototype weapon system that was essentially to the Australian version of the AUG as the [[RareGuns XM29 OICW]] was to the American M16. Unlike most other occurrences of this trope, however, this is actually a plot point, as after Sam overhears a guard test-firing his weapon (noting that he [[GoodGunsBadGuns thinks Kalashnikov when he thinks of guerrillas]], and has had enough of them fired at him over his life to know that what he heard was not one) he is given optional objectives for this and the second mission to find and tag weapon crates to find out where exactly small-time Colombian guerrillas are getting such advanced hardware from.

to:

* The armored vehicle variant shows up in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'', with its TwentyMinutesInTheFuture setting. Many of the vehicles such as the [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Light_tank_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 M2 Bradley]] (here called a "light tank" [[TanksButNoTanks which it isn't]]), the [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Artillery_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 M110 Howitzer]], and [[http://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Apache_%28Tiberian_Dawn%29 AH-64 Apache]] are featured, all more-or-less contemporaneous U.S. equipment. The only problem is that many of them (including the above three) were ''Nod'' units. Sure, the United States hasn't been above supplying -- supplying... [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters let's call them "partisans"]] -- "partisans"]], in the past, but it doesn't usually ship them current-model military vehicles at the same time as it funds the UN force opposing them. This gets even worse in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRenegade'', where Nod now has the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing-Sikorsky_RAH-66_Comanche RAH-66 Comanche]] stealth helicopter'', a design that was hyped for a number of years (and also ended up semi-properly showing up in ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerGenerals Generals]]'' as a US-only helicopter) but ultimately was not adopted and [[RareVehicles only had two prototypes]]. On the other hand, intentionally or not it could be a demonstration of how technology ended up going in different ways from reality thanks to the economic repercussions of Tiberium's arrival of Tiberium - cutscenes, for instance, indicate that the YF-23, another aircraft that only had two prototypes in reality, is GDI's standard jet fighter before they introduce the completely fictional Orca.
Orca, while the YF-22, the winning competitor in the Advanced Tactical Fighter program that was developed into the F-22 Raptor, is used by Nod in those cutscenes.
* Enemies early in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory'' are armed with the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Individual_Combat_Weapon AICW]], a prototype weapon system that was essentially to the Australian version of the AUG as the [[RareGuns XM29 OICW]] was to the American M16. Unlike most other occurrences of this trope, however, this is actually a plot point, as after Sam overhears a guard test-firing his weapon (noting that he [[GoodGunsBadGuns thinks Kalashnikov when he thinks of guerrillas]], and has had enough of them those fired at him over his life to know that what he heard was not one) he is given optional objectives for this and the second mission to find and tag weapon crates to find out where exactly small-time Colombian guerrillas are getting such advanced hardware from.



** In ''Literature/GenerationKill'', Captain America is chewed out by his very annoyed Sergeant for this very reason.

to:

** In ''Literature/GenerationKill'', Captain America America, who is frequently seen carrying some variety of AK alongside his standard M16, is chewed out by his very annoyed Sergeant for this very reason.



*** Two fun facts on the ammo score; first, the Russian [=SMGs=] that used 7.62x25mm Tokarev easily fit into the German logistics train because it was an enhanced version of the 7.63x25mm Mauser round, which the Germans had lots of. And second, the reasons the British Sten Gun was chambered for 9mm Parabellum, the German issue round, were first of all that no comparable self-loading pistol round was made in England ([=SMGs=] don't work too well with rimmed revolver cartridges), and second, when the Italian forces in North Africa surrendered to the British 8th Army in 1941 (before the Afrika Korps arrived), part of the booty was several million rounds of Italian-made 9mm Para ammunition, their Beretta [=SMGs=] also used it (this one actually backfired, sometimes horribly: the Italian rounds came either in an underpowered variant for older UsefulNotes/WorldWarI models or an overpowered one for the Beretta Mod. 38: if used on more modern guns, the underpowered rounds would fail to cycle and cause a jam, and the overpowered ones could only be used with the Mod. [=38s=] or they'd literally blow up the gun).

to:

*** Two fun facts on the ammo score; first, the Russian [=SMGs=] that used 7.62x25mm Tokarev easily fit into the German logistics train because it was an enhanced version of the 7.63x25mm Mauser round, which the Germans had lots of. And second, the reasons the British Sten Gun was chambered for 9mm Parabellum, the German issue round, were first of all that no comparable self-loading pistol round was made in England ([=SMGs=] don't work too well with rimmed revolver cartridges), cartridges); and second, when the Italian forces in North Africa surrendered to the British 8th Army in 1941 (before the Afrika Korps arrived), part of the booty was several million rounds of Italian-made 9mm Para ammunition, as their Beretta [=SMGs=] also used it (this one actually backfired, sometimes horribly: the Italian rounds came either in an underpowered variant for older UsefulNotes/WorldWarI models or an overpowered one for the Beretta Mod. 38: if used on more modern guns, the underpowered rounds would fail to cycle and cause a jam, and the overpowered ones could only be used with the Mod. [=38s=] or they'd literally blow up the gun).
12th Oct '16 7:02:00 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup".setup" (and a half-hearted one at that, considering all the other guns on board are Soviet [=SVDs=]). Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the not-yet-in-production-as-of-this-writing KRISS KARD pistol and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the not-yet-in-production-as-of-this-writing KRISS KARD pistol (not in production even years after the game came out) and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".
3rd Sep '16 9:50:17 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with, and which are called with a "Fox" brevity code (used only for air-to-air munitions).
* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian PKP Pecheneg that's actually in use by modern Russian forces, but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use [[labelnote:Fun fact]]It is officially designated by the Russian military as a ''carbine'', because it has a rifled barrel[[/labelnote]]. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.

to:

** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with, and which are called with a "Fox" brevity code (used only for air-to-air munitions).
munitions). Not to mention as well that the US Navy is apparently the force involved in the attack on the Gulag, and they don't use the F-15 (nor would they ever use an Air Force plane if they can help it).
* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian PKP Pecheneg machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces, forces (the PKP Pecheneg - ignoring, of course, that it's meant primarily for mounted usage), but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2,'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use [[labelnote:Fun fact]]It is officially designated by the Russian military as a ''carbine'', because it has a rifled barrel[[/labelnote]].use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an 80's gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]...or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the not-yet-in-production-as-of-this-writing KRISS KARD pistol and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' doesn't have nearly as many examples, partly since there are only four missions set during the Cold War like in the previous game, but it's still around if you look hard enough. A particular screamer comes in the second flashback level, set during the UsefulNotes/SovietInvasionOfAfghanistan. It would have made all the sense in the world for the game to give some of those mid-80's Soviet troops the RPK-74, given that it was available in the previous game and 90% of the flashback arsenal is lifted directly from it - instead, they're given the old belt-fed RPD machine guns the RPK-74 replaced in the real world. Worse, that RPD model [[PropRecycling is lifted directly from]] ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare ''Modern Warfare 2'', complete with a Picatinny rail over the feed tray that shouldn't exist for another nine years at that point. The player also has the option of invoking this with the singleplayer version of Create-a-Class; nothing is preventing them from [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece taking an 80's '80s gun they like into]] the [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2025 levels]], for instance using an old M16 (misidentified as the improved [=M16A1=]) when the standard JSOC rifles seem to be the [=HK416=] and a slightly dressed-up [=XM8=]...[=XM8=]... or, after completing the game, [[AnachronismStew doing the opposite]] and, say, fighting a battle in the Angolan Civil War with the not-yet-in-production-as-of-this-writing KRISS KARD pistol and a completely fictional weapon like the [[ArmorPiercingAttack cover-penetrating]], [[XRayVision x-ray-scoped]] "Storm PSR".



** Most of the Japanese classes in general all use German weapons, while the Engineer uses the experimental and never issued Type 5 Rifle. The only exception is the Type 99 LMG used by the Assault class, and even then it was originally an STG44 prior to a patch.

to:

** Most of the Japanese classes in general all use German weapons, while the Engineer uses the experimental and never issued Type 5 Rifle. The only exception is Assault class used the [=StG 44=], though like the above, a patch eventually replaced it with the Type 99 LMG used by the Assault class, and even then it was originally an STG44 prior to a patch.99.
17th Aug '16 6:14:46 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* British infantry units realised there was no comparison between their Bren guns and the standard German squad MG's (MG34, MG42) when it came to laying down sheer volume of fire.[[note]]The Bren remained unparelleled for delivering short bursts of extremely accurate MG fire. But sometimes you need more than a thirty-round magazine can provide.[[/note]] As often as not captured German MG's would be pressed into service - but at the risk of their distinctive sound bringing down the wrong sort of attention from friendly forces mistaking the users for Germans.



** British infantry units realized there was no comparison between their Bren guns and the standard German squad [=MGs=] ([=MG34=] and [=MG42=]) when it came to laying down sheer volume of fire (the Bren remained unparalleled for delivering short bursts of extremely accurate MG fire, but sometimes you need more than a thirty-round magazine). As often as not captured German [=MGs=] would be pressed into service - but at the risk of their distinctive sound bringing down the wrong sort of attention from friendly forces mistaking the users for Germans. The Armored Corps in particular would often use German machine guns or others in the same 8mm Mauser, like the Besa, on some models of tanks because their supply chain was separate from the main Army's, thus not causing many issues by the use of non-standard equipment.



*** The Carcano Mod. 91 rifle and its variants have the others beat through sheer weirdness, being used by: Ethiopia (that actually acquired it ''before the Italian Army itself'': [[MagnificentBastard emperor Menelik]], aiming to shake the Italian protectorate, used the credits Italy had given him to buy it. As he was successful, he never paid for it); Bulgaria; Persia; Romania; Saudi Arabia; Finland (Italy had tried to switch to a more powerful rifle round but had to abort due the early start of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, so they shipped there all the new rounds they had manufactured and a number of rifles to help in the Winter War, where, after a trial period on the frontline, was issued to rear-guard troops and the Navy due the logistical issues of keeping the troops supplied and other issues); Somalia (as a consequence of its past as an Italian colony); ''Imperial Japan'' (after the [[UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar invasion of China]], all Arisaka production was required to supply the Army, so the Navy, that needed rifles too, contacted Italy under the terms of the Anti-Comintern Pact, and was supplied with 120,000 Carcano rifles modified to use a box magazine and the standard Japanese round); the Independent State of Croatia (a puppet state of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy); and the ''National Liberation Army of Libya during the 2011 civil war'' (another remnant of the past as an Italian colony. Militians found them in government arsenals or simply passed them down in the family until they were used again at war). Captured guns would be used by various states who found themselves with them... With an American-captured one being sold via mail order and used for [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy a rather infamous assassination]].

to:

*** The Carcano Mod. 91 rifle and its variants have the others beat through sheer weirdness, being used by: Ethiopia (that actually acquired it ''before the Italian Army itself'': [[MagnificentBastard emperor Menelik]], aiming to shake the Italian protectorate, used the credits Italy had given him to buy it. As he was successful, he never paid for it); Bulgaria; Persia; Romania; Saudi Arabia; Finland (Italy had tried to switch to a more powerful rifle round but had to abort due the early start of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, so they shipped there all the new rounds they had manufactured and a number of rifles to help in the Winter War, where, after a trial period on the frontline, was issued to rear-guard troops and the Navy due the logistical issues of keeping the troops supplied and other issues); Somalia (as a consequence of its past as an Italian colony); ''Imperial Japan'' (after the [[UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar invasion of China]], all Arisaka production was required to supply the Army, so the Navy, that needed rifles too, contacted Italy under the terms of the Anti-Comintern Pact, and was supplied with 120,000 Carcano rifles modified to use a box magazine and the standard Japanese round); the Independent State of Croatia (a puppet state of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy); and the ''National Liberation Army of Libya during the 2011 civil war'' (another remnant of the past as an Italian colony. Militians Militants found them in government arsenals or simply passed them down in the family until they were used again at war). Captured guns would be used by various states who found themselves with them... With with an American-captured one being sold via mail order and used for [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy a rather infamous assassination]].



* It should be noted however, that thanks to Lend-Lease Act, the Soviet Red Army utilised a substantial number of British Matilda, Cromwell and Churchill tanks, as well as American Sherman tanks.

to:

* It should be noted however, that thanks to Lend-Lease Act, the Soviet Red Army utilised a substantial number of British Matilda, Cromwell and Churchill tanks, as well as American Sherman tanks. Several American weapons also saw service with the Red Army thanks to Lend-Lease; the famous [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles AK]], in fact, had its bolt essentially copied from a leased M1 Garand.
14th Aug '16 11:03:18 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also {{AKA 47}}, ImprobableWeaponUsage, RareGuns, SelectiveHistoricalArmoury, JustPlaneWrong, TanksButNoTanks and ArtisticLicenseShips.

to:

See also {{AKA 47}}, AKA47, ImprobableWeaponUsage, RareGuns, SelectiveHistoricalArmoury, JustPlaneWrong, TanksButNoTanks and ArtisticLicenseShips.



** In the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels, Honor notoriously carries one and puts it to great use in the ''40th century'', when more contemporary weapons could easily tear apart a real-word tank. It turns out she's in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Creative_Anachronism SCA]], which by that time practice with gunpowder firearms the same way their modern counterparts practice archery. There are also noted to be several advantages to using a contemporary firearm, such as the fact that the sound of firing one is much more intimidating in a universe where people are used to the comparatively quiet "pew pew" of a pulser, and that modern weapons scanners search for a power source the M1911 simply doesn't have, making it easy to sneak into places..
** In John Barnes' ''Timeline Wars'', Mark Strang was previously a 20th century bodyguard with every reason to carry a 1911. He kept it when he got drafted into a time-travelling special forces outfit that gave him a gun which could tear apart modern tanks at [[{{BFG}} six miles, with two thousand homing rounds it can synthesize from scrap metal]]. His stated reasons for keeping it are that the above-mentioned SHAKK looks like kind of like a chromed super-soaker, whereas the [=M1911A1=] [[WeaponForIntimidation is much more obvious about what it does]], and that he actually knows how to fix the semi-auto if he breaks it.

to:

** In the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels, Honor notoriously carries one and puts it to great use in the ''40th century'', when more contemporary weapons could easily tear apart a real-word tank. It turns out she's in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Creative_Anachronism SCA]], which by that time practice with gunpowder firearms the same way their modern counterparts practice archery. There are also noted to be several advantages to using a contemporary firearm, such as the fact that the sound of firing one is [[BangBangBANG much more intimidating intimidating]] in a universe where people are used to the comparatively quiet "pew pew" of a pulser, and that it's easy to sneak into places because modern weapons weapon scanners search for a power source the M1911 simply doesn't have, making it easy to sneak into places..
have.
** In John Barnes' ''Timeline Wars'', Mark Strang was previously a 20th century bodyguard with every reason to carry a 1911. He kept it when he got drafted into a time-travelling special forces outfit that gave him a gun which could tear apart modern tanks at [[{{BFG}} six miles, with two thousand homing rounds it can synthesize from scrap metal]]. His stated reasons for keeping it are that the above-mentioned SHAKK looks like kind of like a chromed super-soaker, whereas the [=M1911A1=] [[WeaponForIntimidation is much more obvious about what it does]], and that he actually knows how to fix the semi-auto if he breaks it.



* Some productions going for a British feel sometime use Armscor shotguns since these are marked with the British-sounding name of "Squires Bingham." Armscor/Squires Bingham is actually a Filipino manufacturer.[[note]]Though it was started by expatriate Englishmen.[[/note]]

to:

* Some productions going for a British feel sometime sometimes use Armscor shotguns since these are marked with the British-sounding name of "Squires Bingham." Armscor/Squires Bingham is actually a Filipino manufacturer.[[note]]Though it was started by expatriate Englishmen.[[/note]]



* Rebarreled M2 machine guns are often used as stand-ins for the Soviet [=DShK=] heavy machine gun, especially before the end of the Cold War (wheen it was just unavailable).

to:

* Rebarreled M2 machine guns are often used as stand-ins for the Soviet [=DShK=] heavy machine gun, especially before the end of the Cold War (wheen (when it was just unavailable).



* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941, Jet a Walther P99 and Faye a Glock 30. The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained how Spike got a plasma cannon on his Swordfish when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the main cast's weapons are out of date ''now''. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.

to:

* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941, Jet a Walther P99 and Faye a Glock 30. The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained how why Spike got has a plasma cannon on his Swordfish II, when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the main cast's weapons are shown in the series were out of date ''now''.even when it first started in 1998. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.



* The ECOAS spec ops troops in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' use FN P90s, despite the series taking place at least a century or two into the future. Earlier in the timeline (such as in ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamThe08thMSTeam The 08th MS Team]]''), Federation troops are often shown using rifles that are very nearly carbon copies of the Enfield [=SA80=], while Zeon troops are described (but not shown) as using old AK-47s. The [[HumongousMecha mobile suits']] non-beam-firing weapons are also often based off of real-world weapons, such as the updated Zaku machine gun from ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam0083StardustMemory Gundam 0083]]'' being a dressed-up AR-15.

to:

* The ECOAS spec ops troops in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' use FN P90s, despite the series taking place at least a century or two into the future. Earlier in the timeline (such as in ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamThe08thMSTeam The 08th MS Team]]''), Federation troops are often shown using rifles that are very nearly carbon copies of the Enfield [=SA80=], while Zeon troops are described (but not shown) as using old AK-47s. The [[HumongousMecha mobile suits']] non-beam-firing weapons are also often based off of real-world weapons, such as the updated Zaku machine gun from ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam0083StardustMemory Gundam 0083]]'' being a dressed-up AR-15.an upscaled AR-15 dressed up with parts from the original Zaku machine gun.



** Hicks carries as a backup an Ithaca 'Stakeout' shotgun, and the Marines' sidearm, the VP 70, is a real, unaltered weapon with a 'futuristic' look. The ''Sulaco's'' weapon racks are also filled with unaltered modern weapons; M16s, Colt Commando rifles, and Enfield L85s. Vasquez also uses a Smith & Wesson Model 39 pistol at one point.
** Alan Dean Foster hangs a {{lampshade}} on the first of these in his novelization of ''Aliens'', when one of the Marines asks Hicks if he got his pump-action shotgun [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece from a museum]].

to:

** Hicks carries as a backup an Ithaca 'Stakeout' shotgun, and the Marines' sidearm, the VP 70, is a real, unaltered weapon with a 'futuristic' look. The ''Sulaco's'' weapon racks are also filled with unaltered modern weapons; M16s, Colt Commando rifles, and Enfield L85s. Vasquez also uses a Smith & Wesson Model 39 pistol at one point.
**
point. Alan Dean Foster [[LampshadeHanging hangs a {{lampshade}} lampshade]] on the first of these in his novelization of ''Aliens'', novelization, when one of the Marines asks Hicks if he got his pump-action shotgun [[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece from a museum]].



** ZSU-23 Shilka replica made using M113 chassis in ''Rambo 3''.
** [=AKMs=], [=AKMSUs=], or Chinese AK replicas modified (such as adding the muzzle brake) to look like AK-74s and AKS-74s since Hollywood did not have access to those weapons at those times.
** [[TheDragon Sgt. Kourov]] uses one of these dressed-up [=AKMs=] mounted with a US-made M203 grenade launcher, instead of a Russian made grenade launcher for the same reasons above. Because the two weapons weren't made for each other, the actors were forced to [[http://www.imfdb.org/images/8/84/Rambo3-AKM2034A.jpg sort-of grip the magazine in an incredibly awkward fashion]] to fire the launcher.

to:

** ZSU-23 Shilka replica made using an M113 chassis in ''Rambo 3''.
** [=AKMs=], [=AKMSUs=], or Chinese AK replicas modified (such as adding the muzzle brake) to look like AK-74s and AKS-74s since Hollywood did not have access to those weapons at those times.
**
times. [[TheDragon Sgt. Kourov]] in the third film uses one of these dressed-up [=AKMs=] mounted with a US-made M203 grenade launcher, instead of a Russian made grenade launcher for the same reasons above. Because the two weapons weren't made for each other, the actors were forced to [[http://www.imfdb.org/images/8/84/Rambo3-AKM2034A.jpg sort-of grip the magazine in an incredibly awkward fashion]] to fire the launcher.



** Something more jarring: Near the finale, Indiana Jones threatens the bad guys by aiming at them with a rocket launcher. Ignoring the fact that such weapons didn't even exist at the time, said weapon is actually an RPG-2 with several cosmetic addons.
** Another, smaller goof, is that Indy is at one point seen with an Inglis Hi-Power, a Canadian variation of Browning's design that didn't begin production until 1944. Even having the original FN Hi-Power, like he does in the bar shootout,[[note]]Indy was originally envisioned as having the Colt 1911 for at least this scene, but as above, since 9mm blanks were more reliable they went with the Hi-Power instead[[/note]] would have been a bit of a stretch, since it would have only been in production for a year at best at the time of the film. Moreover, the initial sales were almost all for military contracts ''and'' FN had an agreement with Colt at the time to not sell its guns in the United States. So Indy would've needed to meet up with an FN sales agent in Europe and special-order the pistol.

to:

** Something more jarring: Near the finale, Indiana Jones threatens the bad guys by aiming at them with a rocket launcher. Ignoring the fact that such weapons didn't even exist at the time, time (they only came about during the war as a more powerful upgrade from the anti-tank rifles used at the time), said weapon is actually an a post-war RPG-2 with several cosmetic addons.
** Another, smaller goof, is that Indy is at one point seen with an Inglis Hi-Power, a Canadian variation of Browning's design that didn't begin production until 1944. Even having the original FN Hi-Power, like he does in the bar shootout,[[note]]Indy was originally envisioned as having the Colt 1911 for at least this scene, but as above, since 9mm blanks were more reliable they went with the Hi-Power instead[[/note]] would have been a bit of a stretch, since it would have only been in production for a year at best at the time of the film. Moreover, the initial sales were almost all for military contracts ''and'' FN had an agreement with Colt at the time to not sell its guns in the United States. So Indy would've needed to meet up with an FN sales agent in Europe and special-order the pistol.
This list shows the last 10 events of 256. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ImproperlyPlacedFirearms