History Main / ImproperlyPlacedFirearms

16th Jul '17 10:15:55 AM nombretomado
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** UNIT, an elite military formation, is armed with bolt-action Lee-Enfield rifles which had been declared obselete in British service nearly twenty years beforehand; they also had WW2-era Vickers and Bren machine-guns[[note]]Brens are still in service, just about. But the Vickers dates back to before WWI[[/note]]

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** UNIT, an elite military formation, is armed with bolt-action Lee-Enfield rifles which had been declared obselete in British service nearly twenty years beforehand; they also had WW2-era [=WW2=]-era Vickers and Bren machine-guns[[note]]Brens are still in service, just about. But the Vickers dates back to before WWI[[/note]]
5th Jul '17 3:12:35 PM Kadorhal
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* Some productions going for a British feel sometimes use Armscor shotguns since these are marked with the British-sounding name of "Squires Bingham." Armscor/Squires Bingham is actually a Filipino manufacturer.[[note]]Though it was started by expatriate Englishmen.[[/note]]
** Speaking of British characters and guns, it is important to note that American AR-type rifles in the hands of British soldiers may not be an example of this trope given certain conditions. If the soldiers are members of the SAS or a few other special forces units that do carry both American made [=M16s=]/[=M4s=] and the Canadian versions, the [=C7s=]/[=C8s=], then it is not an example of this trope. British Army and Territorial Army soldiers using them, however, would be an example of this trope.

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* Some productions going for a British feel sometimes use Armscor shotguns since these are marked with the British-sounding name of "Squires Bingham." Armscor/Squires Bingham is actually a Filipino manufacturer.[[note]]Though it was Bingham, though started by expatriate Englishmen.[[/note]]
Englishmen, is actually a ''Filipino'' manufacturer.
** Speaking of British characters and guns, it is important to note that American AR-type rifles in the hands of British soldiers may not be an example of this trope given certain conditions. If the soldiers are members of the SAS or a few other special forces units that do carry both American made American-made [=M16s=]/[=M4s=] and the Canadian versions, the [=C7s=]/[=C8s=], then it is not an example of this trope. British Army and Territorial Army soldiers using them, however, would be an example of this trope.



* The Beretta [=BM59=] is sometimes used as a stand-in for the M14. As the two weapons are both modifications of the M1 Garand, this is rarely noticed.

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* The Beretta [=BM59=] is sometimes was on occasion used as a stand-in for the M14. As the two weapons are both modifications of the M1 Garand, this is rarely noticed.



* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941, Jet a Walther P99 and Faye a Glock 30. The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained why Spike has a plasma cannon on his Swordfish II, when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the weapons shown in the series were out of date even when it first started in 1998. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.

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* ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' is set in a future with space gates, large spaceships and advanced almost-sentient computers, yet every personal weapon seen is either very similar or exactly identical to present-day ones. Spike himself uses a Jericho 941, 941 (entered production in 1990), Jet a Walther P99 (1997) and Faye a Glock 30.30 (also 1997). The anime tries to convey the idea that it's set in a somewhat realistic and retro future, so it makes sense that there are no blasters and that energy weapons are few and far between and too large for anything other than ship-based mountings (though it's never explained why Spike has a plasma cannon on his Swordfish II, when even police fighters are restricted to machine guns). You'd think personal firearms would have evolved at least ''a little''. Plenty of the weapons shown in the series were out of date even when it first started in 1998. But then again, everything in ''Cowboy Bebop'' is retro.



** Something else to note is that the series is a sort of semi-dystopian/post apocalpyse setting, where a technological incident blew up the moon and turned a large section of earth into barely-habitable wastelands. Even when the story picks up, humanity still seems to be recovering from the incident, which also owes to the series's mix of sci-fi and grungy retro aesthetics since in some cases old is literally mixing with the new. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch to think that personal weapons development wasn't at the priority of humanity's to-do list in the years following the incident.

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** Something else to note is that the series is a sort of semi-dystopian/post apocalpyse setting, where a technological incident blew up the moon and turned a large section of earth into barely-habitable wastelands.wastelands that is still getting hit by meteor fragments fifty years onward. Even when the story picks up, humanity still seems to be recovering from the incident, which also owes to the series's mix of sci-fi and grungy retro aesthetics since in some cases old is literally mixing with the new. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch to think that personal weapons development wasn't at the priority of humanity's to-do list in the years following the incident.
28th Jun '17 10:00:00 AM Kadorhal
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* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm, which being a militia force made up of people who hadn't already been in the regular army and meant as a desperate attempt to hold off the Soviets, was about as far from "elite" as possible.
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'':
** During the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'', 'Off Target', the game has you fight the Italian Army, who are equipped with Karabiner 98Ks and [=MP40s=] instead of the more historically accurate Carcano Rifles and Beretta Model 38s.
** In a similar manner to its predecessor, the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'' has the player face Italian blackshirts armed with German weapons like the K-98 and MP-40 in a small village in Sicily. There's also an odd [[InvertedTrope inversion]]: The 82nd Airborne are missing the [=M1A1=] Carbine (with folding stock), which was specifically designed for paratroopers. Oddly, the gun's holster is modeled.
* Funny enough, ''VideoGame/MafiaII'', whose prologue starts in Sicily, and quite possibly is a ShoutOut to ''Airborne'', also has Italian Blackshirts armed with German weapons.

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* ''VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein'' has the female Nazi EliteMooks all wielding ''British'' Sten guns. Whether this is acceptable is up for debate, since the Germans [[RealityIsUnrealistic did make their own copies of the Sten near the end of the war]], but the majority of them were visibly different from the original and meant for the Volkssturm, which being a militia force made up of people who hadn't already been in the regular army and meant as a desperate attempt to hold off the Soviets, Soviets in the final days of the European theatre of the war, and was about as far from "elite" as possible.
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'':
** During the
The first level levels of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'', 'Off Target', both ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'' and ''[[VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne Airborne]]'', respectively "Off Target" and "Infinite Mischief", start off with the game has you fight the player fighting Italian Army, blackshirts, who are equipped with Karabiner 98Ks and [=MP40s=] instead of the more historically accurate Carcano Rifles rifles and Beretta Model 38s.
** In a similar manner to its predecessor, the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'' has the player face Italian blackshirts armed with German weapons like the K-98 and MP-40 in a small village in Sicily. There's
38 submachine guns. ''Airborne'' also has an odd [[InvertedTrope inversion]]: The 82nd Airborne are missing inversion]], as while the holster for the folding-stock [=M1A1=] Carbine (with folding stock), which was specifically designed paratrooper carbine is present on the models for paratroopers. Oddly, the gun's holster men of the 82nd Airborne, the weapon itself is modeled.
not actually available in the game at all.
* Funny enough, ''VideoGame/MafiaII'', whose prologue starts in Sicily, Sicily , and quite possibly is a ShoutOut to ''Airborne'', also has Italian Blackshirts armed with German weapons.



** What's funny to note about ''Modern Warfare 2'' is that ''only one of the weapons the Russians use makes sense''. This is the Dragunov SVD - and even then, it's still in its original, older wooden-furniture version, rather than the synthetic SVD-M that modern Russian forces actually use. The RPG-7 makes some sense, but even that is not the favored rocket launcher anymore, nor has it been for quite a while. Most of the other guns used by the game's Russian forces ''aren't even Russian'' - for example, the Israeli TAR-21, the French FAMAS, or the Austrian Steyr AUG. The other ones that are Russian, such as the RPD and AK-47, have long since been replaced in military use. Still others, like the Armsel Striker, AA-12, and KRISS Vector, had ''not even been put into production'' at the time of release.

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** What's funny to note about ''Modern Warfare 2'' is that ''only one of the weapons the Russians use makes sense''. This is the Dragunov SVD - and even then, it's still in its original, older wooden-furniture version, rather than the synthetic SVD-M that modern Russian forces actually use. The RPG-7 makes some sense, but even that is not the favored rocket launcher anymore, nor has it been for quite a while. Most of the other guns used by the game's Russian forces ''aren't even Russian'' - for example, the Israeli TAR-21, the French FAMAS, or the Austrian Steyr AUG. The other ones that are Russian, such as the RPD and AK-47, have long since been replaced in military use. Still others, like the Armsel Striker, AA-12, and KRISS Vector, had ''not even been put into production'' at the time of release.release (and still aren't Russian, either - two out of the three just listed are ''American'').



** There's also the G18, which is a modified Glock 17 standing in for the full-auto Glock 18. As mentioned at the top of the page, this is a common occurrence in films; why they would do that in a ''video game'' where they can model whatever gun they want (such as [[GunsAkimbo dual]] {{sawed|OffShotgun}}-down Model 1887 shotguns [[RuleOfCool being flip-cocked after every shot]]), is anybody's guess[[note]]the most likely reason is that they modeled it after such a movie gun without bothering to change it at all once they finished it - this sort of thing seems to be a recurring problem in games developed by Activision-owned companies[[/note]]. Additionally, the Beretta 93R machine pistol is actually a [=92SB=] (the same gun standing in for the M9 here and in ''[=CoD4=]'') with the skeleton stock and forward grip of a 93R added on.
** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with, and which are called with a "Fox" brevity code (used only for air-to-air munitions). Not to mention as well that the US Navy is apparently the force involved in the attack on the Gulag, and they don't use the F-15 (nor would they ever use an Air Force plane if they can help it).
* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces (the PKP Pecheneg - ignoring, of course, that it's meant primarily for mounted usage), but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher next to a crate of [=SVDs=] in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.
** Though come to think of it, the plot's FramingDevice does provide [[UnreliableExpositor a possible justification.]]

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** There's also the G18, which is a modified Glock 17 standing in for the full-auto Glock 18. As mentioned at the top of the page, this is a common occurrence in films; why they would do that in a ''video game'' where they can model whatever gun they want (such as [[GunsAkimbo dual]] {{sawed|OffShotgun}}-down Model 1887 shotguns [[RuleOfCool being flip-cocked after every shot]]), is anybody's guess[[note]]the most likely reason is that they modeled it after such a movie gun without bothering to change it at all once they finished it - this sort of thing seems to be a recurring problem in games developed by Activision-owned companies[[/note]].companies, airsoft guns make a few appearances here and there too[[/note]]. Additionally, the Beretta 93R machine pistol is actually a [=92SB=] (the same gun standing in for the M9 here and in ''[=CoD4=]'') with the skeleton stock and forward grip of a 93R added on.
** A [[JustPlaneWrong plane-based example]] comes with the F-15s bombing the Gulag in its eponymous mission. The F-15s are used in a Wild Weasel role at the start of the mission, launching missiles at hostile AA guns to let the Little Birds holding the player and other soldiers into the gulag - specifically, they're the AGM-88 HARM, an anti-radiation missile that no F-15 variant is compatible with, and which are called with a "Fox" brevity code (used only for air-to-air munitions). Not to mention as well that the US Navy is apparently the force involved in the attack on the Gulag, and they don't use the F-15 (nor [[InterserviceRivalry would they ever use an Air Force plane plane]] if they can help it).
* ''Modern Warfare 3'' adds a Russian machine gun that's actually in use by modern Russian forces (the PKP Pecheneg - ignoring, of course, that it's meant primarily for mounted usage), but otherwise goes all-out with this trope: the new Russian military sidearm is the [[RareGuns never-produced MP412 REX]] while FSO agents use the US Government model of the FN Five-seveN, African militia favor the (conceptual) ''Peruvian'' FAD assault rifle, a flashback to Zakhaev's assassination attempt now includes [[AnachronismStew a few Remington RSASS rifles]] which [[UnreliableNarrator that weren't there the first time around]], and multiplayer allows the use of both the Chinese QBZ-97 assault rifle and the Japanese PM-9 machine pistol, despite neither the PLA nor the JSDF being present anywhere in the game.[[note]]Even worse, the aforementioned QBZ-97 (misidentified as the earlier -95) serves as a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute for the second game's FAMAS, when it would have made perfect sense for the FAMAS to reappear given the GIGN are playable in multiplayer and appear in one campaign level.[[/note]]
* Taken UpToEleven in ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' which features several anachronistic faults in regards to firearms shown in the game. The FN FAL in particular - commonly known as the "Right Arm of the Free World" for its use by many Western-aligned nations, including every NATO member state except the US and West Germany - is only used, of all people, by ''Vietcong'' and ''Cuban'' soldiers in single player. To the developers' credit, the second example is slightly [[JustifiedTrope justified]], since the specific model of the FAL seen in the game was part of a shipment of about 500 of these firearms, all delivered to the Cuban police. But other parts of the game return to playing this trope straight, since while the Cuban soldiers only appear in the first level of the game it's never explained why ''every other'' Soviet-aligned military present in the game uses the FAL as well (or why half of the Viet Cong soldiers armed with them also have American M203 grenade launchers to attach to them); technically, the FAL was also in service as the semi-auto [=L1A1=] Self Loading Rifle with Australian soldiers stationed in Vietnam, so the argument ''could'' be made the ones encountered in Vietcong hands are simply captured rifles. It's somewhat harder to justify the highly anachronistic French FAMAS FELIN Russians occasionally use, except the FAMAS was a Russian staple weapon in ''Modern Warfare 2'' first, so it could again just be a matter of following the leader. Also, both the Soviet special forces seen in the 1968 Kowloon mission and the Vietcong in Huế City use the SPAS-12 shotgun a firearm model from ''Italy'' which was introduced in ''[[AnachronismStew 1982]]''. The turret in the beginning of Vorkuta prison has a mounted American M249 SAW, which was made in 1984. Several campaign levels also feature the KS-23 shotgun, a 23mm riot gun that while at least actually being a Russian model (despite it like the FAL appearing primarily in Cuban and Vietcong hands - even Mason starts with it in a mission or two set in Vietnam) was not designed until 1971 and on top of that wasn't meant for actual combat use. The closest any of these get to an actual justification is the last part of "Crash Site", where the presence of an American China Lake grenade launcher next (next to a crate of [=SVDs=] Soviet [=SVDs=]) in a downed Soviet cargo plane is briefly and weakly {{handwave}}d as "some kind of setup". Somewhere, a firearms enthusiast is drinking themselves to death.
** Though come to think of it, the plot's FramingDevice does provide [[UnreliableExpositor a possible justification.]]]] It especially works considering that the missions where you play as Hudson - who is not the person giving the exposition - have even more crazy scenarios and technology than the missions where you play as Mason (they're the only levels in which the player is allowed to go GunsAkimbo, for instance).
27th Jun '17 1:07:17 PM Kadorhal
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* Anton Chigurh from ''Film/NoCountryForOldMen'' uses a Glock 19 pistol in one scene. Glock pistols were not produced until 1983. The movie takes place in 1980. Other anachronisms include his use of a silenced Remington 11-87 (entering production in 1987) and TEC-9 (produced in 1985), as well as Llewelyn acquiring a Heckler & Koch [=SP89=] at one point (produced starting from '89, though this is standing in for the proper [=MP5k=] used in the book).

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* Anton Chigurh from ''Film/NoCountryForOldMen'' is set in 1980, but features several weapons that weren't available at that point in time. At three different point antagonist Anton Chigurh uses a Glock 19 pistol in one scene. Glock pistols were not produced (not developed until 1983. The movie takes place in 1980. Other anachronisms include his use of 1983), a silenced Remington 11-87 (entering production in 1987) and TEC-9 (produced in 1985), as well as and a Remington 11-87 (produced in 1987). Llewelyn acquiring also acquires a Heckler & Koch [=SP89=] at one point (produced starting from '89, though point, which didn't enter production until 1989, although this is standing in for the proper [=MP5k=] (which entered production in '76) that was used in the book).novel.
26th Jun '17 7:03:07 PM DirtyHarry44Magnum
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* In the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'' the player faces Italian blackshirts armed with German weapons like the K-98 and MP-40 in a small village in Sicily. There's also an odd [[InvertedTrope inversion]]: The 82nd Airborne are missing the [=M1A1=] Carbine (with folding stock), which was specifically designed for paratroopers. Oddly, the gun's holster is modeled.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'':
** During the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'', 'Off Target', the game has you fight the Italian Army, who are equipped with Karabiner 98Ks and [=MP40s=] instead of the more historically accurate Carcano Rifles and Beretta Model 38s.
**
In a similar manner to its predecessor, the first level of ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'' has the player faces face Italian blackshirts armed with German weapons like the K-98 and MP-40 in a small village in Sicily. There's also an odd [[InvertedTrope inversion]]: The 82nd Airborne are missing the [=M1A1=] Carbine (with folding stock), which was specifically designed for paratroopers. Oddly, the gun's holster is modeled.
23rd Jun '17 12:32:59 PM Gosicrystal
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* A very common one is use of the wrong AK variant. Sometimes you see Soviet/ex-Soviet soldiers in a reasonably modern setting wielding the original AK or the AKM. In reality, they'd been mostly replaced in Soviet service by the AK-74 (which can be identified by a smaller, less-curved, orange-coloured magazine, as well as a large muzzle brake on the end of the barrel). ''Film/LordOfWar'' is an example. Recently, however, 7.62mm [=AKs=], either former mainstays of the AKM line, or more modern AK-10x series, made a resurgence, after combat experience in Afghanistan and Chechnya demonstrated that the lighter bullet of the AK-74 tends to ricochet at the slightest prodding, and is thus unsuitable in forested areas. Thus there can be some unexpected aversion, when a bumbling producer [[AccidentallyAccurate accidentally gets things straight.]]

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* A very common one is use of the wrong AK variant. Sometimes you see Soviet/ex-Soviet soldiers in a reasonably modern setting wielding the original AK or the AKM. In reality, they'd been mostly replaced in Soviet service by the AK-74 (which can be identified by a smaller, less-curved, orange-coloured magazine, as well as a large muzzle brake on the end of the barrel). ''Film/LordOfWar'' is an example. Recently, however, 7.62mm [=AKs=], either former mainstays of the AKM line, or more modern AK-10x series, made a resurgence, after combat experience in Afghanistan and Chechnya demonstrated that the lighter bullet of the AK-74 tends to ricochet at the slightest prodding, and is thus unsuitable in forested areas. Thus there can be some unexpected aversion, when a bumbling producer [[AccidentallyAccurate [[AccidentallyCorrectWriting accidentally gets things straight.]]
21st Jun '17 4:08:17 AM JackG
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Added DiffLines:

** The MacGuffin of "Hunter/Hunted" is an [[http://modernfirearms.net/smg/usa/american-10-e.html American 180]]. Because a blank-firing version of this highly restricted automatic weapon would not have been available in Britain at the time, an AR-10 rifle is given a top-mounted Thompson drum magazine and a mock laser sight. For plot-related reasons it's also stated to be a long-range rifle instead of a submachine gun.
11th Jun '17 3:00:05 PM maxwellsilver
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** In ''Literature/GenerationKill'', Captain America, who is frequently seen carrying some variety of AK alongside his standard M16, is chewed out by his very annoyed Sergeant for this very reason.
** This was why the US discouraged its soldiers from taking AK-47s in Vietnam. [[DrillSergeantNasty They are the preferred weapon of the enemy, which make a distinctive sound when fired.]] However, at the time US riflemen were equipped with an early model of the M16 which was notorious for design faults and a tendency to jam at inappropriate moments (discussed in detail [[ReliablyUnreliableGuns elsewhere on the wiki]]), no matter how well looked after. The AK-47, by contrast, was and still is famed for its durability and reliability, so it boiled down to a choice between being unable to shoot anyone or being shot at by everyone.



** Until the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Italian weapons found their way in some unlikely hands ([[JustifiedTrope always for a good reason]]):
*** The Beretta Mod. 38 SMG was used on both sides of the conflict, as it could fire standard 9mm Para rounds just as well as the preferred overpowered variant and was extremely reliable and accurate, even if large and heavy, so Allied forces would use captured weapons... And, after the start of their occupation of Northern Italy (including the factories they were made in), the Germans would buy part of the production, including the overpowered round (West Germany army and federal police would continue using them until the sixties). Also, a small number (50) was used by UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, successfully delivered in spite of Allied blockade.

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** Until the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Italian weapons found their way in some unlikely hands ([[JustifiedTrope always (always for a good reason]]):
reason):
*** The Beretta Mod. 38 SMG was used on both sides of the conflict, as it could fire standard 9mm Para rounds just as well as the preferred overpowered variant and was extremely reliable and accurate, even if large and heavy, so Allied forces would use captured weapons... And, after the start of their occupation of Northern Italy (including the factories they were made in), the Germans would buy part of the production, including the overpowered round (West Germany German army and federal police would continue using them until the sixties). Also, a small number (50) was used by UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, successfully delivered in spite of Allied blockade.



*** The Carcano Mod. 91 rifle and its variants have the others beat through sheer weirdness, being used by: Ethiopia (that actually acquired it ''before the Italian Army itself'': [[MagnificentBastard emperor Menelik]], aiming to shake the Italian protectorate, used the credits Italy had given him to buy it. As he was successful, he never paid for it); Bulgaria; Persia; Romania; Saudi Arabia; Finland (Italy had tried to switch to a more powerful rifle round but had to abort due the early start of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, so they shipped there all the new rounds they had manufactured and a number of rifles to help in the Winter War, where, after a trial period on the frontline, was issued to rear-guard troops and the Navy due the logistical issues of keeping the troops supplied and other issues); Somalia (as a consequence of its past as an Italian colony); ''Imperial Japan'' (after the [[UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar invasion of China]], all Arisaka production was required to supply the Army, so the Navy, that needed rifles too, contacted Italy under the terms of the Anti-Comintern Pact, and was supplied with 120,000 Carcano rifles modified to use a box magazine and the standard Japanese round); the Independent State of Croatia (a puppet state of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy); and the ''National Liberation Army of Libya during the 2011 civil war'' (another remnant of the past as an Italian colony. Militants found them in government arsenals or simply passed them down in the family until they were used again at war). Captured guns would be used by various states who found themselves with them... with an American-captured one being sold via mail order and used for [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy a rather infamous assassination]].
** It's not unusual for regular Army units to get ''some'' familiarization training with common enemy weapons, as well as those used by allied nations; British soldiers get to run a couple of magazines through an [=M16A4=], for example. Doing this when it's not absolutely necessary (i.e. you've run out of ammunition or your weapon is damaged beyond repair) is nevertheless depreciated.

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*** The Carcano Mod. 91 rifle and its variants have the others beat through sheer weirdness, being used by: Ethiopia (that actually acquired it ''before the Italian Army itself'': [[MagnificentBastard emperor Menelik]], Menelik, aiming to shake the Italian protectorate, used the credits Italy had given him to buy it. As he was successful, he never paid for it); Bulgaria; Persia; Romania; Saudi Arabia; Finland (Italy had tried to switch to a more powerful rifle round but had to abort due the early start of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, so they shipped there all the new rounds they had manufactured and a number of rifles to help in the Winter War, where, after a trial period on the frontline, was issued to rear-guard troops and the Navy due the logistical issues of keeping the troops supplied and other issues); Somalia (as a consequence of its past as an Italian colony); ''Imperial Japan'' (after the [[UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar invasion of China]], all Arisaka production was required to supply the Army, so the Navy, that needed rifles too, contacted Italy under the terms of the Anti-Comintern Pact, and was supplied with 120,000 Carcano rifles modified to use a box magazine and the standard Japanese round); the Independent State of Croatia (a puppet state of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy); and the ''National Liberation Army of Libya during the 2011 civil war'' (another remnant of the past as an Italian colony. Militants found them in government arsenals or simply passed them down in the family until they were used again at war). Captured guns would be used by various states who found themselves with them... with an American-captured one being sold via mail order and used for [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy a rather infamous assassination]].\n** It's not unusual for regular Army units to get ''some'' familiarization training with common enemy weapons, as well as those used by allied nations; British soldiers get to run a couple of magazines through an [=M16A4=], for example. Doing this when it's not absolutely necessary (i.e. you've run out of ammunition or your weapon is damaged beyond repair) is nevertheless depreciated.



* It should be noted however, that thanks to Lend-Lease Act, the Soviet Red Army utilised a substantial number of British Matilda, Cromwell and Churchill tanks, as well as American Sherman tanks. Several American weapons also saw service with the Red Army thanks to Lend-Lease; the famous [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles AK]], in fact, had its bolt essentially copied from a leased M1 Garand.
* TruthInTelevision: As the Soviet Union declined, a ''lot'' of Soviet-made [=AKs=] started popping up all over the world.

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* It should be noted however, that thanks to Lend-Lease Act, the Soviet Red Army utilised a substantial number of British Matilda, Cromwell and Churchill tanks, as well as American Sherman tanks. Several American weapons also saw service with the Red Army thanks to Lend-Lease; the famous [[CoolGuns/AssaultRifles AK]], AK, in fact, had its bolt essentially copied from a leased M1 Garand.
* TruthInTelevision: As the Soviet Union declined, a ''lot'' of Soviet-made [=AKs=] started popping up all over the world.
Garand.
29th May '17 6:15:27 AM Morgenthaler
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*** The Beretta Mod. 38 SMG was used on both sides of the conflict, as it could fire standard 9mm Para rounds just as well as the preferred overpowered variant and was extremely reliable and accurate, even if large and heavy, so Allied forces would use captured weapons... And, after the start of their occupation of Northern Italy (including the factories they were made in), the Germans would buy part of the production, including the overpowered round (West Germany army and federal police would continue using them until the sixties). Also, a small number (50) was used by ImperialJapan, successfully delivered in spite of Allied blockade.

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*** The Beretta Mod. 38 SMG was used on both sides of the conflict, as it could fire standard 9mm Para rounds just as well as the preferred overpowered variant and was extremely reliable and accurate, even if large and heavy, so Allied forces would use captured weapons... And, after the start of their occupation of Northern Italy (including the factories they were made in), the Germans would buy part of the production, including the overpowered round (West Germany army and federal police would continue using them until the sixties). Also, a small number (50) was used by ImperialJapan, UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, successfully delivered in spite of Allied blockade.
8th May '17 11:11:45 PM Killerweinerdog
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Added DiffLines:

** There's also the fact that some of the bad guys use a ''Welrod'' of all things; while an effective silenced pistol has its uses[[note]]Despite being made during the Second World War, there are rumors that Welrods are still being produced and built ''today'' for British Special Forces[[/note]] it isn't exactly the best idea to get into a live gunfight with a ''bolt-action pistol.''
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