History Main / ImprobablePowerDiscrepancy

24th Mar '17 4:19:23 PM trulymadmoves
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/DungeonSiege'', power inflates at an incredibly rapid rate; at the beginning of the game, 10 hit points on an enemy is a lot, and by the end, 1000 hit points is average. This mostly works as far as flavor goes, as the environments and enemies do become increasingly dramatic and scary, but it becomes obvious when one meets the occasional PaletteSwap of enemies from an earlier stage. The most noticeable example are the Phrak, the game's resident giant mosquitoes. Ordinary Phrak appear in early stages of the game and have 4 or 5 hit points; later, one encounters Forest Phrak, which have 202 hit points, and yet, mowing down dozens of Forest Phrak is far easier than taking on a handful of Phrak from back home. Most enemies that receive such an upgrade at least have the justification of actually seeming more dangerous (for instance, the low-level Rock Beast is recolored into a Lava Beast, which logic dictates ''would'' be much deadlier), but the Forest Phrak seem to be just as natural as their farmland cousins and are, indeed, smaller.
1st Mar '17 11:21:24 AM Fighteer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game. (A bit of {{Fanon}}, supported by several sources including ''Anime/PokemonOrigins'', lends justification to this. The Gym Leaders are there to ''test'' trainers and help them improve. Therefore, they select teams that should be challenging to the trainer in question and may not include their strongest Mons.)

to:

** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game. (A bit of {{Fanon}}, supported by several sources including ''Anime/PokemonOrigins'', lends justification to this. The Gym Leaders are there to ''test'' trainers and help them improve. Therefore, they select teams that should be challenging to the trainer in question and may not include their strongest Mons.)
1st Mar '17 7:59:27 AM BeerBaron
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features two Expansion Packs, ''Tribunal'' and ''Bloodmoon''. As they were designed for higher level characters than Morrowind's main quest, a number of enemies are as hard or harder than the final boss of that quest. The final boss of Morrowind is a millennia old god that three other deities were unable to defeat, and very few of the enemies in the expansions are anything nearly so spectacular story-wise.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features two Expansion Packs, ''Tribunal'' and ''Bloodmoon''. As they were designed for higher level characters than Morrowind's ''Morrowind'''s main quest, a number of enemies are as hard or harder than the final boss of that quest. The final boss of Morrowind ''Morrowind'' is a millennia four-millennia old god PhysicalGod that three other deities were unable to defeat, and very few of the enemies in the expansions are anything nearly so spectacular story-wise.
1st Mar '17 7:57:29 AM BeerBaron
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game.

to:

** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game. (A bit of {{Fanon}}, supported by several sources including ''Anime/PokemonOrigins'', lends justification to this. The Gym Leaders are there to ''test'' trainers and help them improve. Therefore, they select teams that should be challenging to the trainer in question and may not include their strongest Mons.)



* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features two Expansion Packs, Tribunal and Bloodmoon. As they were designed for higher level characters than Morrowind's main quest, a number of enemies are as hard or harder than the final boss of that quest. The final boss of Morrowind is a millennia old god that three other deities were unable to defeat, and very few of the enemies in the expansions are anything nearly so spectacular story-wise.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features two Expansion Packs, Tribunal ''Tribunal'' and Bloodmoon.''Bloodmoon''. As they were designed for higher level characters than Morrowind's main quest, a number of enemies are as hard or harder than the final boss of that quest. The final boss of Morrowind is a millennia old god that three other deities were unable to defeat, and very few of the enemies in the expansions are anything nearly so spectacular story-wise.
12th Jan '17 12:23:44 AM mogryo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: MMORP Gs ]]

to:

[[folder: MMORP Gs MMORPGs ]]
3rd Jan '17 5:19:36 AM BreadBull
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsOnline'': The rather unique levelling system means that you'll do the same amount of damage whether you're level 1 or level 50. Good news: People can adventure together even if one is vastly higher or lower level. Bad news: Enemies that traditionally become super easy to kill (such as mudcrabs) ''never'' become easy to kill, always taking just as many hits.
18th Nov '16 2:15:00 PM elemt
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The effect is noticeable between the first and second games, but it becomes more so with ''VideoGame/BaldursGateIIThroneOfBhaal'', which basically breaks the logic of [[TableTopGame/ForgottenRealms the established setting]] altogether. In ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Shadows of Amn]]'', when you met, say, an 18th-level character, they'd be considered very powerful as they would be in the setting at large (like the legendary hero Drizzt Do'Urden, who's not quite level 18). In ''Throne of Bhaal'', such characters are a dime a dozen, and even regular mooks, such as the abovementioned rank-and-file Tehyrian soldiers, are well armed and strong enough to stand up to a party past level 20.

to:

The effect is noticeable between the first and second games, but it becomes more so with ''VideoGame/BaldursGateIIThroneOfBhaal'', which basically breaks the logic of [[TableTopGame/ForgottenRealms the established setting]] altogether. In ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Shadows of Amn]]'', when you met, say, an 18th-level character, they'd be considered very powerful as they would be in the setting at large (like the legendary hero Drizzt Do'Urden, who's not quite level 18). In ''Throne of Bhaal'', such characters are a dime a dozen, and even regular mooks, such as the abovementioned rank-and-file Tehyrian soldiers, are well armed and strong enough to stand up to a party past level 20. It goes the other way as well; Ilasera is one of the Five, a group of immensely powerful Bhaalspawn tearing the land apart, but she's also the very first enemy you face, so her abilities consist of casting low level magic and trying ineffectively to stab you.
16th Nov '16 3:17:41 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:{{MMORPG}}s]]
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is all over this:

to:

[[AC:{{MMORPG}}s]]
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: MMORP Gs ]]

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is all over this: this:



[[AC:{{Roguelike}}]]
* In ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress''.

to:

[[AC:{{Roguelike}}]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Roguelike ]]

* In ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress''.



[[AC:RolePlayingGame]]

to:

[[AC:RolePlayingGame]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Role Playing Game ]]



** The farther you get through the games, the stronger the wild Pokémon become, in spite of there not being any logical reason for the strongest Pokémon to be the farthest from your home town.
** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game.
** Interestingly, Pokémon in places that can only be reached with Surf of other [=HM=]s that can only be received later in the games also generally have levels comparable to the level the trainer would be when they get said HM. So, you can have a bunch of level 5 Pokémon in grass on one route, and surf over one square to an island where there are level 20 Pokemon.
** Many of the games have some amount of post-game content after you beat the [[FinalBoss Elite Four and/or Champion]], supposedly the best trainers in the world. The trope is taken to a whole new level as you find countless ordinary trainers with Pokémon that make the Champ's seem pathetically inexperienced. This started in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'', where you can visit the world of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' after beating the champ, and fight level 50+ Ace Trainers (Lance's highest-level Dragonite is 50) in Route 1 alongside the Level 2 wild Pidgeys; the levels continue to march upward until you reach the TrueFinalBoss, who has a team of mons about 30 levels above those of the Elites. The ''[=HeartGold=] and [=SoulSilver=]'' remakes have a "rematch" Elite Four with stronger Pokémon, so that they're always tougher than any other ''available'' trainers, but this only creates further puzzlement. (Why did they stop training their team at around level 50, when plenty of {{mook}}-level trainers were already well past that point?)

to:

** The farther you get through the games, the stronger the wild Pokémon become, in spite of there not being any logical reason for the strongest Pokémon to be the farthest from your home town.
town.
** Particularly bad offenders are the Gym Leaders; supposedly eight of the strongest Pokémon trainers, and yet the first Gym Leader has two Pokémon, of level 12 and 14, while ''wild'' Pokémon of level 30 and over are common-place later in the game.
game.
** Interestingly, Pokémon in places that can only be reached with Surf of other [=HM=]s that can only be received later in the games also generally have levels comparable to the level the trainer would be when they get said HM. So, you can have a bunch of level 5 Pokémon in grass on one route, and surf over one square to an island where there are level 20 Pokemon.
** Many of the games have some amount of post-game content after you beat the [[FinalBoss Elite Four and/or Champion]], supposedly the best trainers in the world. The trope is taken to a whole new level as you find countless ordinary trainers with Pokémon that make the Champ's seem pathetically inexperienced. This started in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'', where you can visit the world of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' after beating the champ, and fight level 50+ Ace Trainers (Lance's highest-level Dragonite is 50) in Route 1 alongside the Level 2 wild Pidgeys; the levels continue to march upward until you reach the TrueFinalBoss, who has a team of mons about 30 levels above those of the Elites. The ''[=HeartGold=] and [=SoulSilver=]'' remakes have a "rematch" Elite Four with stronger Pokémon, so that they're always tougher than any other ''available'' trainers, but this only creates further puzzlement. (Why did they stop training their team at around level 50, when plenty of {{mook}}-level trainers were already well past that point?)



** The strongest Pokémon in existence in terms of base stats ''used'' to be Arceus, with isn't surprising due to it being the in-universe equivalent of God. That is, until Generation VI came along, in which case, both of Mewtwo's Mega Evolutions surpasses it in terms of strength, as well as Rayquaza's Mega Evolution, which can potentially be even stronger due to it being the only Pokémon that can Mega Evolve without an item[[note]]Case in point, Mega Rayquaza broke the Ubers tier on ''Website/{{Smogon}}'' so thoroughly, a new tier removing all restrictions was created simply to counter its might.[[/note]]. Downplayed in that it's only possible for Pokémon to be within their Mega Evolved forms under certain circumstances, and even then, the alternate form is only temporary.

to:

** The strongest Pokémon in existence in terms of base stats ''used'' to be Arceus, with isn't surprising due to it being the in-universe equivalent of God. That is, until Generation VI came along, in which case, both of Mewtwo's Mega Evolutions surpasses it in terms of strength, as well as Rayquaza's Mega Evolution, which can potentially be even stronger due to it being the only Pokémon that can Mega Evolve without an item[[note]]Case in point, Mega Rayquaza broke the Ubers tier on ''Website/{{Smogon}}'' so thoroughly, a new tier removing all restrictions was created simply to counter its might.[[/note]]. Downplayed in that it's only possible for Pokémon to be within their Mega Evolved forms under certain circumstances, and even then, the alternate form is only temporary.



** In generation II and III, Pokémon [[WhaleEgg hatched from eggs]] start at [[CharacterLevel level]] 5. Wild Pokemon could be at levels as low as 2, thus being weaker than ''infants'' of the same species. From gen IV on eggs hatch Pokémon at level 1.

to:

** In generation II and III, Pokémon [[WhaleEgg hatched from eggs]] start at [[CharacterLevel level]] 5. Wild Pokemon could be at levels as low as 2, thus being weaker than ''infants'' of the same species. From gen IV on eggs hatch Pokémon at level 1.



[[AC:SimulationGames]]

to:

[[AC:SimulationGames]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Simulation Games ]]



[[AC:TabletopGames]]

to:

[[AC:TabletopGames]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]



[[AC:TurnBasedStrategy]]

to:

[[AC:TurnBasedStrategy]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Turn Based Strategy ]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
16th Nov '16 12:24:36 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* City guards and soldiers (and bandits etc.) in the ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series grow consistently more powerful as you go through the games and expansions, to the point that by the end, even basic infantry in the Tethyrian army are magically armed and armored supermen to keep up with the fact that your player character is more or less the biggest BadAss on the planet by that point (except for the bosses). Humorously, this means that the Amnish guards from ''Shadows of Amn'' could effortlessly dominate the Flaming Fist from ''Baldur's Gate''... and the main plot of that game involved preventing a war between those two powers. Guess it's a good thing for the Gate that you succeeded, eh?\\

to:

* City guards and soldiers (and bandits etc.) in the ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series grow consistently more powerful as you go through the games and expansions, to the point that by the end, even basic infantry in the Tethyrian army are magically armed and armored supermen to keep up with the fact that your player character is more or less the biggest BadAss badass on the planet by that point (except for the bosses). Humorously, this means that the Amnish guards from ''Shadows of Amn'' could effortlessly dominate the Flaming Fist from ''Baldur's Gate''... and the main plot of that game involved preventing a war between those two powers. Guess it's a good thing for the Gate that you succeeded, eh?\\
20th Oct '16 12:53:19 AM Kotomikun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is unbelievably blatant in the post-game of VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2. The new, exclusive post-game place you can access after defeating the Elite Four and foiling Ghetsis? NUVEMA TOWN. That's right: the beginning town of the previous game is now the post game. Cue the ridiculous Pokemon levels. (There's a PRESCHOOLER with a LEVEL 62 Wooper!) For extra hilarity, the girl standing in a patch of grass will also give you a standard Potion in the midst of trainers with Pokemon that can deal a lot more than 20 HP's worth of damage....
** Similar to that, there are the first few routes of Kanto in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Pokemon HeartGold and SoulSilver]], which you play in the post-game. Cue Level 50+ Ace Trainers in Route 1 alongside the Level 2 wild Pidgeys.

to:

** This is unbelievably blatant Many of the games have some amount of post-game content after you beat the [[FinalBoss Elite Four and/or Champion]], supposedly the best trainers in the world. The trope is taken to a whole new level as you find countless ordinary trainers with Pokémon that make the Champ's seem pathetically inexperienced. This started in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'', where you can visit the world of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' after beating the champ, and fight level 50+ Ace Trainers (Lance's highest-level Dragonite is 50) in Route 1 alongside the Level 2 wild Pidgeys; the levels continue to march upward until you reach the TrueFinalBoss, who has a team of mons about 30 levels above those of the Elites. The ''[=HeartGold=] and [=SoulSilver=]'' remakes have a "rematch" Elite Four with stronger Pokémon, so that they're always tougher than any other ''available'' trainers, but this only creates further puzzlement. (Why did they stop training their team at around level 50, when plenty of {{mook}}-level trainers were already well past that point?)
** The
post-game of VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2. The new, exclusive post-game place you can access ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' pulls the same trick: after defeating the Elite Four and foiling Ghetsis? NUVEMA TOWN. That's right: Ghetsis, your new quest begins in Nuvema Town, the beginning town of the previous game is now the post game. Cue the ridiculous Pokemon levels. (There's a PRESCHOOLER with a LEVEL 62 Wooper!) Wooper! This is especially bizarre because Wooper evolves at level 20.) For extra hilarity, the girl standing in a patch of grass will also give you a standard Potion in the midst of trainers with Pokemon that can deal a lot more than 20 HP's worth of damage....
** Similar to that, there are the first few routes of Kanto in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Pokemon HeartGold and SoulSilver]], which you play in the post-game. Cue Level 50+ Ace Trainers in Route 1 alongside the Level 2 wild Pidgeys.
damage.
This list shows the last 10 events of 120. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ImprobablePowerDiscrepancy