History Main / IfJesusThenAliens

29th Mar '16 1:08:54 AM jormis29
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* The graphic novel ''Comicbook/CreatureTech'' had anů interesting take on this. The protagonist, Dr. Ong, is an atheist and a brilliant scientist, working at [[ExtranormalInstitute a top-secret lab researching the weird and supernatural]]. Then, he runs across the actual Shroud of Turin at work (they know it's the real deal because the blood on it heals people and raises the dead). This makes Ong admit to his preacher father that Jesus must have really been the Son of God, but he doesn't give anything more than intellectual assent to Jesus. Dr. Ong remains this way, until a teleportation accident lands him on another planet, at the foot of a cross where an Alien Jesus is being crucified. I kid you not: ''If Alien Jesus, then Jesus.'' ''Creature Tech'' is all over this trope. Ong's father was driven to religion by his findings as the previous scientist working at the aforementioned institution: [[InvertedTrope If aliens, then Jesus]]. He also objects to the Shroud of Turin because having conclusive evidence of Jesus' divinity would deprive people of the right to ''choose'' whether to believe in Christ.

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* The graphic novel ''Comicbook/CreatureTech'' had anů interesting take on this. The protagonist, Dr. Ong, is an atheist and a brilliant scientist, working at [[ExtranormalInstitute a top-secret lab researching the weird and supernatural]]. Then, he runs across the actual Shroud of Turin ShroudOfTurin at work (they know it's the real deal because the blood on it heals people and raises the dead). This makes Ong admit to his preacher father that Jesus must have really been the Son of God, but he doesn't give anything more than intellectual assent to Jesus. Dr. Ong remains this way, until a teleportation accident lands him on another planet, at the foot of a cross where an Alien Jesus is being crucified. I kid you not: ''If Alien Jesus, then Jesus.'' ''Creature Tech'' is all over this trope. Ong's father was driven to religion by his findings as the previous scientist working at the aforementioned institution: [[InvertedTrope If aliens, then Jesus]]. He also objects to the Shroud of Turin because having conclusive evidence of Jesus' divinity would deprive people of the right to ''choose'' whether to believe in Christ.



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19th Feb '16 1:49:51 AM bwburke94
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The rhetorical term for [[LogicalFallacies this kind of thinking]] is a "FalseDichotomy": A person must be either a [[AgentMulder Believer]] or a [[AgentScully Skeptic]], but may not ever be both, nor fall somewhere between the extremes. Any belief on one side or the other will result in all beliefs on that side so this trope can exist with the title implication often running in reverse; IfGhostsThenJesus is common.

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The rhetorical term for [[LogicalFallacies this kind of thinking]] is a "FalseDichotomy": A person must be either a [[AgentMulder Believer]] or a [[AgentScully Skeptic]], but may not ever be both, nor fall somewhere between the extremes. Any belief on one side or the other will result in all beliefs on that side so this trope can exist with the title implication often running in reverse; IfGhostsThenJesus "if ghosts, then Jesus" is common.
10th Nov '15 5:43:53 AM DarkWillow
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*** The two agents' views on the paranormal are completely inverted very early on in the Season 1 episode 'Beyond the Sea'. Serial killer Luther Boggs (who Mulder helped apprehend) claims to have had psychic revelations regarding a kidnapping case, but Mulder is particularly sceptical whereas Scully comes to believe him after Boggs reveals certain details regarding her recently-deceased father that he could not know. What doesn't help is that Boggs gets certain things wrong, such as 'reading' information from a scrap of 'evidence' related to the case that actually came from one of Mulder's t-shirts.
6th Oct '15 4:11:22 PM SteveMB
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* In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', Bruce displays a healthy attitude to this kind of trope, not dismissing anything out of hand but not blankly accepting all supernatural claims either.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'', Bruce displays a healthy attitude to this kind of trope, not dismissing anything out of hand (having encountered his share of paranormal phenomena during his own cape and cowl career) but not blankly accepting all supernatural claims either.



'''Bruce:''' Of course I do. I've seen it all: Demons, witchboys, immortals, zombies. But [trashing parts of a high school and attacking a bully], it's just so...so ''high school''.

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'''Bruce:''' Of course I do. I've seen {{seen it all: all}}: Demons, witchboys, immortals, zombies. But [trashing parts of a high school and attacking a bully], it's just so...so ''high school''.
25th Sep '15 10:02:14 AM ChronoLegion
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* In Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''The Thief of Baghdad'', the author relays a FishOutOfTemporalWater scenario, in which a modern-day Russian man is magically transported into ArabianNightsDays by a genie to become the legendary titular character. The story (and sequels) feature all manner of Middle Eastern magical creatures. The author decides he shouldn't stop there and invoke this trope. After all, if a guy can be abducted and sent into the magical past by a genie, then why can't he also be abducted by a flying saucer in the middle of a Baghdad street chase, causing the guards to run away in fear.

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* In Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''The Thief of Baghdad'', the author relays a FishOutOfTemporalWater scenario, in which a modern-day Russian man is magically transported into ArabianNightsDays by a genie to become the legendary titular character. The story (and sequels) feature all manner of Middle Eastern magical creatures. The author decides he shouldn't stop there and invoke this trope. After all, if a guy can be abducted and sent into the magical past by a genie, then why can't he also be abducted by a flying saucer in the middle of a Baghdad street chase, causing the guards to run away in fear.fear, claiming that St. Khidr's chariot has taken the thieving infidel for righteous punishment.
25th Sep '15 10:00:37 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

* In Creator/AndreiBelyanin's ''The Thief of Baghdad'', the author relays a FishOutOfTemporalWater scenario, in which a modern-day Russian man is magically transported into ArabianNightsDays by a genie to become the legendary titular character. The story (and sequels) feature all manner of Middle Eastern magical creatures. The author decides he shouldn't stop there and invoke this trope. After all, if a guy can be abducted and sent into the magical past by a genie, then why can't he also be abducted by a flying saucer in the middle of a Baghdad street chase, causing the guards to run away in fear.
4th Aug '15 12:53:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* Captain America in ''Film/TheAvengers''. While he refuses to believe Thor and Loki are gods ("There's only one God, m'am, and he doesn't dress like that."), he accepts that they're magic-using aliens without question. Of course, he ''has'' seen the very-unscientific powers of the Tesseract [[Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger first-hand]], so it's not that much of a stretch for him. Steve is technically correct, as well, given that in the movie universe, the Norse gods are supposed to be {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s.

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* Captain America in ''Film/TheAvengers''.''Film/TheAvengers2012''. While he refuses to believe Thor and Loki are gods ("There's only one God, m'am, and he doesn't dress like that."), he accepts that they're magic-using aliens without question. Of course, he ''has'' seen the very-unscientific powers of the Tesseract [[Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger first-hand]], so it's not that much of a stretch for him. Steve is technically correct, as well, given that in the movie universe, the Norse gods are supposed to be {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s.
23rd Jun '15 8:41:47 AM movie007
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* Last but not least, Young Earth Creationists (Christians who take the book of Genesis in its most literal form) typically disbelieve in aliens -- since Earth is given special attention in the creation story. However, it should be noted that nowhere in Genesis is other planets mentioned - and the sun is treated as a separate entity from other stars.

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* Last but not least, Young Earth Creationists (Christians who take the book of Genesis in its most literal form) typically disbelieve in aliens -- since Earth is given special attention in the creation story. However, it should be noted that nowhere in Genesis is other planets mentioned - -- and the sun is treated as a separate entity from other stars.
23rd Jun '15 8:40:48 AM movie007
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* Last but not least, Young Earth Creationists (Christians who take the book of Genesis in its most literal form) typically disbelieve in aliens -- since Earth is given special attention in the creation story. However, it should be noted that nowhere in Genesis is other planets mentioned - and the sun is treated as a separate entity from other stars.
23rd Jun '15 12:30:35 AM AbuDhabi
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*** The Vatican even has a planned amendment to its dogma if intelligent alien life is discovered.

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*** The Vatican even has a planned amendment to its dogma doctrine if intelligent alien life is discovered.
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