History Main / IJustWriteTheThing

31st Jan '16 7:21:52 AM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
* Even though Talia Shire was perfectly willing to return as Adrian in ''RockyBalboa'', Creator/SylvesterStallone came to the conclusion during the scriptwriting that it would make more of a emotional impact if the character had died between ''Film/RockyV'' and ''RockyBalboa''. They even made a public statement about it, to make sure that it wasn't mistaken for a falling out between them.
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* Even though Talia Shire was perfectly willing to return as Adrian in ''RockyBalboa'', ''Film/RockyBalboa'', Creator/SylvesterStallone came to the conclusion during the scriptwriting that it would make more of a emotional impact if the character had died between ''Film/RockyV'' and ''RockyBalboa''.''Film/RockyBalboa''. They even made a public statement about it, to make sure that it wasn't mistaken for a falling out between them.
15th Jan '16 10:41:53 AM Anddrix
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* Played with in ''Series/StargateSG1'' in the episode "Citizen Joe", where an ancient device allows an ordinary citizen to see the events in Jack O'Neil's life. He tells everyone around him about the stories and eventually starts writing them down and tries to get them published. When the people he's telling the stories to ask questions (hilariously similar to ones that [[ViewersAreMorons Viewers]] or [[ExecutiveMeddling Executives]] might ask while watching the real show), Joe dismisses them because "that's how it really happened!" Of course, in his case, that really IS what happened.
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* Played with in ''Series/StargateSG1'' in the episode "Citizen Joe", where an ancient device allows an ordinary citizen to see the events in Jack O'Neil's life. He tells everyone around him about the stories and eventually starts writing them down and tries to get them published. When the people he's telling the stories to ask questions (hilariously similar to ones that [[ViewersAreMorons Viewers]] Viewers or [[ExecutiveMeddling Executives]] might ask while watching the real show), Joe dismisses them because "that's how it really happened!" Of course, in his case, that really IS what happened.
7th Jan '16 5:24:24 AM HighCrate
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* It's quite common for fanfic authors to apologise for the lack of porn with the excuse that the characters just wanted to talk. [[TropesAreNotBad It's as if]] [[PornWithPlot that was a bad thing]].
9th Dec '15 2:56:30 PM FF32
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* ''{{Sonichu}}'' author Christian Chandler really does believe that the characters he uses exist in some sort of alternate reality. He has apparently even "spoken" to some of them in real life.
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* ''{{Sonichu}}'' ''Webcomic/{{Sonichu}}'' author Christian Chandler really does believe that the characters he uses exist in some sort of alternate reality. He has apparently even "spoken" to some of them in real life.
1st Dec '15 9:01:59 PM margdean56
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* In ''The Mind of the Maker'', Creator/DorothyLSayers writes: -->[T]he free will of a genuinely created character has a certain reality, which the writer will defy at his peril. It does sometimes happen that the plot requires from its characters certain behavior, which, when it comes to the point, no ingenuity on the author's part can force them into, except at the cost of destroying them. ** Elsewhere Sayers notes that this was why Harriet Vane did ''not'' fall into Lord Peter Wimsey's arms at the end of ''Strong Poison'', but rather took several more books to agree to marry him.
7th Nov '15 5:24:55 PM arbane
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* At the end of [[Cerebus Rick's Story]] Cerebus, after spending decade in a bar (and more than two years in real life!) simply refuses to leave and do anything interesting, even at the urging of [[CreatorInsert Dave Sim]]. Eventually Jaka (or a [[EpilepticTrees Jaka simulacrum]]) has to show up and lure Cerebus away.
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* At the end of [[Cerebus ''[[{{ComicBook/Cerebus}} Rick's Story]] Story]]'', Cerebus, after spending a entire decade in a bar (and more than two years in real life!) simply refuses to leave and do anything interesting, even at the urging of [[CreatorInsert Dave Sim]]. Eventually Jaka (or a [[EpilepticTrees Jaka simulacrum]]) has to show up and lure Cerebus away.
2nd Oct '15 9:03:17 AM vifetoile
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Creator/StephenKing, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies. At its best, the story starts making sense on an intuitive level, and the author is less inclined to [[CreatorsPet play favorites]] and fiddle with their AuthorPowers to craft {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}e where convenient. See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this. At its source, the DeathOfTheAuthor theory builds on a variant of this idea, that a writer is a "conduit" for a story, and when their work is done their opinion on it is the same as any other reader's.
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Creator/StephenKing, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies. At its best, the story starts making sense on an is intuitive level, and satisfying, and the author is less inclined to [[CreatorsPet play favorites]] and fiddle with their AuthorPowers to craft {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}e where convenient. See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this. At its source, the DeathOfTheAuthor theory builds on a variant of this idea, that a writer is a "conduit" for a story, and when their work is done their opinion on it is the same as no more important than any other reader's.
2nd Oct '15 9:02:09 AM vifetoile
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Creator/StephenKing, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies- and the story will be better for the lack of artifical interference from AuthorPowers creating {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}s to serve the authors whims. See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this.
to:
Creator/StephenKing, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies- and comedies. At its best, the story will be better for starts making sense on an intuitive level, and the lack of artifical interference from author is less inclined to [[CreatorsPet play favorites]] and fiddle with their AuthorPowers creating to craft {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}s to serve the authors whims.Machina}}e where convenient. See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this. At its source, the DeathOfTheAuthor theory builds on a variant of this idea, that a writer is a "conduit" for a story, and when their work is done their opinion on it is the same as any other reader's.
20th Sep '15 1:05:41 AM Seanette
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Steven King, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies- and the story will be better for the lack of artifical interference from AuthorPowers creating {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}s to serve the authors whims.
to:
Steven King, Creator/StephenKing, in fact, has mentioned a personal theory that in order to write a truly great work of fiction, an author ''must'' embrace this idea. His reasoning is that if a writer can convince themselves on some level, even briefly, that the world they are creating does in fact exist and is not completely within their control, a work ceases to be based purely on WishFulfillment and AuthorAppeal, and begins to tap into the subconscious and random passing thoughts of the author. At this point, a work becomes something that can ''legitimately'' surprise even the author, in the same way that a dream can surprise a dreamer. Characters do things that the author doesn't like, events happen ''because'' the author doesn't want them to happen, {{Author Phobia}}s leak into works that were supposed to be lighthearted comedies- and the story will be better for the lack of artifical interference from AuthorPowers creating {{Mary Sue}}s and {{Deus Ex Machina}}s to serve the authors whims.
19th Sep '15 4:34:30 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''TheDarkHalf'', Thad comments in a journal entry that the characters in the novel he's writing insist on doing things he doesn't want them to do.
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* In ''TheDarkHalf'', ''Literature/TheDarkHalf'', Thad comments in a journal entry that the characters in the novel he's writing insist on doing things he doesn't want them to do.
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