History Main / IJustWriteTheThing

24th Apr '18 5:00:02 PM MasterN
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Justified to a certain extent: The RuleOfDrama dictates that what makes the best story isn't always the easiest thing to write. The author might ''know'' that killing off Bob is the most exciting/logical/dramatic/marketable course of action, but we can assume that as an author, he ''likes'' his character and will suffer a bit of heartache over it... heartache which is going to be magnified when the move proves to be extremely unpopular, or the fans react with horror and run away screaming, "[[FanonDiscontinuity That never happened]]!"

This approach also tends to make an author more accessible to fans, since he comes across as just one of the group. However, some fans will call "FridgeLogic!" by pointing out that if the author felt ''that'' badly about the turn of events, nobody forced him to write it that way (at least, [[ExecutiveMeddling we assume not]]). Writers may also risk making hypocrites of themselves if they then dictate exactly what happens in the universe and leave no room for fan speculation, beating down dissenters who write fanfic that goes against canon, or those who note that they preferred the story when it was cute and funny and Bob was still alive.

A writer who claims he just writes the thing usually takes one or both of two different forms:

to:

Justified to a certain extent: The RuleOfDrama dictates that what makes the best story isn't always the easiest thing to write. The author might ''know'' that killing off Bob is the most exciting/logical/dramatic/marketable course of action, but we can assume that as an author, he ''likes'' his they ''like'' their character and will suffer a bit of heartache over it... heartache which is going to be magnified when the move proves to be extremely unpopular, or the fans react with horror and run away screaming, "[[FanonDiscontinuity That never happened]]!"

This approach also tends to make an author more accessible to fans, since he comes they come across as [[OneOfUs just one of the group. group]]. However, some fans will call "FridgeLogic!" FridgeLogic by pointing out that if the author felt ''that'' badly about the turn of events, nobody forced him them to write it that way (at least, [[ExecutiveMeddling we assume not]]). Writers may also risk making hypocrites of themselves if they then dictate exactly what happens in the universe and leave no room for fan speculation, beating down dissenters who write fanfic that goes against canon, or those who note that they preferred the story when it was cute and funny and Bob was still alive.

A writer who claims he they just writes write the thing usually takes one or both of two different forms:
9th Apr '18 7:03:27 AM Crossover-Enthusiast
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A step down from the LiteraryAgentHypothesis, this is an author who speaks about the events in thier stories as if they had no control over them. The author claims heartbreak when a character gets KilledOffForReal, commiserates with the fans over the ShipSinking, laments when CharacterDerailment strikes, and rants along with the fans at characters' WhatAnIdiot moments. Often becomes prominent when CerebusSyndrome strikes.

to:

A step down from the LiteraryAgentHypothesis, this is an author who speaks about the events in thier their stories as if they had no control over them. The author claims heartbreak when a character gets KilledOffForReal, commiserates with the fans over the ShipSinking, laments when CharacterDerailment strikes, and rants along with the fans at characters' WhatAnIdiot moments. Often becomes prominent when CerebusSyndrome strikes.
31st Mar '18 6:21:19 AM Dina_M
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Fanfic/WeasleyGirl'' author Tropers/{{Roo}} has made this claim on occasion, mostly of the Because The Characters Say So variant. Most notably the big revelation in ''Secrets of the Past'' that [[spoiler:Ronnie is a lesbian]] is revealed as something the character informed the author. Same author also briefly discusses the trope in the very meta story ''[[https://archiveofourown.org/works/4817126 Hermione Granger's Guide To Gender-Flip Fiction]]''. Here, the moment when a character begins feeling so three-dimensional that they write themselves is explored from the point of view of the characters, and it's referred to as "the ''Happening''."
3rd Feb '18 12:38:26 AM MasterN
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A step down from the LiteraryAgentHypothesis, this is an author who speaks about the events in his stories as if he had no control over them. He claims heartbreak when a character gets KilledOffForReal, commiserates with the fans over the ShipSinking, laments when CharacterDerailment strikes, and rants along with the fans at characters' WhatAnIdiot moments. Often becomes prominent when CerebusSyndrome strikes.

to:

A step down from the LiteraryAgentHypothesis, this is an author who speaks about the events in his thier stories as if he they had no control over them. He The author claims heartbreak when a character gets KilledOffForReal, commiserates with the fans over the ShipSinking, laments when CharacterDerailment strikes, and rants along with the fans at characters' WhatAnIdiot moments. Often becomes prominent when CerebusSyndrome strikes.
1st Feb '18 10:16:47 PM lalalei2001
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* Trailers for ''Film/TheManWhoInventedChristmas'' strongly suggest that the character-driven version was a major part of the creative process for Creator/CharlesDickens. At one point he even tells Scrooge that the characters should do what he wants them to do, since "I'm the author!" Scrooge's response is an amused denial.

to:

* Trailers for ''Film/TheManWhoInventedChristmas'' strongly suggest show that the character-driven version was a major part of the creative process for Creator/CharlesDickens. At one point he even tells Scrooge that the characters should do what he wants them to do, since "I'm the author!" Scrooge's response is an amused denial.
31st Dec '17 7:57:53 AM SeptimusHeap
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* The ''{{Spider-Man}}'' writers in the 70's killed off Gwen Stacy because the only logical way her relationship with Peter Parker could go would be to get married, and that would age him more than than they wanted. When asked why they had written their relationship into such a dead end in the first place, this was their explanation.

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* The ''{{Spider-Man}}'' ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' writers in the 70's killed off Gwen Stacy because the only logical way her relationship with Peter Parker could go would be to get married, and that would age him more than than they wanted. When asked why they had written their relationship into such a dead end in the first place, this was their explanation.
18th Dec '17 7:12:00 PM HarpieSiren
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[[folder: Theatre]]
* ''Six Characters in Search of an Author'' by Luigi Pirandello dramatises the writing of a play and portrays an author's characters as driving his writing, including arguing about whether the setting is realistic, rather than having the author in full control.
* The narrator in ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' has no more control over the events of the play than the characters, as proved when [[spoiler:they band together and kill him]].
[[/folder]]



* ''Six Characters in Search of an Author'' by Luigi Pirandello dramatises the writing of a play and portrays an author's characters as driving his writing, including arguing about whether the setting is realistic, rather than having the author in full control.



* The narrator in ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' has no more control over the events of the play than the characters, as proved when [[spoiler:they band together and kill him]].
8th Dec '17 1:16:18 PM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

* One of Creator/AAPessimal's most finely-realised characters was only ever meant to appear in one story as an expansion of a one-line placeholder in canon. She was originally intended to be a rather stroppy "[[AmoralAfrikaner South African]]" who took all the NationalStereotypes of "White South African-ness" UpToEleven in a Discworld context, and, very deliberately, be hard for the reader to like or sympathise with. And that would have been it. Only... as WordOfGod has it, this [[FieryRedhead late-entry Assassin]] ended up standing behind Pessimal with a very large blade at his neck, demanding he write her more sympathetically and make her more of an ActionGirl heroine. Thus, the nineteen-year old new arrival in Ankh-Morpork evolved over a series of tales into a more mellow forty-something mother of three daughters. And her family started to appear in such numbers that the author realised he'd better make an effort to learn ''some'' Afrikaans and not keep winging it.
17th Nov '17 10:21:29 PM LadyNorbert
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Justified to a certain extent: The RuleOfDrama dictates that what makes the best story isn't always the easiest thing to write. The author might ''know'' that killing off Bob is the most exciting/logical/dramatic/marketable course of action, but we can assume that as an author, he ''likes'' his character and will suffer a bit of heartache over it...heartache that is going to be magnified when the move proves to be extremely unpopular, or the fans react with horror and run away screaming, "[[FanonDiscontinuity That never happened]]!"

to:

Justified to a certain extent: The RuleOfDrama dictates that what makes the best story isn't always the easiest thing to write. The author might ''know'' that killing off Bob is the most exciting/logical/dramatic/marketable course of action, but we can assume that as an author, he ''likes'' his character and will suffer a bit of heartache over it... heartache that which is going to be magnified when the move proves to be extremely unpopular, or the fans react with horror and run away screaming, "[[FanonDiscontinuity That never happened]]!"



[[folder:Film]]
* Trailers for ''Film/TheManWhoInventedChristmas'' strongly suggest that the character-driven version was a major part of the creative process for Creator/CharlesDickens. At one point he even tells Scrooge that the characters should do what he wants them to do, since "I'm the author!" Scrooge's response is an amused denial.
[[/folder]]



* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', this is [[TheStoryteller Varric's]] response when Aveline asks how his city guard serial (loosely based on her) is going to end. "The story will go where it wants to go. The characters drive it, not me."

to:

* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', this is [[TheStoryteller Varric's]] response when Aveline asks how his city guard serial (loosely (which includes a character loosely based on her) is going to end. "The story will go where it wants to go. The characters drive it, not me." He reiterates the sentiment in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' when talking about his body of work in general, noting that "You don't really write a good story. It was there the whole time. You just uncover it."
10th Nov '17 11:18:11 AM MasterN
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See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this. At its source, the DeathOfTheAuthor theory builds on a variant of this idea, that a writer is a "conduit" for a story, and when their work is done their opinion on it is no more important than any other reader's.

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See also WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants, which can lead to this. At its source, the DeathOfTheAuthor theory builds on a variant of this idea, that a writer is a "conduit" for a story, and when their work is done their opinion on it is no more important than any other reader's.
reader's. Can also happen when itís not the plot or characters but the executives who demand a story be written a certain way, and the author has no choice but to comply- for that, see ExecutiveMeddling.
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