History Main / HyperSpaceIsAScaryPlace

22nd Jan '17 6:31:09 AM Morgenthaler
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*** In the IDW Comics "Infestation 2" crossover arc, ''[[OhCrap they get loose]]'' and are every bit as horrible as they sound. And are apparently the inspiration for the CthulhuMythos. It doesn't seem especially clear that the creatures from this IDW megacrossover are the same as the ones from the much earlier ''Anime/TransformersCybertron'' based story, but Wiki/TFWiki seems to be sure about it.

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*** In the IDW Comics "Infestation 2" crossover arc, ''[[OhCrap they get loose]]'' and are every bit as horrible as they sound. And are apparently the inspiration for the CthulhuMythos.Franchise/CthulhuMythos. It doesn't seem especially clear that the creatures from this IDW megacrossover are the same as the ones from the much earlier ''Anime/TransformersCybertron'' based story, but Wiki/TFWiki seems to be sure about it.
22nd Jan '17 2:09:42 AM Andyroid
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* In ''[[VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice Sam & Max: The Penal Zone]]'', when Sam and Max first use the power of Teleportation (outside the tutorial flashback at the beginning), the two travel through a bizarre multicolored void where Max is a talking skeleton with a creepy voice.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice Sam & Max: The Penal Zone]]'', the first episode of ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxTheDevilsPlayhouse'', when Sam and Max first use the power of Teleportation (outside the tutorial flashback at the beginning), the two travel through a bizarre multicolored void where Max is a talking skeleton with a creepy voice.
18th Jan '17 10:35:03 PM dvorak
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* Inverted in ''The Engines of Dawn''. Hyperspace is so beautiful that a religion sprung up around it, believing it to be not just heaven, but the literal Body of God. In reality, [[spoiler: that's how the {{Eldritch Abomination}}s used as FTL engines communicate]].
12th Jan '17 8:02:22 PM LBHills
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov wrote a Robots story about a computer going mad when asked to design a FTL drive, as the properties of hyperspace meant that humans passing through it were temporarily "dead", and it was programmed to protect human life. And don't forget how the computer hoaxed the crew, during history's first FTL jump, making them think they had died and gone to hell. And filled the pantry with nothing but baked beans. The conflict between its orders and its need to protect human life ''warped'' that thing.

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* Creator/IsaacAsimov wrote a Robots story about a computer going mad when asked to design a FTL drive, as the properties of hyperspace meant that humans passing through it were temporarily "dead", and it the computer mind was programmed to protect human life. And don't forget how the ThreeLawsCompliant. The computer hoaxed the crew, during history's first FTL jump, making them think they had died and gone to hell. And filled the pantry with nothing but baked beans. The conflict between its orders and its need to protect human life ''warped'' that thing.



* The Gray Limbo in Creator/JulianMay's ''Literature/GalacticMilieu Trilogy''. A virtually addictive "nothing": there's nothing to see, but it's still hard to look away. Can drive a person mad. To top it off, upsilon field transition (a.k.a. jumping to hyperspace) is incredibly painful to intelligent beings, and becomes more so the faster you intend to travel once in the Limbo. So painful, the effective top speed of a craft is determined by how much pain a person can stand without going insane or dying. Humans top out at around 180df (light-years per twelve hours), with two notable exceptions: Jack Remillard, a bodiless brain, who tops out around 400df, and the main antagonist, who figures out a way to enter the Limbo in effectively naked skin just before his HeelFaceTurn, topping out at 18,000df, and then one of the primary causes of his HeelFaceTurn is being given a pain mitigator -- whereupon he travels several '''billion''' light-years to another galaxy in seven hops. The Ships are a race of [[SpaceWhale giant interplanetary beings]] who can be convinced to consume a passenger vessel and serve as spaceships through ThePowerOfLove. One of them made the same several-billion-light-year journey in a single hop, albeit dying in the process.
* Continua-craft in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'' don't directly show any scariness as travel is instantaneous. However there is a slight downside in that inventing one or even just working on the math required to invent one will get you murdered by demons. Well, actually hermaphroditic lobster-aliens who just happen to look like demons.

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* The Gray Limbo in Creator/JulianMay's ''Literature/GalacticMilieu Trilogy''. A virtually addictive "nothing": there's nothing to see, but it's still hard to look away. Can This can drive a person mad. To top it off, upsilon field transition (a.k.a. jumping to hyperspace) is incredibly painful to intelligent beings, and becomes more so the faster you intend to travel once in the Limbo. So painful, the effective top speed of a craft is determined by how much pain a person can stand without going insane or dying. Humans top out at around 180df (light-years per twelve hours), with two notable exceptions: Jack Remillard, a bodiless brain, who tops out around 400df, and the main antagonist, who figures out a way to enter the Limbo in effectively naked skin just before his HeelFaceTurn, topping out at 18,000df, and then one of the primary causes of his HeelFaceTurn is being given a pain mitigator -- whereupon he travels several '''billion''' light-years to another galaxy in seven hops. The Ships are a race of [[SpaceWhale giant interplanetary beings]] who can be convinced to consume a passenger vessel and serve as spaceships through ThePowerOfLove. One of them made the same several-billion-light-year journey in a single hop, albeit dying in although this was a desperation maneuver that killed the process.
vehicle.
* Continua-craft in Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/TheNumberOfTheBeast'' don't directly show any scariness as travel is instantaneous. However there is a slight downside in that inventing one or even just working on the math required to invent one will get you murdered by demons. Well, actually hermaphroditic lobster-aliens who just happen to look like demons. They're protecting their turf: it's kind of complicated.



* ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'': ''Between'', through which dragons and fire-lizards teleport, is "black, blacker, blackest", has no reference points, and is freezing cold. It's also the dragon method of suicide... intentional or otherwise. (Going ''between'' without a clear mental image of your intended destination is a one-way trip.) It also has no air. Dragons can hold their breaths for a surprisingly long time, but this is rather inconvenient for their human riders. Prolonged and repeated trips through ''between'' also terminate human pregnancies. The Weyrwoman Kylara took advantage of this by using trips through ''between'' as birth control. This also can save dragonriders battling Thread. In the first book ''Dragonflight'', F'lar avoids being eaten by a wad of Thread that hit his face by going ''between''. The icy cold of ''between'' immediately kills the Threads. The series implies that this is the original use of ''between'', a method fire-lizards evolved to help them survive threadfall. One last thing. If the image of the destination is both clear enough and specific enough, it's possible to TimeTravel via ''between''.

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* ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'': ''Between'', through which dragons and fire-lizards teleport, is "black, blacker, blackest", has no reference points, and is freezing cold. It's also the dragon method of suicide... intentional or otherwise. (Going ''between'' without a clear mental image of your intended destination is a one-way trip.) It also has no air. Dragons can hold their breaths for a surprisingly long time, but this is rather inconvenient for their human riders. Prolonged and repeated trips through ''between'' also terminate human pregnancies. The Weyrwoman Kylara took advantage of this by using trips through ''between'' as birth control. This also can save dragonriders battling Thread. In the first book book, ''Dragonflight'', F'lar avoids being eaten by a wad of Thread that hit his face by going ''between''. The icy cold of ''between'' immediately kills the Threads. The series implies that this is the original use of ''between'', a method fire-lizards evolved to help them survive threadfall. One last thing. If the image of the destination is both clear enough and specific enough, it's possible to TimeTravel via ''between''.''between'', but this carries an additional danger of arriving in the wrong time period, or dying of asphyxiation and shock during a very long jump.



* While there is nothing inherently bad about hypersphere in ''Literature/TheHistoryOfTheGalaxy'', it's essentially an empty dimension (or anomaly, as the author prefers to call it). It's pitch black there. The only navigational tool that works in hypersphere is the mass-detector, which measures the "energy pressure" around the ship to determine what sort of objects lie in normal space. Early human hyperdrive-equipped ships were flying totally blind, and many were never heard from again (either they ended up in empty systems or materialized inside stellar bodies). All others ended up in random star systems with not enough power for a second jump, resulting in a lot of {{Lost Colon|y}}ies. The first human ship to end up in hypersphere wasn't even equipped with a hyperdrive. It was humanity's first extrasolar vessel, the colony ship ''Alpha'' (also the largest ship ever built). Propelled by three powerful fusion drives, it was supposed to accelerate to .5c on its way to Alpha Centauri. The drives activate... and the sheer power tears a hole in space/time, sucking the ship into hypersphere.\\\

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* While there is nothing inherently bad about the hypersphere in ''Literature/TheHistoryOfTheGalaxy'', it's essentially an empty dimension (or anomaly, as the author prefers to call it). It's pitch black there. The only navigational tool that works in hypersphere is the mass-detector, which measures the "energy pressure" around the ship to determine what sort of objects lie in normal space. Early human hyperdrive-equipped ships were flying totally blind, and many were never heard from again (either they ended up in empty systems or materialized inside stellar bodies). All others ended up in random star systems with not enough power for a second jump, resulting in a lot of {{Lost Colon|y}}ies. The first human ship to end up in hypersphere wasn't even equipped with a hyperdrive. It was humanity's first extrasolar vessel, the colony ship ''Alpha'' (also the largest ship ever built). Propelled by three powerful fusion drives, it was supposed to accelerate to .5c on its way to Alpha Centauri. The drives activate... and the sheer power tears a hole in space/time, sucking the ship into hypersphere.\\\



* FTL travel in the Literature/HeecheeSaga isn't dangerous in and of itself, but nobody knows how it actually ''works'' (all FTL ships were left behind by ThePrecursors and they didn't leave any instructions manuals or maps). Further, the manner FTL functions leaves a lot to be desired. For one thing every FTL starship only has one preset destination, making travel a dangerous risk; there's no telling what you'll find on the other side and also no way of telling how long the trip will take, so you'd better pack as many supplies as you freaking can. There's multiple times mentioned where ships came back filled with the corpses of it's crew because they ran out of food and water mid-jump. Oh and nobody knows what happens to ships that get pushed off-course; they're certainly never seen again...
* Inverted in ''Literature/TheLongEarth''. Interdimensional travel is so safe and convenient, Datum Earth has a political and economic crisis as people leave it in massive quantities. Several sentient species mastered it at the "pointy stick" level of technology.

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* FTL travel in the Literature/HeecheeSaga isn't dangerous in and of itself, but nobody knows how it actually ''works'' (all FTL ships were left behind by ThePrecursors and they didn't leave any instructions manuals or maps). Further, the manner FTL functions leaves a lot to be desired. For one thing every FTL starship only has one preset destination, making travel a dangerous risk; there's no telling what you'll find on the other side and also no way of telling how long the trip will take, so you'd better pack as many supplies as you freaking can. There's multiple times mentioned where ships came back filled with the corpses of it's its crew because they ran out of food and water mid-jump. Oh mid-jump... and nobody knows what happens others where they had to ships that draw straws to see who would get pushed off-course; they're certainly to keep eating and breathing long enough to report back. Attempts at attempted course adjustment (using volunteers paid a large bonus in advance) have never seen again...
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* Inverted in ''Literature/TheLongEarth''. Interdimensional travel is so safe and convenient, Datum Earth has a political and economic crisis as people leave it in massive quantities. Several sentient species mastered it at back during the "pointy stick" level of technology.technology: humans seem to have caught on unusually late in their development.


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* A. Bertram Chandler's space novels involve the Mannschenn Drive, which uses 'temporal precession' - essentially a hybrid of time machine and matter 'phasing', carrying all the worrying baggage of both those technologies. A serious accident will disintegrate the ship: lesser malfunctions can drop the ship into AnotherDimension, or a random time period. (Really random: say, six billion years ahead of schedule.)
9th Jan '17 10:21:31 PM Yozzy
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** Faster-than-light travel is achieved by jumping into a parallel dimension called the Warp or the Immaterium, which is essentially the Afterlife. A [[YourMindMakesItReal manifestation]] of the [[TheHeartless thoughts and emotions of all conscious life]], also the location of [[OurSoulsAreDifferent everyone's souls]] and the origin, power source and curse of all PsychicPowers, but also a {{Hell}} brimming with [[TheLegionsOfHell soul-eating daemons]] and [[EldritchAbomination dark Gods]]. Ships need special Gellar Fields to keep the entities that swarm through the Immaterium from passing right through the hull and feasting on the minds and souls of all within. Even with the Gellar Field, the ship needs to be covered in holy baroque symbols to prevent daemons from blowing it up, or worse. The normal passage of time is also completely irrelevant; it's impossible to know the exact age of people who do a lot of Warp travel, it's possible (though rare) for a vessel to disappear within the Warp for centuries or even ''millennia'' despite the crew only experiencing a few months of difference, and there is at least one documented case of someone entering the Warp and exiting at the same location ''before they left''. One ork Waaaagh! did so as well, but since the future warboss killed the past warboss in order to have his favorite gun twice, the Waaagh! disbanded due to the confusion.

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** Faster-than-light travel is achieved by jumping into a parallel dimension known by many names, but chiefly called the Warp or Warp, and to put it one way, it's comprised entirely of exotic energies and behaves in a manner very similar to an ocean. To put it in another, it acts as the Immaterium, which is essentially "sink" for the Afterlife. material universe's psychic energy, including serving as a number of Afterlives. A [[YourMindMakesItReal manifestation]] of the [[TheHeartless thoughts and emotions of all conscious life]], also the location of [[OurSoulsAreDifferent everyone's souls]] and the origin, power source and curse of all PsychicPowers, but also a {{Hell}} brimming with [[TheLegionsOfHell soul-eating daemons]] and [[EldritchAbomination dark Dark Gods]]. Ships need special Gellar Fields to keep the entities that swarm through the Immaterium from passing right through the hull and feasting on the minds and souls of all within. Even with the Gellar Field, the ship needs to be covered in holy baroque symbols to prevent daemons from blowing it up, or worse. The normal passage of time is also completely irrelevant; it's impossible to know the exact age of people who do a lot of Warp travel, it's possible (though rare) for a vessel to disappear within the Warp for centuries or even ''millennia'' despite the crew only experiencing a few months of difference, and there is at least one documented case of someone entering the Warp and exiting at the same location ''before they left''. One ork Ork Waaaagh! did so as well, but since the future warboss killed the past warboss in order to have a spare of his favorite gun twice, gun, the Waaagh! disbanded due to the confusion.



** The Tau, due to lacking any psykers or a strong Warp presence, can't access the Warp like most other factions, and are restricted to the "shallows" of the Warp, "skimming" it instead of immersing their vessels any "deeper" (apparently SpaceIsAnOcean metaphors are plentiful when describing the Warp, but metaphors are the only effective method of describing a realm of illogical thought). While this means painfully slow interstellar travel even by the standards of the setting, it runs much less risk of daemons raping the flat bit of your neck where your head used to be, although it still has its dangers. Unfortunately this also means that the Tau have less understanding about the dangers of the Warp than Humans or Eldar do and even less understanding about the forces in it. Supposedly, they tried to duplicate the Imperium's Warp technology, but eventually decided "Screw this. Too many tentacles."
*** The main problem for Tau is that their species don't have psykers and navigators, who are absolutely necessary to navigate through the warp with any degree of success.
** Even staying out of the Warp doesn't mean escaping this trope. Sometimes, [[NegativeSpaceWedgie Warp/realspace overlaps]] (known as Warp Storms or Warp Rifts) are generated that can swallow planets, star systems, or even entire sectors of space; the largest, the Eye of Terror, is ''thousands of light years'' in diameter. It's never a good idea to be on any planet caught anywhere near one of these, as not only does [[RealityIsOutToLunch physics take an extended vacation]], creating a lovely little WorldOfChaos, but the denizens of the Warp can freely manifest in an overlap, leaving them with plenty of time for Fun. As luck would have it, warp storms sometimes have beneficial effects as well. At one point the Imperium of Man found a Stone-Age alien species on an uncharted world, and as per normal procedure tasked forces to exterminate them. A warp storm blew up and rendered the star system off limits for about 6,000 years. Then the storm dissipated and the Imperium tried again, only to discover that in the interim the aliens in question, the previously mentioned Tau, had become a spacefaring culture more technologically advanced than the Imperium and fended off the incursion quite handily.

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** The Tau, due to lacking any psykers or a strong Warp presence, can't don't have psykers, and thus no analogues for the Imperial Astropaths and Navigators. This leaves them with a very limited access to the Warp like most other factions, Warp, and next to no way to explore it's nature and applications. Despite having advanced technology otherwise, the Tau are very primitive when it comes to psychic and warp-based technology, including their FTL drives. The Tau are restricted to the "shallows" of the Warp, "skimming" it instead of immersing their vessels any "deeper" (apparently SpaceIsAnOcean metaphors are plentiful when describing the Warp, but metaphors are the only effective method of describing a realm of illogical thought). While this means painfully slow interstellar travel FTL travel, even by the standards of the setting, it runs it's a much less risk safer and reliable method of daemons raping the flat bit of your neck where your head used to be, travel, although it still has its dangers. Unfortunately this also means that the Tau have less understanding about the dangers of the Warp than Humans or Eldar do just about every other faction, and even less understanding about the forces in it. Supposedly, they tried to duplicate the Imperium's Warp technology, but eventually decided "Screw this. Too many tentacles."
*** The main problem for Tau is that their species don't have psykers and navigators, who are absolutely necessary to navigate through the warp with any degree of success.
"
** Even staying out of the Warp doesn't mean escaping this trope. Sometimes, a [[NegativeSpaceWedgie Warp/realspace overlaps]] Warpspace/realspace overlap]] (known as Warp Storms or Warp Rifts) are is generated that can swallow planets, star systems, or even entire sectors of space; the largest, the Eye of Terror, is roughly the size and shape of a dwarf spiral galaxy, meaning ''thousands of light years'' in diameter. It's never a good idea to be on any planet caught anywhere near one of these, as these. While the [[GreenRocks exact affects vary on a case-by-case basis]], general affect include not only does [[RealityIsOutToLunch physics take taking an extended vacation]], creating a lovely little WorldOfChaos, but the denizens of the Warp can freely manifest in an overlap, leaving them with plenty of time for Fun. As luck would have it, warp storms sometimes have beneficial effects as well. At one point the Imperium of Man found a Stone-Age alien species on an uncharted world, and as per normal procedure tasked forces to exterminate them. A warp storm blew up and rendered the star system off limits for about 6,000 years. Then the storm dissipated and the Imperium tried again, only to discover that in the interim the aliens in question, the previously mentioned Tau, had become a spacefaring culture more technologically advanced than the Imperium and fended off the incursion quite handily.



** Of course, being ''40K'', some factions just don't care about the mind-breaking horrors inherent to the Warp. The Orks coat their vessels in "teef" to ward off daemons (which works [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve because Orks believe it should]]), but even if that doesn't work, daemonic incursions are treated as a way of [[BloodKnight breaking up the tedium of long trips]]. Chaos followers have a much easier time navigating the home realm of their patron deities, but they still need Gellar fields to prevent daemons from coming to [[DealWithTheDevil collect on their pacts]]. And the sheer might of the Tyranid HiveMind plays havoc with the Warp and its denizens, meaning only the most powerful daemons can go anywhere near them, and they can't fight an entire hive fleet by themselves anyway.

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** Of course, being ''40K'', some factions just don't care about the mind-breaking horrors inherent to the Warp. The Orks coat their vessels in "teef" to ward scare off daemons (which works [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve because Orks believe it should]]), but even if that doesn't work, daemonic incursions are treated as a way of [[BloodKnight breaking up the tedium of long trips]]. Chaos followers have a much easier time navigating the home realm of their patron deities, but they still need Gellar fields to prevent daemons from coming to [[DealWithTheDevil collect on their pacts]]. And the sheer might of the Tyranid HiveMind plays havoc with the Warp and its denizens, meaning only the most powerful daemons can go anywhere near them, and they can't fight an entire hive fleet by themselves anyway.
6th Jan '17 10:28:18 PM PhantomRider
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** Played straighter in the original ''Film/{{Stargate}}'' movie and the first episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'', where travel through the Stargate was disorientating, made some people feel sick and everyone came through the other side freezing cold, no matter what the temperature on either side of the gate was. Oh, and it threw you out the receiving gate, no matter how fast you entered it. After the pilot of [=SG1=], ''Children of the Gods'', this was all dropped. This was later explained as being due to Earth's lack of a Dial Home Device, or DHD. Normally, these regularly "update" the Stargates in the Gate Network to compensate for stellar drift. Since Earth's Stargate didn't have one, it was slightly out of sync with the rest of the network until they learned to compensate for it. This resulted in the rough ride. After this, there was only such a rough ride to the home territory of the Asgard (the first eight-symbol super-distant address) and to the ''Destiny'' at the beginning of ''Series/StargateUniverse'' (even farther than that!)

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** Played straighter in the original ''Film/{{Stargate}}'' movie and the first episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'', where travel through the Stargate was disorientating, made some people feel sick and everyone came through the other side freezing cold, no matter what the temperature on either side of the gate was. Oh, and it threw you out the receiving gate, no matter how fast you entered it. After the pilot of [=SG1=], ''Children of the Gods'', this was all dropped. This was later explained as being due to Earth's lack of a Dial the "Dial Home Device, Device," or DHD.DHD, which is what they call the control panels the gates were built with. Normally, these regularly "update" the Stargates in the Gate Network to compensate for stellar drift. Since Earth's Stargate didn't have one, it was slightly out of sync with the rest of the network until they learned to compensate for it. This resulted in the rough ride. After this, there was only such a rough ride to the home territory of the Asgard (the first eight-symbol super-distant address) and to the ''Destiny'' at the beginning of ''Series/StargateUniverse'' (even farther than that!)
23rd Dec '16 10:46:10 PM Xtifr
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* Vonda N. [=McIntyre=]'s short story "Aztecs" (later incorporated into ''Superluminal'') had a variation where the subjective measurement of time was affected; people conscious through the trip tended to die of old age. Passengers were thus kept in [[HumanPopsicle suspended animation]] for the trip to keep them safe. For the captain, however, the trick is to ensure the captain has no method of marking the passage of time. No clocks, and the captain has to have his [[BodyHorror heart removed and replaced with a quiet rotary pump]], ensuring they have no heartbeat they can use to measure time with. Most captains keep the ashes of their own hearts to remind them of the permanency of this... hence the title of the original short story.

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* Vonda N. [=McIntyre=]'s Creator/VondaNMcIntyre's short story "Aztecs" (later incorporated into ''Superluminal'') had a variation where the subjective measurement of time was affected; people conscious through the trip tended to die of old age. Passengers were thus kept in [[HumanPopsicle suspended animation]] for the trip to keep them safe. For the captain, however, the trick is to ensure the captain has no method of marking the passage of time. No clocks, and the captain has to have his [[BodyHorror heart removed and replaced with a quiet rotary pump]], ensuring they have no heartbeat they can use to measure time with. Most captains keep the ashes of their own hearts to remind them of the permanency of this... hence the title of the original short story.
12th Dec '16 10:40:35 AM Daethalion
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* In ''Film/Interstellar'', both the wormhole and [[spoiler: the interior of the black hole]] are incredibly freaky. Both places cause the spaceship's internal electronics to go haywire, and both render the ship's maneuvering thrusters completely useless due to both places ''not being physical space.'' [[spoiler: The black hole takes it UpToEleven with the Tesseract, a three-dimensional construct at the center that manages to represent all instants of time for a given location ''simultaneously''.]]

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* In ''Film/Interstellar'', ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'', both the wormhole and [[spoiler: the interior of the black hole]] are incredibly freaky. Both places cause the spaceship's internal electronics to go haywire, and both render the ship's maneuvering thrusters completely useless due to both places ''not being physical space.'' [[spoiler: The black hole takes it UpToEleven with the Tesseract, a three-dimensional construct at the center that manages to represent all instants of time for a given location ''simultaneously''.]]
12th Dec '16 10:39:56 AM Daethalion
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* In ''Film/Interstellar'', both the wormhole and [[spoiler: the interior of the black hole]] are incredibly freaky. Both places cause the spaceship's internal electronics to go haywire, and both render the ship's maneuvering thrusters completely useless due to both places ''not being physical space.'' [[spoiler: The black hole takes it UpToEleven with the Tesseract, a three-dimensional construct at the center that manages to represent all instants of time for a given location ''simultaneously''.]]
25th Nov '16 6:14:02 PM Xtifr
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* While not hyperspace per se, the dimension dwelt in by the Hounds of Tindalos (in Frank Belknap Long and later H.P. Lovecraft) is a pretty nasty place to be, as if you travel through it, you set the Hound on you. And as they can enter the world through any angle, and will never stop; this is bad to say the least.

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* While not hyperspace per se, the dimension dwelt in by the Hounds of Tindalos (in Frank Belknap Long stories by Creator/FrankBelknapLong and later H.P. Lovecraft) Creator/HPLovecraft) is a pretty nasty place to be, as if you travel through it, you set the Hound on you. And as they can enter the world through any angle, and will never stop; this is bad to say the least.
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